Issuu on Google+

Windows 97 Inc Kitchener, ON Twitter.com/windows97

An download podcasts on itunes

Windows 97 Updates September 2008- June 2009 Circulation: 25,000 Pages: 99 Created: June 6th 2009 Mohamed-adan1@hotmail.com To advertise this section

[WHATS INSIDE] The HP Compaq Business Desktop dc7100 offers advanced manageability and security features to business customers. The HP Compaq Business Desktop dc7100 boasts the latest PC technology and one of the longest lifecycles for business PCs. Maintaining consistent hardware and software images for at least 15 months, the dc7100 offers IT managers easy deployment and management and fewer software drivers and images to qualify and maintain. This allows business customers and IT managers to focus on business-critical items instead of task-related PC management. The HP Compaq Business Desktop dc7100 is available in three designs - ultra-slim desktop, small form factor and convertible minitower - giving customers a choice of features based on their business needs and budgets, and more @ windows 97


Privacy

Consolidation Official As of June 1, 2009, all consolidated Acts and regulations on the Justice Laws Web site are “official�, meaning that they can be used for evidentiary purposes. Amendments made to the Statute Revision Act, renamed the Legislation Revision and Consolidation Act by chapter 5 of the 2000 Statutes of Canada, in force on June 1, 2009, authorize the Minister of Justice to publish an electronic consolidation of statutes and regulations and provide that the consolidation is evidence of those statutes and regulations. The Act also provides that, in the case of any inconsistency between the consolidated statute or regulation and the original or a subsequent amendment, the original or amendment prevails.

Bilingual PDFs Available A side-by-side bilingual PDF version of all Acts and regulations is now available. You can access the PDF version at the head of each page of an Act or regulation. A PDF version of certain Acts and regulations is also available on the Main page of this site and in the Frequently Accessed Laws list in the Related Resources section. Privacy Canada

2


How do I install Windows 95 on a computer with nothing else on it? Added: February 28th 2009 First you will need to use Fdisk to create a File Allocation TABLE (FAT) partition on your hard drive to install Windows 95 to. If you bought the Windows 95 package designed for a computer without Windows (not the upgrade) it will come with a start-up disk for this purpose. The start-up disk will create a partition and format it for you. It will then ask for Setup Disk 1 or the CD-ROM, which will install Windows 95. If you want to install the Windows 95 Upgrade version on to an empty system, you will need a boot disk with the DOS utilities Fdisk, Format, Sys. First you will need to use Fdisk to create a File Allocation TABLE (FAT) partition on your hard drive. Here is how: In the Fdisk Options screen, press Enter. The Create DOS Partition or Logical DOS Drive screen appears Press Enter. The Create Primary DOS Partition screen appears If you want the partition to be the maximum size, press Enter. Then insert your startup disk in drive A, and press a key If you don't want the partition to be the maximum size, press n, and then press Enter. Another Create Primary DOS Partition screen appears Follow the instructions on-screen to specify the partition size you want, and then press Enter You can specify the partition size as a percentage of disk space or in megabytes of disk space. If you specify a percentage of disk space, include a percent (%) sign after the number Press Esc to return to the Fdisk Options screen, then follow the instructions on-screen to make the primary DOS partition active, and then return to the Fdisk Options screen If you have not allocated all the space on a disk drive to the primary DOS partition, you can create an extended DOS partition and logical drives by choosing the Create Extended DOS Partition in Fdisk. You specify the partition size you want as a percentage or number of megabytes of disk space. If you don't want to create an extended partition, press Esc to quit Fdisk. Insert a startup disk in drive A, and press any key For more information on using Fdisk read Microsoft's Knowledge Base Article No 106423 Second you will have to format your hard drive with the option /s (Format c:/s). Now you can start with the Setup Disk 1 or the CD-ROM, to install Windows 95. You will also need your Windows 3.1 Disk 1, as proof that you're eligible for the upgrade. If you have the CD-ROM version of Windows 95, you would need to have the drivers for your CD-ROM drive, and the Autoexec.bat and Config.sys files with the correct settings for your CD-ROM drive. If you have a driver disk with your CD-ROM drive, you first install the drivers after formatting. If you don't have a driver disk, try to find someone with a similar drive and copy their drivers and Autoexec.bat and Config.sys files, using only the settings related to the CD-ROM drive. If you encounter difficulties installing Win95, try Microsoft's Windows 95 Support Center. page 2 How do I install Windows 95 on a computer with MS-DOS and Windows 3.x on it? Microsoft recommends you to run the Windows 95 setup from within Windows 3.x, which does work, but if you plan on installing Windows 95 in a separate directory than your existing Windows, you should run setup from DOS instead. Make sure that all your peripherals work properly with Windows 3.x before you upgrade. If you don't plan on dual booting between Windows 95 and Windows 3.x and you just can't wait to install all your applications from scratch again (?), it is still the best to install Windows 95 from scratch! It will 3


take some time, but you will have the best chance of a good working Windows 95. If you installed Windows 95 "on top" of Windows 3.x and you experience a lot of errors which you can't explain, try installing Windows 95 from scratch! (meaning: start with Format C:). Just back-up all your data files, and check that you have all the installation disks. See How do I install Windows 95 on a computer with nothing else on it? for more details.

1. Monitor (sold separately) 6. 1 3.5" internal bay 2. 2-Button Scroll Mouse (PS/2) 7. 200-watt power supply 3. 2004 Standard Keyboard (PS/2) 8. 1 full-height PCI slot 4. Front I/O: 2 USB 2.0, headphone and microphone 9. Rear I/O: 6 USB 2.0, 1 optional serial port, 1 optional parallel port (available via PCI card), 2 PS/2, 1 RJ-45, 1 VGA, audio in/out 5. 1 external MultiBay Small Form Factor

1. Monitor (sold separately) 6. 1 3.5" internal bay 2. 2-Button Scroll Mouse (PS/2) 7. 240-watt power supply 3. 2004 Standard Keyboard (PS/2) 8. Rear I/O: 6 USB 2.0, 1 standard serial port, 1 optional serial port, 1 parallel port, 2 PS/2, 1 RJ-45, 1 VGA, audio in/out 4. Front I/O: 2 USB 2.0, headphone and microphone 9. 2 low profile PCI slots, 1 low profile PCI Express x1 slot, 1 low profile PCI Express x16 slot standard; 2 full-height PCI slots optional NOTE: With riser card option, express x1 and x16 slots are not supported. 5. 1 5.25" and 1 3.25" external bays for optional diskette drive or other devices Convertible Minitower

1. Monitor (sold separately) 6. 3 5.25" external bays and 2 3.5" internal bays 2. 2-Button Scroll Mouse (PS/2) 7. 2 full-height PCI slots, 1 full-height PCI Express x1 slot, 1 full-height PCI Express x16 slot, 2 additional PCI slots optional 4


3. 2004 Standard Keyboard (PS/2) 8. Rear I/O: 6 USB 2.0, 1 standard serial port, 1 optional serial port, 1 parallel port, 2 PS/2, 1 RJ-45, 1 VGA, audio in/out, mic in 4. Front I/O: 2 USB 2.0, headphone and microphone 5. 1 3.5" external bay for optional diskette drive or other 3.5" device 9. 340-watt power supply At A Glance Intel® Pentium® 4 processors Choice of operating systems: Microsoft Windows XP Professional Microsoft Windows XP Home SuSE Linux Personal 9.2 OEM (delivered on CDs with system, not pre-installed)– WW except Asia Turbolinux 10D (delivered on CDs with system, not pre-installed)– China only Intel 915G Express chipset with Integrated Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 900 DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (DDR400) Memory Integrated Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit ethernet 800-MHz processor front side bus support Intel Hyper-Thread Technology*1 Serial ATA Hard Drives Support for PCI Express SoundMax Digital AC97 integrated audio with internal speaker Manageability tools included Energy Star compliance with energy-saving features Protected by HP Services, including a 3-3-3 standard warranty. Terms and conditions vary by country. Certain restrictions and exclusions apply. 1 The Hyper-Threading feature is a new technology designed to improve performance of multi-threaded software products; please contact your software provider to determine software compatibility. Not all customers or software applications will benefit from the use of hyperthreading. Visit http://www.intel.com/info/hyperthreading/ for more information. Standard Features - Custom Components USDT SFF CMT Processor and Speed One of the following Intel Celeron D Processors: Intel Celeron D 331 Processor (2.66-GHz, 256K L2 cache, 533-MHz FSB) X X X Intel Celeron D 336 Processor (2.80-GHz, 256K L2 cache, 533-MHz FSB) X X X Intel Pentium 4 Processors with HT Technology Intel Pentium 4 520 Processor 5


(2.8-GHz, 1 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X X Intel Pentium 4 521 Processor (2.8-GHz, 1 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X X Intel Pentium 4 530 Processor (3.0-GHz, 1 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X X Intel Pentium 4 531 Processor (3.0-GHz, 1 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X X Intel Pentium 4 540 Processor (3.2-GHz, 1 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X X Intel Pentium 4 541 Processor (3.2-GHz, 1 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X X Intel Pentium 4 550 Processor (3.4-GHz, 1 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X X Intel Pentium 4 551 Processor (3.4-GHz, 1 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X X Intel Pentium 4 560 Processor (3.6-GHz, 1 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X Intel Pentium 4 630 Processor (3.0-GHz, 2 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X X Intel Pentium 4 640 Processor (3.2-GHz, 2 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X X Intel Pentium 4 650 Processor (3.4-GHz, 2 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X X Intel Pentium 4 660 Processor (3.6-GHz, 2 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) X X Intel Pentium 4 670 Processor (3.8-GHz, 2 MB L2 cache, 800 MHz FSB) XX -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Operating System One of the following Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP2 X X X Microsoft Windows XP Home SP2 X X X SuSE Linux Personal 9.2 OEM (delivered on CDs with system, not pre-installed)– WW except Asia X X X Turbolinux 10D (delivered on CDs with system, not pre-installed) – China only X X X NOTE: Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 and Microsoft Windows 2000 are not available on system, but Softpaq drivers are downloadable from hp.com. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

6


Hard Drive One of the following 40-GB Serial ATA 1.5-Gb/s Hard Drive (7200 rpm) X X X 80-GB Serial ATA 1.5-Gb/s Hard Drive (7200 rpm) X X X 160-GB Serial ATA 1.5-Gb/s Hard Drive (7200 rpm) X X X 250-GB Serial ATA 1.5-Gb/s Hard Drive (7200 rpm) X X X 2nd hard drive, 40-GB Serial ATA 1.5-Gb/s Hard Drive (7200 rpm) X X 2nd hard drive, 80-GB Serial ATA 1.5-Gb/s Hard Drive (7200 rpm) X X 2nd hard drive, 160-GB Serial ATA 1.5-Gb/s Hard Drive (7200 rpm) X X 2nd hard drive, 250-GB Serial ATA 1.5-Gb/s Hard Drive (7200 rpm) X X -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Memory One of the following 128-MB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (400-MHz) Non ECC (1 x 128) X X X 256-MB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (400-MHz) Non ECC (1 x 256) X X X 512-MB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (400-MHz) Non ECC (1 x 512) X X X 512-MB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (400-MHz) Non ECC (2 x 256) X X X 1-GB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (400-MHz) Non ECC (1 x 1GB) X X X 1-GB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (400-MHz) Non ECC (4 x 256) - X X 1-GB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (400-MHz) Non ECC (2 x 512) X X X 1.5-GB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (400-MHz) Non ECC (2 x 256, 2 x 512) - X X 2-GB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (400-MHz) Non ECC (2 x 1GB) X X X 2-GB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (400-MHz) Non ECC (4 x 512) - X X 3-GB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (400-MHz) Non ECC (3 x 1GB) X - 4-GB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (400-MHz) Non ECC (4 x 1GB) - X X NOTE: For best performance, memory speeds and sizes should not be mixed. See memory section for more information. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------7


Storage One of the following Diskette and Zip Drives 1.44-MB Diskette Drive - X X Zip 250 for 3.5" Drive Bay - X X Zip 250 for 5.25" Drive Bay - X X USB Drives 256MB USB HP Drive Key II (USB 2.0) X X X Optical Drives 48X CD-ROM Drive - X X 52X CD-ROM Drive – APJ only - X X 16X/40X DVD-ROM - X X 48X/32X/48X CD-RW Drive - X X 48X/32X/48X/16X Combo CD-RW/DVD-ROM Drive - X X 16X DVD+R/RW Drive - X X MultiBay Multibay Drive Adapter - X X MultiBay 24X CD-ROM Drive X X X MultiBay 24X/24X/24X/8X DVD-CDRW Combo Drive X X X MultiBay 8X/24X DVD-ROM with +R Drive X X X Multibay 1.44MB diskette drive X - -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Keyboard One of the following PS/2 2004 Standard Keyboard X X X USB 2004 BG1650 Blue Angel Compliant Keyboard - Europe Only X X X USB 2004 Standard Keyboard X X X -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Mouse One of the following PS/2 2-Button Scroll Mouse X X X USB 2-Button Optical Mouse X X X USB 2-Button Scroll Mouse X X X -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Modem Agere 56K full-height PCI SoftModem X Agere 56K low-profile PCI SoftModem X X

8


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Audio SoundMax Digital AC97 integrated audio with internal speaker X X X -------------------------------------------------------------------------------NIC Integrated Broadcom NetXtreme X X X Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit ethernet X X X Intel Pro 1000 MT Gigabit NIC X X X -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Miscellaneous IEEE 1394 PCI Card X X X USB to printer adapter cable X - USB to serial adapter X - PCI riser card – adds 2 full-height PCI slots. NOTE: Low profile slots are unusable with riser card installed. - X PCI extender card for CMT (adds 2 PCI) - - X Serial & parallel I/O adapter X - 2nd serial port option - X X Tower stand X X Blue Angel Compliant Bezel – Europe Only X X X -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Graphics USDT SFF CMT Integrated Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 900 graphics X X X DVI ADD2 card full height - - X DVI ADD2 card low profile - X ATI RADEON X300 SE PCI Express 64-MB DDR singlehead VGA with TV out and low profile bracket - X ATI RADEON X300 SE PCI Express 128-MB DDR singlehead DVI with TV out and low profile bracket - X ATI RADEON X300 SE PCI Express 64-MB DDR singlehead VGA with TV out and full height bracket - - X ATI RADEON X300 SE PCI Express 128-MB DDR singlehead DVI with TV out and full height bracket - - X NVIDIA Quadro NVS 280 64MB PCI X X X NVIDIA Quadro NVS 50 64MB PCI X X X -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Security Solenoid and Hood Sensor - X X Hood Sensor X - Chassis clamp lock, universal, with cable X X X 9


Security cable with Kensington lock X X X Rear port control cover X X X HP ProtectTools Embedded security module (TPM) X X X HP ProtectTools Security Manager: - Smart Card Security for HP ProtectTools - Embedded Security for HP ProtectTools - Credential Manager for HP ProtectTools X X X -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Software Norton AntiVirus 2005 X X X Microsoft Office XP Professional X X X Microsoft Office XP Small Business Edition X X X Microsoft Office 2003 Basic X X X Microsoft Office 2003 Personal X X X Microsoft Office 2003 Professional X X X Microsoft Office 2003 Small Business X X X Microsoft Works 7.0 X X X Altiris Local Recovery X X X PDF Complete X X X Corel Word Perfect Office 11 X X X Sun Java Runtime Environment X X X ZIM SMS Mail X X X Acrobat Reader X X X HP Client Management Solutions visit http://www.hp.com/go/easydeploy. Standard Features Ultra-slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower Operating System (choice) Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP1a X Microsoft Windows XP Home SP1a X Processor Intel Pentium 4 processors CPU Bus Speed Supported 800-MHz Standard L2 Cache 1024-KB Chipset Intel 915GV Express Intel 915G Express Intel 915G Express Memory Expansion Slots 3 DIMM's 4 DIMM's 4 DIMM's Memory Type Supported Non-ECC DDR Synch Dram (ECC not supported by Chipset) Memory Speed Supported DDR Synch DRAM PC3200 (400MHz) non-ECC Maximum Memory* 3-GB 4-GB 4-GB Network controller Integrated Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit thernet for HP Graphics Integrated Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 900 10


Audio Integrated digital audio with S/Pdif 6-channel pass-through, stereo microphone, active noise cancellation and Yamaha XG Lite Softsynth support *NOTE: Above 3-GB, all memory may not be available due to system resource requirements. Expandability PCI slots 1 full-height (4.2"), length (6.6") 2 low-profile (2.5"), length (6.6") standard; 2 full-height (4.2"), length (6.875") via optional riser card. NOTE: With riser card option, express x1 and x16 slots are not supported. 2 full-height (4.2"), length (13.4") standard; (2 additional slots available via optional extender card) PCI Express x16 slot -- 1 low-profile (2.5"), length (6.6") 1 full-height (4.2"), length (10.5") PCI Express x1 slot -- 1 low profile (2.5"), length (6.6") 1 full-height (4.2"), length (13.4") AGP slot none none none External Bays 1 MultiBay 2 bays (1 - 5.25", length (8.189"), and 1 - 3.5" (supports 2nd HDD)) 4 bays (2 5.25", length (8.189"), 1 - 5.25" length (5.71") and 1 - 3.5") Internal Bays 1 - 3.5" hard drive bay 1 - 3.5" hard drive bay 2 - 3.5" hard drive bays MultiBay standard optional via MultiBay adapter optional via MultiBay adapter IDE 1 IDE connector for opticals 1 IDE connector for opticals 1 IDE connector for opticals Serial-ATA 1 serial-ATA connector for SATA hard drive 2 serial-ATA connectors for SATA hard drives 4 serial-ATA connectors for SATA hard drives Ports USB 2.0 8 (2 front, 6 rear) 8 (2 front, 6 rear) 8 (2 front, 6 rear) Serial 1 optional via USB serial adapter 1 standard with 2nd optional 1 standard with 2nd optional Parallel 1 optional via USB printer adapter 1 1 PS/2 1 keyboard, 1 mouse 1 keyboard, 1 mouse 1 keyboard, 1 mouse Video analog for integrated graphics analog for integrated graphics analog for integrated graphics DVI output available via PCI card available via ADD2 card, PCI-E x16 card, and PCI card available via ADD2 card, PCI-E x16 card, and PCI card Support for Multi-Monitor available via PCI card available via ADD2 card, PCI-E x16 card, and PCI card available via ADD2 card, PCI-E x16 card, and PCI card Audio Front - mic and headphone Rear - line in, line out Front - mic and headphone Rear - line in, line out Front - mic and headphone Rear - line in, line out, mic in NIC Integrated Broadcom Gigabit Integrated Broadcom Gigabit Integrated Broadcom Gigabit Dimensions Chassis Dimensions (H x W x D) 2.95 x 12.4 x 13.18 in 3.95 x 13.3 x 14.9 in 17.65 x 6.6 x 17.8 in Chassis Dimensions (H x W x D) 7.49 x 31.50 x 33.48 cm 10.03 x 33.78 x 37.85 cm 44.83 x 16.76 x 45.21 cm System weight 13.2 lb 19.5 lb 32.5 lb 11


System volume 7.9 liters 12.8 liters 33.8 liters Shipping weight 19 lb 30 lb 43 lb Shipping box dimensions (H x W x D) 12.63 x 18.75 x 20 in 12.63 x 18.75 x 20 in 23.38 x 13.06 x 22.88 in Power Supply 200W power supply – Active PFC 240W power supply – Active PFC 340W power supply – Active PFC Hard Drive Interfaces Supported 1 Serial ATA interface 2 Serial ATA interfaces 2 Serial ATA interfaces Hard Drive Controller (PCI) Supported Serial ATA Preinstalled Software Computer Setup Utility X Diagnostics for Windows X Microsoft Internet Explorer X After-Market Options USDT SFF CMT Part Number Communications Wireless LAN HP USB Bluetooth transceiver (BT1.2) X X X DN650B HP WL500 PCI (802.11a/b/g) WiFi wireless LAN X X X DV649A NICs Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit Ethernet PCI Adapter X X X DC194A Intel Pro/1000 MT Gigabit Ethernet PCI Adapter (full height only) X X X DC193A Intel Pro/1000 MT Gigabit Ethernet PCI Adapter (low profile only) - X - DC193B Modem Agere 56K PCI Modem X X X DC132D -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Graphics Single head solutions DVI-D ADD2 adapter, normal pinout - - X DY674A DVI-D ADD2 adapter, reverse pinout - X - DY673A ATI RADEON X300 SE PCI Express 64-MB DDR singlehead VGA with TV out - X X DY597A ATI RADEON X300 SE PCI Express 128-MB DDR singlehead DVI with TV out - X X DY596A NVIDIA Quadro NVS 50 64MB PCI single head DVI-I with TV out X X X PU615AA Multi head solutions NVIDIA Quadro NVS 280 64MB PCI dual head (DMS59 connector with dual VGA Y-cable) X X X DY599A NVIDIA Quadro NVS 280 64MB PCIE dual head (DMS59 connector with dual VGA Y-cable) - X X DY650A Dual DVI Y-cable for DY599A or DY650A X X X DL139A --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

12


Hard Drives Serial ATA SMART III Hard Drives 40-GB ATA SMART III Hard Drive (7200 rpm) X X X PB317A 80-GB ATA SMART III Hard Drive (7200 rpm) X X X DE705A 120-GB ATA SMART III Hard Drive (7200 rpm) X X X PA995A 160-GB ATA SMART III Hard Drive (7200 rpm) X X X DE706A -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Input/Output Devices Keyboards HP PS/2 2004 Standard Keyboard X X X DT527A HP USB 2004 Standard Keyboard X X X DT528A Smartcard adapter for 2004 Modular Keyboard X X X DT531A Wireless (BT) adapter kit for 2004 Modular Keyboard X X X DT532A Pointing Devices HP Bluetooth Optical Mouse (included in DT532A) X X X PA720A HP PS/2 2-Button Scroll Mouse (Carbonite) X X X DD440B HP USB 2-Button Scroll Mouse (Carbonite) X X X DD441B HP USB 2-Button Optical Scroll Mouse (Carbonite/Silver) X X X DC172B -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Memory (DIMMs) PC3200 (DDR400-MHz) DIMMs Non-ECC 128-MB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (DDR400) X X X DE465G 256-MB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (DDR400) X X X DE466G 512-MB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (DDR400) X X X DE467G 1-GB DDR Synch Dram PC3200 (DDR400) X X X DE468G -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Monitors TFTs HP L1502 Flat Panel Monitor (15" analog only) X X X P9617D#ABA HP L1530 Flat Panel Monitor (15" analog/digital & multimedia) X X X P9624A#ABA HP L1702 Flat Panel Monitor (17" analog only) X X X P9621D#ABA HP L1730 Flat Panel Monitor (17" analog/digital & multimedia) X X X P9625A#ABA HP L1925 Flat Panel Monitor (19" analog/digital) X X X P9626A#ABA HP L2035 Flat Panel Monitor (20") X X X P9614A#ABA 13


HP L2335 Flat Panel Monitor (23" widescreen) X X X P9615A#ABA CRTs HP v7550 CRT Monitor (17" flat-face) X X X P9013A#ABA HP s9500 CRT Monitor (19") X X X P9010A#ABA HP p1230 CRT Monitor (22" natural flat) X X X P9613A#ABA -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Multimedia Harman/Kardon Satellite speaker pair (EMEA only) X X X DL983A JBL Platinum Series Speakers – Carbonite X X X DE893B HP Desktop Access Center X X X DK985A Logitech Axis202 PC Headset (analog, no mute) X X X DE640A -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Optical Drives DVD-ROM Drive 16X/40X DVD-ROM - X X DC151B 16X/48X DVD-ROM - X X PR596A CD-ROM Drive 48X Max CD-ROM Drive - X X DC143B CD-RW Drive 48X/32X/48X CD-RW Drive - X X DL975B Combo Drive 48X/32X Combo DVD-ROM/CD-RW Drive - X X DL976B DVD+/-RW Drive 16X DVD+/-RW LightScribe Drive (Double Layer/Dual Format) - X X PR595A -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Removable Storage Drive Key Options 256-MB HP Drive Key II (USB 2.0) X X X PH657A 512-MB HP Drive Key II (USB 2.0) X X X ED516AA Diskette and Digital Drives 1.44-MB USB Diskette Drive - External (Carbonite) X X X DC141B 1.44-MB Internal Diskette Drive - X X DS710B Zip Drives and Media Zip 250 Drive (Carbonite) - X X DC140B Zip 750 Drive (Carbonite) - X X DC518B -------------------------------------------------------------------------------14


MultiBay Drive Storage MultiBay Drive Adapter - X X DC149B Multibay 40GB hard drive X X X DC365A Multibay 60GB hard drive X X X DC894A Multibay 80GB hard drive X X X DC920A Multibay 1.44-MB Diskette Drive X DE612B MultiBay 24X CD-ROM Drive X X X DC513B MultiBay 4X DVD+R/+RW Drive X X X DG189A MultiBay 24X/24X/24X/8X Combo DVD-ROM/CD-RW Drive X X X DL974B MultiBay 8X DVD-ROM Drive (reads all formats) X X X DC515B NOTE: In order to use Multibay devices on SFF & CMT, the Multibay Drive adapter is required -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Security Security cable with Kensington lock X X X DC368A Chassis clamp lock, universal, no cable X X X DE817A HP Business PC Security Lock Kit X X X PV606AA Wall mount/security sleeve (USDT) X - - PA719A Wall mount/security sleeve (SFF) - X - PA717A -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Software HP Client Foundation Suite HP Client Manager HP Systems Insight Manager Connector Altiris Local Recovery Pro Altiris Migration Suite X X X EF117AA (use EF118AA for 1000+ licenses) HP Client Premium Suite HP Client Manager HP Systems Insight Manager Connector Altiris Local Recovery Pro Altiris Migration Suite Altiris Connector Solution Altiris Client Management Suite Level 1 HP OpenView Connector X X X EF119AA (use EF120AA for 1000+ licenses)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------15


Brackets/Stands HP Compaq 7000 Series Ultra-slim Desktop Integrated Work Center Stand (no display) X - - DL641B -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Miscellaneous Accessories Serial and parallel I/O adapter (USDT) X - - PD825A USB to parallel printer adapter X - - P8821A USB to serial adapter X - - PA718A 2nd serial port (SFF) - X - PA716A PCI riser card (SFF) - X - PD824A IEEE 1394 PCI Card X X X PA997A Memory 915GV Express chipset DDR SYNCH DRAM NON-ECC MEMORY It is not necessary to add memory in pairs. Memory upgrades are accomplished by adding single or multiple DIMMs of the same or varied sizes. This chart does not represent all possible memory configurations. The Intel 915G/GV Express chipsets support non-ECC DDR PC2700 (333-MHz) and nonECC DDR PC3200 (400-MHz) memory. For best performance, add in pairs, add in same channel, and do not mix speeds. For dual-channel performance, the total amount of memory in each channel should be equal. If speeds are mixed, speed will default to the slowest DIMM. MAXIMUM MEMORY (ULTRA-SLIM DESKTOP) Supports up to 3-GB of DDR SYNCH DRAM. Not all memory configurations possible are represented below.

DIMM Size Slot Channel A Channel B 123 128-MB 128-MB 256-MB (dual channel) 128-MB 128-MB 512-MB 512-MB 512-MB (dual-channel) 256-MB 256-MB 1-GB (dual channel) 1-GB 1-GB (dual channel) 512-MB 512-MB 2-GB 1-GB 1-GB 2-GB 512-MB 512-MB 1-GB 16


3-GB maximum 1-GB 1-GB 1-GB 915G Express chipset DDR SYNCH DRAM NON-ECC MEMORY It is not necessary to add memory in pairs. Memory upgrades are accomplished by adding single or multiple DIMMs of the same or varied sizes. This chart does not represent all possible memory configurations. The Intel 915G Express chipset supports non-ECC DDR PC2700 (333-MHz) and non-ECC DDR PC3200 (400-MHz) memory. For best performance, add in pairs, add in same channel, and do not mix speeds. For dual-channel performance, the total amount of memory in each channel should be equal. If speeds are mixed, speed will default to the slowest DIMM. MAXIMUM MEMORY (SMALL FORM FACTOR AND CONVERTIBLE MINITOWER) Supports up to 4-GB of DDR SYNCH DRAM. Above 3-GB, all memory may not be available due to system resource requirements. Not all memory configurations possible are represented below.

DIMM Size Slot Channel A Channel B 1234 128-MB 128-MB 256-MB (dual-channel) 128-MB 128-MB 512-MB 512-MB 512-MB (dual-channel) 256-MB 256-MB 1-GB 1-GB 1-GB (dual-channel) 512-MB 512-MB 2-GB (dual channel) 1-GB 1-GB 2-GB (dual-channel) 512-MB 512-MB 512-MB 512-MB 4-GB maximum (dual-channel) 1-GB 1-GB 1-GB 1-GB Storage ultra-slim desktop small form factor convertible minitower Quantity Supported Position Supported Controller Ultra-slim Desktop Hot-swappable MultiBay Drive 1 2 IDE 3.5" Serial ATA Hard Drive 1 1 SATA Small Form Factor 17


Diskette Drives (optional) 1 1 Diskette Storage Drive Bay 1 2 IDE 3.5" Serial ATA Hard Drives 1 1, 3 SATA MultiBay Drive (optional, with adapter) 2 2 IDE Convertible Minitower Diskette Drive 1 4 Diskette Storage Drive Bay 2 1, 2, 3 IDE 3.5" Serial ATA Hard Drives 2 4, 5, 6 SATA MultiBay Drive (optional, with adapter) 2 1, 2, 3 IDE Overview Standard Features - Select Models (localized by Regions) Standard Features - Custom Components Standard Features After-Market Options Memory Storage Technical Specifications Technical Specifications - Audio Technical Specifications - Communications Technical Specifications Graphics Technical Specifications - Hard Drives Technical Specifications - Input/Output Devices Technical Specifications - Optical Storage Technical Specifications - Removable Storage Technical Specifications Base Unit Contents Ultra-Slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower Coprocessor Integrated L2 Cache Architecture/Speed Full core clock speed Cache Upgradeable Not upgradeable – Integrated into Processor System board with Intel 915 Express Chipset with Integrated graphics X Cables Serial ATA Cable Quick Setup Poster X Product Documentation on CD X Operating System CD X Restore CD X Power Cord X Keyboard X (PS/2) Mouse X (PS/2) Memory Parity Not Needed for non-ECC ECC Memory Not Supported by chipset Serial Presence Detect Support Supported Hard Drive Interfaces Supported 1 Serial ATA interface 2 Serial ATA interfaces 2 Serial ATA interfaces Hard Drive Controller (PCI) Supported Serial ATA System Board Ultra-Slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower Architecture P4/PCI/PCI Express Chipset Intel 915GV Express Chipset Intel 915G Express Chipset Intel 915G Express Chipset 18


I/O Controller LPC47B397 System Board Form Factor custom custom micro ATX Processor Socket - 775 Pin ZIF X DIMM Connectors (2.5V) 3 4 4 Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 900 integrated X PCI Connector 1 2 low profile standard (2 Full height available with optional riser card) 2 full height (2 full height additional with optional extender card) PCI Express x16 PCI Express x1 Flash ROM X Audio (AC97 Integrated Audio) X CD ROM IN (Audio) X AUX IN (Audio) X Clear CMOS Button X CPU Fan Header X Chassis Fan Header X Chassis Speaker Header X CMOS Battery Holder – Lithium X Hood Lock Header -- Optional Optional Hood Sensor Header Optional Multibay Header X X X Integrated Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit ethernet for HP X Wake-On-Lan® X ASF 2.0 (Alert Standard Format) X Power Supply Header X Power Switch, Power LED & Hard Drive LED Header X Password Clear Header X Riser Connector X X -PCI extender that connects to System Board -- -- X Chassis Ultra-Slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower Color Carbonite/Silver System Board Form Factors Supported custom custom micro ATX Power Supply Fan (Variable Speed) X Processor Fan-Heatsink (Variable Speed) X Chassis Fan X Internal Speaker X Security Locks Supported Kensington Cable Lock Provision (Lock not included) 19


Hood Cover Security Loop (Lock not included) Security Loop hole diameter .236 inches Unit Environment and Operating Conditions Ultra-Slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower General Unit Operating Guidelines Keep the computer away from excessive moisture, direct moisture and the extremes of heat and cold, to ensure that unit is operated within the specified operating range. Leave a 10.2 cm (4 in) clearance on all vented sides of the computer to permit the required airflow. Never restrict airflow into the computer by blocking any vents or air intakes. Do not stack computers on top of each other or place computers so near each other that they are subject to each other's re-circulated or preheated air. Occasionally clean the air vents on the front, back, and any other vented side of the computer. Lint, dust and other foreign matter can block the vents and limit the airflow. If the computer is to be operated within a separate enclosure, intake and exhaust ventilation must be provided on the enclosure, and the same operating guidelines listed above will still apply. Temperature Range Operating: 50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)* Non-operating: -22° to 140° F(-30° to 60° C) Relative Humidity Operating: 10% to 90% (non condensing at ambient) Non-operating: 5% to 95% (non condensing at ambient) Maximum Altitude (unpressurized) Operating: 10,000 ft (3048 m) Non-operating: 30,000 ft (9144 m) NOTE: Operating temperature is de-rated 1.0 deg C per 300 m (1000 ft) to 3000 m (10,000 ft) above sea level, no direct sustained sunlight. Maximum rate of change is 10 deg C/Hr. The upper limit may be limited by the type and number of options installed. Interfaces Ultra-Slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower Serial Port 1 optional 1 standard, 2nd via option 1 standard, 2nd via option Parallel Port 1 optional 1 1 PS/2 1 Keyboard and 1 Mouse USB (2.0) 8 ports (6 rear/2 front) RJ-45 10/100/1000 Network X Keyboard X (PS/2) Mouse X (PS/2) Multibay 1 standard optional optional Video (VGA) X Audio X Power Supply Ultra-Slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower 20


Power Supply 200 watt custom power supply – Active PFC) 240 watt custom power supply – Active PFC) 340 watt custom power supply – Active PFC) Operating Voltage Range 90 – 132/180 – 264 VAC 90 – 132/180 – 264 VAC 90 – 132/180 – 264 VAC Rated Voltage Range 100 – 127/200 – 240 VAC 100 – 127/200 – 240 VAC 100 – 127/200 – 240 VAC Rated Line Frequency 50/60 Hz 50/60 Hz 50/60 Hz Operating Line Frequency Range 47 – 63 Hz 47 – 63 Hz 47 – 63 Hz Rated Input Current 5A/2.5A 5A/2.5A 6A/3A Heat Dissipation Typical 256 btu/hr (65 kg-cal/hr) Maximum 788 btu/hr (199 kg-cal/hr) Typical 256 btu/hr (65 kg-cal/hr) Maximum 971 btu/hr (245 kg-cal/hr Typical 256 btu/hr (65 kg-cal/hr) Maximum 1260 btu/hr (318 kg-cal/hr) Power Supply Fan None; airflow is ducted from processor blower 60mm variable speed 92mm variable speed Energy Star Compliant X X X Blue Angel Compliant (<5w in S5 – Power Off) X X X FEMP Standby Power Compliant (<2W in S5 – Power Off)** X X X Power Consumption in ES Mode – Suspend to RAM (S3) (Instantly Available PC) 2.5W to 3W 2.5W to 3W 2.5W to 3W Processor/Cache Memory Power – Down (S3) < 3W < 3W < 3W Environmental and Mechanical Engineering Support Center (EMESC) – Intranet Web Site only http://env-webserver.ccm.cpqcorp.net/EMESC/default.htm **NOTE: Power consumption in the Off/Apparent Off mode is measured and reported with the network interface controller "Wake on LAN" feature disabled in F10 Setup (default is "enabled"). ROM Features Description Ultra-slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower Instantly Available PC (Suspend to RAM - S3) Allows for very low power consumption with quick resume time X X X ROM Based F10 Setup Review and customize BIOS settings X X X Remote System Installation via F12 (PXE) (Remote Boot from Server) Allows a new or existing system to boot over the network and download software, including the operating system X X X 21


System/Emergency ROM Flash Recovery with Video Recovers corrupted system BIOS X X X BIOS Smart Card Support BIOS preboot smart card authentication (passwords) via USB CCID compliant smart card readers X X X Auto Setup when New Hardware Installed System automatically detects addition of new hardware X X X Serial, Parallel, USB, Audio, Network, Enable/Disable Port Control Enable or disables serial, parallel, USB, audio, and network ports X X X Removable Media Write/ Boot Control Prevents ability to boot from removable media on supported devices (and can disable writes to media) X X X Network Server Mode Allows for secured keyboard-less operation X X X Power-On Password Prevents an unauthorized person from booting up the computer X X X Setup Password Prevents an unauthorized person from changing the system configuration X X X Replicated Setup Saves BIOS settings to diskette or USB disk-on-key in human readable file. Repset.exe utility can then replicate these settings on machines being deployed without entering ROM-based F10 setup X X X Master Boot Record Security Detects changes to MBR and optional restoration, useful in protecting from viruses X X X Remote ROM Flash Provides secure, fail-safe ROM image management from a central network console X XX Remote Wakeup System administrators can power on, restart, and power off a client computer from a remote location. Enables cost-effective power consumption when the administrator needs to distribute software, perform security management, or update the ROM XXX ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power Management Interface) Allows the system to wake from a low power mode Controls system power consumption, making it possible to place individual cards and peripherals in a low-power or powered-off state without affecting other elements of the system XXX Keyboard-less Operation The system can be operated without a keyboard X X X SMBIOS System Management BIOS, previously known as DMI BIOS, for system management information XXX Software Description Ultra-slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower Preinstalled Software X X X Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP1a X X X Microsoft Windows XP Home SP1a X X X Computer Setup Utility X X X 22


Diagnostics for Windows X X X Microsoft Internet Explorer X X X Initial Configuration and Deployment Description Ultra-slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower HP Client Management Solutions HP Client Management Solutions help simplify management of PCs and significantly reduce total ownership costs. These solutions share a common design and are highly integrated due to the extensive work between HP and its partner Altiris. HP Client Manager Software is included free with all HP business PCs. It enables central tracking, monitoring, and management of the hardware aspects of HP client systems: Get valuable hardware information such as CPU, memory, video, and security settings Monitor system health to fix problems before they occur Install drivers and BIOS updates without visiting each PC Remotely configure BIOS and security settings Automate processes to quickly resolve hardware problems Additional Altiris solutions (fee-based) are available to address PC management challenges through the entire IT lifecycle including: Inventory assessment Software license compliance Personality migration Software image deployment Software distribution Asset management Client backup and recovery Problem resolution Visit http://www.hp.com/go/easydeploy for more information, to download HP Client Manager Software, and to evaluate the Altiris solutions. XXX System Software Manager (free) A free utility that detects and updates BIOS, device drivers, and management agent versions on your networked PCs X X X Replicated Setup Saves BIOS settings to diskette or USB disk-on-key in human readable file. Repset.exe utility can then replicate these settings on machines being deployed without entering ROM-based F10 setup X X X Support Software CD -- X X X Software Restore CD Restores computer to its original factory shipping image X X X Asset Tag Repository for storing company-specific property asset numbers for easy tracking Initially set equal to the system serial number 23


Stored in a protected section of non-volatile memory that can be accessed and modified with the F10 Setup program XXX DIMM Serial Presence Detect Detects whether or not memory DIMMs are present and their type X X X Hard drive serial number, model, and manufacturer Hard drive manufacturer, model, and serial number is stored in the hard drive firmware and reported in ROM-based F10 setup X X X Monitor serial number, model & manufacturer -- X X X System serial number, model, & manufacturer System serial number, model, & manufacturer stored in a non-volatile memory and can be retrieved with management SW or viewed in ROM-based F10 setup X X X ROM revision levels Identifies system ROM revision levels and reports in ROM-based F10 setup Version is stored in an industry standard memory location (SMBIOS) so that management SW applications can use and report this information XXX System board revision level Allows management SW to read the revision level of the system board Revision level is digitally encoded into the hardware and cannot be modified XXX Memory Change Alert Alerts management console if memory is removed or changed X X X Ownership Tag A user-defined string stored in non-volatile memory that is displayed in the BIOS splash screen X X X Security Features Description Ultra-slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower Mechanical Hood Security Provision Security Loop X X X Kensington Lock Support Kensington lock slot on the chassis X X X Cable Lock Provision Physically secure computer hardware from theft X X X Serial, Parallel, USB Enable/Disable Enable or disable serial, parallel or USB ports and hide them form the operating system X X X Removable Media Write/ Boot Control Prevents the computer from being booted from removable media on supported devices (and can disable writes to media) X X X Power-On Password Prevents an unauthorized person from booting up the computer X X X Setup Password Prevents an unauthorized person from changing the system configuration X X X Fault Notification and Recovery Description Ultra-slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower SMART Hard Drives, Fault & Prefailure Notification Allows hard drives to monitor their own health and 24


to raise flags if imminent failures were predicted Predicts failures before they occur. Tracks fault prediction and failure indication parameters such as reallocated sector count, spin retry count, calibration retry count By avoiding actual hard drive failures, SMART hard drives act as "insurance" against unplanned user downtime and potential data loss from hard drive failure XXX Memory Change Notification (Requires HP Client Manager Software) Alerts management console if memory is removed or changed X X X Thermal Notification (Requires HP Client Manager Software) Monitors the temperature state within the chassis. Three modes: NORMAL – normal temperature ranges ALERTED – excessive temperatures are detected. Raises a flag so action can be taken to avoid shutdown or provide for a smoother system shutdown SHUTDOWN – excessive temperatures are encountered. Automatically shuts down the computer without warning before hardware component damage occurs XXX Altiris Local Recovery Provides data and system file protection for HP business PCs to enable fast recovery of information that is accidentally deleted or if the system becomes corrupted. Designed for disconnected or seldom-connected users, Local Recovery protects your HP computer's data and system state by taking scheduled snapshots, which are then stored in a protected area on the local hard disk. System backup and disaster recovery is now simple and fast for all users, regardless of connectivity. X X X Surge Tolerant Full Ranging Power Supply Withstands power surges up to 2000V X X X Ultra ATA Integrity Monitoring (CRC Checking) Provides data transfer verification and proactive notification of hard drive data transmission problems with recommendations for enhancing system performance. It detects all the following errors types: single bit errors double bit errors an odd number of errors error bursts up to 32-bits long XXX System Software Updating Description Ultra-slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower Subscriber's Choice Free web-based subscription service that provides customized support information, products tips, and feature articles based on subscriber profile

25


E-mail Driver and Support Alerts/Notifications (available WW) Proactive email information on drivers, software patches, product change notifications, and customer advisories on HP product lines The Product Change Notification service provides information on hardware and software changes that will be implemented in manufacturing up to 60-days in advance E-newsletters (available NA) HP Technology at Work SMB Promotional Newslette XXX Remote ROM Flash Provides secure, fail-safe ROM image management from a central network console X XX Remote Wakeup/ Remote Shutdown System administrators can power on, restart, and power off a client computer from a remote location. Enables cost-effective power consumption when the administrator needs to distribute software, perform security management, or update the ROM. XXX ROM Based Setup (F10) and Start-up Diagnostics -- X X X Support Software CD & WWW -- X X X Other Features Description Ultra-slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower ACPI-Ready Hardware Advanced Configuration and Power Management Interface (ACPI). Allows the system to wake from a low power mode. Controls system power consumption, making it possible to place individual cards and peripherals in a low-power or powered-off state without affecting other elements of the system. XXX SMBIOS System Management BIOS, previously known as DMI BIOS, for system management information XXX Wired for Management Support Intel-driven, industry-wide initiative to make Intel architecture-based PCs, servers and mobile computers more inherently manageable right out of the box and over the network X X X Dual-State Power Button Power button acts as both an on/off button and suspend-to-sleep button X X X Serviceability Features of System Description Ultra-slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower 26


Dual Color Power LED on Front of Computer (Indicates Normal Operations and Fault Conditions) -- X X X Diagnostic LED Explanation Table Number of 1-second red LED blinks followed by 2-second pause, then repeats: 2-processor thermal protection activated 3-processor not installed 4-power supply failure 5-memory error 6-video error 7-PCA failure (ROM detected failure prior to video) 8-invalid ROM, bootblock recover mode X X X System/Emergency ROM Recovers corrupted system BIOS. X X X Flash Recovery with Video Configuration Record SW -- X X X Over-Temp Warning on Screen (Requires IM Agents) -- X X X OS CD (Restore OS CD) Restores computer to its original factory shipping image X X X Restore CD Restores the computer to its original factory shipping image X X X Flash ROM -- X X X 5 Aux Power LED on System PCA -- X X X Dual Function 5V Aux Power LED (ON)/PS_ON LED (OFF) on System PCA -- X X X Diagnostic Power Switch LED on board -- X X X Clear Password Jumper -- X X X Clear CMOS Button -- X X X CMOS Battery Holder for easy Replacement -- X X X Processor ZIP Socket for easy Upgrade -- X X X DIMM Connectors for easy Upgrade -- X X X NIC LEDs (integrated) (Green & Amber) Used to determine NIC status X X X Serviceability Features of Chassis Description Ultra-slim Desktop Small Form Factor Convertible Minitower Dual Color Power and HD LED - To Indicate Normal Operations and Fault Conditions -- X X X ASF 2.0 support (Alert Standard Format) Industry-standard specification for network alerting in operating system-absent environments X X X Front power switch -- X X X Green Pull Tabs, and Quick Release Latches for easy Identification -- X X X Color coordinated cables and connectors X X X System memory can be upgraded without removing the system board or any internal components Eases memory upgrading X X X Tool-less Hood Removal Eases entry to the chassis without use of special tools X (thumb screw) X X 27


Tool-less Hard Drive, CD & Diskette Removal -- X X X Tool-less System Board Removal No special tools required for system board removal or maintenance X X X Towerable Product can be oriented as a tower (in addition to desktop orientation) X X X Drive Self Tests (DPS) Drive Protection System A diagnostic hard drive self test. It scans critical physical components and every sector of the hard drive for physical faults and then reports any faults to the user. Running independently of the operating system, it can be accessed through a Windows-based diagnostics utility or through the computer's setup procedure. It produces an evaluation on whether the hard drive is the source of the problem and needs to be replaced. The system expands on the Self-Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology (SMART), a continuously running systems diagnostic that alerts the user to certain types of failures XXX DPS Access through F10 Setup during Boot X X X DPS Access through Diagnostics for Windows X X X SMART Technology (Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology) Allows hard drives to monitor their own health and to raise flags if imminent failures were predicted Helps predict failures before they occur. Tracks fault prediction and failure indication parameters such as re-allocated sector count, spin retry count, calibration retry count By helping to avoid actual hard drive failures, SMART hard drives may provide additional insurance" against unplanned user downtime and potential data loss from hard drive failure XXX SMART I - Drive Failure Prediction X X X SMART II - Off-Line Data Collection X X X SMART III - Off-Line Read Scanning with Defect Reallocation X X X Service and Support On-site Warranty and Service Note 1: This three-year (3-3-3), limited warranty and service offering delivers three years of parts, labor and on-site repair. Response time is next businessday Note 2 and includes free telephone support Note 3 24 x 7. Global coverage Note 2 ensures that any product purchased in one country and transferred to another non-restricted country will remain fully covered under the original warranty and service offering. Some countries/regions do not offer one year onsite and labor. NOTE 1: Terms and conditions may vary by country. Certain restrictions and exclusions apply. NOTE 2: On-site service may be provided pursuant to a service contract between HP and an authorized HP third-party provider, and is not available in certain countries. Global service response times are based on commercially reasonable best effort and may vary by country. NOTE 3: Technical telephone support applies only to HP-configured, HP and HP-qualified, third-party hardware and software. Toll-free calling and 24 x 7 support may not be available in some countries. Technical Specifications - Audio 28


AC97 Integrated ADI 1981B Audio Type Integrated AC ‘97 Stereo Codec Yes FM Synthesis Support Yes – Yamaha XG Lite OPL3 FM Synthesis Support Yes Sound Blaster Compatibility Yes Audio Jacks Microphone-In (20-K ohm Input Impedance); rear stereo and front analog microphone ports available except for USDT which has front stereo microphone only Line-In (12-K ohm Input Impedance) Line-Out * (less than 800 ohms Output Impedance, expects at least a 10-K ohm load) Headphone-Out (2.5 Ohms Output Impedance, expects at least a 32 ohm load) NOTE: *Internal Speaker Amplifier is for Internal Speaker only. External Speakers need to be powered externally. Sampling 7 kHz – 48 kHz Wavetable Syntheses (software) Yes – GM and FM Midi Support, Direct Music and Down Loadable Soundset (4 Meg DLS Level 1 and 2 Support) 3D Positional Sound No Digital Audio Yes Analog Audio Yes Number of Channels on Line-Out (mono/stereo) Stereo (Left & Right channels) Internal Audio Speaker Power Rating 3W Internal Speaker Yes Hardware Equalizer for Internal Speaker Fixed 7 Band ParametricEQ External Speaker Jack (Line-Out) Yes Technical Specifications - Communications Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit Ethernet PCI-Express Adapter Connector RJ-45 Controller Broadcom 5751 PCI-Express LAN Controller Memory Integrated 96Kb frame buffer memory Data rates supported 10/100/1000 Mbps Compliance IEEE 802.1P, 802.1Q, 802.2, 802.3, 802.3AB and 802.3u compliant, 802.3x flow control Bus architecture PCI-E Data path width Single channel, PCI-E Data transfer mode Bus-master DMA Hardware certifications FCC, B, CE, TUV- cTUVus Mark Canada and United States, TUV- GS Mark for European Union Power requirement 3.1 watts @ +3.3V AUX supply with 5V tolerance Boot ROM support Yes 29


Network transfer mode Full-duplex Half-duplex (not available for the 1000BASE-T transceiver) Network transfer rate 10BASE-T (half-duplex) 10 Mbps 10BASE-T (full-duplex) 20 Mbps 100BASE-TX (half-duplex) 100 Mbps 100BASE-TX (full-duplex) 200 Mbps 1000BASE-T (full-duplex) 2000 Mbps Environmental Operating temperature 32° to 131°F (0° to 55° C) Operating humidity 85% at 131° F (55° C) Dimensions 4.4 x 2.2 x 0.08 in (11.2 x 5.5 x 2 cm) Operating system driver support Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Microsoft Windows 98, Microsoft 2000, Microsoft XP, Linux 2.2, Linux 2.4 Management capabilities ACPI, WOL and DMI 2.0, PXE 2.0, WfM 2.0, Broadcom mgmt utility Alerting N/A Kit contents Broadcom 5751, CD, Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit Ethernet PCI-E Adapter, drivers, quick install guide, product warranty statement -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Integrated Broadcom NetXtreme Gigabit Ethernet NIC Connector RJ-45 Controller Broadcom 5782 PCI LAN Controller Memory Integrated 96Kb frame buffer memory Data rates supported 10/100/1000 Mbps Compliance IEEE 802.1A, 802.1P, 802.1Q, 802.2, 802.3, 802.3AB and 802.3u compliant, 802.3x flow control Bus architecture PCI 2.2 Data path width 32-bit, 33/66 MHz bus interface Data transfer mode Bus-master DMA Hardware certifications FCC class B, CE, TUV- cTUVus Mark Canada and United States, TUV- GS Mark for European Union Power requirement 1.48 watts @ +3.3V AUX supply with 5V tolerance Boot ROM support Yes Network Transfer Mode Full-duplex Half-duplex (not available for the 1000BASE-T transceiver) Network transfer rate 10BASE-T (half-duplex) 10 Mbps 10BASE-T (full-duplex) 20 Mbps 100BASE-TX (half-duplex) 100 Mbps 100BASE-TX (full-duplex) 200 Mbps 1000BASE-T, (full-duplex) 2000 Mbps Environmental Operating temperature 32° to 131° F (0° to 55° C) Operating humidity 85% at 131° F (55° C) 30


Dimensions 4.7 x 2.0 x 0.08 in (12 x 5 x 1.9 cm) Operating system driver support Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Microsoft Windows 98, Microsoft 2000, Microsoft XP, Linux 2.2, Linux 2.4 Management capabilities ACPI, WOL and DMI 2.0, PXE 2.0, WfM 2.0 Alerting ASF 2.0 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Intel Pro 1000 MT Gigabit NIC Connector RJ-45 Controller Intel 82540EM Gigabit Controller Memory Integrated 96Kb frame buffer memory Data rates supported 10/100/1000 Mbps Compliance IEEE 802.1A, 802.1P, 802.1P, 802.1Q, 802.2, 802.3, 802.3AB and 802.3u compliant, 802.3x flow control Bus architecture PCI 2.3 Data path width 32-bit, 33/66 MHz bus interface Data transfer mode Bus-master DMA Hardware certifications FCC, B, CE, TUV- cTUVus Mark Canada and United States, TUV- GS Mark for European Union Power requirement 1.48 watts @ +3.3V AUX supply with 5V tolerance Boot ROM support Yes Network transfer rate 10BASE-T (half-duplex) 10 Mbps 10BASE-T (full-duplex) 20 Mbps 100BASE-TX (half-duplex) 100 Mbps 100BASE-TX (full-duplex) 200 Mbps 1000BASE-T, 1000 Mbps Environmental Operating temperature 32° to 131° F (0° to 55° C) Operating humidity 85% at 131° F (55° C) Dimensions 6.4 x 4.8 x 0.8 in (16.3 x 12.1 x 1.9 cm) Operating system driver support Microsoft® Windows® NT® 4.0, Microsoft Windows 98, Microsoft 2000, Microsoft XP, Linux 2.2, Linux 2.4 Management capabilities ACPI, WOL and DMI 2.0, PXE 2.0, WfM 2.0, Intel PROset II utility -------------------------------------------------------------------------------56K PCI SoftModem Data Transmission Technology speeds: 56,000 Kbps maximum downstream data, controllerless NOTE: 56 Kbps technology refers to download speeds only and requires compatible modems at server sites. Other conditions may limit modem speed. FCC limitations allow a maximum of 53 Kbps during download transmissions. Data Speeds (Upload only) 33,600/31,200/28,800/26,400/21,600/19,200/16,800/14,400/12,000/ 31


9,600/7,200/4,800/2,400/1,200/300 Data Standards ITU high speed 56K, ITU-T, V.34bis, V.22bis, V.22bis, V.21, V.23, Bell 212A, and Bell 103 Fax Speeds 14,400/12,000/9,600/7,200/4,800/2,400/1,200/300 b/s Fax Mode Capabilities Group3 FAX, V. 17, V.29, V.27ter, and V.21 Channel 2, Class 1 Error Correction and Data Compression V.44 (software upgradeable), 4.2bis, V.42 and MNP2-5 Power Management APM and ACPI states D0, D1, D2, and D3; meets PCI 2.2 requirements and PC'99 requirements Upgradeability Software driver upgradeable for high speed 56K modem and future enhancements Video ITU-T V.80 video ready interface Other TIA/EIA 602 standard AT command set ntegrated DTE interface with speeds of up to 115.2 Kbps, parallel 16550a UART-compatible interface Optional ring wakeup signal Operating Temperature 32° to 158° F (0° to 70° C) Operating Humidity 20% to 90%, non-condensing Operating System Support Microsoft® Windows® 95 and 98, Microsoft Windows 98 SE, Microsoft Windows 2000, Microsoft Windows Me, Microsoft Windows NT® 4.0, and Microsoft Windows XP OS Driver Support Microsoft Windows 95 and 98, Microsoft Windows 98 SE, Microsoft Windows 2000, Microsoft Windows Me, Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Microsoft Windows XP Power Requires a 3.3-V auxiliary power rail on PCI bus Uses only one PCI load (i.e., one grant/request pair), one shared IRQ, one electrical load Chipset Agere Systems 1648C (Mars 3.2) – Integrated PCI interface with 5-V tolerant buffers and CardBus support Dimensions (L X H) Complies with PCI low profile specifications – 6.7 x 2.3 in (17.0 x 5.8 cm) and supports high-and low-profile brackets Connection Dual, parallel RJ-11 support with auxiliary Tip/Ring connector Other Features Digital line protection, call progress monitoring via on-board piezo device, transformerbased DAA design, support for high profile and low profile brackets, PnP ID supports via external EEPROM Safety UL recognized to UL 1950, 3rd edition (U.S. and Canada); IEC 950 (TUV, NEMKO, DEMKO, SEMKO); CE Mark, EC 950 (TUV, NEMKO, DEMKO, SEMKO, CE mark EMC FCC Part 15, IC ES003, EN 55022, 3rd edition, EN 55024, annex A, EN 61000-4-6, EN 61000-4-8 Telecom FCC Part 68, IC-CS-03 (Canada); Worldwide PTT approvals Not available in India, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Belarus, Brunei, Croatia, Ecuador, Latvia, Lithuania, Morocco, Peru, Phillipines, Sri Lanka, Ukraine, Malaysia (use DC132B or DC132C instead) Health Bare PCB material compliant to 94V-0 or better (marked as such), Microsoft Windows Me health compliant Other PC'99 compliant, PCI version 2.2, WHQL approved; support for ACPI revision 1.1 Technical Specifications - Graphics Integrated Graphics Media Accelerator 900 3D/2D Controller Microsoft® DirectX® 9 based with support 32


for Pixel Shader 2.0, 4:1 anisotropic filtering, Gaussian texture filtering, shadow maps, volumetric textures, double-sided stencil buffers, and 4 pixel pipes. VGA Controller Integrated Bus Type PCI Express™ x16 (Internal graphics is automatically disabled if an external graphics card is installed. If the external graphics card is installed in a PCI slot, the internal graphics can be re-enabled using the system's BIOS setup utility. If the external graphics card is installed in the PCI Express™ slot, the internal graphics cannot be enabled). RAMDAC Integrated, 400 MHz Memory Graphics memory is shared with system memory. Graphics memory usage can vary from 8-128 MB depending on the amount of system memory installed and system load. 8 MB is pre-allocated for graphics use at system boot time. Additional memory is allocated for graphics using Intel's Dynamic Video Memory Technology (DVMT) to balance the optimum amount of memory between graphics and other system use. Memory < 256 MB: 8 MB pre-allocated (for DOS) + 24 MB DVMT : max frame buffer of 32 MB 256 MB <= Memory < 512 MB:8 MB pre-allocated + 56 MB DVMT: max frame buffer of 64 MB 512 MB <= Memory: 8 MB pre-allocated + 120 MB DVMT : max frame buffer of 128 MB Controller Clock Speed 333 MHz Overlay Planes Single overlay support with 5x3 filtering Maximum Color Depth 32 bits/pixel Maximum Vertical Refresh Rate 85 Hz at up to 1920x1440, 75Hz at 2048x1536. Varies with mode and configuration. See table below. Multi-display Support Support for one CRT via the motherboard's VGA connector. Support for an additional DVI-D display via the optional DVI ADD2 card. Dual independent displays and dual synchronous (Twin or Clone mode) displays are supported. Operating Systems Microsoft Windows XP and Windows 2000 Graphics/Video API Support Microsoft DirectX®9, DirectXVA®, VMR9, GDI/GDI+; OpenGL® 1.4. Resolutions Supported1 Resolution Maximum Refresh Rate (Hz) Analog Monitor Digital Monitor 640 x 480 800 x 600 1024 x 768 1152 x 864 1280 x768 1280 x 960 1280 x 1024 1600 x 900 1600 x 1200 1920 x 1080 1920 x 1200 1920 x 1440 2048 x 1536 85 33


85 85 85 60 85 85 60 85 60 60 75 75 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 60 1 Modes listed are supported with a single active display. The supported mode list for multiple active displays is a subset of this list. Not all modes will support video playback and some supported modes may use software MC (motion compensation) rather than hardware MC. Not all modes will support 3D acceleration depending on the system configuration (e.g., resolution selected, size of frame buffer, number of installed memory modules, etc.). NOTE: Other resolutions and refresh rates may be selectable but are not recommended. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------NVIDIA Quadro NVS 280 Graphics Card Form Factor ATX Graphic Controller Integrated Quadro 280 2-D graphics processor unit (GPU) VGA controller Integrated into the Quadro GPU Bus type Workstations: AGP 8X or PCI Desktops: PCI RAMDAC Dual 350 MHz Memory 64 MB DDR with frame buffer and Texture storage Connector Single High-density Flex Connector 34


Dimensions Low-profile, 2.586 x 6.6 in (6.57 x 16.76 cm) Controller clock speed 275 MHz Color planes 32-bit color buffer Overlay planes 1 16-bit Video overlay plane Maximum vertical refresh rate 120 Hz Maximum pixel clock 350 MHz Multi-monitor support Dual analog or digital monitors Single DVI Support Yes Dual DVI Support Yes High-definition Video Processor (HDVP) Full-screen, full-frame video playback of HDTV and DVD content DVD-ready motion compensation for MPEG-2 Independent hardware color controls for video overlay Hardware color-space conversion (YUV 4:2:2 and 4:2:0) IDCT motion compensation 5-tap horizontal by 3-tap vertical filtering 8:1 up/down scaling Available graphics drivers Microsoft Windows 2000 and Microsoft Windows XP (Provides full native Dual View mode, Span or Big Desktop mode, and Clone mode). HP qualified drivers may be preloaded or available from the HP support Web site: http://welcome.hp.com/country/us/eng/software_drivers.html. Analog Resolution Maximum Colors Supported Maximum Refresh Rate Analog Resolution 640 x 480 16.7 M 240 Hz 640 x 480 800 x 600 16.7 M 240 Hz 800 x 600 1024 x 768 16.7 M 200 Hz 1024 x 768 1600 x 1200 16.7 M 170 Hz 1600 x 1200 1600 x 1200 16.7 M 150 Hz 1600 x 1200 1600 x 1200 16.7 M 100 Hz 1600 x 1200 1920 x 1200 16.7 M 85 Hz 1920 x 1200 1920 x 1200 16.7 M 85 Hz 1920 x 1200 1920 x 1440 16.7 M 75 Hz 1920 x 1440 2048 x 1536 16.7 M 60 Hz 2048 x 1536 Digital Resolution Maximum Colors Supported Maximum Refresh Rate Digital Resolution 640 x 480 16.7 M 75 Hz 640 x 480 800 x 600 16.7 M 75 Hz 800 x 600 1024 x 768 16.7 M 75 Hz 1024 x 768 1152 x 864 16.7 M 60 Hz 1152 x 864 1280 x 1024 16.7 M 60 Hz 1280 x 1024 1600 x 1200 16.7 M 60 Hz (primary only) 1600 x 1200 Technical Specifications - Hard Drives

35


7200 rpm Serial ATA Hard Drives 40-GB Capacity 40,020,000,000 bytes Height 1 inch (2.54 mm) Width Media diameter: 3.5 in (8.89 cm) Physical size: 4 in (10.2 cm) Interface Serial ATA Synchronous Transfer Rate (Maximum) 150 MB/s Buffer 2 MB Seek Time (typical reads, includes controller overhead, including settling) Single Track 1.0 ms Average 8.5 ms Full-Stroke 18.0 ms Rotational Speed 7,200 rpm Logical Blocks 78,165,360 Operating Temperature 41° to 131° F (5° to 55° C) 80-GB Capacity 85,899,345,920 bytes Height 1 in (2.54 cm) Width Media diameter: 3.5 in (8.89 cm) Physical size: 4 in (10.2 cm) Interface Serial ATA Synchronous Transfer Rate (Maximum) 150 MB/s Buffer 8 MB Seek Time (typical reads, includes controller overhead, including settling) Single Track 0.9 ms Average 9.3 ms Full-Stroke 18 ms Rotational Speed 7,200 rpm Logical Blocks 153,301,488 Operating Temperature 41° to 131° F (5° to 55° C) 120-GB Capacity 120,034,000,000 bytes Height 1 in (2.54 cm) Width Media diameter: 3.5 in (8.89 cm) Physical size: 4 in (10.2 cm) Interface Serial ATA Synchronous Transfer Rate (Maximum) 150 MB/s Buffer 8 MB Seek Time (typical reads, includes controller overhead, including settling) Single Track 1.0 ms Average 8.5 ms Full-Stroke 18 ms Rotational Speed 7,200 rpm Logical Blocks 234,441,648 Operating Temperature 41° to 131° F (5° to 55° C) 36


160-GB Capacity 171,798,691,840 bytes Height 1 in (2.54 cm) Width Media diameter: 3.5 in (8.89 cm) Physical size: 4 in (10.2 cm) Interface Serial ATA Synchronous Transfer Rate (Maximum) 150 MB/s Buffer 8 MB Seek Time (typical reads, includes controller overhead, including settling) Single Track 0.9 ms Average 9.3 ms Full-Stroke 18 ms Rotational Speed 7,200 rpm Logical Blocks 312,581,808 Operating Temperature 41° to 131° F (5° to 55° C) Technical Specifications - Input/Output Devices 2004 Standard Keyboard (PS/2 or USB) Physical characteristics Keys 104, 105, 106, 107, 109 layout (depending upon country) Dimensions (L x W x H) 18.0 x 6.4 x 0.98 in (45.8 x 16.3 x 2.5 cm) Weight 2 lb (0.9 kg) minimum Electrical Operating voltage + 5VDC ± 5% Power consumption 50-mA maximum (with three LEDs ON) System interface USB Type A plug connector ESD CE level 4, 15-kV air discharge EMI - RFI Conforms to FCC rules for a Class B computing device Microsoft® PC 99 - 2001 Functionally compliant Mechanical Languages 38 available Keycaps Low-profile design Switch actuation 55-g nominal peak force with tactile feedback Switch life 20 million keystrokes (using Hasco modified tester) Switch type Contamination-resistant switch membrane Key-leveling mechanisms For all double-wide and greater-length keys Cable length 6 ft (1.8 m) Microsoft PC 99 - 2001 Mechanically compliant Acoustics 43-dBA maximum sound pressure level Environmental Operating temperature 50° to 122° F (10° to 50° C) Non-operating temperature -22° to 140° F (-30° to 60° C) Operating humidity 10% to 90% (non-condensing at ambient) Non-operating humidity 20% to 80% (non-condensing at ambient) Operating shock 40 g, six surfaces 37


Non-operating shock 80 g, six surfaces Operating vibration 2-g peak acceleration Non-operating vibration 4-g peak acceleration Drop (out of box) 26 in (66 cm) on carpet, six-drop sequence Drop (in box) 42 in (107 cm) on concrete, 16-drop sequence Operating system support Windows® 2000 and Windows XP Approvals UL, CSA, FCC, CE Mark, TUV, TUV GS, VCCI, BSMI, C-Tick, MIC Ergonomic compliance ANSI HFS 100, ISO 9241-4, and TUVGS -------------------------------------------------------------------------------2-Button Scroll Mouse (PS/2 or USB) Scroll Wheel 8 mm Maximum Rotation Speed 30 mm/s Switch Type Light force micro-switch Switch Life 1 million operations Mechanical Life Minimum 200,000 revolutions Environmental Operating Temperature 50° to 122° F (10° to 50° C) Non-operating Temperature -22° to 140° F (-30° to 60° C) Operating Humidity 10% to 90% (non condensing at ambient) Non-operating Humidity 20% to 80% (non condensing at ambient) Operating Shock 40 g, 6 surfaces Non-operating Shock 80 g, 6 surfaces Operating Vibration 2 g peak acceleration Non-operating Vibration 4 g peak acceleration Electrical Operating Voltage + 5VDC ± 10% Power Consumption 15mA System Consumption PS/2 mini-din connector ESD CE level 4, 15 kV air discharge EMI-RFI Conforms to FCC rules for a Class B computing device PC98 Functionally compliant Mechanical Resolution 400 ± 20% DPI Tracking Speed 10 in/s maximum Acceleration 100 in/s Switch Actuation 85 g nominal peak force Switch Life 1,000,000 operations (using Hasco modified tester) Cable Length 2 m PC98-99 Mechanically compliant Regulatory Approvals UL, CSA, FCC, CE Mark, TUV, TUV GS, VCCI, BCIQ, C-Tick Technical Specifications - Optical Storage

38


16X DVD+/-RW LightScribe Drive (Double Layer / Dual Format) Height 5.25-inch, half-height, tray-load Orientation Either horizontal or vertical Interface type ATAPI/EIDE Disc recording capacity 8.5 GB DL or 4.7 GB standard Dimensions (W x H x D) 5.9 x 1.7 x 8.0 in (15.0 x 4.4 x 20.3 cm) Weight (max) 2.6 lb (1.2 kg) Write speed DVD+R Up to 16X DVD+RW Up to 4X DVD+R DL Up to 2.4X DVD-R Up to 8X DVD-RW Up to 4X CD-R Up to 40X CD-RW Up to 24X Read speed DVD+R/-R/+RW/ -RW/+R DL Up to 8X DVD-ROM Up to 16X CD-ROM, CD-R Up to 40X CD-RW Up to 32X Access time (typical reads, including settling) Random DVD: < 130 ms (typical), CD: < 120 ms (typical) Full Stroke DVD: < 240 ms (seek), CD: < 200 ms (seek) Startup Time Single-session: < 15 seconds (typical), Multi-session: < 30 seconds (typical) Stop Time < 4 seconds Cache Buffer 2 MB (minimum) Data Transfer Modes ATA PIO mode 4 (16.7 MB/s); ATA Multi-word DMA mode 2 (16.7 MB/s); ATA UltraDMA Mode 3 (44.4 MB/s -default) Power Source Four-pin, DC power receptacle DC Power Requirement 5 VDC ± 5%-100 mV ripple p-p 12 VDC ± 5%-200 mV ripple p-p DC Current 5 VDC (< 1000 mA typical, 1600 mA maximum) 12 VDC (< 600 mA typical, 1400 mA maximum) Total Drive Power (standby mode) < 2.5 Watt Audio output Line-Out 0.7 VRMS Signal-to-Noise Ratio 74 dB 39


Channel Separation 65 dB Environmental conditions (operating - non-condensing) Temperature 41° to 122° F (5° to 50° C) Relative humidity 10% to 90% Maximum wet bulb temperature 86° F (30° C) System configuration Intel PentiumIII Processor or later with 128 MB of memory (required); 256 MB recommended 2-D or 3-D graphics cards on primary disk drive for operating system and application software; second disk drive for audio and video data Operating systems support Microsoft Windows 2000, Windows XP Professional, Windows XP Home Regulatory approvals MPC-3 compliant, multi-read requirements, ATA Spec X3T9.2, ATAPI Spec T13.1153D, ANSI C63.4-1992, UL 1950, ACA AS/NZS 3548, CB Bulletin No. 96A, CSA C22.2 No. 950-1995, CFR 47 C.I.S.P.R. Pub 22 Class B, DHHS/FDA, EMKO-TSE 07/94, TUV EN60950, EN60825-1, MIC, BSMI-CNS 13438, CE, Microsoft PC2001 certification, Microsoft Logo for Windows XP and 2000. Option kit contents 16X DVD+/-RW LightScribe drive, LightScribe software, InterVideo WinDVD, InterVideo WinDVD Creator, Roxio Easy Media Creator 7, Dantz Retrospect Express Backup Software, installation guide, and DVD+R media. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------48X Max CD-ROM Drive Interface ATAPI IDE Data Buffer 16.6 Mbps Data Transfer Rate Sustained—1200 Kbps minimum (audio) Variable (CD)—3,000 to 7,200 Kbps Disk Rotation Technology CAV (Constant Angular Velocity) Access Time (ms) Random: <100 ms Full-stroke seek: <150 ms Average Access Time < 80 ms Cache Buffer (standard/maximum) 128 KB Disk Formats Read Multi-session Photo CD, multi-read CD-ROM, CD text, audio CD, CD-I, CD-RW, CD-R, CD-Extra, CD-ROM XA Disk Formats Written None Disk Capacity (CD) 650 MB Block Size Mode 1 – 2,048, 2,352 bytes Mode 2-1, 2,088, 2,328, 2,336, 2,340, 2,353 bytes Mode 2-2, 2,328, 2,336, 2,340, 2,352 bytes CD-DA – 2,352, 2,368 bytes Diameter 12 cm; 8 cm Thickness 1.2 mm Track Pitch 1.6 µm Audio Output Level Line-out—0.7 V @ 47 Kohm Headphone—0.6 V @ 32 ohm Startup Time <7 seconds (typical); < 30 seconds with multi-session Operating Conditions Temperature 41° to 120° F (5° to 50° C) 40


Relative Humidity 10% to 80% Dimensions (H x W x D, maximum) 1.7 x 5.9 x 8.0 in (4.3 x 15.0 x 20.3 cm) Weight 2.6 lb (1200 g) MPEG Playback Graphics Solution Support None -------------------------------------------------------------------------------48X/32X/48X CD-RW Drive Orientation Either horizontal or vertical Disc Loading Mechanism Half-height, tray load Interface Type ATAPI IDE Dimensions—external (W x H x D) 7.99 x 5.88 x 1.71 in (203 x 149.5 x 43.5 mm) Weight 2.6 lb (1.2 kg) Disc Diameter 12 cm, 8 cm Disc Thickness 1.2 mm Track Pitch 1.6 µm Disc Center Hole Diameter 15 mm Reference Scanning Velocity 1.2 m/s Recording/Playing Time 80 minutes with CD-R media Read Only Disc Parameters Formats and Modes Supported CD-ROM – Mode 1; CD-ROM XA – Mode 2 (forms 1 and 2); CD digital audio; CD Extra; CD-I – Mode 2 (forms 1 and 2) and CD-I-Ready; Photo CD (single and multi-session); video CD Capacity 185 MB (Mode 2, 8cm); 540 MB (Mode 1, 12 cm); 650 MB (Mode 2, 12 cm); 700 MB (Mode 2, 12 cm) Block Size Mode 1 – 2,048 and 2,352 bytes; mode 2, form 1 – 2,048; 2,328; 2,336; 2,340 and 2,352 bytes; mode 2, form 2-2,328; 2,336; 2,340 and 2,352 bytes; CD-DA-2,352 and 2,368 bytes Writeable Disc Parameters Disc Type CD-R and CD-RW Write Methods Disc at Once, Track at Once, Session at Once, Variable Packet, Fixed Packet Format and Modes Supported CD-ROM (mode 1); CD-ROM XA (mode 2, forms 1 and 2); CD digital audio, CD-I (mode 2, forms 1 and 2); video CD Capacity 185 MB (Mode 2, 8cm); 540 MB (Mode 1, 12 cm); 650 MB (Mode 2, 12 cm); 700 MB (Mode 2, 12 cm) Block Size Mode 1 – 2,048 bytes; mode 2, form 1 – 2,048 and 2,352 bytes; mode 2, form 2 – 2,352 bytes; CD-DA ---2,352 bytes Access Times (typical) Random < 120 ms Full Stroke < 200 ms Maximum Data Transfer Rates CD-RW Write 4800 KB/s (32X) Max CD-ROM, CD-R read 7200 KB/s (48X) Max CD-RW read 7200 KB/s (32X) Max CD-R write 7200 KB/s (48X) Max 41


Data Transfer Modes ATA PIO mode 4 (16.7MB/s); ATA multi-word DMA mode 2 (16.7 MB/s); ATA UltraDMA mode 0 (16.7 MB/s); ATA UltraDMA mode 1 (24 MB/s); ATA UltraDMA mode 2 (33 MB/s) – default. Cache Buffer 2 MB (minimum) Start-up Time (single) < 7 seconds typical Start-up Time (multi-session) < 30 seconds typical Stop Time < 4 seconds Power Source Four-pin, DC power receptacle DC power requirement 5 VDC ± 5%—100 mV ripple p-p 12 VDC ± 5%—200 mV ripple p-p DC current 5 VCD < 1A (typical) < 1600 mA (maximum) 12 VCD < 600 mA (typical) < 1.4A (maximum) Total Drive Power (Standby mode) < 2.5 watt Audio Output Level 0.7 Vrms Configuration Jumper Block Master, slave and cable select modes Data Interface Connector 50-pin IDE interface Environmental (all conditions, non-condensing) Temperature (operating) 41° to 122° F (5° to 50° C) Relative Humidity (operating) 10% to 90% Maximum Wet Bulb Temperature (operating) 84° F (29° C) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------16X/40X DVD-ROM Height 5.25-in, half-height Interface Type ATAPI Dimensions– External, Excluding Bezel (W x H) 5.88 x 1.71 in (149.5 x 43.5 mm) Disc Diameter 12 cm, 8 cm Disc Thickness 1.2 mm Track Pitch 1.6 µm (CD), 0.74 µm (DVD) Disc Center Hole Diameter 15 mm Disc Formats DVD-ROM (single and dual layer); DVD-video; DVD-R version 1.0 and 2.0; DVD-RW version 1.0 and 1.1; DVD-R multi-border; DVD+RW; DVD+R ; CD-ROM Mode 1 and 2; CD-DA; CD-ROM XA Mode 2, Form 1 and 2; CD-extra; CD-text; CD-I Mode 2, Form 1 and 2; CD-I ready; video CD, CD-bridge; PhotoCD (single and multi-session); CD-R; CD-RW Disc Capacity DVD-ROM 4.7 GB (DVD-5), 8.54 GB (DVD-9), 9.4 GB (DVD-10), 3.95 GB (DVD-R version 1.0), 4.7 GB (DVD-R version 2.0), 4.7 GB (DVD-RW version 1.0 and 1.1), 4.7 GB (DVD+RW), 4.7 GB (DVD+R) 42


CD-ROM 40 MB (Mode 1, 12 cm), 640 MB (Mode 2, 12 cm), 700 MB (80 minimum CD-R and CD-RW), 180 MB (8 cm) Block Size (bytes) DVD-ROM – 2048; CD-ROM Mode 0 – 2352; CD-ROM Mode 1 – 2352, 2340, 2336, 2048; CD-ROM Mode 2 – 2352, 2340, 2336, 2048 Access Times (typical reads, including settling) DVD-ROM Single Layer 120 ms (typical) CD-ROM Mode 1 90 ms (typical) Full Stroke DVD 240 ms (seek) (typical) Full Stroke CD 160 ms (seek) (typical) Maximum Data Transfer Rates CD-ROM Read 6000 KB/s (40X) Max DVD-ROM Read 21,600 KB/s (16X) Max Data Transfer Modes PIO Mode 4 (16.6 MB/s); Multi-word DMA mode 2 (16.6 MB/s); UltraDMA Mode 3 (44.4 MB/s) Power Source Four-pin, DC power receptacle DC Power Requirement 5 VDC ± 5% – 100 mV ripple p-p 12 VDC ± 5% – 200 mV ripple p-p DC Current 5 VDC – <800 mA typical, < 1000 mA maximum 12 VDC – < 870 mA typical Audio Output Level 0.7 Vrms (typical) Configuration Jumper Block Master, slave, and cable select modes Data Interface Connector 40-pin, shrouded and keyed, flat ribbon Environmental (all conditions non-condensing) Temperature (operating) 41° to 122° F (5° to 50° C) Relative Humidity (operating) 10% to 90% Maximum Wet Bulb Temperature (operating) 86° F (30° C) Certifications, Approvals MMC II support, multi-read certification, Microsoft WHQL certification, ACA AS/NZS 3548 class B, CNS 13438, C.I.S.P.R. Pub 22, TUV or VDE EN60950, EN 55022, EN55024, SEMKO, NEMKO, DEMKO, FIMKO, EN 60825-1, UL 60950, and CSA C22.2 60950-2000. Operating Systems Supported Microsoft Windows 2000, Windows XP Professional, Windows XP Home Kit Contents 16X/40X DVD-ROM Drive, Roxio CinePlayer software, and installation guide. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------48X/32X/48X/16X Combo CD-RW/DVD-ROM 5.25-inch, half-height, tray-load Color Carbonite Orientation Either horizontal or vertical Interface Type ATAPI Dimensions (W x H x D) 5.77 x 1.71 x 7.36 in (146.5 x 43.5 x 187 mm) (external, excluding bezel) Disc Diameter 12 cm, 8 cm Disc Thickness 0.05 in (1.2 mm) Track Pitch 1.6 um (CD), 0.74 um (DVD) 43


Disc Center Hole Diameter 0.6 in (15 mm) Reference Scanning Velocity 1.2 m/s (CD); 3.49 m/s (DVD SL); 3.84 m/s (DVD DL) Read Only Disc Parameters Formats and Modes Supported CD-ROM – Mode 1; CD-ROM XA-Mode 2 (forms 1 and 2); CD-Bridge; CD digital audio; CD Extra; CD-I – Mode 2 (forms 1 and 2) and CD-I-Ready; Photo CD (single and multi-session); video CD; DVD (single- and double-layer); DVD-R; DVD-RW; DVD-RW Multi-Border; DVD+R; DVD+R Multi-Session , and DVD+RW Capacity 180 MB (mode 2, 8 cm); 540 MB (mode 1, 12 cm); 650 MB (mode 2, 12 cm); 700 MB (Mode 2, 12 cm); 4.7 GB (DVD-5); 8.54 GB (DVD-9); 9.4 GB (DVD-10) Block Size Mode 1 – 2,048 and 2,352 bytes; mode 2, form 1 – 2,048; 2,328; 2,336; 2,340 and 2,352 bytes; mode 2, form 2 – 2,328; 2,336; 2,340 and 2,352 bytes; CD-DA – 2,352 bytes; DVD-2,048 bytes Writeable Disc Parameters Disc Type CD-R and CD-RW Write Methods Disc at Once, Track at Once, Session at Once, Variable Packet, Fixed Packet Format and Modes Supported CD-ROM (mode 1); CD-ROM XA (mode 2, forms 1 and 2); CD digital audio, CD-I (mode 2, forms 1 and 2); video CD; CD-Bridge; Video CD Capacity 180 MB (mode 2, 8 cm); 540 MB (mode 1, 12 cm); 650 MB (mode 2, 12 cm); 700 MB (mode 2, 12 cm) Block Size CD-DA – 2,352 bytes; mode 0 – 2,336 and 2,352 bytes; mode 1 – 2,048 and 2,352 bytes; mode 2 – 2,336 and 2,352; mode 2, form 1 – 1 ,048 and 2,352 bytes; mode 2, form 2 – 2,324 and 2,352 bytes Access Times (typical reads, including settling) Random DVD < 140 ms (typical) Random CD < 125 ms, (typical) Full Stroke DVD < 250 ms (seek) Full Stroke CD < 210 ms (seek) Maximum Data Transfer Rates CD-R write 7200 KB/s (48X) Max CD-RW write 1500 KB/s (10X) Max CD-ROM, CD-R, CD-RW read 7200 KB/s (48X) Max DVD ROM read 21,632 KB/s (16X ) Max Data Transfer Modes ATA PIO mode 4 (16.7 MB/s); ATA Multi-word DMA mode 2 (16.7 MB/s); ATA UltraDMA mode 0 (16.7 MB/s); ATA UltraDMA mode 1 (24 MB/s), mode 2 (33 MB/s); ATA UltraDMA Mode 3 44 Mbytes/s (default) Cache Buffer 2 MB (minimum) Startup Time (single) < 7 seconds (typical) Startup Time (multi-session) < 30 seconds (typical) Stop Time < 4 seconds Power Source Four-pin, DC power receptacle DC Power Requirement 5 VDC ± 5%-100 mV ripple p-p 12 VDC ± 5%-200 mV ripple p-p 44


DC Current 5 VDC (< 1000 mA typical, < 1600 mA maximum) 12 VDC (< 600 mA typical, < 1400 mA maximum) Total Drive Power (standby mode) < 2.5 Watt Audio Output Level 0.7 Vrms (typical) Configuration Jumper Block Master, slave, and cable select modes Data Interface Connector 40-pin, shrouded and keyed, flat ribbon Environmental (all conditions non-condensing) Temperature (operating) 41° to 122° F (5° to 50° C) Relative humidity (operating) 10% to 90% Maximum wet bulb temperature (operating) 86° F (30° C) Certifications, Requirements MPC-3 compliant, multi-read requirements, ACA AS/NZS 3548, ANSI C63.41992, ATAPI Spec SFF-8020, ATA Spec X3T9.2, CB Bulletin No. 92A, CSA C22.2 No. 950-1995, C.I.S.P.R. Pub 22, EMKO-TSE 207/94, TUV or VDE EN60 950, EN60825-1, Microsoft PC2001 certification, Microsoft Logo for Windows XP, 2000, and NT4 Operating Systems Supported Microsoft Windows 2000, Microsoft Windows XP Professional, Microsoft Windows XP Home -------------------------------------------------------------------------------16X DVD+/-RW Drive 5.25-inch, half-height, tray-load Orientation Either horizontal or vertical Interface type ATAPI/EIDE Disc recording capacity 8.5 GB DL or 4.7 GB standard Dimensions (W x H x D) 5.9 x 1.7 x 8.0 in (15.0 x 4.4 x 20.3 cm) Weight (max) 2.6 lb (1.2 kg) Write speed DVD+R Up to 16X DVD+RW Up to 4X DVD+R DL Up to 2.4X DVD-R Up to 8X DVD-RW Up to 4X CD-R Up to 40X CD-RW Up to 24X Reads DVD+R/-R/+RW/-RW Up to 16X DVD-ROM Up to 16X CD-R/RW Up to 40X 45


Access time (typical reads, including settling) Random DVD: < 130 ms (typical), CD: < 120 ms (typical) Full Stroke DVD: < 240 ms (seek), CD: < 200 ms (seek) Startup Time Single-session: < 7 seconds (typical), Multi-session: < 30 seconds (typical) Stop Time < 4 seconds Cache Buffer 2 MB (minimum) Data Transfer Modes ATA PIO mode 4 (16.7 MB/s); ATA Multi-word DMA mode 2 (16.7 MB/s); ATA UltraDMA Mode 3 (44.4 MB/s -default) Power Source Four-pin, DC power receptacle DC Power Requirement 5 VDC ± 5%-100 mV ripple p-p 12 VDC ± 5%-200 mV ripple p-p DC Current 5 VDC (< 1000 mA typical, 1600 mA maximum) 12 VDC (< 600 mA typical, 1400 mA maximum) Total Drive Power (standby mode) < 2.5 Watt Audio output Line-Out 0.7 VRMS Signal-to-noise ratio 74 dB Channel separation 65 dB Operating environmental (all conditions non-condensing) Temperature 41° to 122° F (5° to 50° C) Relative humidity 10% to 90% Maximum wet bulb temperature 86° F (30° C) System configuration Intel Pentium III Processor or later with 128 MB of memory (required); 256 MB recommended 2-D or 3D graphics cards on primary disk drive for operating system and application software; second disk drive for audio and video data Operating systems support Microsoft Windows 2000 and Windows XP Regulatory approvals MPC-3 compliant, multi-read requirements, ATA Spec X3T9.2, ATAPI Spec T13.1153D, ANSI C63.4-1992, UL 1950, ACA AS/NZS 3548, CB Bulletin No. 96A, CSA C22.2 No. 950-1995, CFR 47 C.I.S.P.R. Pub 22 Class B, DHHS/FDA, EMKO-TSE 07/94, TUV EN60950, EN60825-1, MIC, BSMI-CNS 13438, CE, Microsoft PC2001 certification, Microsoft Logo for Windows XP and 2000. 46


Option kit contents 16X DVD+/-RW drive, Roxio DigitalMedia Plus, Dantz Retrospect Express Backup Software, installation guide, and DVD+R media. Technical Specifications - Removable Storage HP Drive Key II Dimensions (HxWxD) 0.32 x 0.63 x 2.67 in (0.8 x 1.6 x 6.8 cm) Storage Capacity 256 MB Weight 0.05 lb (0.02 kg) Transfer Rates Read Capable of 6.0 MB/s sustained read speed in USB 2.0 system Write Capable of 6.0 MB/s sustained write speed in USB 2.0 system Operating Temperature 41° to 122° F (5° to 50° C) Non-operating Temperature -22° to 140° F (-30° to 60° C) Operating System Support Microsoft Windows 2000, Windows XP Professional, Windows XP Home. No driver is required for this device. Native support is provided by the operating system. Option Kit Contents HP Drive Key II, documentation -------------------------------------------------------------------------------© Copyright 2006 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. Intel and Pentium are U.S. registered trademarks of Intel Corporation. Microsoft and Windows are U.S. registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------DA-11948 - Worldwide - Version 33 - January 31, 2006 --- Retired on January 19, 2006 Microsoft: There will only be one Beta for Windows 7 2/13/09, 17:45 GMT At the end of January, in a posting to the Windows 7 Engineering Blog, Steven Sinofsky senior vice president for the Windows and Windows Live Engineering Group made it clear that Microsoft will only ship one Beta of Windows 7 before releasing a Release Candidate (RC). Windows 7: Beta 1 Review 2/07/09, 18:05 GMT With the first beta of Windows 7 available to the general public to download, I will take you through an overview of Windows 7. Microsoft Announces Windows 7 Editions 2/03/09, 21:25 GMT Today Microsoft announced the SKU lineup of Windows 7, and while the company says it will focus mainly on two editions: Windows 7 Home Premium and Windows 7 Professional; Microsoft offers a total of six different Windows 7 versions. Microsoft Releases Internet Explorer 8 Release Candidate 1 1/27/09, 20:30 GMT Yesterday Microsoft announced the release of Internet Explorer 8 Release Candidate 1 (RC1). This release is the 47


first update sice the public Beta 2 release last August. Windows 7: Public Beta Available 1/08/09, 13:40 GMT At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) last Wednesday, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer announced the beta release of Windows 7 (and Windows Server 2008 R2) to the public this week. Windows Vista Service Pack 2 Public Beta 12/13/08, 14:05 GMT Early this month Microsoft released a Beta of Windows Vista Service Pack 2 via their Customer Preview Program (CPP). The beta was released in five languages: English, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish. Windows 7: Public Beta Soon 12/12/08, 20:15 GMT There have been several reports that indicate that a public beta of Windows 7 would be available in early January. What's more, according to several sources (ZDNet's Ed Bott, Internet News.com Andy Patrizio and last week WinInfo's Paul Thurrott) Windows 7 will ship this summer (a June 2009 shipping date is being mentioned) - way earlier than Microsoft has (so far) indicated. Windows 7: The new Taskbar 11/28/08, 19:00 GMT Microsoft did a lot of work on the new taskbar for Windows 7. They looked extensively how people where using their computers and started making improvements based on those observations. Windows 7 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) 11/11/08, 09:25 GMT Frequently asked questions and general information about Windows 7 Microsoft Delivers Pre-Beta Release of Windows 7 at PDC Conference 10/30/08, 17:35 GMT Last Tuesday at its Professional Developers Conference 2008 (PDC2008), Microsoft shared the first full public demo of Windows 7 and also delivered a pre-beta build of Windows 7 to PDC attendees and announced plans to release a full Windows 7 beta early next year. more headlines... Windows 2000 is Microsoft's "business OS", but fact is that more and more consumers are moving to this - the most stable - windows version. If you need help with Windows 2000, browse to our Support BBS.

Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for September, 2007 13 September 2007, 17:00 GMT The security update for September 2007 includes one update for Microsoft Windows, and one for MSN Messenger/Windows Live Messenger. Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for August, 2007 15 August 2007, 13:45 GMT The security update for August 2007 includes five updates for Microsoft Windows, and two for Internet Explorer.

48


Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for July, 2007 11 July 2007, 13:15 GMT The security update for July 2007 includes three updates for Microsoft Windows, and one for .NET Framework. Microsoft Updates Malicious Software Removal Tool 25 May 2007, 21:00 GMT Microsoft has updated the Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool to help remove specific, prevalent malicious software from computers that are running Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista or Windows XP. Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for May, 2007 8 May 2007, 22:40 GMT The security update for May 2007 includes one update for Microsoft Windows and one for Internet Explorer. Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for April, 2007 12 April 2007, 18:15 GMT The security update for April 2007 includes five updates for Microsoft Windows. Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for February, 2007 2/16/06, 11:35 GMT The security update for February 2007 includes seven updates for Microsoft Windows, and one update for Internet Explorer. Microsoft Updates Malicious Software Removal Tool 12/21/06, 21:35 GMT Microsoft has updated the Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool to help remove specific, prevalent malicious software from computers that are running Microsoft Windows Server 49


2003, Microsoft Windows XP, or Microsoft Windows 2000. Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for December, 2006 12/14/06, 21:25 GMT The security update for December 2006 includes four fixes for Microsoft Windows, one for Internet Explorer and one for Outlook Express. Windows User State Migration Tool (USMT) version 3.0 11/24/06, 09:15 GMT Microsoft Windows User State Migration Tool (USMT) version 3.0 migrates user files and settings during deployments of Microsoft Windows XP and Windows Vista. You can use USMT to perform unattended migrations and to migrate files and settings for computers with multiple users. Also, with USMT you have the ability to encrypt and compress the store. USMT 3.0 is intended for administrators who are performing automated deployments. Windows Me is not a new Windows version; the user interface makes the program look like Windows 2000, but "under the hood" it's still Windows 9x code. New in Windows Me are: System Restore function A new TCP/IP stack Windows Media Player 7 Internet Explorer 5.5 Movie Maker application for recording, editing, publishing, and organizing audio and video content No Real mode DOS System Requirements According to Microsoft a Pentium 150 or better with at least 32MB of RAM is the minimum system required to run Me. We would suggest at least a Pentium II 300MHz with a minimum of 128MB RAM. More information on system requirements for Windows Me. Windows Me is no longer supported by Microsoft. We have a few Windows Me Tips archived here.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------If you can't find the Information you are looking for, you can post a message on our Support BBS. 50


Please do not send questions by e-mail, they will go unanswered! We get many mails asking the same things, so that's one of the reasons we've set up the BBS. Read through the posts, and if you don't find an answer to your problem, post a message. This will benefit everyone in a similar situation (and while you are there, why not answer some of the questions you know the answer to!).

MCSA stands for Microsoft certified systems administrator certification is very advanced to testify the basic knowledge and experience of IT professionals by ensuring their bright career in IT field. 70-296 exams are providing very accomplished tasks management, planning, maintenance for the exclusive operation of Microsoft windows server 2003 which are very identified very plausible for MCSE candidates. 70-305 exams help in developing, manipulating web application by utilizing Microsoft visual basic .NET and Microsoft visual studio .NET tools which is very essential part of MCSD (Microsoft certified solution developer) and MCAD (Microsoft certified application developer) certification. 70-294 exams of Microsoft certification are exclusively designed fro planning, deployi9ng and maintaining Microsoft windows server 2003 with the complete demonstration of all technical and strategic tools and technologies in the advanced age. 70-291 exams are deploying and maintaining IP addressing, name resolution, network security and routing and remote access of network infrastructure very effectively. I get messages from people having problems with Windows Explorer crashes on a regular basis. Mostly they go something like this: "When I right-click a file in Windows Explorer, I get a message that Windows Explorer has encountered a problem and needs to close" or "When I try to browse through the folders on my computer, I receive an error message that Windows Explorer needs to close." In a lot of cases, these errors are caused by 3rd party shell extensions that are not functioning properly. These shell extensions are responsible for creating the options you'll see on the menu when you rightclick a file using Windows Explorer. Some 3rd party applications will add their own "action" to this menu, and this can cause problems. If you look careful at the picture on the right, you'll see several non-standard additions to the right-click menu: "Send to Fax Recipient", "Scan with Norton Antivirus", "TextPad" and "Winzip". To try and find if a 3rd party shell extension is causing your Windows Explorer to crash on certain actions, you'll need to download this handy (and free) utility: ShelExView. It will let you view & disable shell extensions. After you downloaded & executed it, ShelExView will show all shell extensions installed on your system. You could sort the entries so that you'll have all non Microsoft shell extensions grouped together. Next, select all these non Microsoft shell extensions, and disable them. Try the sequence that would previously have resulted in Windows Explorer crashing (for example browsing a folder, or right-clicking a file). If no crash occurred, one of the shell extensions you disabled has been causing the crash. To find out which one, start enabling one shell extension at a time, each time testing to make sure you can still use Windows Explorer without it crashing, until you find the shell extension that would cause Windows 51


Explorer to crash. ShelExView gives you all additional information you need to know such as the product & company name of the shell extension, as well as the version number. If you would like to continue using the software of the 3rd party whose shell extension is causing the Explorer crash, contact the company responsible, and check to see if there is an updated version of the software you are trying to use.

Another cause of Windows Explorer crashes can also be attributed to the existence of viruses or spyware on the machine. To tackle this, start by running one or two on-line virus scans. I'd suggest the on-line scan from eTrust, Trend Micro's HouseCall, or the Online Scan from RAV. To combat any spyware that might lurk on your machine, I'd suggest the following programs: Microsoft Windows AntiSpyware (Beta), Lavasoft's Ad-Aware, Rose City Software's Spyware Medic, or Spybot's Search & Distroy. As with Anti-virus scanners, run at least two different ones, they will detect different things! If you need more help in fighting Spyware or Virus infections, start by reading these instructions on our WindowsBBS.com support forum, and post a message in the appropriate forum.

If after following the advice above, you are still getting crashes when opening/using Windows Explorer, we need to do some advanced troubleshooting (Windows 2000/XP/2003 only). Please follow the following instructions carefully: Download and install the Debugging Tools for Windows from Microsoft Download our DebugWizard tool Extract the debugwiz.exe file, and place it anywhere on your system (the desktop will be fine) Click the Browse button next to the Dump file to be analyzed box Depending on the cause of the crash & how your system is setup, the dump file will most likely be located in \Windows\Minidump\. Do a search for *.dmp if that fails. Look for a date/time on the dump that corresponds with the latest crash. Select the most recent dump file, and click Generate Log When the Command Prompt window closes, you should be able to locate the debuglog.txt file in C:\ Go to Microsoft Support Services, and select an option to "open" a support request You can use the log file (debuglog.txt) generated to supply the needed information to start your support 52


request

Below I have listed a number of Microsoft Knowledge Base Articles dealing with Windows Explorer crashes: KB Art. # Title Applies to 188540 You receive an "Invalid page fault" error message when you try to view the contents of a folder or its subfolders by using Thumbnail view in Windows Explorer Windows 98, Me, 2000, XP 192315 "All Folders" pane missing or Windows Explorer is blank Windows 95, 98 221085 Error Message Typing Address in Address Box or in Open Box Internet Explorer 4.x, 5.x 227152 Error Message: Explorer Caused an Invalid Page Fault in Pdm.dll Windows 98 Second Edition 257675 Windows Explorer May Hang When Viewing Images Internet Explorer 5.x 266320 Error Message When You Use Windows Explorer to Search for Files or Folders Windows 2000 289799 Desktop Is White and Error Message Reports a Windows Explorer Error in Browseui.dll Windows Me 293174 Error Message: Explorer Caused an Invalid Page Fault in Module Browseui.dll Windows 98, 98 SE 306599 Error Message: Error Loading Explorer.exe You Must Reinstall Windows Windows 98, 98 SE, Millennium Edition 317250 Access Violation in Windows Explorer When You View Printer Properties in Active Directory Windows 2000 320563 Windows Explorer Quits When You View Contents of My Computer Windows XP 322857 Windows Explorer Quits and Generates an Error Message When You Try to Map a Network Drive Windows 2000, XP 326612 "Explorer.exe Has Generated Errors and Will Be Closed By Windows" Error Message When You Try to Install Service Pack 3 Windows 2000 SP3 329692 Explorer.exe may generate an application error when you close a folder Windows XP SP1 555177 Windows XP halts on desktop when loading Windows Explorer, after upgrading to Service Pack 2 Windows XP 810891 Access Violation Occurs in Windows Explorer When the My Computer Window Is Refreshed Windows 2000 811266 You receive a "Windows Explorer has encountered a problem and needs to close" error message when you try to open My Network Places in Windows XP Windows XP 815240 Windows Explorer Stops Responding When You Try to Rotate a JPEG Image in Windows Picture and Fax Viewer Windows XP 817768 Windows Explorer Stops Responding When It Tries to Sort More Than 1 Million Objects on a RAID Controller Windows 2000 821403 Mipmapi.dll Error Message When You Point to "Send To" and Then Click "Mail Recipient" to Send a File in an E-mail Message Windows 2000, XP 824136 Error Message Occurs When File is Right-Clicked, or Problems Occur When Opening Certain Files 53


in Autodesk or Discreet Products Windows 2000, XP 831938 My Computer and Windows Explorer unexpectedly quit when you try to open My Network Places or Shared Documents in Windows XP Windows XP 883791 Explorer.exe repeatedly quits unexpectedly in Windows XP Windows XP, XP SP1 925066 Windows Explorer may stop responding on a Windows XP-based client computer in a domain environment, and CPU usage is very high on the primary domain controller Windows XP Professional 930092 Windows Explorer stops responding on a Windows Vista-based computer when you try to open a file or a folder that resides on a Sony Ultra Portable universal serial bus drive Windows Vista 931702 Windows Explorer crashes when you try to remove the $WINDOWS.OLD folder from a computer that has been upgraded to Windows Vista Windows Vista Thanks for the votes! Windows XP: Clean the Start Menu The Windows XP Start menu is "polluted" with a number of extra links courtesy of Microsoft. At the top there are links to the Internet and E-mail programs; these default to the Microsoft programs. We'll discuss changing those later. Under those two shortcuts, we find the "Most frequently used" programs list. But when you start using other programs, you'll notice that Microsoft has given its own an apparent "head start", as they will be slow to disappear from the list. It is, however, easy enough to remove a program from this list: just right-click on the program you want to remove, and from the menu select Remove from This List. When you right-click, you might also note that Pin to Start menu is an option. When you select that option, the shortcut will be moved to the top of the Start menu, directly below the E-mail link. You can also remove a program that was pinned to the Start menu by right-clicking, and choosing Unpin from Start menu (which will restore it to its position on the lower part of the start menu), or choosing Remove from This List, which will remove it completely from the Start menu. Next you will notice a great number of links on the right side of the Start menu such as My Documents, My Recent Documents, My Pictures and My Music. Well, I don't know about you, but that's nothing that I need there! Just right-click an empty space on the Start menu, click Properties, click Customize and select the Advanced tab. Now you can customize the look & feel of your Start menu in whatever way you want! There are a number of items (Control Panel, My Computer, My Documents, My Music, and My Pictures) for which you have these three options: Display as link Display as menu 54


Don't display this item

It is especially useful to have the Control Panel as menu, as this will create faster access to the individual Control Panel applets. There are another number of options... I suggest you check it out. One other option I should mention is the Highlight newly installed programs. This is another annoyance you will want to switch off quickly! Not only will newly installed programs be listed with a yellowish highlight in the All Programs menu, you will also receive a pop-up when you open the start menu that tells you New programs installed.

On the General tab (after pressing Customize on the Taskbar and Start Menu properties), you can also change the Internet & E-mail programs listed on the Start menu. The drop-down boxes should contain all programs installed on your system. Also you can change the number of shortcuts listed on the (left side) Start menu, as well as clear the whole list of programs in one shot. On the Taskbar and Start Menu properties itself, you can also choose Classic Start menu. Choosing this option will make your start menu look like the Windows 2000 Start menu. Windows 2000 is Microsoft's "business OS", but fact is that more and more consumers are moving to this - the most stable - windows version. If you need help with Windows 2000, browse to our Support.

Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for September, 2007

The security update for September 2007 includes one update for Microsoft Windows, and one for MSN Messenger/Windows Live Messenger. Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for August, 2007 55


The security update for August 2007 includes five updates for Microsoft Windows, and two for Internet Explorer. Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for July, 2007

The security update for July 2007 includes three updates for Microsoft Windows, and one for .NET Framework. Microsoft Updates Malicious Software Removal Tool

Microsoft has updated the Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool to help remove specific, prevalent malicious software from computers that are running Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista or Windows XP. Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for May, 2007

The security update for May 2007 includes one update for Microsoft Windows and one for Internet Explorer. Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for April, 2007

The security update for April 2007 includes five updates for Microsoft Windows. Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for February, 2007

The security update for February 2007 includes seven updates for Microsoft Windows, and one update for Internet Explorer.

56


Microsoft Updates Malicious Software Removal Tool

Microsoft has updated the Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool to help remove specific, prevalent malicious software from computers that are running Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Microsoft Windows XP, or Microsoft Windows 2000. Microsoft Windows Security Bulletin Summary for December, 2006

The security update for December 2006 includes four fixes for Microsoft Windows, one for Internet Explorer and one for Outlook Express. Windows User State Migration Tool (USMT) version 3.0

Microsoft Windows User State Migration Tool (USMT) version 3.0 migrates user files and settings during deployments of Microsoft Windows XP and Windows Vista. You can use USMT to perform unattended migrations and to migrate files and settings for computers with multiple users. Also, with USMT you have the ability to encrypt and compress the store. USMT 3.0 is intended for administrators who are performing automated deployments. WindowsÂŽ Vistaâ&#x201E;˘ is Microsoft's next generation operating system, formerly known by its code-name Longhorn. Originally announced in 2001, and officially unveiled at Microsoft's 2003 developers' conference, Windows Vista faced numerous delays; with Microsoft scaling back some of its features in order to help get it out the door within the stated target of 2006. Windows Vista was released in November 2006 for business customers, and for consumers in January 2007. On this portal page you will find information about Windows Vista. Index: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) Troubleshooting Windows Vista Windows Vista How To's Microsoft Releases Internet Explorer 8 Release Candidate 1 27 January 2009, 20:30 GMT Yesterday Microsoft announced the release of Internet Explorer 8 Release Candidate 1 (RC1). This release is the first update sice the public Beta 2 release last August. Windows Vista Service Pack 2 Public Beta 13 December 2008, 14:05 GMT Early this month Microsoft released a Beta of Windows Vista Service Pack 2 via their Customer Preview 57


Program (CPP). The beta was released in five languages: English, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish. Update for Windows Vista (KB956774) 2 October 2008, 19:30 GMT Microsoft released an update for Windows Vista & Windows Vista x64 Edition to resolve the scenario where a Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS) client cannot handle files that have paths that contain the volume GUID in Windows Vista Service Pack 1. Update for Windows Vista (KB957055) 5 September 2008, 13:55 GMT Microsoft released an update for Windows Vista & Windows Vista x64 Edition to resolve a known application compatibility issue when using Real Networks Real Player11 with a Beta version of Internet Explorer 8 on Windows Vista Service Pack 1. Update for Windows Vista (KB951725) 5 September 2008, 13:55 GMT Microsoft released an update for Windows Vista & Windows Vista x64 Edition for Microsoft Management Console snap-in context Help topics. Update for Windows Vista (KB948473) 5 September 2008, 13:55 GMT Microsoft released an update for Windows Vista & Windows Vista x64 Edition to resolve an issue in which WHQL test does not finish successfully on a system that is running Windows Vista with multiple display adapters in a Linked Display Adapter configuration Update for Windows Vista (KB953026) 5 September 2008, 13:55 GMT Microsoft released an update for Windows Vista & Windows Vista x64 Edition to resolve an issue where Dxgkrnl.sys may crash your windows-based operating system. Update for Windows Vista (KB954708) 5 September 2008, 13:55 GMT Microsoft released an update for Windows Vista & Windows Vista x64 Edition to enable XMP metadata with complex data types to be stored using Windows Imaging Component. Microsoft to Launch Vista Ad Campaign 26 July 2008, 10:30 GMT Windows Vista may have been on the market for a good year and a half now, but Microsoft finally thought it would be necessary to launch a multi-million dollar ad campaign. The aim of this campaign is to remove doubts & misconceptions about the OS. Update for Windows Vista (KB950888) 24 July 2008, 12:50 GMT Microsoft released an update for Windows Vista & Windows Vista x64 Edition to resolve the issue in which users cannot create multiple Rights Management Services client sessions per user context. Update for Windows Vista (KB952664) 14 July 2008, 08:50 GMT Microsoft released an update for Windows Vista & Windows Vista x64 Edition to resolve the issue in 58


which the Crimson service stops responding when a remote subscription disconnects while a client is being delivered events. Update for Windows Vista (KB951072) 7 July 2008, 15:55 GMT Microsoft released an update for Windows Vista & Windows Vista x64 Edition to resolve an issue that is caused by revised daylight saving time laws in many countries Windows Vista Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) December 21, 2006 - 10:50 GMT Frequently asked questions and general information about Windows Vista. Slipstream Windows Vista Service Pack 1 12 May 2008, 17:25 GMT Slipstreaming a Service Pack, is the process to integrate the Service Pack into the installation so that with every new installation the Operating System and Service Pack are installed at the same time. Windows Vista: Which Edition Should You Get? November 10, 2006 - 16:30 GMT With the release of Windows Vista, Microsoft is offering users a choice of six product versions, not counting the 'special' versions for the European Union and Korea (the so-called N and K editions), so which version should you get? Other Windows Vista articles: Choose from dropdown list---------------------------------Windows NT Backup - Restore UtilityWhat's New in Windows Vista Service Pack 1Windows Vista UpdatesMicrosoft Releases Windows Vista Service Pack 1Microsoft Announces Windows Vista SP1 and Windows XP SP3 BetaVista Reliability, Compatibility and Performance UpdatesWindows Vista ReviewUpgrading To Windows VistaMicrosoft Offers Windows Vista Family DiscountMicrosoft Launches Windows Vista to ConsumersWindows Vista Service Pack 1?Windows Vista Ultimate, what's in it for you?Windows User State Migration Tool (USMT) version 3.0Microsoft Announces Windows Vista Hardware RequirementsWindows Vista Availability: January 2007Microsoft Unveils Windows Vista Product LineupWindows Vista's Least-privilege User Account (LUA)Microsoft Unveils Official Name for "Longhorn": Windows Vista If you can't find the Information you are looking for, you can post a message on our Support BBS. Please do not send questions by e-mail, they will go unanswered! We get many mails asking the same things, so that's one of the reasons we've set up the BBS. Read through the posts, and if you don't find an answer to your problem, post a message. This will benefit everyone in a similar situation (and while you are there, why not answer some of the questions you know the answer to!). Vista Home Premium (SP1) upgrade USA (USD $117.99) UK (GBP 65.53) Vista Business (SP1) upgrade USA (USD $187.89) UK (GBP 158.58) Vista Ultimate (SP1) upgrade USA (USD $185.99) UK (GBP 160.07) A Windows 97 TechFile I get messages from people having problems with Windows Explorer crashes on a regular basis. Mostly they go something like this: "When I right-click a file in Windows Explorer, I get a 59


message that Windows Explorer has encountered a problem and needs to close" or "When I try to browse through the folders on my computer, I receive an error message that Windows Explorer needs to close." In a lot of cases, these errors are caused by 3rd party shell extensions that are not functioning properly. These shell extensions are responsible for creating the options you'll see on the menu when you right-click a file using Windows Explorer. Some 3rd party applications will add their own "action" to this menu, and this can cause problems. If you look careful at the picture on the right, you'll see several non-standard additions to the right-click menu: "Send to Fax Recipient", "Scan with Norton Antivirus", "TextPad" and "Winzip". To try and find if a 3rd party shell extension is causing your Windows Explorer to crash on certain actions, you'll need to download this handy (and free) utility: ShelExView. It will let you view & disable shell extensions. After you downloaded & executed it, ShelExView will show all shell extensions installed on your system. You could sort the entries so that you'll have all non Microsoft shell extensions grouped together. Next, select all these non Microsoft shell extensions, and disable them. Try the sequence that would previously have resulted in Windows Explorer crashing (for example browsing a folder, or right-clicking a file). If no crash occurred, one of the shell extensions you disabled has been causing the crash. To find out which one, start enabling one shell extension at a time, each time testing to make sure you can still use Windows Explorer without it crashing, until you find the shell extension that would cause Windows Explorer to crash. ShelExView gives you all additional information you need to know such as the product & company name of the shell extension, as well as the version number. If you would like to continue using the software of the 3rd party whose shell extension is causing the Explorer crash, contact the company responsible, and check to see if there is an updated version of the software you are trying to use. Another cause of Windows Explorer crashes can also be attributed to the existence of viruses or spyware on the machine. To tackle this, start by running one or two on-line virus scans. I'd suggest the on-line scan from eTrust, Trend Micro's HouseCall, or the Online Scan from RAV. To combat any spyware that might lurk on your machine, I'd suggest the following programs: Microsoft Windows AntiSpyware (Beta), Lavasoft's Ad-Aware, Rose City Software's Spyware Medic, or Spybot's Search & Distroy. As with Anti-virus scanners, run at least two different ones, they will detect different things! If you need more help in fighting Spyware or Virus infections, start by reading these instructions on our WindowsBBS.com support forum, and post a message in the appropriate forum. If after following the advice above, you are still getting crashes when opening/using Windows Explorer, we need to do some advanced troubleshooting (Windows 2000/XP/2003 only). Please follow the following instructions carefully: Download and install the Debugging Tools for Windows from Microsoft Download our DebugWizard tool Extract the debugwiz.exe file, and place it anywhere on your system (the desktop will be fine) Click the Browse button next to the Dump file to be analyzed box Depending on the cause of the crash & how your system is setup, the dump file will most likely be located in \Windows\Minidump\. Do a search for *.dmp if that fails. Look for a date/time on the dump that corresponds with the latest crash. Select the most recent dump file, and click Generate Log When the Command Prompt window closes, you should be able to locate the debuglog.txt file in C:\ Go to Microsoft Support Services, and select an option to "open" a support request You can use the log file (debuglog.txt) generated to supply the needed information to start your support request Below I have listed a number of Microsoft Knowledge Base Articles dealing with Windows Explorer crashes: KB Art. # Title Applies to 188540 You receive an "Invalid page fault" error message when you try to view the 60


contents of a folder or its subfolders by using Thumbnail view in Windows Explorer Windows 98, Me, 2000, XP 192315 "All Folders" pane missing or Windows Explorer is blank Windows 95, 98 221085 Error Message Typing Address in Address Box or in Open Box Internet Explorer 4.x, 5.x 227152 Error Message: Explorer Caused an Invalid Page Fault in Pdm.dll Windows 98 Second Edition 257675 Windows Explorer May Hang When Viewing Images Internet Explorer 5.x 266320 Error Message When You Use Windows Explorer to Search for Files or Folders Windows 2000 289799 Desktop Is White and Error Message Reports a Windows Explorer Error in Browseui.dll Windows Me 293174 Error Message: Explorer Caused an Invalid Page Fault in Module Browseui.dll Windows 98, 98 SE 306599 Error Message: Error Loading Explorer.exe You Must Reinstall Windows Windows 98, 98 SE, Millennium Edition 317250 Access Violation in Windows Explorer When You View Printer Properties in Active Directory Windows 2000 320563 Windows Explorer Quits When You View Contents of My Computer Windows XP 322857 Windows Explorer Quits and Generates an Error Message When You Try to Map a Network Drive Windows 2000, XP 326612 "Explorer.exe Has Generated Errors and Will Be Closed By Windows" Error Message When You Try to Install Service Pack 3 Windows 2000 SP3 329692 Explorer.exe may generate an application error when you close a folder Windows XP SP1 555177 Windows XP halts on desktop when loading Windows Explorer, after upgrading to Service Pack 2 Windows XP 810891 Access Violation Occurs in Windows Explorer When the My Computer Window Is Refreshed Windows 2000 811266 You receive a "Windows Explorer has encountered a problem and needs to close" error message when you try to open My Network Places in Windows XP Windows XP 815240 Windows Explorer Stops Responding When You Try to Rotate a JPEG Image in Windows Picture and Fax Viewer Windows XP 817768 Windows Explorer Stops Responding When It Tries to Sort More Than 1 Million Objects on a RAID Controller Windows 2000 821403 Mipmapi.dll Error Message When You Point to "Send To" and Then Click "Mail Recipient" to Send a File in an E-mail Message Windows 2000, XP 824136 Error Message Occurs When File is Right-Clicked, or Problems Occur When Opening Certain Files in Autodesk or Discreet Products Windows 2000, XP 831938 My Computer and Windows Explorer unexpectedly quit when you try to open My Network Places or Shared Documents in Windows XP Windows XP 883791 Explorer.exe repeatedly quits unexpectedly in Windows XP Windows XP, XP SP1 925066 Windows Explorer may stop responding on a Windows XP-based client computer in a domain environment, and CPU usage is very high on the primary domain controller Windows XP Professional 930092 Windows Explorer stops responding on a Windows Vista-based computer when you try to open a file or a folder that resides on a Sony Ultra Portable universal serial bus drive Windows Vista 931702 Windows Explorer crashes when you try to remove the $WINDOWS.OLD folder from a computer that has been upgraded to Windows Vista Windows Vista Give your comments on this article. E-mail This Page Last Updated: April 3 2009 640-861 exams of Microsoft certification are very comprehensively providing guidelines for those individuals who want to enhance their evaluative capability for the advancement of information technology. 642-522 exams of Microsoft certification are very important for the propagation of the modern technology with the latest tools and applications to broaden the vision of IT professionals marvelously. XK0-002 exams o f Microsoft certification are very fantastic sources of developing the knowledge and understanding of IT professionals splendidly about the perfect manipulation of Linux operating systems with good prospects of the great career as excellent operator of Linux system. PMI001, project management professional is also very advantageous to boost up the outstanding 61


characteristics of IT professionals who want to get start their career as project manager in IT field. 70315 exams of Microsoft certification are very considerably providing the great opportunities of practicability for IT professionals who desire to be proficient in IT field.

Windows 7 Looks Good, but XP Migration Is Key John Fontana, Network World People who read this also read: People Who Like This Also Like Vista Service Pack 2 Now Ready for Download 24760800 Apple Cofounder Wozniak Claims CEO Jobs Is Healthy 24807222 Windows 7: I'm Rolling It Out Right Away 24609732 Windows 7 Prices May Be Announced in Mid-June 24678670 Office 2000 Nears End of Life 24781744 Windows 7: Already Slipping in the Polls? 24578070 Related Searches: windows upgrading windows 7 windows xp Related Terms: windows upgrading Windows 7 windows xp Find a Review Select Category Cell Phones Desktop PCs Cameras Hard Drives Monitors Notebooks Optical Drives Printers Projectors Sort By Rating Rating Date Performance Price Get Reviews Close Thursday, May 28, 2009 2:26 PM PDT Corporate migration to Windows 7 may be less about evaluating the new Microsoft operating system and more about how to properly gauge the correct time to get XP off client desktops. The equation corporate IT pros will have to figure out is how long it will take to get all their XP desktops to Windows 7 before XP support runs out or before application vendors quit producing XP versions of upgrades or new software, which some predict could come as early as 2012. Windows 7 is the shiny new operating system from Microsoft slated to arrive this fall to replace Windows Vista, which after 30 months has failed in the eyes of IT buyers. Windows 7 offers a host of tantalizing corporate features such as AppLocker, DirectAccess, Branch Cache and XP Mode, a virtualization 62


technology that should buy time for users who migrate but must hold on to key legacy applications. Gartner predicts that more than half of the corporate Windows userbase is skipping Vista and aiming at Windows 7.While that means XP users won't have to tangle with Vista in name, it doesn't mean they will avoid the application compatibility issues that gave Vista a black eye right out of the blocks in November 2006. Windows 7 is built on the Vista code base. "If you are on XP, Windows 7 isn't going to solve a lot of Vista's migration problems," says Brett Waldman, a research analyst for IDC. "Going from Vista to Windows 7 should be a much easier transition than XP to 7." Users who have deployed Vista have an easier path because Microsoft provides an upgrade option not available to XP users, and because they have already solved their application compatibility issues. Microsoft says nearly all applications that run on Vista will run on Windows 7 and early testing by users is beginning to validate that claim. In addition, hardware upgrades made for Vista are relevant for Windows 7 rollouts. While those rollouts won't be painless for Vista converts, it is those on the XP side who will have to tap into their planning and organizational skills. The XP equation The predominant migration questions among those coming off XP are "when" and "how." "What we are saying is that by the end of 2012 you should be off XP," says Michael Silver, vice president and research director at Gartner. With most large corporations taking 12 to 18 months to test and pilot a new operating system, the migration clock is ticking. "If I target the end of 2012 to get XP out then you have your migration window," he says. "Organizations really need to be poised to do a lot of migrations on new machines and some existing ones in 2011 and 2012. That will be the mainstream of the migrations." Silver says Gartner's recommendation is a conservative one that provides a 15-month buffer before XP support ends on April 8, 2014. Mainstream support for XP ended in April 2009, just a year after XP SP3 shipped. 63


Microsoft for its part told XP users last month (MAY) that if they are just starting to test Vista that they should switch to Windows 7. Silver recommends users in that boat switch only if it means less than a six-month delay in their current planning. "You don't want to lose momentum. If you have already done lots of testing or might be set to deploy you should continue with Vista," he says. "One of the big issues here is that Vista is a difficult decision politically at this point, but the folks that have migrated to Vista are generally happy." Hitching the migration horse to the Windows 7 wagon, however, doesn't mean users won't have to take along issues that polluted Vista acceptance. Applications that were not compatible with Vista won't work on Windows 7. The new XP Mode, available with professional, ultimate and enterprise editions, will give users a bit of a respite, but not a panacea. With both Windows 7 (the host operating system) and XP (guest) running on a single machine, users will be forced to maintain and patch two operating systems per desktop. Analysts such as IDC's Waldman and Gartner's Silver say it's a short-term solution. "To take full advantage of new enhancements in Windows 7, which is what users are paying for, the app needs to be built for Windows 7," Waldman says. He says XP Mode is likely a one- to two-year Band-Aid. Users are gearing up "XP Mode might be the way we get around the fact that some of our institutional apps are behind the technology curve; it could be the answer," says Jeff Allred, manager of network services at the Duke University Cancer Center. He said patch management tools will make it easier to manage two operating systems on a desktop and that XP Mode's administrative considerations are not a showstopper Allred is in the process of testing Windows 7, which he says is faster, more stable and seems leaner than Vista. "We are much happier with Windows 7 RC than Vista in its full shrink-wrap version," he says. He said a Vista migration would have meant upgrading 60% of his hardware, something he was not prepared to do. With Windows 7 and its 64


smaller footprint, the majority of his hardware is already compatible. The same is true for Wesley Stahler, senior system consultant at Ohio State University Medical Center, who is testing Windows 7 from an Asus Eee netbook. He says the medical center is just now beginning migration discussions to move off XP. "We have some clinical-based apps that work great on [Internet Explorer] 6, but on IE 8 [with Windows 7] not so much. Those are the thing we will have to look into," he says. He says XP Mode might help, but "as someone who has to maintain the environment I would prefer not to support two operating systems." Stahler says there are other features that are enticing or will help save money. "Right now we are using two different products to do what BitLocker can do, so we could save money and administrative headache," he says. BitLocker is a full-disk encryption feature introduced with Windows Vista and available in Windows 7. Microsoft's input For its part, Microsoft is offering its range of migration tools to help with a move to Windows 7. Microsoft also has added tools to its Windows Automated Installation Kit (WAIK), specifically to ease the management and deployment of Windows images. The Windows System Image Manager lets users do low-level customization of an operating system image. The tool works with System Center Configuration Manager, which adds an administrative UI that lets users replicate information across their network. Integration with System Center management tools supports rollouts that scale to enterprise deployments. Windows 7 also features updates to Microsoft's ImageX command-line tool, which lets users capture, modify and deploy Windows images. The tool is rolled into Configuration Manager and given a GUI interface. Deployment Image Servicing and Management also is part of WAIK and is 65


used to apply updates and drivers to Windows images. Microsoft also is updating its User State Migration Toolkit with a new feature for hard-link migration, which keeps desktop data on the machine during the operating system upgrade, cutting deployment time from hours to minutes. And the forthcoming Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) 2010 is an updated version of the Business Desktop Deployment Kit that shipped with Vista. It is now integrated with System Center Configuration Manager and builds off WAIK tools. Microsoft will release version 6.0 of its Application Compatibility Toolkit once Windows 7 ships. "The capability to centralize and bring into one admin console the ability to customize and deploy an [operating system] with applications and updates is where the Windows division with System Center is a great story," says Jeff Wettlaufer, senior technical product manger for System Center. Now the only other story left to tell is if Windows 7 will deliver on its promises By PC World Windows 7: Release Candidate Review 5/12/09, 21:40 GMT Last week Microsoft released Windows 7 Release Candidate to the general public to download & test. Microsoft: There will only be one Beta for Windows 7 2/13/09, 17:45 GMT At the end of January, in a posting to the Windows 7 Engineering Blog, Steven Sinofsky senior vice president for the Windows and Windows Live Engineering Group made it clear that Microsoft will only ship one Beta of Windows 7 before releasing a Release Candidate (RC). Windows 7: Beta 1 Review 2/07/09, 18:05 GMT With the first beta of Windows 7 available to the general public to download, I will take you through an overview of Windows 7. 66


Microsoft Announces Windows 7 Editions 2/03/09, 21:25 GMT Today Microsoft announced the SKU lineup of Windows 7, and while the company says it will focus mainly on two editions: Windows 7 Home Premium and Windows 7 Professional; Microsoft offers a total of six different Windows 7 versions. Microsoft Releases Internet Explorer 8 Release Candidate 1 1/27/09, 20:30 GMT Yesterday Microsoft announced the release of Internet Explorer 8 Release Candidate 1 (RC1). This release is the first update sice the public Beta 2 release last August. Windows 7: Public Beta Available 1/08/09, 13:40 GMT At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) last Wednesday, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer announced the beta release of Windows 7 (and Windows Server 2008 R2) to the public this week. Windows Vista Service Pack 2 Public Beta 12/13/08, 14:05 GMT Early this month Microsoft released a Beta of Windows Vista Service Pack 2 via their Customer Preview Program (CPP). The beta was released in five languages: English, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish. Windows 7: Public Beta Soon 12/12/08, 20:15 GMT There have been several reports that indicate that a public beta of Windows 7 would be available in early January. What's more, according to several sources (ZDNet's Ed Bott, Internet News.com Andy Patrizio and last week WinInfo's Paul Thurrott) Windows 7 will ship this summer (a June 2009 shipping date is being mentioned) - way earlier than Microsoft has (so far) indicated. Windows 7: The new Taskbar

67


11/28/08, 19:00 GMT Microsoft did a lot of work on the new taskbar for Windows 7. They looked extensively how people where using their computers and started making improvements based on those observations. Windows 7 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) 11/11/08, 09:25 GMT Frequently asked questions and general information about Windows 7 more headlines @ windows-97.com

Windows 95 is a consumer-oriented graphical user interface-based operating system. It was released on August 24, 1995 by Microsoft,[2] and was a significant progression from the company's previous Windows products. During development it was referred to as Windows 4.0 or by the internal codename Windows Chicago. Windows 95 was intended to integrate Microsoft's formerly separate MS-DOS and Windows products and includes an enhanced version of DOS, often referred to as MS-DOS 7.0. It features significant improvements over its predecessor, Windows 3.1, most visibly in the graphical user interface (GUI). There were also major changes made at lower levels of the operating system. In the marketplace, Windows 95 was a major success, and within a year or two of its release had become the most successful operating system ever produced. It also had the effect of driving other major players in the DOS-compatible operating system out of business, something which would later be used in court against Microsoft. Some three years after introduction, Windows 95 was succeeded by Windows 98. Contents [hide] 1 User interface 2 Technical improvements 2.1 Long file names 2.2 32-bit 3 Release 3.1 Beta 3.2 Final 4 Internet Explorer 5 Editions 6 System requirements 7 References 68


8 External links

[edit] User interface The basic elements of the interface introduced in Windows 95 -- including the taskbar, Start button and menu, and the Windows Explorer file manager -- remain fundamentally unchanged in later versions of Windows, such as Windows Server 2008 and Windows 7, more than a decade later. The word "Start" was dropped from the button in Windows Vista in 2006, with the company preferring to label the button with the Windows logo ("Start" is still present as a tooltip and in the classic GUI mode). When released for Windows 95, Internet Explorer 4.0 came with an optional shell update known as Windows Desktop Update that changed the user interface significantly. That update gave Windows 95 (and Windows NT 4.0) features that would become the graphical user interface of Windows 98.

[edit] Technical improvements Windows 95 included support for 255-character mixed-case long filenames and preemptively multitasked pseudo-protected-mode 32-bit applications. Whereas earlier versions of Windows are optional "DOS extending shells" requiring an MS-DOS or MS-DOS compatible operating system (usually sold separately). Windows 95 incorporated MS-DOS into a consolidated operating system, which was a significant marketing change. The release of Windows 95 also marked wider acceptance of Plug and Play standards on the IBM PC platform.

[edit] Long file names 32-bit File Access is necessary for the long file names feature introduced with Windows 95 through the use of the VFAT file system. It is available to both Windows programs and MS-DOS programs started from Windows (they have to be adapted slightly, since accessing long file names requires using larger pathname buffers and hence different system calls). Competing DOS-compatible operating systems released before Windows 95 cannot see these names. Using older versions of DOS utilities to manipulate files means that the long names are not visible and are lost if files are moved or renamed, as well as by the copy (but not the original), if the file is copied. During a Windows 95 automatic upgrade of an older Windows 3.1 system, DOS and third-party disk utilities which can destroy long file names are identified and made unavailable (Microsoft Anti-Virus for Windows indicated that the upgrade program was itself a computer virus). When Windows 95 is started in DOS mode, e.g. for running DOS programs, low-level access to disks is locked out. In case the need arises to depend on disk utilities that do not recognize long file names, such as MS-DOS 6.x's defrag utility, a program called LFNBACK for backup and restoration of long file names is provided on the CD-ROM. The program is in the \ADMIN\APPTOOLS\LFNBACK directory of the Windows 95 CD-ROM.

69


[edit] 32-bit Windows 95 followed Windows for Workgroups 3.11 with its lack of support for older, 16-bit x86 processors, thus requiring an Intel 80386 (or compatible). The introduction of 32-bit File Access in Windows for Workgroups 3.11 meant that 16-bit real mode MS-DOS is not used for managing the files while Windows is running, and the earlier introduction of the 32-bit Disk Access means that the PC BIOS is not used for managing hard disks. This essentially reduces MS-DOS to the role of a boot loader for the protected-mode Windows kernel. DOS can be used for running old-style drivers for compatibility, but Microsoft discourages using them, as this prevents proper multitasking and impairs system stability. Control Panel allows a user to see what MS-DOS components are used by the system; optimal performance is achieved when they are all bypassed. The Windows kernel uses MS-DOS style real-mode drivers in Safe Mode, which exists to allow a user to fix problems relating to loading native, protected-mode drivers.

[edit] Release [edit] Beta Several Windows 95 betas were released before the final launch. Build 58 introduced a Start menu prototype. It divided the functions of the Windows 95 Start menu up into three buttons. Future Chicago builds combined these three into the Start button still recognized today. Build 58 included a new File Manager, Chicago Explorer, which remained relatively unchanged in the initial version of Windows 95 and in Windows NT 4.0. Build 58 still included Program Manager as found in Windows 3.1, although this application was supplemented by the new desktop and taskbar/Start menu designs. This build also introduced shortcuts (Chicago referred to them as Links) and native right click functionality, which Windows 3.1 lacked. It also introduced long file name support. Prior to the official release, the American public was given a chance to preview Windows 95 in the Windows 95 Preview Program. For US$19.95, users were sent a set of 3½" floppy diskettes that would install Windows 95 either as an upgrade to Windows 3.1x or as a fresh install on a clean computer. Users who bought into the program were also given a free preview of The Microsoft Network (MSN), the online service that Microsoft launched with Windows 95. The preview versions expired in November 1995, after which the user would have to purchase their own copy of the final version of Windows 95.

[edit] Final Microsoft Windows 95 operating system cover shotWindows 95 was released with great fanfare, 70


including a commercial featuring the Rolling Stones song "Start Me Up" (a reference to the Start button).[3] It was widely reported that Microsoft paid the Rolling Stones between US$8 and US$14 million for the use of the song (from the 1981 album Tattoo You) in the '95 advertising campaign. According to sources at Microsoft, however, this was just a rumor spread by the Stones to increase their market value, and Microsoft actually paid a fraction of that amount.[4] A 30 minute promotional video, labeled a "cyber sitcom", featuring Jennifer Aniston and Matthew Perry, was also released to showcase the features of Windows 95. Microsoft's US$300 million dollar advertising campaign featured stories of people waiting in line outside stores to get a copy. In the UK, the largest computer chain PC World received a large number of oversized Windows 95 boxes, posters and point of sale material, and many branches opened at midnight to sell the first copies of the product, although these customers were far fewer in number than publicity had suggested.[citation needed] In the United States, the Empire State Building in New York City was lit to match the colors of the Windows logo. In Canada, a 300-foot banner was hung from the top of the CN Tower in Toronto. Copies of The Times were available for free in the United Kingdom where Microsoft paid for 1.5 million issues (twice the daily circulation at the time). The release included a number of "Fun Stuff" items on the CD, including music videos from Edie Brickell[5] and Weezer.

[edit] Internet Explorer Windows 95 originally shipped without Internet Explorer, and the default network installation did not install TCP/IP, the network protocol used on the Internet. At the release date of Windows 95, Internet Explorer 1.0 was available, but only in the Plus! add-on pack for Windows 95, which was a separate product. The Plus! Pack did not reach as many retail consumers as the operating system itself (it was mainly advertised for its add-ons such as themes and better disk compression) but was usually included in pre-installed (OEM) sales, and at the time of Windows 95 release, the web was being browsed mainly with a variety of early web browsers such as Netscape (promoted by products such as Internet in a Box). Windows 95 OEM Service Release 1 was the first release of Windows to include Internet Explorer (Codenamed O'Hare) with the OS, including version 2.0. While there was no uninstaller, it could be deleted easily if the user so desired. The included version switched to Internet Explorer 3 when it came out. The installation of Internet Explorer 4 on Windows 95 (or the OSR2.5 version preinstalled on a computer) gave Windows 95 active desktop and browser integration into Windows Explorer, known as the Windows Desktop Update. The CD version of the last release of Windows 95, OEM Service Release 2.5 (Version 4.00.950C), includes Internet Explorer 4, and installs it after Windows 95's initial setup and first boot is complete. Only the 4.x series of the browser contained the Windows Desktop Update features, so anyone wanting the new shell had to install IE4 with the desktop update before installing a newer 71


version of Internet Explorer. The last version of Internet Explorer supported on Windows 95 is Internet Explorer 5.5 which was released in 2000. Windows 95 shipped with Microsoft's own dial-up online service called The Microsoft Network.

[edit] Editions Release Version Release Date Internet Explorer USB Support FAT32 Support UDMA Support Windows 95 Retail 4.00.950[6] 1995 ✗[7] ✗ ✗ ✗ Windows 95 Retail SP1 4.00.950A 31 December 1995 2.0[8] ✗ ✗ ✗ OEM Service Release 1 4.00.950A 1996 2.0 ✗ ✗ ✗ OEM Service Release 2 4.00.950B (4.00.1111) 1996 3.0 ✗ ✓ ✓ OEM Service Release 2.1 4.00.950B (4.03.1212 or 4.03.1214[9]) 1996 3.0 ✓ ✓ ✓ OEM Service Release 2.5 4.00.950C (4.03.1214) 1997 4.0 ✓ ✓ ✓ While Windows 95 was originally sold as a shrink-wrapped product, later editions were provided only to computer OEMs for installation on new PCs. The term OEM Service Release is frequently abbreviated OSR, as in OSR1 or OSR2.1. Thus, for example, OSR1 was the OEM release that was identical to Windows 95 retail with Service Pack 1 applied (with the addition of Internet Explorer). In order to maintain compatibility with existing programs, Windows 95 has an internal version number of "4.00.950", regardless of the internal build number, thus reflecting Windows 95's alternative identity as "Windows 4.0" (similarly, the original edition of Windows 98 has an internal version number of Windows 4.10.1998.) Later versions are sometimes referred to by the trailing letter appended to this version string, such as Windows 95 B for OSR2 and OSR2.1. Windows 95 partially supports USB as of OSR 2.1, though it is disabled by default and is limited by driver availability.

[edit] System requirements Official system requirements were an Intel 80386 DX CPU of any speed, 4 MB of system RAM, and 50 MB of hard drive space. These minimal claims were made in order to maximize the available market of Windows 3.1 converts. This configuration was distinctly suboptimal for any productive use on anything but single tasking dedicated workstations due to the heavy reliance on virtual memory. Also, in some cases, if any networking or similar components were installed the system would refuse to boot with 4 megabytes of RAM. It was possible to run Windows 95 on a 386 SX but this led to even less acceptable performance due to its 16-bit external data bus. To achieve optimal performance, Microsoft recommends an Intel 80486 or compatible microprocessor with at least 8 MB of RAM.[10] Windows 95 was superseded by Windows 98 and could still be directly upgraded by both Windows 2000[11] and Windows Me. On 31 December 2001, Microsoft ended its support for Windows 95, making it an "obsolete" product according to the Microsoft Lifecycle Policy.[12] 72


Even though support for Windows 95 has ended, the software still remains in use on some home and school computers because of budget issues, a lack of knowledge or lack of desire to upgrade to newer editions of Windows. In addition, some video game enthusiasts choose to use Windows 95 for their legacy system to play old DOS games, although some other versions of Windows such as Windows 98 can also be used for this purpose. Windows 95 has been released on both floppy disks and on CD-ROM, as some computer systems at the time did not include a CD-ROM drive. The retail floppy disk version of Windows 95 came on 13 DMF formatted floppy disks, while OSR 2.1 doubled the floppy count to 26. Both versions exclude additional software that CD-ROM might have featured. Microsoft Plus! for Windows 95 was also available on floppy disks.

[edit] References ^ "Windows Life-Cycle Policy". Microsoft. http://www.microsoft.com/windows/lifecycle/default.mspx. Retrieved on 2006-09-02. ^ Washingtonpost.com: WashTech ^ Microsoft detractors were quick to point out that the second verse of Start Me Up begins "you make a grown man cry" (a line which is repeated throughout). The phrase subsequently featured as a humorous reference in many critical expositions of Windows 95. ^ Michael Gartenberg (2006-08-22). "The Story behind "Start Me Up" and Windows 95". Jupiter Research. http://weblogs.jupiterresearch.com/analysts/gartenberg/archives/016913.html. Retrieved on 2006-09-02. ^ "Good Times" release on release disk ^ This version of Windows 95 is sometimes called "950r6" because there were five prior release candidates of build 950. Release candidate 6 was the build that shipped in retail boxes. ^ Internet Explorer v1.0 was available with the additional purchase of Microsoft Plus!. ^ Microsoft Windows 95 Service Pack 1 CD-ROM Readme.txt File ^ How to Determine the Version of Windows 95/98/Me in Use ^ "Windows 95 Installation Requirements". Microsoft. http://www.support.microsoft.com/kb/138349/. Retrieved on 2006-08-07. ^ Windows 2000 Server ^ "Windows 95 Contact Support". Microsoft. 1 January 2002. http://www.microsoft.com/windows95/support/contact/default.asp. Retrieved on 2006-10-06. Windows 95: The hype and beyond, Guardian Unlimited With Windows 95's Debut, Microsoft Scales Heights of Hype, Washington Post Windows 95 Installation Requirements, Microsoft Windows 95 end of support date, Microsoft Description of Microsoft Windows 95 Service Pack 1 Components Description of Microsoft Windows 95 Service Pack 1 Updates Description of Windows 95 OEM Service Release 1 Availability of Universal Serial Bus Support in Windows 95 Implementing Windows 95 Updates Schulman, Andrew (1994). Unauthorized Windows 95: A Developer's Guide to Exploring the Foundations of Windows "Chicago". IDG Books. ISBN 1-56884-169-8 (paperback). 73


Microsoft Releases Internet Explorer 8 Release Candidate 1 27 January 2009, 20:30 GMT Yesterday Microsoft announced the release of Internet Explorer 8 Release Candidate 1 (RC1). This release is the first update sice the public Beta 2 release last August. Update for Windows XP (KB954708) 5 September 2008, 13:55 GMT Install this update to enable XMP metadata with complex data types to be stored using Windows Imaging Component.

74


Update for Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 (KB954086) 24 July 2008, 12:50 GMT Install this update to resolve an issue in which a Windows Media Center configuration that uses an analog TV broadcast without a set-top box, displays a protected content message when recording television shows. Update for Windows XP (KB951618) 7 July 2008, 16:50 GMT Install this update to resolve a known application compatibility issue with the Saming OneKey recovery software driver Safnt.sys. Update for Windows XP (KB953979) 4 July 2008, 17:35 GMT After you install Windows XP Service Pack 3 (SP3), Device Manager may not show any devices, and Network Connections may not show any network connections. Update for Windows XP (KB952155) 4 July 2008, 16:35 GMT Install this update to use new Terminal Services features on a computer that is running Windows XP Service Pack 2 connecting to computers that are running either Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008 operating systems. Update for Windows XP (KB952230) 4 July 2008, 16:30 GMT Install this update to display the Remote Desktop Connection 6.1 interface in multiple languages on systems using Windows XP Service Pack 2. Windows XP: No Reprieve - Phasing-out Starts June 30 28 June 2008, 09:45 GMT

75


Microsoft is to stop selling Windows XP on June 30, but many people are confused on what that actually means. What will happen after that date is that Microsoft will no longer be supplying the retail chain with (shrink-wrapped) copies of Windows XP. It will also stop supplying XP to the OEMs (Dell, HP and other manufacturers). Update for Windows XP (KB951978) 12 June 2008, 22:15 GMT Microsoft released an update to resolve resolve an issue in VBScript/JScript scripts from CScript\WScript hosts, certain built-ins may not function correctly when "Standards and Formats" in "Regional Settings" is changed. Update for Windows XP (KB953356) 12 June 2008, 22:15 GMT Microsoft released an update to install before you install Windows XP Service Pack 3 to prevent an issue in which your computer may restart continuously after you upgrade to SP3 on systems with nonIntel processors. Slipstreaming Windows XP Service Pack 3 and Create Bootable CD 15 May 2008, 05:50 GMT Slipstreaming a Service Pack, is the process to integrate the Service Pack into the installation so that with every new installation the Operating System and Service Pack are installed at the same time. Keep your Computer free from Viruses, Trojans, Spyware and other Malware May 11, 2006 - 12:50 GMT Surfing the Internet these days is a hazardous occupation, but a few simple precautions will keep your computer free from infection in an increasingly hostile environment. Troubleshooting Windows Explorer Errors March 14, 2005 - 15:25 GMT I get messages from people having problems with Windows Explorer crashes on a regular basis. In a lot of cases, these errors are caused by 3rd party shell extensions that are not functioning properly. 76


If your computer is part of a Workgroup, you will notice that a Shared Documents folder appears in My Computer. This folder lets you share files with multiple users easily. If you want to remove this folder you can: Start the Registry Editor Go to HKEY_CURRENT_USER \ Software \ Microsoft \ Windows \ CurrentVersion \ Policies \ Explorer \ Right-click an empty space in the right pane and select New > DWORD Value Name the new value NoSharedDocuments Double-click this new value, and enter 1 as its Value data Close the registry editor Log off, or restart Windows for the changes to take effect

To reverse this process, change the Value data to 0, or delete the NoSharedDocuments Value. Microsoft Announces Windows 7 Pricing - including exciting 50% pre-order discount! 6/25/09, 19:30 GMT Today Microsoft announced the Windows 7 Upgrade Option Program & Windows 7 Pricing, as well as the General Availability (GA) of Windows 7. Microsoft also announced an exciting 50% pre-order discount for Windows 7! Microsoft Releases Windows Vista Service Pack 2 5/28/09, 18:15 GMT This week Microsoft announced that it has released Vista Service Pack 2 (SP2) for download. Besides combining previously released updates, SP2 also contains a few small enhancements to Vista. Windows 7: Release Candidate Review 5/12/09, 21:40 GMT Last week Microsoft released Windows 7 Release Candidate to the general public to download & test. Microsoft: There will only be one Beta for Windows 7 2/13/09, 17:45 GMT At the end of January, in a posting to the Windows 7 Engineering Blog, Steven Sinofsky senior vice president for the Windows and Windows Live Engineering Group made it clear that Microsoft will only ship one Beta of Windows 7 before releasing a Release Candidate (RC). Windows 7: Beta 1 Review 2/07/09, 18:05 GMT With the first beta of Windows 7 available to the general public to download, I will take you through an overview of Windows 7. Microsoft Announces Windows 7 Editions 2/03/09, 21:25 GMT Today Microsoft announced the SKU lineup of Windows 7, and while the company says it will focus mainly on two editions: Windows 7 Home Premium and Windows 7 Professional; Microsoft offers a total of six different Windows 7 versions. 77


Microsoft Releases Internet Explorer 8 Release Candidate 1 1/27/09, 20:30 GMT Yesterday Microsoft announced the release of Internet Explorer 8 Release Candidate 1 (RC1). This release is the first update sice the public Beta 2 release last August. Windows 7: Public Beta Available 1/08/09, 13:40 GMT At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) last Wednesday, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer announced the beta release of Windows 7 (and Windows Server 2008 R2) to the public this week. Windows Vista Service Pack 2 Public Beta 12/13/08, 14:05 GMT Early this month Microsoft released a Beta of Windows Vista Service Pack 2 via their Customer Preview Program (CPP). The beta was released in five languages: English, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish. Windows 7: Public Beta Soon 12/12/08, 20:15 GMT There have been several reports that indicate that a public beta of Windows 7 would be available in early January. What's more, according to several sources (ZDNet's Ed Bott, Internet News.com Andy Patrizio and last week WinInfo's Paul Thurrott) Windows 7 will ship this summer (a June 2009 shipping date is being mentioned) - way earlier than Microsoft has (so far) indicated.

Windows XP FAQ Windows XP is the most important release of Windows since Windows 95. Here's the first--and most comprehensive--Windows XP FAQ anywhere, extensively updated with all-new information about the final, shipping version of Windows XP. UPDATE: This FAQ is now retired. Q: What is Windows XP? A: Technically, Windows XP is the next version of Windows 2000, but it is positioned as an upgrade for Windows 98, 98 SE, Millennium Edition (Me), 2000, and NT 4.0 users. It is based on the Windows Engine, an update to the Windows NT/2000 kernel. Q. What does XP stand for? A. "eXPerience". Microsoft likes to say that previous versions of Windows bundled applications, but that Windows XP bundles experiences. In other words, it enables end-to-end experiences with things such as digital photography, digital music, home networking, the Internet, and more. Q: So what the heck is "Whistler"? A: During its development, Windows XP was called "Whistler". Or, as noted succinctly by Craig Beilinson, the lead product manager for Windows, in early 2000, "Whistler is the code name for the next iteration of Windows." Q: What editions does Windows XP include? A: Windows XP ships in three edition, including Home Edition for consumers, Professional 78


Edition for business and power users, and a 64-bit version for Intel Itanium processor-based systems, called Windows XP 64-bit Edition. Read more about the 64-bit version in my showcase on the 64-bit editions of Windows XP and Windows .NET Server. Q: What's the difference between Windows XP Home Edition and Professional Edition? A: Windows XP Home is designed as an upgrade for Windows 9x/Me and therefore ships with the same type of consumer features found in Windows Me. The biggest difference is processor support: Windows XP Home will support only one processor, while Professional supports two. I have a full and detailed list available regarding the differences between the two editions available, however: Use this showcase to determine which version is for you. Q: How much will Windows XP cost? A: Windows XP Home Edition retails for $199.99, while the Home Upgrade version is $99.99. Windows XP Professional is $299.99, while the Pro Upgrade is $199.99. Windows XP 64-bit Edition is only made available with new Itanium workstations, and is not available separately. Q: Will I be able to upgrade Windows Me to Windows XP? What about Windows 95 and Windows 98? A: Windows XP is an upgrade for almost every 32-bit version of Windows; you will be able to upgrade Windows 98, 98 SE, and Me to Windows XP Home Edition or Professional. You will also be able to upgrade Windows 2000 Professional and Windows NT 4.0 Workstation to Windows XP Professional as well, but not to Home Edition. In case it isn't obvious, then, Windows 95 and Windows NT 3.51, or earlier, are not supported for upgrading, so you will need to buy a full version of Windows XP if you wish to upgrade your system. Also note that Windows 98, 98 SE, and Me users will be able to uninstall Windows XP if the upgrade doesn't work out for some reason. This capability will not be made available to Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000 upgraders. For more information about what upgrades what, please refer to my showcase, What to Expect from Windows XP. Q: This sounds cool. I want to know more about Windows XP! A: No problem: Read my exhaustive review of Windows XP Home Edition and Professional and the many Technology Showcases I've written! No one has written more about Windows XP. Q: I've heard that Windows XP includes a new user interface. Is this true? A: Yes. Though you will be able to use the same "classic" Explorer user interface found in Windows 95-Windows 2000, Windows XP also includes support for Visual Styles, an XMLbased "skinning" technology that will allow users to tailor the way their system looks in ways that were never before possible. Sadly, Windows XP only ships with only one Visual Style (called "Windows XP", go figure; it was code-named "Luna"), though that style will support various color 79


schemes as well. During the early beta of Windows XP, Microsoft shipped a style called "Professional" (later called "Watercolor") but this skin didn't test well with corporations, which was the intended audience. The "Windows XP" visual style can be adopted by applications that run under this OS as well; in Windows XP, both IE 6 and Windows Media Player 8 use the new look and feel. Q: I want more Visual Styles now! What can I do? A: I recommend the excellent WindowBlinds XP, which can be downloaded, in beta form, from the Stardock Web site. This excellent tool allows you to totally customize the Windows XP user interface. Q: Is Windows XP the same thing as the "Whistler" speech recognition software that Microsoft Research is working on? A: No. Microsoft has been working on a speech to text translator project dubbed Whistler, along with a speech recognition engine called "Whisper," for some time now. But don't be confused about this seemingly unrelated set of projects: They have nothing to do with each other per se. However, Windows XP does include speech technology; but that's not why this release is codenamed Whistler. Q: So why was Windows XP code-named Whistler? I thought Microsoft was using space names for their betas. A. They were ("Odyssey," "Neptune," "Mars") for a while, and before that they were using city names ("Chicago," "Detroit," "Memphis"). But now they've turned to mountain names: Whistler and Blackcomb are popular ski resorts a few hours from Seattle, located in British Columbia, and Longhorn, the next interim release, is a tavern at the base of Whistler mountain. However, the space names continue with other projects: The new Whistler user interface found in Windows XP was code-named "Luna." Q: Is Windows XP 64-bit, 32-bit, or a 16/32-bit system like Windows 98? A: Windows XP is based on the NT/2000 kernel and is therefore a full 32-bit system with no legacy deadwood. However, Windows XP is also available in a 64-bit version called Windows XP 64-bit Edition (find out more!). Q: When will Windows XP be released? A: Microsoft is planning to release all editions of Windows XP simultaneously on October 25, 2001. The products were finalized, or released to manufacturing (RTM), on August 24, 2001. Q: I read somewhere that Windows XP will feature a new feature to finally cure "DLL hell". Is this true? A: Yes. Back in the early days of Windows, before hard drives were even widely available, Microsoft introduced the concept of a shared code library called a "DLL" (Dynamic Link Library). The theory was that each program that needed certain snippets of code could get that code from a single location and thus save hard drive space. Over time, however, this became one of Windows' biggest weaknesses: Applications would "upgrade" these shared libraries with their 80


own copies, causing other applications or even Windows itself to fail. In Windows XP, applications will think they're copying their files as usual, but the OS will manage the process so that they don't actually overwrite any existing files. Then, each time the application is run, Windows XP will ensure that it only uses its copies of the files, ensuring that all apps run correctly and none of them are able to get in the way of other applications. Microsoft says that this feature will "isolate applications from each other, providing users with a 'run once, run forever' environment. Sounds good to me. So good, in fact, that I wrote up a Technology Showcase about this feature, which Microsoft internally calls Fusion. Q. Is there going to be a Plus! pack for Windows XP? A. Yes. Plus! for Windows XP includes enhancements in four key areas: digital media, games, screensavers, and themes. For digital media, Plus!XP includes the Plus! speaker enhancement, which provides better sound clarity and richness through desktop speakers; Plus! Personal DJ for easier custom playlist generation; Plus! Voice Command for Windows Media Player (WMP); Plus! CD Label Maker; various new WMP skins; new 3-D visualizations; and the Plus! MP3 Audio Converter for converting MP3 audio files to Windows Media Audio (WMA) format, which will save hard-disk space. New games include Russian Squares Plus! Edition, The Labyrinth Plus! Edition, and Hyperbowl Plus! Edition. New Plus! desktop themes take advantage of new XP features to create beautiful photos, screen savers, icons, sounds, pointers, WMP skins, and more. These themes include Plus! Aquarium, Plus! Space, Plus! Nature, and Plus! DaVinci. New screensavers include Plus! My Pictures, Plus! Robot Circus, Plus! Sand Pendulum, Plus! Mercury, and four other screensavers that correspond to the new desktop themes. Microsoft Plus! for Windows XP will retail for $39.99. For more information, read my review of Plus! for Windows XP. Q. Are there going to be new Power Toys for Windows XP? A. Yes. add features to the base OS; although some of them are too buggy or slow for daily use, they present an interesting look at how developers might create XP add-ins. The XP PowerToys consist of Faster User Switcher, Shell Audio Player, Task Switcher, IE Find Toolbar, Open Command Window Here, the ever-popular TweakUI, PowerToy Calculator, and Bulk Resize for Photos. Faster User Switcher lets you type WinKey+Q to bypass the Welcome screen and quickly switch to another logged-on user. Shell Audio Player adds an "Audio Player" toolbar to the XP taskbar and lets you play songs and playlists from the taskbar; the player is a great idea, but it loses its playlist every time you move or change it. The new Task Switcher replaces the standard ALT+TAB capability with a new version that sports thumbnails of each open window; unfortunately, this feature is particular slow. The IE Find Toolbar adds a new toolbar to Internet Explorer (IE) 6 called Find that visually resembles the Address Bar; the toolbar lets you search for text in the currently loaded document without opening a dialog box. Open Command Window Here adds a pop-up menu entry that lets you open command-line windows anywhere in the 81


shell. PowerToy Calculator is a graphing calculator that will be immediately familiar to anyone who used a Texas Instruments (TI) graphing calculator in school. Bulk Resize for Windows lets you resize a photo or group of photos directly from the shell; it does so in various standard sizes and without deleting the originals. The most interesting PowerToy is TweakUI, which is now a standalone executable instead of a Control Panel applet. TweakUI for Windows XP builds on the features from previous versions of TweakUI and adds new, much-needed XP-specific tasks. For example, you can disable those annoying XP balloon tips, turn off taskbar button grouping, and configure special shell folders such as CD Burning, My Music, My Pictures, and My Videos. Unfortunately, this release is very buggy and setting certain options resets and reorders desktop icons. For more information, please read my review of the Windows XP PowerToys. Q. When I upgraded from Windows 9x/Me to Windows XP, the C:\My Documents folder was emptied! What happened to all my documents!? A. Because Windows XP is a true multi-user system, each user has his or her own documents folder, located in a very specific directory structure. Check out C:\Documents and Settings: You should see a folder under there for each user. Under each user will be a folder called My Documents. Q. What happened to WINIPCFG.EXE? A. WINIPCFG.EXE is a GUI application in Windows 9x/Me that lets you check the status of your network connections. Because Windows XP was designed for networking from the ground up, however, and supports far more network connections, something a little more elegant was required. So Windows XP has two replacements for WINIPCFG.EXE. The first is ipconfig.exe, a command line application that supplies the same information, via text interface. The second is a much more elegant (GUI) interface that is individual to each network connection: Just right-click (or double-click) each network connectoid to make configuration changes and check their status Q. If I want to clean install Windows XP, do I need to create a boot diskette like I did with Windows 9x/Me? A. No. The Windows XP CD-ROM is bootable. Q. Will there be a Windows XP Resource Kit? A. Yes, though Microsoft is marketing it under a new name for some reason. The XP version is now called Administering Microsoft Windows XP Professional, Operations Guide. You can order it now from Amazon.com and other book stores. It will ship October 10, and the list price is approximately $70 US. Q: Has the final version of Windows XP been released? A: Yes, Windows XP was released to manufacturing (RTM) on Friday, August 24, 2001. Q: What's the final version number? 82


A: 5.10.2600 Q: When will beta testers get the final code? A: On Friday, August 24th, beta testers received final code of Home, Pro, and 64-bit Editions, each of which comes with a time limitation, 120 days for Home, and 180 days for Pro. These versions are 100% final code, and only differ from the OEM and retail code in the time limit. In late October, active beta testers will be able to choose a single boxed copy of either Home and Professional Edition. Q. When will MSDN Universal subscribers get the final code? And what editions will they get? A. MSDN Universal subscribers will be able to download Windows XP Home and Professional, OEM full versions, from Subscriber Downloads on September 21. It will also ship in the November CD shipments. Q: When will PCs with Windows XP ship? A: Probably in early October. Most PC makers say that they will start taking orders on XP-based PC SKUs in late September, and begin shipping systems in early October. Q: Where is your review of Windows XP? A: It's now available here. Q: How do I change drive letter assignments in Windows XP? A: Right click on My Computer and choose Manage. In the window that appears, click on Disk Management. Then right click any partition you want to reassign and choose Change Drive Letter and Path. You cannot change the drive letter of the boot or system partitions (typically C:). Q: Can I remove that "Evaluation Copy" text on the desktop from beta versions of Windows XP? A: Yes, but the cure is worse than the problem. See my Windows XP Tips 'N' Tricks page for more information. This text is not present in the release version of Windows XP. Q: I upgraded Windows Me/9x to Windows XP Beta 2 and I want to uninstall Windows XP and go back to my previous OS. How do I do this? A: Open the Start Menu, then Control Panel, and go to Add and Remove Programs. You will see an option to uninstall Windows XP. If you upgraded from Windows 2000 or Windows NT 4.0, there is no uninstall option, so you will need to do a full reinstall from scratch. Q: I have a DVD drive and heard that you could play DVDs in Windows XP. But when I load up Windows Media Player 8, it tells me that it cannot play DVDs. What gives? A: Windows XP doesn't ship out of the box with a DVD decoder, so you'll have to get one by installing another DVD player first or an add-on codec first. Usually, you get such a player from your PC maker, so this won't be an issue for most XP customers when the product ships this fall. In the meantime, you can install WinDVD or PowerDVD, and then Windows Media Player will be able to play DVDs in Windows XP. When Windows XP ships, you'll be able to buy one of 83


several low-cost ($10) DVD Encoder Packs for Windows XP from the Microsoft Web site. Q: I'm seeing a weird little toolbar when I hover the mouse over images on my Active Desktop. How do I turn that off? A: What you're seeing is the Internet Explorer 6 Image Toolbar. You can turn this off by opening IE 6 and then navigating to Tools, Internet Options. On the Advanced tab, uncheck Enable Image Toolbar under Multimedia. Q: I heard that Windows XP allowed button grouping in the taskbar, but I don't see this happening. How do I make the taskbar group buttons? A: It's working, but you don't have enough similar windows open for it to group them. Try open several Explorer windows, several IE 6 windows, and some other apps, all at the same time. They will group. You can control grouping in Taskbar Properties: Right-click the Taskbar and choose Properties. Then make sure the option Group Similar taskbar buttons is checked. Q: How come different users can't have different screen resolutions? I like the multi-user feature, but would like to set different resolutions for each user. A: Sorry, that's impossible in Windows XP. Each user must have the same resolution, though just about everything else is customizable on a user-by-user basis. Q: What's the deal with Windows Product Activation (WPA)? Is Microsoft trying to prevent me from installing my copy of Windows on more than one PC? Are they spying on me? No. I've written a lot about this technology for Windows 2000 Magazine UPDATE and WinInfo. Please refer to my articles, Clearing Up Some Windows XP Confusion, A Closer Look at Windows Product Activation and Microsoft Reveals Post-RTM Updates for Windows XP for more information. Since writing these, I've seen a lot of other Web sites and magazine try to grapple with this complex issue, and to this day, I have yet to see it described it as accurately or completely. Q: What happened to Lock Computer? In Windows 2000/NT 4, you hit CTRL+ALT+DEL to bring up a window that lets you choose this. In XP, this just brings up the Task Manager. A: Type WINKEY+L to lock the computer. Or, turn off the Welcome Screen to go back to the Windows 2000/NT 4 style of logging on (this will enable the Lock Computer option as well): To do this, open User Accounts in Control Panel and choose Change the way users log on and off. Then, uncheck Use the Welcome screen. Q: I heard that the new version of MSN Explorer will look like Windows XP. Is this true? A: No. MSN Explorer 6.1 looks almost exactly like the previous version of MSN Explorer. It features a collapsible My Stuff bar, new spell checking, and other features. You can download MSN Explorer 6.1 from the MSN Web site. Q: Every time I install an application in Windows XP, I get a little balloon help telling me that new programs are installed. The thing is, the little bugger never goes away! Is there an easy way to get rid of this? 84


A: Yes. Right-click the Start button, choose Properties, Customize, and then Advanced, and then uncheck Highlight newly installed applications. Q. Does Windows XP include IIS (Microsoft's Web server)? How do you it? A. Windows XP Professional and 64-bit Edition include IIS 5.1 (Home Edition does not). You can install it by placing your Windows XP CD-ROM in the drive and choosing "Install Additional Components" in the dialog that appears. You'll see IIS in the list. Q. What do I do if Windows XP doesn't include a driver for a particular piece of hardware? Should I try the Windows 98 driver? A. No. Normally, you should try the Windows 2000 driver first. Remember that Windows XP is simply the next version of Windows 2000. Q. How come Open GL games won't work in Windows XP? A. Open GL is supported through video card drivers, not the OS. Some Windows XP drivers do support this feature, but some don't. If yours doesn't, located the latest Windows 2000 driver for your card and install it. Quake 3 Arena and your other Open GL favorites should work once again. Q. Will my Windows 9x anti-virus software work in Windows XP? A. Probably not. But AV vendors are beginning to release Windows XP-compatible products, such as Norton Anti-Virus 2002. Other Windows 9x products that you shouldn't use in Windows XP include disk utilities and other low-level system utilities. But Windows XP will warn you about these applications during the upgrade process, or later, if you try to install them in Windows XP. Q. What file system does Windows XP support? Just FAT? Or does it support NTFS as well? A. Windows XP supports FAT/FAT16 (the legacy file system dating back to DOS), VFAT (from Windows 95), FAT32 (which debuted in Windows 95 OSR-2), and NTFS (the NT/2000 file system). You can choose which to use, and you can use different file systems on different partitions if you want. If you're upgrading to XP, you'll be asked if you want to upgrade your file system to NTFS. Incidentally, Windows XP includes NTFS version 3.1, which is newer than the version used in Windows 2000. This means that Windows 2000-era disk utilities--such as Diskeeper and Partition Magic 6--should not be used with Windows XP. If you want to use either of these applications, be sure you're using the latest, Windows XP-compatible version. Q. So which file system should I use? A. You should always use NTFS in Windows XP unless you are going to dual-boot a system with Windows 9x/Me and XP and wish to access your XP partition from the old 9x-based OS. Remember that Windows 9x/Me cannot access NTFS file systems. However... You can access NTFS partitions over a network. Q. I've heard that you can convert drives to NTFS when upgrading, but if I do this, can I still 85


uninstall XP and return to my previous Windows 9x/Me version? A. No. If you think you're going to want to uninstall XP, do not allow it to convert your drives during Setup. Instead, wait a few weeks and ensure that XP works on your system first, and then run the convert.exe command line tool to convert any FAT or FAT32 drives to NTFS, on the fly, without destroying any of your data. Q. I've heard that Windows XP will unleash a new wave of Internet-based Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. Is Windows XP insecure? A. No. As Microsoft likes to point out, Windows XP is its most secure operating system to date, thanks to features like Windows Driver Signing, System Restore, driver rollback, Internet Connection Firewall (ICF), and new privacy features in IE 6. However, there isn't much you can do about user error. Most compromised systems got that way because the user opened an unknown email attachment--unleashing a trojan or worm on the system. Q: OK, Windows XP is a huge upgrade for Windows 9x/Me users, but I'm happy with Windows 2000. Why would I want to upgrade? A. You might not want to, actually. But there are some pretty decent improvements in Windows XP that might make you change your mind: Remote Assistance, Remote Desktop, better laptop support, Windows Messenger-based audio and video conferencing, integrated digital media features, better compatibility with Windows 9x-based games, application, and hardware, and more. Windows XP is also more secure than Windows 2000, and more reliable. Q. Speaking of compatibility, how good is XP's hardware and software compatibility? A. In general, XP's compatibility is excellent. Microsoft reports that more than 90 percent of the Win2K/NT and Window Me/9x applications distributed in North America during the past 3 years will work fine with XP. And to iron out any remaining problems, Microsoft will deliver new updates through Windows Update. The company guarantees that virtually all new applications from major software retailers will be XP compatible. In addition, XP is compatible with more than 12,000 hardware devices out of the box, including the top 1000 best-selling devices. More than 300 devices have already received the new XP logo, which ensures a higher quality of driver compatibility and user experience. Microsoft tells me that the vast majority of Win2K drivers will work fine with XP, although some scanners, multifunction devices, video-capture cards, CDROM writers, and USB Web cameras might experience problems. The company is continuing to work with hardware vendors on these issues. Q. Windows 98 Plus! and Windows Me included a cool feature called Compressed Folders. Is there something similar in Windows XP? A. Yes, Windows XP ships with Compressed Folders, which provides a handy way to compress a file or group of files into a smaller compressed "ZIP" file. However, Compressed Folders is slow when working with numerous or large numbers of files. If you find this program to be a bit anemic, I recommend WinZIP 8.1, currently in beta. Q. The little animated dog in Windows XP Search is annoying, to say the least. How do I remove it? 86


A. When you click the Search button and the dog appears, choose Turn off animated character. You can also make Windows XP Search act like Windows 2000 Search (which I prefer, incidentally) by clicking Change Preferences, then Change files and folders search behavior; then choose Advanced. Q. What happened to Active Desktop? Is it still present in Windows XP? A. Yes, Active Desktop is still there, but Microsoft has hidden it so users don't need to manually turn it on and off. If you add any Web content--or a GIF or JPEG image--to your desktop, Windows XP will automatically enable Active Desktop. If you turn off these features, Windows XP will turn off Active Desktop as well, behind the scenes. Q. I want to do audio and video chatting with my friends who have MSN Messenger (I'm using Windows XP and Windows Messenger). How come it doesn't work? A. Microsoft needs to update MSN Messenger before you can exchange audio and video with those users. The company says they will release an update on October 25th to enable this compatibility. Q. Microsoft says that Windows XP will run with a Pentium II 233 and 64 MB of RAM. Is this realistic? A. No. I recommend a 500 MHz or faster Pentium III and 256 MB or more of RAM for Windows XP. Q. What are the other system requirements for Windows XP? A: Windows XP requires 1.5 GB of available drive space, SVGA (800 x 600) or higher resolution video adapter and monitor, a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive, and a keyboard and mouse. Q. I have two home computers. Will I have to buy two copies of Windows XP? A. Yes. Windows XP includes a technology called WPA (discussed above), which enforces a license Microsoft has been using for years (that is, you're supposed to buy one copy of Windows for each computer). However, there are ways in which you can minimize your costs. If you only need Home Edition, and you qualify for the upgrade version, buy two copies of that. Or use Microsoft's new Additional Family License (AFL) option to get 8 to 12 percent off the cost of the second installation. I'll have more information about the AFL when Microsoft makes an official pricing announcement. Q. I read that Windows XP includes a firewall. Is this true? A. Yes. Windows XP includes a firewall called Internet Connection Firewall (ICF), which can protect your home network against intrusion. It's a zero-configuration option, too: Just check a box and it's on. Note that ICF is inbound-only: It won't prevent you from sending out trojans and viruses if you're system is infected. To get more functionality than ICF provides, try a fullfeatured firewall such as ZoneAlarm. Q. How do I get America Online (AOL) working in Windows XP? A. AOL 6 is only "sort of" compatible with Windows XP, but the recently released AOL 7 works 87


just fine with XP. Q. How do I know if I qualify for an upgrade version of Windows XP? A. You must have a retail Windows 98, 98 SE, Millennium Edition (Me), NT 4.0, or 2000 CDROM, Full Version or Upgrade, to qualify for the Windows XP upgrade versions. Restore CDs from PC makers do not qualify. Q. Will Windows XP be as fast/responsive as my current version of Windows? A. Microsoft says that Windows XP performs 5 percent to 20 percent faster than Windows Me and Windows 9x and is on par with Win2K. "Windows XP gets faster as you use it, too," Kristian Gyorkos, an XP product manager, told me, "because of its dynamic, self-tuning features. Periodically, the application-launch, system-boot, and file-placement routines are optimized." Microsoft notes that Standby and Resume performance has also improved. Based on my own personal use, I can verify that XP seems to be on par with Windows 2000. I find it hard to believe that it outperforms 9x. However, Windows XP is much more secure, stable and reliable than Windows 9x, a more than acceptable trade-off in my opinion. Q. How do I network Windows XP with Windows 9x machines? A. Unlike Windows 9x/Me, Windows XP is secure, so you have to be logged on as a particular user--with specific rights--before you are granted network access. To make Windows 9x/Me work with Windows XP, then, you will need to ensure that the Windows 9x boxes are logged on with a user name and password that appears on the XP box. Then, you should have no problem sharing resources between the two machines. Q. Will Microsoft upgrade Windows XP now that it's finalized? A. Actually, yes, and quite often too. Since Microsoft released XP to manufacturing, the company has updated several system components, and users will be able to download these updates through Windows Update when XP becomes widely available. Microsoft will extensively update Windows Messenger, for example, to include compatibility with Exchange Server 2000. The company will update Windows Movie Maker (WMM) from version 1.1, which ships in the box with XP, to version 1.2. WMM 1.2 includes support for Windows Media Audio 8 (WMA 8) and Windows Media Video 8 (WMV 8) and will include a 640 x 480 WMV mode for digital video. To prevent system failures, Microsoft has hardened several system drivers since the Release Candidate 2 (RC2) release; previously, users could install these drivers even when XP warned them not to. Now XP will actually prevent the installation of known problem drivers. Q. Can I reboot into DOS with Windows XP? A. No. Windows XP is not based on DOS, as is Windows 9x. However, Windows XP does support a DOS-like command line environment, and you can run most DOS applications--and even many DOS games--in Windows XP. Windows XP also supports an optional boot-time command line environment called the Recover Console. As its name suggests, the Recovery Console is only designed to be used in the event 88


of a system problem. To enable it, insert your Windows XP CD-ROM and type D:\i386\winnt32.exe /cmdcons in a command line (assuming your CD drive is D:). Q. Can I dual-boot between Windows XP and a previous OS? A. Yes, but you will have to have two partitions (or hard drives) so that you can install XP separately from your other system (which can be DOS/Windows 3.1, Windows 9x/Me, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 2000). Windows XP will automatically set up a boot menu so you can choose which OS you want when the machine starts up or reboots. The boot menu is configurable by hand-editing the hidden file boot.ini, which you will find in the root of the C: drive. A better way to change the boot-up sequence, however, is to right-click My Computer, choose Properties, then Advanced, then click Settings under Startup and Recovery. Q. I like the new Welcome screen, but it doesn't give me the option to log on as Administrator. How can I do this? A: There are two ways to do this: First, you can use the "old" login screen, instead of the Welcome screen, as Administrator doesn't appear on the Welcome screen by default. To enable this, open User Accounts, choose Change the way users log on or off, and then uncheck Use the Welcome screen. Or, use the TweakUI for Windows XP Power Toy to add Administrator to the Welcome screen. This tool will not be available in final form, however, until XP ships in late October. Thanks to several readers who pointed out that you can also get the classic Windows 2000style logon to appear by pressing CTRL+ALT+DEL twice at the Welcome screen; this will allow you to logon as Administrator. Q. What happened to NetBEUI (an older Microsoft networking protocol)? My home network uses this. A. NetBEUI is no longer supported and I don't recommend using it: Go with the more powerful, and routable, TCP/IP protocol instead, which is the default in Windows XP. But if you must have NetBEUI, Microsoft made it available on the Windows XP CD-ROM as an optional install. It's in D:Valueadd\msft\net\netbeui by default. You add it by configuring a network adapter and choosing Properties, General, Install. Q. You seem unnaturally positive about Windows XP. Are you a Microsoft shill? How much is Microsoft paying you to write about Windows XP? A. I'm honestly very excited about Windows XP, and yes, it does come through in my writing about this OS. I come down hard on Microsoft when they deserve it, but there is precious little in Windows XP to complain about (aside, obviously, from Windows Product Activation). But I don't work for--or get paid by--Microsoft. Slipstreaming Windows XP with Service Pack 2 (SP2) It's been a while since I've covered slipstreaming, or combining, a service pack into Windows (link), but the release of Windows XP Service Pack with Advanced Security Technologies (hereafter referred to as 89


SP2) warrants some discussion. That's because XP SP2 is a huge change from the original shipping version of XP, offering as many new features and capabilities as a major new Windows version. For this reason, many people are going to want to install XP SP2 directly the next time they install Windows, and skip the time-consuming and potentially insecure step of installing the initial XP version first, and then applying SP2 after the fact.

But what, exactly, is slipstreaming, you ask? Back when Microsoft was developing Windows 2000, the company decided to create up a more elegant way of integrating service packs and other fixes back into the core OS, so that enterprise customers could always maintain an install set of the latest version of Windows, ready to be installed at any time on new machines. In the NT days, this process was convoluted at best, and service pack installs often required users to reinstall components that had previously been installed. It just wasn't elegant, but Windows 2000 fixed all that, and in XP the slipstreaming process is largely unchanged. For end users, slipstreaming can also be useful. For example, you can copy the installation directory from your XP CD-ROM to the hard drive, slipstream the XP SP2 files into that installation directory, and than write it back to a recordable CD, giving you a bootable copy of the XP setup disk that includes SP2 right out of the box (so to speak). That's the process we're going to examine here. And slipstreaming isn't limited to service packs, either: You can also slipstream in various product updates, including hotfixes. Previous to the release of SP2, I created a bootable XP CD that included the original "gold" version of XP, Service Pack 1a, and the Security Rollup 1 update, all meshed together into a single install. Now, I've tossed that CD aside for one that includes XP SP2 instead. Let's take a look at how I did this.

Main article: Development of Windows 7 Originally, a version of Windows codenamed Blackcomb was planned as the successor to Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. Major features were planned for Blackcomb, including an emphasis on searching and querying data and an advanced storage system named WinFS to enable such scenarios. However, an interim, minor release, codenamed "Longhorn" was announced for 2003, delaying the development of Blackcomb.[6] By the middle of 2003, however, Longhorn had acquired some of the features originally intended for Blackcomb. After three major viruses exploited flaws in Windows operating systems within a short time period in 2003, Microsoft changed its development priorities, putting some of Longhorn's major development work on hold while developing new service packs for Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. Development of Longhorn (Windows Vista) was also "reset", or delayed in September 2004. A number of features were cut from Longhorn.[7] Blackcomb was renamed Vienna in early 2006, [8] and again to Windows 7 in 2007.[9] In 2008, it was announced that Windows 7 would also be the official name of the operating system.[10][11]

90


The first external release to select Microsoft partners came in January 2008 with Milestone 1, build 6519.[12] At PDC 2008, Microsoft demonstrated Windows 7 with its reworked taskbar. Copies of Windows 7 build 6801 were distributed out at the end of the conference, but the demonstrated taskbar was disabled in this build. On December 27, 2008, Windows 7 Beta was leaked onto the Internet via BitTorrent.[13] According to a performance test by ZDNet,[14] Windows 7 Beta has beaten both Windows XP and Vista in several key areas, including boot and shut down time, working with files and loading documents; others, including PC Pro benchmarks for typical office activities and video-editing, remain identical to Vista and slower than XP.[15] On January 7, 2009, the 64-bit version of the Windows 7 Beta (build 7000) was leaked onto the web, with some torrents being infected with a trojan.[16][17] At CES 2009, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer announced the Windows 7 Beta, build 7000, had been made available for download to MSDN and TechNet subscribers in the format of an ISO image.[18] The Beta was to be publicly released January 9, 2009. Initially, Microsoft planned for the download to be made available to 2.5 million people on January 9. However, access to the downloads was delayed due to high traffic.[19] The download limit was also extended, initially until January 24, then again to February 10. People who did not complete downloading the beta had two extra days to complete the download. After February 12, unfinished downloads became unable to complete. Users can still obtain product keys from Microsoft to activate their copy of Windows 7 Beta. Users can still download Windows 7 via the Microsoft Connect program. The beta expires on August 1, 2009, with bihourly shutdowns starting July 1, 2009. The release candidate, build 7100, has been available for MSDN and TechNet subscribers and Connect Program participants since April 30 and is available to the general public as of May 5, 2009.[20] It has also been leaked onto the Internet via BitTorrent.[21] The release candidate is available in five languages and will expire on June 1, 2010, with bihourly shutdowns starting March 1, 2010.[22] According to Microsoft, the final release is planned in time for the 2009 holiday shopping season.[2] On June 2, 2009, Microsoft confirmed that Windows 7 will be released on October 22, 2009. The release of Windows 7 will coincide with the release of Windows Server 2008 R2. [23]

[edit] Goals Bill Gates, in an interview with Newsweek, suggested that the next version of Windows would "be more user-centric".[24] Gates later said that Windows 7 will also focus on performance improvements;[25] Steven Sinofsky later expanded on this point, explaining in the Engineering Windows 7 blog that the company was using a variety of new tracing tools to measure the performance of many areas of the operating system on an ongoing basis, to help locate inefficient code paths and to help prevent performance regressions.[26] Senior Vice President Bill Veghte stated that Windows Vista users migrating to Windows 7 would not find the kind of device compatibility issues they encountered migrating from Windows XP.[27] Speaking about Windows 7 on October 16, 2008, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer confirmed compatibility between Vista and Windows 7.[28] Ballmer also confirmed the relationship between Vista and Windows 7, 91


indicating that Windows 7 will be a refined version of Windows Vista.[28]

[edit] Features [edit] New and changed features Main article: Features new to Windows 7 The new Action Center which replaces Windows Security CenterWindows 7 includes a number of new features, such as advances in touch and handwriting recognition, support for virtual hard disks, improved performance on multi-core processors,[29][30][31][32] improved boot performance, and kernel improvements. Windows 7 adds support for systems using multiple heterogeneous graphics cards from different vendors (Heterogeneous Multi-adapter), a new version of Windows Media Center,[33] a Gadget for Windows Media Center, improved media features, the XPS Essentials Pack and Windows PowerShell being included, and a redesigned Calculator with multiline capabilities including Programmer and Statistics modes along with unit conversion. Many new items have been added to the Control Panel, including ClearType Text Tuner, Display Color Calibration Wizard, Gadgets, Recovery, Troubleshooting, Workspaces Center, Location and Other Sensors, Credential Manager, Biometric Devices, System Icons, and Display.[34] Windows Security Center has been renamed to Windows Action Center (Windows Health Center and Windows Solution Center in earlier builds) which encompasses both security and maintenance of the computer. The taskbar has seen the biggest visual changes, where the Quick Launch toolbar has been replaced with pinning applications to the taskbar. Buttons for pinned applications are integrated with the task buttons. These buttons also enable the Jump Lists feature to allow easy access to common tasks.[35] The revamped taskbar also allows the reordering of taskbar buttons. To the far right of the system clock is a small rectangular button that serves as the Show desktop icon. This button is part of the new feature in Windows 7 called Aero Peek. Hovering over this button makes all visible windows transparent for a quick look at the desktop.[36] In touch-enabled displays such as touch screens, tablet PCs etc, this button is slightly wider to accommodate being pressed with a finger.[37] Clicking this button minimizes all windows, and clicking it a second time restores them. Additionally, when a user drags a window to the edge of the screen, it will snap in place on that half of the screen. This allows users to snap documents or files on either side of the screen to compare them. There is also a feature that when a user pulls a window to the top of the screen, it automatically maximizes. When a user moves windows that are maximized, the system restores them automatically. This functionality is also accomplished with keyboard shortcuts. Holding down the Windows key and pressing the up arrow maximizes; pressing down the down arrow minimizes; pressing the left or right arrows snap the windows to the sides of the screen. Repeating the keyboard shortcuts generally restores the window's previous size. Unlike in Windows Vista, window borders and the taskbar do not turn opaque when a window is maximized with Windows Aero applied. Instead, they remain 92


transparent. For developers, Windows 7 includes a new networking API with support for building SOAP based web services in native code (as opposed to .NET based WCF web services),[38] new features to shorten application install times, reduced UAC prompts, simplified development of installation packages,[39] and improved globalization support through a new Extended Linguistic Services API.[40] At WinHEC 2008 Microsoft announced that color depths of 30-bit and 48-bit would be supported in Windows 7 along with the wide color gamut scRGB (which for HDMI 1.3 can be converted and output as xvYCC). The video modes supported in Windows 7 are 16-bit sRGB, 24-bit sRGB, 30-bit sRGB, 30-bit with extended color gamut sRGB, and 48-bit scRGB.[41][42] Microsoft is also implementing better support for Solid State Drives [43] and Windows 7 will be able to identify a Solid State Drive uniquely. Internet Spades, Internet Backgammon and Internet Checkers, which were removed from Windows Vista, were restored in Windows 7. Windows 7 will include Internet Explorer 8 and Windows Media Player 12. Wikinews has related news: Windows 7 will allow users to disable Internet Explorer Users will also be able to disable many more Windows components than was possible in Windows Vista. New additions to this list of components include Internet Explorer 8, Windows Media Player, Windows Media Center, Windows Search, and the Windows Gadget Platform.[44] Windows 7 includes 13 additional sound schemes, entitled Afternoon, Calligraphy, Characters, Cityscape, delta, Festival, Garden, Heritage, Landscape, Quirky, Raga, Savanna, and Sonata.[45] A new version of Virtual PC, Windows Virtual PC Beta is available for Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, and Ultimate editions.[46] It allows multiple Windows environments, including Windows XP Mode, to run on the same machine, requiring the use of Intel VT-x or AMD-V. Windows XP Mode runs Windows XP in a virtual machine and redirects displayed applications running in Windows XP to the Windows 7 desktop.[47] Furthermore Windows 7 supports to mount a virtual hard disk (VHD) as a normal data storage, and the bootloader delivered with Windows 7 can boot Windows system from VHD.[48] The Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) of Windows 7 is also enhanced to support real-time multimedia application including video playback and 3D games. That means the Direct X 10 can be used in a remote desktop environment. [49] The three application limit will be removed from Windows 7 Starter. [edit] Removed features Main article: Features removed from Windows 7 A number of capabilities and certain programs that were a part of Windows Vista are no longer present or have changed, resulting in the removal of certain functionality. Some notable Windows Vista features and components have been replaced or removed in Windows 7, including the classic Start Menu user interface, Windows Ultimate Extras, InkBall, and Windows Calendar. Windows Photo Gallery, Windows Movie Maker, and Windows Mail have been removed from Windows itself, but they are available in a separate package called Windows Live Essentials.

[edit] Antitrust regulatory attention 93


As with other Microsoft operating systems, Windows 7 is being studied by United States federal regulators who oversee the company's operations following the 2001 United States v. Microsoft settlement. According to status reports filed, the three-member panel began assessing prototypes of the new operating system in February 2008. Michael Gartenberg, an analyst at Jupiter Research said that, "[Microsoft's] challenge for Windows 7 will be how can they continue to add features that consumers will want that also don't run afoul of regulators."[50] In Europe, Windows 7 may be required to ship with rival browsers including possibly Mozilla Firefox, or Google Chrome. The reason for this suspicion is on the inclusion of Internet Explorer which is seen as harming competition, as in the European Union Microsoft competition case.[51] However, Microsoft announced on the Engineering Windows 7 blog that users will be able to turn off more features than in Windows Vista including Internet Explorer.[44]

[edit] Editions Main article: Windows 7 editions Windows 7 will be available in six different editions, but only Home Premium and Professional will be widely available at retail.[52] The other editions are focused at other markets, such as the developing world or enterprise use.[52] Each edition of Windows 7 will include all of the capabilities and features of the edition below it.[52][53][54][55][56] With the exception of Windows 7 Starter, all editions will support both 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86-64) processor architectures.[57] According to Microsoft, the features for all editions of Windows 7 will be stored on the machine, regardless of what edition is in use.[58] Users who wish to upgrade to an edition of Windows 7 with more features can then use Windows Anytime Upgrade to purchase the upgrade, and unlock the features of those editions.[53][58][59] Microsoft has not yet announced pricing information or volume licensing details for Windows 7.[59]

[edit] Hardware requirements Microsoft has published their minimum recommended specifications for a system running Windows 7 Release Candidate.[60][61] For the 32-bit version, these are much the same as those for premium editions of Vista, but they are considerably higher for the 64-bit version. Microsoft has released a beta version of an upgrade advisor that scans a computer to see if it is compatible with Windows 7. Minimum recommended hardware requirements for Windows 7[60] Architecture 32-bit 64-bit Processor speed 1 GHz processor Memory (RAM) 1 GB of RAM 2 GB of RAM Graphics card Support for DirectX 9 graphics device with 128MB of graphic memory (for Windows Aero) HDD free space 16 GB of available disk space 20 GB of available disk space Optical drive DVD-R/RW

94


95


96


In case you haven't heard, Microsoft's going to launch its new Windows 7 operating system (OS) this Fall. But 7's your lucky number today because we've got a sneak preview, a full upgrade to this stellar new OS for a ridiculously low price. That's right, you can pre-order the upgrade to Windows 7 now and save up to 50%. Windows 7 is much simpler to operate than Vista, and just as easy as XP Pro, except you've got an even cooler interface than Vista (which is pretty cool no matter how you slice it). Windows 7 also gives you more control over your computing experience. It provides a clean and uncluttered desktop, as well as more options than ever to customize and personalize your PC. ď&#x201A;ˇ

You can open files in just two (2) clicks!

ď&#x201A;ˇ

You'll browse faster in Windows 7 because it speeds up your common web tasks.

97


Windows 7 features simplified home networking and an easier wireless setup than Vista.

In fact, Windows 7 works the way you want. It's designed for faster start up, shut down, sleep & resume. Your laptops will run longer with Windows 7 because it improves battery life. Plus - and I know you're going to love this - Windows 7 allows fewer pop-ups and security alerts, which though essential, can be awfully frustrating when you're ready to work on a spreadsheet, writing e-mail, or watching a slideshow of your favorite photos. Now, we've given you a tiny snapshot of what Windows 7 brings to your computer and why it's an upgrade from Window Vista and XP Pro. Maybe you're saying, "So what? I'm doing just fine with Vista. All the kinks have been worked out. All my drivers work fine. I'm going to stick to what I've got." Okay, we'll be blunt. If you don't upgrade to Windows 7 you're going to get left in the dust. Because Windows 7's the coolest and most powerful new operating system ever! And we're offering you an upgrade at an insanely low price. However, we have many more reasons you need to upgrade to Windows 7 now. Like we said before, it's simpler and easier. But there's lots more: 

You can easily resize windows to maximize vertically. Or you can snap two documents side by side to compare content (I LOVE this feature, which is great when you're working with spreadsheets).

You can access your most frequent and frequently used files by simply rightclicking on a program icon on the Taskbar.

You're going to love this -- with Windows 7 web browsing is incredibly easy when you're working with the new Internet Explorer 8. 

You can run a visual search by typing a search request. You'll immediately see a list of search results and images while you're typing!

And your monitor changes on Web sites of interest.

Windows 7 is way, way cool! It's faster because it reduces the number of default services that start & run in the background, which enables your PC to start up and shot down faster. It goes into sleep mode faster because it writes less to disk. You've also got enhanced stability - you're not going to see many crashes and freezes that short circuit your work and fun while you're in midstream. Windows 7 even recovers data easier because it can automatically backup to your home and business network.

98


Okay, here's the big question that you have on the tip of your tongue. Compatibility? You might have had all kinds of problems with Vista compatibility, but built into the design of Windows 7 are key technologies that give it perfect compatibility with the same programs and devices you've been able to run on Vista. In other words, if an application or device runs on Windows Vista it should run on Windows 7. And here's some great news - if a your system runs on Windows Vista, it should run faster on Windows 7! You can download podcast on iTunes@ itunes.com See you in 2010!

99


Windows 97 2008/2009 Issue