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Brainport Eindhoven creating a HEALTHY FUTURE Highlights of the visit by Mr. Robert Bell, member of the jury and co-founder of the Intelligent Community Forum, to the Brainport region. 3 - 6 April 2011


“The developments in Brainport Eindhoven are unstoppable� Robert Bell, co-founder Intelligent Community Forum (ICF)


INTRODUCING THE BRAINPORT REGION In the Netherlands we find three cornerstones of the economy: Airport (Amsterdam), Seaport (Rotterdam) and Brainport (Eindhoven region). The first overseas radio transmissions, the video phone, the CD, the LED lamp, the world’s leading manufacturing systems for computer chips, innovative transport systems: all examples of inventions and applications from the Southeast Netherlands region that underline the region’s very deserving claim to its ‘Brainport’ status. It is a fitting name that puts the region on the global map as an area where the knowledge industry flourishes and prospers. Brainport is one of Europe’s formidable top technology regions, with the added distinction of being a top design region. Brainport has everything at its fingertips: from basic research to industrial manufacturing. More importantly, the prevailing culture is one of open innovation and close collaboration between multinationals and SMEs, knowledge institutions and government. This intertwined collaboration throughout the region is know as the Triple Helix collaboration. Being a top technology region it is important to focus on creating, attracting and retaining investment, capital and talent as keys to our future.

Critical Success Factors of Brainport Eindhoven:

Brainport Spearhead Sectors:

Intelligent Community Indicators:

Intelligent Community Success Factors:

• Successful collaboration • Favourable business climate • A fantastic place to live, work and enjoy life • Brainport 2020: a sustainable vision towards a great future

• High-tech systems and materials • Food • Automotive • Lifetec • Design

• Broadband connectivity • Knowledge workforce • Digital inclusion • Innovation • Marketing & support

• Collaboration • Leadership • Sustainability

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WHY BRAINPORT IS THE SMARTEST REGION IN THE WORLD International ‘benchmarks’ reveal the importance of operating quickly and decisively, in terms of both time and place, in an ever more dynamically competitive world. Our Dutch trump card is a combination of ‘smart’ and ‘strong’, due in part to a knowledge-intensive manufacturing industry, focal sectors high tech systems & materials, food, automotive, liftec and design, a high percentage of private research (33%), and broadly supported, results-focused cooperation between government, industry and knowledge and educational institutions whose aim is to make a tangible contribution to societal solutions to global problems.

Societal challenges The major societal themes of today have a significant impact on the competitiveness of our region: scarcity of raw materials, ageing, climate change, growing energy and food demand, congesting roads and strong international competition. The challenge of the the region is to find answers to these societal developments by strengthening the existing top clusters and looking for new, sustainable markets, of which there are plenty. Here solutions are created for global problems. Smart remote care, solar energy, electric cars and sustainable solutions for mobility issues along with led lighting are just a few examples. Technology, ICT and broadband allow us to innovate!! The aim: even further, smarter, smaller and faster. This means in with the new (technologies) and out with the old.

Healthcare becomes personal In healthcare we see the impact of ageing and a decline in rejuvenation (shortage of working people) on our caring society: more demand for care but fewer people to provide it. So you look for solutions in cost-saving and the use of technology to reorganise or innovate by thinking more up front in terms of solutions; from reactive to ‘predictive’ or even ‘preventive’ and ‘personal’. But this can only work if the person is central. Which prompts different questions, like “Can you empower people to live independently for longer because that is what they want?’’ or “How can we help older people maintain quality of life by giving them the opportunity to participate fully in society?” By taking these questions, you can then pursue the solutions. By making care more personal, emphasising extended empowerment and more patient autonomy, we can answer this demand and save costs at the same time. Technology provides part of the solution, but another important part is contained in finding the human scale. We have to involve the user in reforming care. This creates new markets for our top sectors, in this region we are good at making equipment smaller, smarter and faster. Like Philips and TU/e that develop products and services geared to themes like ‘smart diagnosis’, ‘smart intervention’ and ‘smart environment’.

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Smart and strong The region’s strategy is, in addition to focusing on existing top clusters, geared to the further development of several new clusters like smart mobility, smart materials, homecare, industrial design, solar energy, energy in the built environment and agro-food. Laying connections is vital to this: connections, between biology and psychology, between technology and design, between entrepreneurship and behavioural science, Companies compete but they also cooperate on innovations that lie at the edge of what is technically feasible. They gain strength from cooperation in open innovation. They can call on world-class universities, hospitals and research institutes. And on a well-educated labour force. This makes Brainporta place where companies and knowledge workers from the Netherlands and abroad want to locate, especially since they arrive in a green and welcoming environment... All contained in the DNA of our region. It is not without reason that Brainport has been selected by the Intelligent Community Forum (ICF) as one of the world’s smartest seven regions for the third year in succession.

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Brainport Region in 4 days


1 Brainport region 4 days 15 site visits 28 programme components 36 organisations and 105 handshakes!

From Sunday 3 April till Wednesday 6 April Robert Bell of the Intelligent Community Forum visited our region, a visit that in part will determine whether Brainport can call itself the world’s smartest region on 3 June. The theme for 2011 is Health in the Intelligent Community. In short, what does a ‘smart region’ do in the field of healthcare for the development of this region? In the past Brainport has done a lot in terms of development in this field. And those developments go even further, just think of Philips. This region uses an international network and increasingly more companies and knowledge workers know what Brainport has in store for them. One thing is crucial: to actually propagate all the success here in the region.

Yvonne van Mierlo, Deputy Mayor of the City of Helmond and board member of Brainport Eindhoven:

“It is an honour to be nominated as one of the seven smartest regions in the world because the competition is so intense: there are, after all, some 300 renowned regions competing. In recent years we have proven our status among the world’s elite. However, we do not take it for granted that we will be at the top table next time around. That keeps us alert and constantly motivated to perform.” It is the third year in a row that Brainport is among the world’s seven most intelligent communities. This booklet is a summary of Robert Bell’s four-day tour of the region.

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Smart House demo case During his visit, Robert Bell stays for three nights at the Smart House. This house displays a wide range of home automation and smart living, like a lit pathway to the bathroom, electric locks and one central control unit for everything. But this place is not just about the engineering, it’s about functionality! A place where everybody can learn about everyday things that already exist, things that you can even apply yourself to improve your life. The aim of the Smart Home foundation is to use technology to improve the quality of life for everyone, young and old, with or without limitations. Corien van Berlo, director of the foundation, gives a tour and explains that many different groups visit the house, from primary schoolchildren to care professionals. She describes the importance of allowing the ‘techies’ to experience for themselves the limitations of the target group for whom they design. She also elaborates about the organisation’s knowledge-sharing networks, its connections with Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) and the significance of international collaboration and research projects like ‘Ambient Assisted Living’.

Health Innovation in Brainport Peter Portheine, Programme Manager of Brainport Health Innovation tells Bell about the multi-year programme developed by the healthcare sector, knowledge institutions, industry and government to promote and underline the need for innovation at the interface of care and technology. Because how do you keep healthcare affordable and accessible for the increasingly critical client and patient? Brainport Health Innovation is cooperating with industry, government and knowledge institutions in the search for tangible answers that can already be developed and put into practice. Brainport also plays a key role here as a driving force, not only overseeing the interconnections but also encouraging and motivating the participants. Brainport Health Innovation is a connecting factor in this, aiming to help the participants to ultimately find each other.

Winner Health Innovation Award Nemo Healthcare Nemo Healthcare is a nice example of a company that has achieved a lot in a short space of time partly thanks to Brainport Health Innovation. NEMO Healthcare BV is a high-tech start-up, created from the results of the scientific cooperation between Eindhoven University of Technology and the Máxima Medical Centre in Veldhoven. In 2010 the company of Bas Lemmens won the Brainport Health Innovation Award that challenges health innovators to put their innovative ideas, products or methods in the limelight. It offers industry a stage.

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Lemmens developed a plaster for monitoring pregnancy through electrophysiological measurements. Nemo Healthcare is the kind of rapidly growing high-tech starter that the Brainport region is looking for. By providing a push to these potentials in which the region is rich, through the Brainport Health Innovation Award for example, new opportunities are created that ultimately benefit the same region.

Living Lab E-health Eindhoven The Eindhoven neighbourhood Doornakkers is home to the Dolmans family, a couple in their eighties. Innovative applications enable this couple to live independently at home together. For Mrs Dolmans there is an exercise coach that demonstrates the exercises via an online videolink, enthusing and correcting the participants. The same link sends her medical data through to Topsupport, the medical sports health centre of the St. Anna Hospital (Geldrop/Eindhoven). The Living Lab is a nice example of how technology can best be accepted in daily life. A positive side effect of the system is the social participation. Neighbourhood residents that participate in the Living Lab are more in touch with each other and that boosts the living experience in the neighbourhood.

Food for thought in Helmond In the wonderful Helmond castle there is a discussion on the Saturday evening on the topic of ‘Food for thought’ from all kinds of perspectives relating to food sustainability. By producing healthier food in the future many symptoms can be prevented or the chance of them occurring reduced, which will save money and relive pressure on the healthcare system. The developments concerning the Food Technology Park Brainport being realised in Helmond are also illuminated. Bavaria, the beer brewer, and the Elkerliek Hospital in Helmond sit at the same table. This provides a good example of how two completely different organisations can find each other and cooperate. Out-of-the-box thinking is essential for this to happen, and the Food Connection Point (FCP) has an important role to play in this development by bringing the various players together. From education to industry, with food the link.

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PSV uses technology to train young talent Day two starts at de Herdgang, the training complex of the Eindhoven soccer club PSV, the best performing Dutch soccer club of the past decade, with a total of seven national championships. PSV is also a highly respected club internationally, a reputation built partly on famous former players like Ronaldo, Romario, Ruud van Nistelrooy and Arjen Robben. An explanation by PSV’s exercise physiologist Luc van Agt and Inmotio’s Frans Lefeber makes it very clear that soccer is no longer just about kicking a ball between two goals. PSV uses a computer program to analyse the heart activity and physical performance of the players as well as to review tactics and soccer skills. The movement of the ball and position of the players is also linked to the system and everything can be recorded using transponders (transmitters), antennas, cameras and computer stations around the pitch. Thousands of data per second are sent to a computer and translated into figures, diagrams and images. “In this way we can show our players through facts and figures what they are doing well and what not,” Lefeber clarifies. Van Agt explains why PSV leads the field in this area. “PSV does not have the money that clubs like Chelsea, Barcelona and Manchester United have. So if you are not rich, you have to be smart. We therefore invest a lot in improving the training performance of both our seniors and juniors. After all, the future lies in our youth players.” The Eindhoven soccer club is a great place to promote technology. The soccer players, who are regarded as superstars, make technology sexy, something that would have been unthinkable a few years ago.

Playing for Success In the Philips Stadium Robert Bell is informed about the successful project Playing for Success. Teacher Rick van Rooij briefly explains to those present what the aim of the project is. “It is all about learning to connect with the challenging world of soccer for children who lack a bit of self-confidence. We try to give them just

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that extra bit of attention in a nice atmosphere to help them catch up a little. Soccer is a nice way of conveying both ICT and arithmetic skills. It is a great way also of putting technology more in the picture.”

Treated with Care, the ongoing learning path in healthcare education On the stadium’s first floor, which looks out onto the wonderful green pitch, lunch is scheduled along with the theme of Treated with Care in which care education in the region is prominent. Representatives from both ROC Eindhoven (MBO) and Fontys University of Applied Science (HBO) reveal how the education uses the technological knowledge in and around Eindhoven, with the students already being prepared for the ‘new care’. For instance, working with smart homes or with screen to screen links, all of which requires a completely different approach from new nursing staff. Although the future will see more remote care, those who actually require care at home will get it. “Then we will be there but only when necessary.” Themes like ageing and doing more with less money are also on the care education agenda in the region.

GGzE innovates with light and technology The GGzE (Mental Healthcare Eindhoven) on the Boschdijk in Eindhoven is also on the visit route. ICT is playing an increasingly important role in mental healthcare. By cooperating with regional partners GGzE is able to provide the help people need more and more ‘by remote’, for instance, using online video links in the Brainport region. Contact can be made much easier by the fast fibre-optic connections there are available, with smooth pictures and clear audio, person to person. This has added value in assessing and conveying emotions. In the field of stress and impulse regulation too, ICT is increasingly used at the GGzE. By giving patients the sense of control, the impulse bursts that can lead to aggression are, to a great extent, restricted or prevented and are measured using stress meters in the form of a watch.  In addition, GGzE offers clients  the possibility to decide on the colour of the light in a comfort room, which brings calm. GGzE works with ‘hands-on’ experts in order to better understand patients and more quickly get the problems under control. GGzE is a pioneer in this respect in the Netherlands.

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TU/e, a research spectrum for smart diagnosis and treatment The third day of Robert Bell’s four-day visit starts at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e). Roel Fonville of TU/e kicks off, stressing the important role of the Brainport region in getting technology and healthcare closer together. “These were miles apart but now people with health problems can stay at home for longer thanks to technology. The ‘quality of life’ is enhanced. And technology also helps us to combat the rising costs of healthcare.” After the introduction there is a visit to several robots produced through cooperation between industry and TU/e. Maarten Steinbuch of TU/e shows what is already possible using robots and what they can bring us in the future. Currently efforts are being concentrated on a robot that is not only self-learning but can also teach other robots anywhere in the world. “These robots will be able to take over household work in the future, and that is of particular benefit to people suffering from a physical handicap or restriction.” A less accessible but just as impressive robot is Sofie, who assists surgeons during very complex and precise keyhole surgery in the chest and abdomen. The current crop of operation robots does not allow the surgeon to ‘feel’ the force of his incision or how much he pulls on the stitching. These robots are also large and awkward to use. TU/e researcher Linda van den Bedem therefore developed a much more compact version that allows the surgeon to feel what he is doing through ‘force feedback’. Sofie’s size makes her less of an obstacle in the operating theatre. The robot is not on the floor but actually attached to the operating table itself, so it is not necessary to have to constantly readjust the robot when the operating table and patient are moved or tilted. Sofie also enables an organ to be approached from different angles and can even operate around corners. Sofie can be remotely controlled so the surgeon no longer needs to be in situ, and this is something that can be useful in thinly populated areas. After a tour of the robots comes a ‘lecture’ by the German Holger Gruell, who is researching cancer treatment at TU/e. In close cooperation with Philips a method has been developed to tackle the cancerous tumour alone using chemotherapy and thus leaving the rest of the body unaffected. Ultrasound heats up the tumour and the cytostatic, which is processed in a drug, is only released on the heated spot, which leaves the rest of the body untouched. This is a unique application that enhances the quality of life for cancer patients and is a nice example of the use of complex technology in ‘normal’ life. The final part of the programme at TU/e is a visit to the Industrial Design department where Bell is informed about several graduation projects, one of which enables the parents of premature babies to have contact with their babies in the incubators by remote control. This remote control vibrates at the moment that the baby in the incubator feels discomfort. By holding the remote control and ‘warming’ it, a signal is sent to the sheet

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High Tech Campus, open innovation hotspot in Southeast Netherlands

that contracts a little and makes the baby feel more comfortable. This allows the parents to give the baby a virtual cuddle and still be there for their child. Another project we will certainly hear more of is derived from the social medium Twitter, but one which is more user-friendly for older people. It is a ‘tablet’ and a pen that allows them to stay more in touch with each other.      

Holst Centre Holst Centre is an independent international research institute that develops technologies for Wireless Autonomous Sensor Systems and systems-on-foil, such as autonomous, super energy-efficient sensor systems for biomedical applications. Examples are the wireless ECG Necklace and the EEG system. After a short presentation Bell is given a tour of the building and is shown these two new developments that are currently the focus of much effort. The complete heart signal is subsequently read out via a mobile phone. ‘Open innovation’ is the key to cooperation at Holst Centre. By sharing the costs of research into the development of new technology among several parties, time-to-market is shortened and more knowledge is generated. Since the cooperation is pre-competitive, generic technologies are not threatened by competition among the participating parties. Within Holst Centre there is a culture of co-development. It is no coincidence that Holst Centre is located in the Brainport region. It appears to be easier to incorporate foreign personnel in the Brainport culture of codevelopment than to incorporate the Brainport culture in a different country. The research programmes undertaken by Holst Centre with global parties – from both industry and science – also include a lot of cooperation with regional partners, with SMEs very much involved. A special programme has even been developed for this sector, the Holst Centre Open SME. In short, all the knowledge that is available

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is used by Holst Centre, and size plays no role. Quality is always leading. The nice thing is that success almost always happens in the Brainport region. “It is with very good reason that we have chosen to locate here.”

Cytocentrics: Life Sciences start-up at the Incubator centre Beta at HTCE A short visit follows to Cytocentrics, a company that helps the pharmaceutical industry to more quickly develop new drugs. One of the compulsory tests of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA ) is to measure the efficacy on cultured animal cells that resemble human heart cells, testing efficacy and side effects. To date this has been a manual task, expensive and time-consuming. By using advanced chip technology the process is improved and automated so simpler, cheaper and qualitatively better for the user. The state-of-the-art solution is the CytoPatch™, a tool that automatically performs the patch clamp method. Open innovation is the key word here, too – using each other’s knowledge and being open to cooperation.

ASML, global excellence in chip manufacturing The third day ends at ASML, a leading global chip technology player whose income this year is expected to be five billion euros. At the Veldhoven-based company Bell is told how the chip machine manufacturer works with regional suppliers on new products and how they share responsibility in the development. The biggest challenge to ASML and its customers (chip manufacturers) is to get an increasing level of detail on the chips, so that they have more calculation or storage capacity at a lower level of energy consumption. With the development of machines like the TwinScan, ASML helps to get smarter, faster, smaller and cheaper chips on the market, which significantly boost the possibilities of high-tech systems in and around the field of care. ASML machines make around 80% of all the chips in the world. So the healthcare sector also depends to a large extent on the chip machine manufacturer. The faster the developments at ASML, the sooner healthcare can benefit. By continuing to innovate, and challenging suppliers to do so, keeps ASML a top world player. During the crisis ASML kept its R&D spending almost intact and did all it could to retain personnel. The result is that 2011 is the best year in the company’s history in terms of income. In short, a fantastic company that the region can be proud of.

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Philips Healthcare The final day of Robert Bell’s visit begins at Philips Healthcare in Best. In the Customer Visit Centre the jury member of the Intelligent Community Forum gets a short presentation about Philips Healthcare. This is followed by a guided tour. The Healthcare sector of Philips has grown to become one of the company’s core activities says Casper Garos, Senior Director of External Partnerships at Philips Healthcare. There is a good explanation for this development. The number of people worldwide in need of healthcare is growing exponentially. As is the Healthcare division (sector) of Philips, which currently employs more than three thousand people at the complex in Best, a third of whom are in the R&D department. Each year some 10% of the total revenue is spent by Philips on research and development of its Healthcare sector. Healthcare is changing significantly. People are getting older, care more expensive and the number of nursing staff falling. Technology can play a key role in solving these problems. New technological developments can help to reduce costs and risks, something Philips is also aware of. Philips is responding smartly to these developments. One of the prevalent healthcare themes that frequently occupies Philips is Image Guided Intervention. More and more operations can be performed without the need for major incisions. For example, a small incision in the groin allows instruments to be inserted into the body and using the very latest equipment specialists can carry out complex operations. The images replace what the eyes see, as it were. Garos: “In developing these new techniques we work a lot with companies in the Brainport region, without whom it would be difficult for us to succeed. It is great that we can select our partners from our own region!” Reflection with Robert Bell in De Gasterij, part of the WIN care complex (akkoord Henri Smits-WR) Following the tour, a visit to De Gasterij in Nuenen sees Bells reflecting with the Helmond city councillor for Economic Affairs, Yvonne van Mierlo, on his last four days. “Having read so much about the region, it was good to see the human side. The enthusiasm of the Brainport residents radiates all over me. You have a region to be rightly proud of.”

Helpt Elkander, pioneer in new kinds of care After lunch there is a tour of the new care homes of the Helpt Elkander housing association. The building was developed in close cooperation with the WIN (Wooninitiatief Nuenen) association. The homes offer a place for young adults with a physical and /or mental handicap. New technical devices enable them to live (partly) independently. Smart home technology and a live video link keep them in contact with nursing staff and family. These new technological developments help relieve pressure on the volunteers. Bell: “In terms of healthcare we in America can learn a lot from you.”

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Centre of Nuenen To finish there is a tour of Nuenen with the world famous painter Vincent van Gogh the focal point. In the seven years that he actively painted, Van Gogh spent two in Nuenen. A new Layar application on your smartphone means that you can have all kinds of information about Van Gogh at your disposal as you walk around the town. By pointing your smartphone’s camera at the surroundings, information appears about the respective area or building. This is Augmented Reality. The user gets more information about the surroundings that what he can observes by senses alone. Use is made of linking different sources of information to achieve this.

The jury visit ends in the Vincentre in the heart of Nuenen, with a scintillating performance by pupils of NXT Generation, which is in the First Lego League. The youngsters present a new application for healthcare: a cooling plaster for your neck after a heart attack. They have also programmed a robot as part of a social work placement. This is all to get young people enthusiastic about technology because these young people are the future.

Educational, impressive and inspiring Robert Bell looks back with satisfaction over the past four days.

“It was special, educational, occasionally impressive and certainly very inspiring to see how good the cooperation is in the Brainport region. Whoever wins, my compliments for all of those that contributed to this visit.”

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Maxime Verhagen, Deputy Prime Minister and head of the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture & Innovation supports the Brainport region’s candidacy:

“The Brainport Eindhoven Region is vital to the Dutch economy. This highly innovative European region is leading our country’s knowledge economy on a global level. As the Netherlands’ Minister for Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation, I fully support the region in the implementation of the Brainport 2020 vision and agenda. The successful outcome of this programme I consider to be a shared responsibility. I encourage the founders of the Intelligent Community Forum to challenge innovative regions in the world to learn, improve and develop their crucial role in the world economy.”

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Br o Co adb nn an ec d tiv ity Kn ow wo le rk dg fo e rc e Di gi ta lI nc lu si In on no va tio n M ar (re ket g in in ion g & te al A rn , n d at at voc io io a n a n a cy Co l) l, lla bo ra tio Le n ad er sh ip Su st ai na bi lit y Th em In e te H lli ea ge lt nt h i Co n t m he m un ity

Programme components & themes

Smart Home

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x

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Brainport Health Innovation

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Nemo Healthcare

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Living Lab eHealth

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Food for Thought

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PSV

x

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Playing for Succes

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Treated with care

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GGzE

x

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x

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TU/e

x

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holst centre

x

x

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x

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Cytocentrics

x

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x

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ASML

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Philips Healthcare

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Helpt Elkander

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Vincentre

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

NXT Generation

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Brainport, a European top technology region of some standing, stands at the axis of a network that stretches across the Southeast Netherlands and the country’s national borders. At its heart is the Eindhoven region. Together with Rotterdam (seaport) and Schiphol (airport), Brainport is one of the cornerstones of the Dutch economy. Focal sectors in Brainport are High Tech Systems & Materials, Food, Automotive, Lifetec and Design.

Industry, educational and knowledge institutions as well as government cooperate closely in the Triple Helix. This has resulted in a positive climate for business, not just for the large international companies but also for the small and medium-sized enterprise sector. And for the residents, too, this safeguards the climate in which they live and work.

Brainport Development N.V. De Admirant, Emmasingel 11, 5611 az Eindhoven P.O. Box 2181, 5600 cd Eindhoven p +31 (0)40 751 24 24 e info@brainportdevelopment.nl brainportdevelopment.nl brainport.nl

creating the industries of the future

Brainport Eindhoven, Creating a healthy future  

Highlights of the visit by Mr. Robert Bell, member of the jury and co-founder of the Intelligent Community Forum, to the Brainport region as...

Brainport Eindhoven, Creating a healthy future  

Highlights of the visit by Mr. Robert Bell, member of the jury and co-founder of the Intelligent Community Forum, to the Brainport region as...

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