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Wilson High School

Program of Studies 2012-2013

Studies


Wilson Senior High School

2601 Grandview Blvd. West Lawn, PA 19609 610-670-0180 <www.wilsonsd.org>

Administration High School Principal

George Fiore High School Assistant Principals

Matthew Bender Laura Shepler Patrick Sasse Jeffrey Ebert Counseling Department

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Alison Emkey, Counselor William Pors, Counselor Michael Piersol, Counselor Becky G. Kaag, Counselor Sabrina L. Andrieux, Counselor WVA+ Rebekah Marconi, Counselor Diane Arndt, Secretary Kelly Williams, Secretary

Wilson School District Mission Statement Education Excellence today for tomorrow by: Accentuating Rigor Building Relationships Creating Relevance The ABC’s of the 3 R’s.

Wilson High School Mission Statement

Wilson School District Administration Board of School Directors

Carol C. Reid– President Jay Nigrini–Vice President Dr. Steven Chmielewski Steve Ehrlich Jason B. Hopp George E. Mack- Treasurer Michael W. Martin Matt Wolf Superintendent

Thomas (Rudy) Ruth, Ed.D. Assistant Superintendent for Administration and Technology

Steve Gerhard, Ed. D. Director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Staff Development Supervisor of Secondary Special Education

Anne Douglas Director of Finance and Support Service

Diane Richards Public Information Director/Wilson Education Foundation Executive Director

Tracy Markle

We at Wilson High School, in partnership with families and community, encourage the development of students to become principlecentered, life-long learners. We offer a diverse and dynamic curriculum that supports the development of learning skills for success in an ever-changing global society. Wilson High School is accredited by the Middle States Association for the years 2010-2015. The Wilson School District complies with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and Public Law 90-202 which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or physical handicap.

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Introduction Selecting courses for the upcoming school year is an important decision-making process for students and families. The outcomes determine the academic opportunities and experiences a student will have at Wilson High School and create the foundation of knowledge from which the student can pursue future academic and career goals. It is the goal of the Wilson High School counselors and administrators, in conjunction with students and parents, to develop a schedule for each student that meets his or her educational needs and interests. Please read carefully the scheduling information in this Program of Studies booklet. Students who need individual help are encouraged to make an appointment with their counselor. The counseling office is open from 7:00 am to 3:30 pm daily. Students or parents requesting appointments should call 610-6700180, extension 1131. The teachers and administrators at Wilson High School will also offer assistance as needed. The Wilson Curriculum Academic subjects-English, social studies, mathematics, and science are offered at various instructional levels to accommodate individual differences with respect to learning, preferences, and educational background. Students should select the individual level within each discipline that affords the greatest opportunity for both intellectual challenge and academic success. It is important to review the course content prerequisites, credits, and instructional levels as indicated in the program of studies in order to make the appropriate course selections. Note: Some of the courses written in this catalog may not be offered every school year; it is dependent upon student request. Students should read very carefully the course requirements of the Academic Academy programs while selecting courses. The Academic Academies suggested course sequences are contained within the Academy pages of the Program of Studies. One of the outstanding features of Wilson High School is its philosophy of access, options and choice within the vast academic program. We are committed to providing an academic program that meets the needs of the individual student. With the assistance of the faculty and the counseling staff, Wilson High School students select from among the large number of distinct courses to develop a completely individualized program of study designed to address their personal, educational, and career needs and goals.

George Fiore Principal

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Table of Contents Policies Promotion/Graduation.......................................................................................................................6 Promotion Requirements for 2010-11 and 2001-12 School Years Credit Requirements for Senior Status ....................................................................................6 Credit Requirements for Junior Status ....................................................................................6 Graduation Requirements .................................................................................................................6 Credits ......................................................................................................................................... 6 Completion of a Culminating Project ......................................................................................... 6 Attainment of Academic Standards..............................................................................................7 Paths to Graduation ......................................................................................................................7 Keystone End of Course exams…………………………………………………………………7 Summer School Eligibility.................................................................................................................8 Course Selection Process ...................................................................................................................8 Schedule Change Procedure ..............................................................................................................9 Interim Reports .................................................................................................................................10 Mid-Term and Final Exam Policies ..................................................................................................10 Honor Roll Calculation .....................................................................................................................10 High Honor Roll ...............................................................................................................................10 Honor Roll ........................................................................................................................................10 Advanced Placement Program ..........................................................................................................10 Honors and AP Course Criteria.........................................................................................................11 Class Rank ........................................................................................................................................11 Valedictorian/Salutatorian Selection .................................................................................................12 National Honor Society.....................................................................................................................12 Courses Requiring Summer Assignments.........................................................................................13

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Guidelines for Exempting Courses ......................................................................................................13 Guidelines for Students Participating in Post-Secondary Education ...................................................15 Extracurricular Activity Eligibility Policy ...........................................................................................15 NCAA Rules and Regulations .............................................................................................................16 Berks Career & Technology Center .....................................................................................................16 Wilson High School Academies STEM Academy ……………………………………………………………………….…..……….. 19 Advanced Placement Academy ……………………………………………………….……………...20 Global Studies Academy……………………………………………………………………………...21 Wilson Virtual Academy ………..…………………………………………………………..………..22 Berks Career and Technology Academy………………………………………………………...…....23

Course Descriptions Art ........................................................................................................................................................24 Business ...............................................................................................................................................26 English and Reading.............................................................................................................................28 Family and Consumer Sciences ...........................................................................................................34 Mathematics .........................................................................................................................................36 Music....................................................................................................................................................39 Physical Education/Health & Driver Education ..................................................................................41 Science .................................................................................................................................................45 Social Studies.......................................................................................................................................49 Technology & Engineering Education……………………….............................................................60 World Languages .................................................................................................................................65 Virtual Course Offerings……………………………………………………………………………..70 Special Programs Junior Reserve Officers Training Courses ...........................................................................................72 School to Work.....................................................................................................................................73

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Policies Promotion/Graduation

• Promotion Requirements for 2012-13 School Year •

Credit Requirements for Senior Status

In order to be recognized as a senior and placed in the senior class, students must have accrued at least 17 credits by the end of July prior to their senior year. If the student has not accrued the credits specified above, he/she will be placed in a junior homeroom and deemed not aligned to graduate the following June. •

Credit Requirements for Junior Status

In order to be recognized as a junior and placed in a junior homeroom, students must have accrued at least 10 credits by the end of July prior to their junior year. If the student has not accrued the credits specified above, he/she will be placed in a sophomore homeroom.

• Graduation Requirements •

Credits

Students are required to earn 24 credits for graduation, class of 2015 will need 25*** credits for graduation. The following courses shall be included in the total credits required for graduation: 2012 – 13 Graduation Requirements* And 2013 – 14 Graduation Requirements**

Content Area English Social Studies Math Science Physical Education Health Electives Total Credits

Credits 4.0 4.0 4.0* 3.0 1.0 0.5 7.5 24.0

* Math from the 8th grade may be carried for credit only.

2014 – 15 Graduation Requirements***

Content Area English Social Studies Math Science Physical Education Health Electives Graduation Project Total Credits

Credits 4.0 4.0 4.0* 3.0 1.0 0.5 7.5 1.0 25.0

*** And **Students will need to score proficient on the Keystone end of course exam.

• Completion of a Culminating Project In order to graduate from Wilson High School, a student must complete a project in one or more areas of concentrated study under the guidance and direction of the high school faculty. This project is mandated under the State of Pennsylvania Chapter 4 regulations. According to the law, “The purpose of the culminating projects is to assure that students are able to apply, analyze, synthesize and evaluate information and communicate significant knowledge and understanding.”

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The purpose of the Wilson High School culminating or graduation project is to allow all students the opportunity to explore a career they might be interested in pursuing. Students may investigate this career in one of three ways: career research, community service, or a creative project. Each contains a series of steps the student must complete starting in ninth grade and continuing to twelfth grade. For in-depth information on the project, refer to Wilson High School’s Culminating Project handbook and the Wilson High school web site. Transfer Students

Any student who transfers into the Wilson School District will be responsible to complete a culminating project prior to his/her graduation. The requirements will remain the same for a student who transfers in as a sophomore or junior as that of a current sophomore or junior already in the district. If a student transfers in as a senior, special arrangements will be made with the culminating project coordinator to complete this state-mandated graduation requirement. If a student completes his/her culminating project at another school, the student will not be responsible to complete another project at Wilson. However, a student may still need to complete a project in order to receive honor of distinction at graduation for any of the academy requirements. • Attainment of Academic Standard According to Wilson School District graduation policy (#217), besides the completion of the grades nine through twelve instructional program and a culminating project, the students graduating in 2003 and thereafter must demonstrate the attainment of academic standards in reading, writing, and mathematics at the “Proficient” level on local or State assessments. • Paths to Graduation for All Students: 1. A student who scores at the proficient level on the 11th grade PSSA math, reading and writing assessments, and passes all courses with 24.0 credits, and successfully completes a culminating project, will graduate in June of their senior year. 2. A high school student who has not met Pennsylvania standards as determined by Wilson School District in any of the four assessed areas (mathematics, reading, writing, science) must remediate in all deficient areas to graduate. The methods of remediation for individual subject areas will be specified by administration and may result in student electives being specified or eliminated in order to meet graduation requirements. 3. Any junior who has not scored proficient on the PSSA will be required to take the PSSA retest in his/her senior year. • Keystone End of Course Exams The Keystone Exams are end-of-course assessments designed to assess proficiency in the subject areas of Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Literature, English Composition, Biology, Chemistry, U.S. History, World History, and Civics and Government. •

The exams are one component of Pennsylvania’s high school graduation requirements beginning for the graduating class of 2014-2015. However the class of 2013-2014 will be required to take the Algebra I, Biology, and Literature exams if they are currently enrolled in these classes.

The exams are taken near the end of course completion that counts for at least one-third of the final course grade or, based upon School Board approval a proficient or higher, beginning with the class of 2014-2015. The exams are comprised of two (2) modules one Multiple-Choice (MC) and one Constructed-Response (CR) items.

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Students in the graduating classes of 2015 and 2016 must demonstrate proficiency in: English Composition; Literature; Algebra I; and Biology. A student who does not score proficient on a Keystone Exam after two attempts will be eligible to complete a project-based assessment.

Students in the graduating classes of 2016 and 2017 and beyond must demonstrate proficiency on six of the ten Keystone exams in the following areas: *Proficient on the (2) Literature and English Composition Keystone Exams *Proficient on (2) of the following (3) math areas: Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry *Proficient on (1) of the following (2) science areas: Biology, or Chemistry *Proficient on (1) of the following (3) social studies areas: U.S. History, World History, and Civics and Government

Summer School Eligibility A student who has failed a course in math, English, science, social studies, health, or physical education but attained a year-long average of at least 50% in the course is eligible to make up the credit during a five-week long summer school program held at Wilson High School. The student's summer school grade, when averaged with his/her year-long average in the course, must be 60% or greater. Students attaining this required average will have a grade of 60% recorded on their transcripts.

The Course Selection Process The interest, effort, and work ethic of the student all have a significant bearing on academic performance in a class such as English, mathematics, social studies, science, and world languages. In academic areas, students will be assigned to the class in which the professional staff feels they can best succeed and maximize their potential. All students have the opportunity to select courses based on individual abilities, interest, talents, and career goals. The guidance department and the administration reserve the right to change a student’s schedule based on the student’s past academic performance and standardized testing results and to accommodate the needs of the student body. NOTE: Course offerings are always subject to enrollment number and board approval of the school budget. 1. Students select their courses and note them on the course selection sheet. Generally speaking, courses may be taken only one year for credit. Exceptions are noted. 2. Teachers will initial their recommendations of the courses students select. 3. Each student must select 6 majors (minimum) and physical education. 4. Each student will be expected to maintain a minimum of 6 credits throughout the school year. 5. Parents and students are encouraged to discuss course selections prior to the students’ scheduling courses with their counselors. 6. Counselors will meet with students to review course selection, course prerequisites, course load, Wilson High School

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graduation requirements, and students’ career educational goals. 7. Scheduling conflicts may prohibit placement in electives. Counselors will ask students to identify an alternate elective which will be substituted for a conflicting course. 8. Requests for changes in course selection must be made during the "drop/add" time frame from September 4, 2012 to September 14, 2012 based upon course availability. The completed course request represents final course selection and requests for changes will not be honored except as outlined in the next section.

SCHEDULE CHANGE PROCEDURES We expect students to retain the program of studies they selected with the advice and consent of their parents, teachers, and counselors. There are, however, circumstances which arise that necessitate a change in the course selected. When valid reason is presented and the principal or assistant principal, teacher, counselor, parent, and student agree, adjustments may be made. Valid Reasons for Schedule Change 1. Scheduling error - The counselors will make these changes as soon as possible at the beginning of the school year. 2. Resolution of insufficient credits for graduation - The counselors will make these changes as soon as possible during the summer or at the beginning of the school year. 3. In the case of English, Math, Science, Social Studies, and Foreign Language courses, the following guidelines will apply: If the student is not meeting success at the level of understanding that the course requires, the counselor will make the change only after: A student meets with counselor to obtain a Course Change Request Form. The student is then responsible to gather information using the guidelines provided on this form for the class change procedure. This information includes: * A written request and reason for the class change from the student and written approval from a parent. * Written notification from the teacher documenting the student’s efforts to pass the course (these efforts must include homework completion, test retakes, and tutoring), as well as the teacher’s recommendation for the change. * Written approval for the change from the principal or grade level principal will be the final requirement above all other requirements. 4. Requests for elective course changes must be made during the 2 week "drop/add" time frame from September 4, 2012 to September 14, 2012 based upon course availability. In order to preserve the continuity of the student’s education, multiple schedule change requests will not be granted. Electives can be added only if they meet during the same period as the elective to be dropped. Grading Policy with Regard to Schedule Changes * Students will not receive any grade whatsoever for courses that were deleted as a result of scheduling error or successful completion of summer school work. * Students withdrawing from a course with parent, teacher, and department supervisor/chair approval will receive a grade of R for the course. In cases where students move from one level of a course to another level of the same course, the grades will be transferred. * Students withdrawing from a course without parent, teacher, and department supervisor/chair recommendation will receive a grade of 0% for the course. Wilson High School

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Interim Reports/ Report Cards Interim reports and quarterly report cards will be available through the Home Access Center and sent home only by request to all parents at mid-marking period and the end of the quarter. The interim report will state the student’s current grade and may comment on his/her progress. In addition, parents can check their students’ grades by accessing the Home Access Center found on the district’s website. The final report card for the year will be sent to the home address.

Mid-term and Final Exam Policies High school seniors are not exempt from mid-term exams but can be exempt from a final exam if they have achieved a 90% average in a course only if it is not a class requiring a Keystone exam. A grade average for a student exempt from taking a final exam will be calculated by averaging the four quarter grades plus the mid-term grade. Raw scores will be used for this calculation. The exception to the above procedures involves students enrolled in courses considered semester courses. A student is exempt at midterm if he/she has achieved a 90% in both quarters. Requests to take mid-term or final exams before the scheduled date will not be granted. Allowing students to take exams prior to the scheduled date will compromise the integrity of the exam. Students who are absent from school and miss a mid-term must make arrangements with the teacher to make up the test. IMPORTANT: Students who are absent during final exams must make up those exams prior to June 30 on specified dates announced by the high school. Make-up final exams will be proctored and graded by the subject area department head or his/her designee; the cost of these services must be assumed by the students’ parents/guardians. Please refer to the school calendar and note potential snow make-up days when planning vacations and make every effort to take final exams at the times they are administered. Please review Board policy #204 regarding attendance during mid-term and final exams.

Honor Roll Calculation Honor roll will be calculated using the chart of weighted averages and credit value of the course, as seen on Page 11.

High Honor Roll In order for a student to achieve high honor roll status, he/she must attain a grade average of at least 93% with no individual grade being lower than 85% in all major subjects. Individual grades of 70% or higher must be achieved in all special subjects.

Honor Roll In order for a student to achieve honor roll status, he/she must attain a grade average of at least 85% with no individual grade being lower than 75% in all major subjects. Individual grades of 70% or higher must be achieved in all special subjects. (See Class Rank.)

Advanced Placement Program The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program (AP) is an opportunity for students to pursue Wilson High School

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college-level studies while still in high school. Through this program they may earn credit, advanced placement, or both for college. By challenging and stimulating students, the AP Program provides access to high quality education, accelerates learning, rewards achievement, and enhances both high school and college programs. Wilson High School is committed to the Advanced Placement Program. Wilson teachers are well prepared to teach Advanced Placement courses, having attended summer courses that prepared them for teaching specific subject areas. AP exams are an integral part of an AP course. The exam grade provides an important payoff to students in terms of college credit and advanced placement. Exam results from all AP students also give AP teachers and administrators important feedback on the strengths and weaknesses of their courses. Students at Wilson High School who enroll in AP courses will have two options with regard to the end-of-the-year national AP exam. 1) The student elects to register for, pay for, and take the national AP exam. The student who selects this option will receive the AP designation on the student’s transcripts and weighting for the course in calculating GPA. Students must elect this and pay in full by the designated date in October, 2011. 2) The student elects not to take the end of the year national AP exam. The student who selects this option will receive the honors designation on the student’s transcripts and weighting for the course in calculating GPA. We believe that true college preparatory students should challenge themselves with at least one AP course during high school. Please note that grade weights for honors and AP courses are listed on the next page. It is important to note, however, that the raw score, not the weighted score, appears on the student’s report card. Weighting is configured into the student’s GPA at the end of every semester, but the student’s GPA only appears on the report card at the end of the year.

Honors and AP Course Criteria Enrollment in all Honors and Advanced Placement Courses will be based upon the recommendation of the student’s current teacher in the same subject area. If a student is not recommended by the area teacher to take an Honors or Advanced Placement course, he or she may still enroll in the desired course, with the following stipulations: 1. The student and parents/guardians must sign a form (available from the student’s counselor) acknowledging that the course is being taken without the endorsement of the school. By signing the form, the student promises to complete the required summer assignments and remain committed to the Honors or Advanced Placement course for the entire year (see Schedule Change Procedures, p. 8). 2. Students who enroll in Honors or Advanced Placement courses which require completion of summer assignments and who fail to complete those assignments must remain in the enrolled course.

Class Rank For the purposes of class ranking, which begins in the student’s 9th grade year, each student receives an overall numeric average which includes all courses attempted. A student moving into the Wilson School District becomes eligible for class ranking only after he or she has been a student in the District for 91 days, or more than one semester. The numeric average for class rank is adjusted for weighted courses (honors and AP) as follows: Wilson High School

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Raw Score

Honors 1.1

AP 1.17

100 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92 91 90 89 88 87 86 85 84 83 82 81 80 79

110.00 108.90 107.80 106.70 105.60 104.50 103.40 102.30 101.20 100.10 99.00 97.90 96.80 95.70 94.60 93.50 92.40 91.30 90.20 89.10 88.00 86.90

117.00 115.83 114.66 113.49 112.32 111.15 109.98 108.81 107.64 106.47 105.30 104.13 102.96 101.79 100.62 99.45 98.28 97.11 95.94 94.77 93.60 92.43

Raw Score

Honors 1.1

AP 1.17

78 85.80 91.26 77 84.70 90.09 76 83.60 88.92 75 82.50 87.75 74 81.40 86.58 73 80.30 85.41 72 79.20 84.24 71 78.10 83.07 70 77.00 81.90 69 75.90 80.73 68 74.80 79.56 67 73.70 78.39 66 72.60 77.22 65 71.50 76.05 64 70.40 74.88 63 69.30 73.71 62 68.20 72.54 61 67.10 71.37 60 66.00 70.20 Weighting does not extend below 60%.

Valedictorian/Salutatorian Selection These two honors are bestowed upon the two seniors who, at the end of their senior year, have attained the two highest positions on the cumulative class rank. Selection is based solely on the weighted GPA earned to the differentiating decimal point. The Valedictorian/Salutatorian honors are considered a residential privilege. Because of the disparity between educational systems, grading policies, and course difficulty levels, etc., students must have entered Wilson High School on the first student day of their junior year and been a student for two consecutive school years to be considered for these honors. Any student having committed a level three or four offense during their junior or senior year will not be allowed to receive or be recognized for either of these honors.

National Honor Society Selection to membership in the National Honor Society is based on scholarship, leadership, service, and character. Membership is bestowed by the Faculty Council on behalf of the faculty. To be eligible for membership, a candidate must be a junior or senior and must have attended Wilson for one semester. Candidates must have a cumulative scholastic average of at least 90% (weighted average). The Faculty Council will ask all faculty members to submit comments on the candidacy of scholastically eligible students. The Faculty Council will use all available information to evaluate potential members. It is important to note that while the academic criterion is important and is considered first, membership is never granted on the basis of grades alone. Actual selection will be by a majority vote of the Council. If needed, students will be asked to provide information regarding service and extracurricular activities on the Student Activity Information Form which must be returned for further consideration for membership. Review of the information by the Faculty Council does not guarantee election. Students selected, and their parents, will be notified and invited to the induction ceremony by the principal. The National Honor Society is under the sponsorship and supervision of the National AsWilson High School

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sociation of Secondary School Principals. According to NASSP legal counsel, no constitutional due process requirements apply in non-selection cases. National Honor Society members who fall below the standards that were the basis for their selection shall be promptly warned in writing by the chapter advisor and given a reasonable amount of time to correct the deficiency, except in the case of flagrant violation of school rules a member does not have to be warned. In all cases of impending dismissal, a member shall have a right to a hearing before the Faculty Council. The Wilson NHS Faculty Council is comprised of the NHS Advisor(s), counselors, and administrators.

Courses Requiring Summer Assignments Honors English 9 • Honors English 10 • Honors English 11 • AP English 12 • AP Music Theory • AP Biology • AP Chemistry • AP Microeconomics • AP Studio Art • AP United States History • AP World History • AP United States Government and Politics • AP Psychology • AP European History

Guidelines for Exempting Courses Exempting a Course by Private Tutoring

A. Purpose: To move students ahead of the district-adopted sequence of courses in a particular academic subject through private tutoring. B. Guidelines: 1. Request for tutoring must be initiated by parent and student in writing to the principal. 2. Any costs are to be funded by the student and/or parents, which may include the cost of assembling materials, and administering and scoring the exams. 3. Tutoring is to be done by a subject-certified teacher. Thirty hours of tutoring is recommended to insure total mastery of the subject matter. 4. Tutoring is not to be scheduled for a course in which a student is presently enrolled. 5. The student must take the district version of the mid-term and the final examination and achieve a score of 85% or better on both. The examinations may be taken no more than twice within a twelve-month period. 6. The grade achieved is not included in the GPA. 7. The mid-term and the final examination grades and equivalent credit will be recorded on the student’s transcript as “Course Exempted by Private Tutor.” 8. Instructional materials will be provided by the Wilson School District. The appropriate department head will coordinate and finalize the process. 9. Verification of the tutoring process, administration/scoring of mid-year and final examinations will be completed by the building principal or his/her designee. 10. Administative costs accrued by execution of Steps 8 and 9 will be paid by the student and/ or parents. Remediation by Tutor

A. Purpose: To give a student who fails a course during the regular school year the opportunity to make up the course by being tutored. B. Guidelines: 1. Request for remediation by tutoring must be initiated by parents and students in writing to the principal. 2. Any costs are to be funded by the student and/or parents, which may include the costs of Wilson High School

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assembling materials, and administering and scoring the exams. 3. Tutoring is to be done by a properly certified teacher. A minimum of 15 hours of tutoring is required. 4. After tutoring, the student must take the district version of the mid-term and the final examinations and achieve a score of 70% or better. The examinations may be taken no more than twice within a twelve-month period. 5. An average score of 60% or better must be achieved when adding the mid-term and the final examination scores with the student’s final average the first time the course was taken. The grade recorded on the transcript will be 60% as is the practice with summer school courses. 6. The grade of 60% and equivalent credits will be recorded on the student’s transcripts as “Course Completed by Remedial Tutoring.” 7. The grade achieved is included in the GPA. 8. Instructional materials will be provided by the Wilson School District. The appropri at e department head/ supervisor will coordinate and finalize the process. 9. Verification of the tutoring process, administration/scoring of mid-term and final examinations will be completed by the building principal or his/her designee. 10. Administative costs accrued by execution of Steps 8 and 9 will be paid by the student and/ or parents. Exempting a Course by Exam

A. Purpose: To allow a student to exempt a particular course because of an existing knowledge base. B. Guidelines: 1. Request to exempt a course by exam is to be initiated by parent and student, in writing, to the principal; the letter must state the reason exemption is being requested. Exemption by exam must be requested prior to the start of the course. Permission to exempt a course by exam is granted at the principal's discretion. 2. Any costs are to be funded by the student and/or parents, which may include the costs of assembling materials, and administering and scoring the exams. 3. The student must take the district version of the mid-term and the final examinations and achieve a score of 85% or better. The examinations may be taken no more than twice within a twelve-month period. 4. No grade will be assigned or included in the GPA. 5. The mid-term and the final examination grades and equivalent credit will be recorded on the transcript as “Course Exempted by Exam.” 6. The mid-year and final examinations dates and administration/scoring will be completed by the building principal or his/her designee. 7. Courses completed through credit-by-exam may not be used to satisfy core-course requirements for NCAA Eligibility Center. 8. Students taking a course by independent study must follow the curriculum established by the teacher and the Wilson School District. In addition, they must complete the course’s mid-term and final assessments as established by the teacher and the Wilson School District. 9. Any student taking the Keystone End of Course Exam and achieving an advance score.

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Guidelines for High School Students Participating in Post-Secondary Education (College, University, Trade/Tech School) Students who wish to enroll in a class or attend classes on a part-time basis at a local college, university, or trade/tech school should follow the following procedures: 1. Submit a written request to the principal, co-signed by the parents and the student at least 30 days prior to the student starting such a class or classes. The principal will confer with the assistant superintendent of secondary education before a final decision is made. All decisions will be communicated in writing to the parent and student. 2. The request must list the course title, number of college credits, name of the college or university, a copy of the course syllabus, and evidence of admission to the college course. 3. If a student wishes to attend a college or university on a part-time basis, he/she must be able to fulfill all the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s graduation requirements while maintaining only part-time status as a high school student. 4. All college fees and tuition will be at the expense of the parents and/or student. 5. Transportation to and from the college, university, or trade school will be the responsibility of the parent and/or student. 6. All rules and regulations of the district still apply to the student while the student is enrolled at the high school. 7. College, university, or trade school grades will not be included in the calculation for class rank or final grade point average (GPA). 8. Part-time college, university, or trade school students will be considered for valedictorian/ salutatorian honors. College, university, or trade school grades will not be included in calculations. 9. Earned college, university, or trade school credits will count in the total credits required for graduation. Three college credits will equal 1.0 high school credit. 10. College, university, or trade school transcripts will be attached to the high school transcript. 11. The counseling department will report to the Director of Pupil Services the names of any students who are enrolled in college classes part-time during the school day in any given semester. Dual Enrollment

Wilson has concurrent (dual) enrollment agreements with three post-secondary institutions: Penn State Berks, Albright College, and Reading Area Community College. These agreements allow a junior or senior to enroll in a specified course at one of these schools and, provided the student is accepted, earn one Wilson credit and three or more college credits simultaneously. The student must provide his or her own transportation, but the tuition fees are reduced by the college and may be subsidized by Pennsylvania Department of Education grant money. Students interested in this option should discuss details with their counselors when scheduling courses for the following year.

Extracurricular Activity Eligibility Policy If a student fails one or more major subjects, he or she will be required to attend tutoring sessions at least three days per week until passing grades are achieved. As long as the student is attending the minimum number of tutoring sessions required per week, he or she may participate in contests or performances. If the number of subjects failed during any given week reaches three, the student is automatically ineligible to participate until passing grades are achieved. In all cases where a student must attend tutoring sessions, he or she is required to attend a minimum of two days per week until passing grades are achieved or the student will be ineligible to participate in the weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contest, performance, or activity. Wilson High School

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NCAA Rules and Regulations Registration Information

The NCAA strongly suggests that prospective student-athletes who plan to participate in intercollegiate athletics at an NCAA Division I or II institution use the new online registration rather than complete the paper form. To register, prospective student-athletes should access the registration materials by visiting the new NCAA Eligibility Center web site at www.eligibilitycenter.org . Students should register online no sooner than August before their senior year. Students must request transcripts from the Counseling Office. SAT and ACT scores must be sent directly from the testing center to the NCAA. The NCAA does not accept these scores from the high school transcript.

Division I Academic Eligibility Requirements

In order to be considered a “qualifier” for a Division I college, you must complete the following requirements: 1. Graduate from high school 2. Successfully complete a core curriculum of at least 16 academic courses in the following areas: a. at least four years in English b. three years in math (Algebra I or higher) c. two years in social science d. two years in natural or physical science, including one laboratory science e. one additional course in English, math, or natural or physical science f. four additional academic courses g. courses completed through credit-by-exam may not be used to satisfy core-course requirements. 3. Have a GPA and combined scores on the SAT verbal and math sections or a sum score on the 4. Complete the amateurism questionnaire and request final amateurism certification. ACT based on the qualifier index scale, as seen on the www.eligibilitycenter.org website. Division II Academic Eligibility Requirements

In order to be considered a “qualifier” of a Division II college, a student must graduate from high school and have a GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in a successfully completed core curriculum of at least 14 academic courses (please see the list of requirements under Division I requirements). In addition, a student must have a combined score on the SAT math and verbal sections of 820 or a 68 sum score on the ACT. In order to be considered a “partial qualifier,” a student must graduate from high school and meet one of the two requirements listed above. Complete the amateurism questionnaire and request final amateurism certification. If you have specific questions involving your son or daughter, or would like more detailed information, please contact the counseling office.

Wilson High School

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Berks Career and Technology Center The Berks Career and Technology Center offers additional opportunities for vocational or technical training. Training is offered in the following areas: AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGIES Automotive Collision Repair TechnologyE,W Automotive Technology E,W Diesel TechnologyE Heavy Equipment TechnologyE Recreational & Power Equipment TechnologyW COMMUNICATION Communications Media Technology Visual Imaging & Design TechnologyW Photo Imaging TechnologyW Graphic Imaging TechnologyW Electronic Technology CONSTRUCTION Building Construction OccupationsE CabinetmakingE CarpentryE,W Electrical OccupationsE,W Heating, Ventilation, & Air ConditioningW MasonryE Painting & DecoratingW Plumbing & HeatingE Drafting Design TechnologyW HEALTH CARE Medical Health Professional Dental OccupationsE

Health OccupationsE,W Health-Related TechnologyE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ApplicationsW NetworkingE ProgrammingE,W MANUFACTURING Computerized Machining TechnologyW Precision Machining TechnologyW Welding TechnologyW Drafting Design TechnologyW Electronic Technology Mechatronics Engineering Technology Robotics & Automation TechnologyW PERSONAL SERVICES CosmetologyE,W Culinary ArtsE,W HorticultureE Occupational Child DevelopmentE,W Protective ServicesE,W Service OccupationsE (limited to students with special needs) Offered at

E

East Campus W West Campus

BCTC APPLICATION PROCESS www.berkscareer.com

Students apply for enrollment at BCTC through their school counselor. All student applications are sent to the BCTC where candidates from throughout the county are chosen. Each student application is reviewed according to the following criteria: • Student Interest —The thoroughness of the application is viewed as a measure of the interest of the student applicant. Special attention is paid to what research was done to find information about the career area to which a student is applying. • Teacher Evaluation — Students may request evaluations from junior or senior high school teachers of their choice. • Counselor Recommendation • School Citizenship —Student behavior and attitudes are noted. • Attendance — Students should have strong patterns of school attendance. Attendance is reviewed for patterns over a 3-year period. • Grades — While grades are important, they are not the most critical item. Grades are reviewed over a 3-year period. • Aptitude — Does the student possess the potential to be successful in the field? • Health — While not restricting a student’s selection, health concerns are a necessary consideration. Conditions such as color blindness, fear of heights, etc., will affect success in certain programs. Students who are selected will attend one of the career-technical centers on a half-day basis. All Wilson High School

Program of Studies 2012-13 Page 17


Wilson students are assigned to the PM session BCTC offerings. BCTC Students will be expected to attend their sessions at the BCTC even if the classes at Wilson are not in session. Normal transportation will be provided.

Wilson Academic Academies

The Wilson School District is excited to announce the continuation of the five academies for the 2013-2014 school year. These academies will provide students with the opportunity to focus their studies on specific areas of interest while also providing collegiate, business and industry connections that should prove to motivate and inspire them to pursue post-secondary education. The following academies will be offered during the 2013-2014 school year.

STEM Academy

This academy will allow students to focus their studies on integrated Science, Technology, Engineering and Math concepts. AP Academy

This academy is designed for the self-motivated student who is looking to participate in a rigorous academic-focused curriculum. Students will be expected to successfully complete six AP courses in addition to other academy requirements including the AP exam. Global Studies Academy

This academy will allow students to focus on the study of the political, economic, social, and cultural relationships of the world. Wilson Virtual Academy

The mission of the Wilson School District's Virtual Academy, the WVA, is to ensure students have access to quality online learning opportunities that prepare them for a lifetime of success. BCTC Academy

This academy will allow students to build and sustain strong partnerships with our industry and business communities in order to improve their economic vitality and quality of life.

Wilson High School

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Wilson School District STEM Academy

STEM Academy 2013-2014

This academy will allow students to focus their studies on integrated Science, Technology, Engineering and Math concepts. Please see Mr. Trickett for more details.

STEM Academy Requirements 1. Senior collaborative research & design project that focuses on a specific field of STEM

STEM Academy Graduation Requirements

Subject

Minimum Credit Requirement - 26 th

th

th

th

th

th

Science

4

9 , 10 , 11 Required th 12 can be a Science or Technology & Engineering selection

Math

4

9 , 10 , 11 , 12 Required

English

4

9 , 10 , 11 , 12 Required

Social Studies

3

9 , 10 , 11

PLTW Engineering

4

th

th

th

th

th

th

th

th

th

th

th

9 , 10 , 11 , 12 Required

See PLTW STEM course offerings.

Required Courses

2.25

Electives

4.75

• • • •

Wilson High School

2. Participate in STEM career fair The bi-yearly STEM career fair will be held on Wilson’s campus and will focus on educating and inspiring our students to further their studies in STEM related fields. Students will be expected to create a working relationship with one of the presenters who will then serve as a mentor for their senior research project.

3. STEM portfolio Students will create a digital portfolio showcasing all work created and skills learned throughout the program. This portfolio will be presented as part of the student’s graduation project.

4. STEM student showcase

Required th

Students will work with their graduation project teacher (a STEM advisor), and a local STEM professional from our list of partners to complete their graduation project.

Health-.5 credit Personal Finance-.5 credit Physical Education-1 credit Driver’s Education Student choice

A student showcase will be held at the conclusion of each school year and will focus on exhibiting student work. This exhibit will be held in May and will be a required component senior capstone course and the STEM academy. Local STEM professionals will also be involved to provide feedback and expertise to students.

Program of Studies 2012-13 Page 19


Wilson School District Advanced Placement Academy Advanced Placement

Wilson AP Academy 2012-2013 The Wilson School District is excited to announce the Advanced Placement academy for the 2012-2013 school year. This academy is designed for the self-motivated student who is looking to participate in a rigorous academic-focused curriculum. Students will be expected to successfully complete six AP courses in addition to other Academy requirements. Please contact Mrs. Hagee for more details.

Academy

AP Academy Requirements

AP Academy Graduation Requirements

Subject

Minimum Credit Requirement - 26

Science

3

Math

4

English

4

4

Social Studies

• • • •

Required Courses

2.25

Electives

8.75

• • • •

Wilson High School

9th,

10th,

11th

& Grade Requirements 12th Grade Electives available Four years of Math are required Algebra I, if taken in 8th grade, will fulfill one math credit

9th, 10th, 11th, & 12th Grade Requirements

9th, 10th, & 11th Grade Requirements Students must take a Social Studies elective during their 12th Grade year.

Health-.5 credit Personal Finance-.5 credit Physical Education-1 credit Driver’s Education Student choice

1. Complete a senior collaborative research & design project that focuses on a specific field within the AP focus of the student. Students will work with their senior project teacher and local professional from our list of partners. Students will have the option of completing a research based project or research paper. 2. AP Portfolio All students will create a digital portfolio showcasing all work created and skills learned throughout the program. This portfolio will be presented as part of the student’s graduation project. 3. Academic Counseling All students will work with our tutoring center and/or middle schools to provide support and academic assistance to younger students who need additional help in an AP student’s area of strength or interest. A minimum of 40 hours of volunteer service tutoring other students over the course of grades 9-12 will be required. 4. Advanced Placement Classes All students will be required to take at least six AP courses during their high school career. At least two of these six courses must come from the academic core subjects (Science, Math, Social Studies, and English). All students are required to complete the AP exams as per board policy. 5. Guest Lecture Series All students will be required to attend scheduled guest lecture events. Scheduled events will be posted and approved by the high school administration. Speakers will include local scholars and/or business leaders who promote high academic achievement. Events will be on and off campus. It is suggested that students attend 5 of the guest lecture series presentations per year. A minimum of 20 total sessions over the course of grades 9-12 will be required.

Program of Studies 2012-13 Page 20


Wilson High School

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Wilson Virtual Academy Where learning, creativity and achievement are limitless.

~MISSION STATEMENT~ The mission of the Wilson School District's Virtual Academy, the WVA, is to ensure students have access to quality online learning opportunities that prepare them for a lifetime of success.

Virtual Course Offerings

For the 2012-2013 School Year MATH

SCIENCE

Virtual Pre-Algebra / PreGeometry Virtual Concepts Geometry Virtual CP Algebra I Virtual Concepts Algebra I Virtual CP Algebra 2

Virtual CP Biology Virtual CP Physics Virtual Human Biology Virtual CP Chemistry

SOCIAL STUDIES Virtual US History Virtual America and the World Virtual American History II Virtual Civics

ENGLISH Virtual CP English 12 Virtual CP English 11 Virtual CP English 10

Virtual Trig Virtual Calculus 1

PE, HEALTH, DRIVER’s ED Virtual Health 10th Virtual Driver’s Ed

BUSINESS

FCS

Virtual Personal Finance Virtual Accounting I Virtual Honors Accounting III Virtual Microsoft Office Specialist Virtual Intro To Computers

Virtual Student Instructional Aide

WORLD LANGUAGES Virtual Chinese 4

http://www.wilsonsd.org/770210101111588977/site/default.asp?770210101111588977Nav=|&NodeID=4057

Wilson High School

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Wilson High School

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Course Descriptions On the following pages are descriptions of courses taught at Wilson High School. You should read the descriptions carefully and incorporate your selection into your educational and vocational goals. We urge you to consult with your teachers, counselors, and parents before making your final selections. Special attention should be given to the prerequisites of the subjects. Please note that course offerings are always subject to course enrollment and board approval of the school budget and curriculum.

ART

Course:

Exploring Mediums

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

Know the difference between a 6B and 6H? Burnt Umber and Burnt Sienna? Heard of the grid method? Contour Line? Nibs? If not, this is the course for you! Throughout the year, we will explore many different media available in the visual arts: drawing (pencil, charcoal and pastels,) acrylic and watercolor painting (portraits, landscapes,) calligraphy, pen and ink, clay, sculpture, paper making, macramé and anything else we can fit in! This class teaches skills such as realistic shading, facial features, mixing flesh tones, and body proportion - everything you need to know to become a good artist! From this class, students will be able to choose with confidence any other classes the department offers. Open to any grade level. Course:

DRAWING I

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Semester course paired with Painting I

Do you doodle? Do you like to draw? Do you wish your drawing skills were better? This course starts off working with line, builds up to shading and then Bam! Color! We work with pen, pencil, ink, charcoal, pastels and anything else you can draw with! This course will teach you how to “see” as an artist. A journal is required for this class and all grade levels are welcome. Course:

PAINTING I

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Semester course paired with Drawing I

Now that you know how to draw, let’s learn to paint! We will learn to mix colors, shades, tints and alter intensities. Students will paint on paper, canvas board, and stretched canvas. Watercolor, acrylic and even pastels are used. Our subject matter covers realism, emotion and humor. A journal is required for this class and all grades are welcome. Course:

DRAWING II

Prerequisite: Drawing I and Painting I Credit: 0.5 Semester course paired with Painting II

Now that you have a foundation, Let’s crank it up a notch! All art has meaning and this course will help you to examine and understand how to convey meaning in your own work. You will Wilson High School

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stretch your observation skills and refine your individual techniques. You will begin to interpret objects creatively and are expected to solve visual assignments in more than one way. A journal is required for this class. You will create a digital portfolio with a gallery to keep a record of your progress and also display your work. Course:

PAINTING II

Prerequisite: Drawing I and Painting I Credit: 0.5 Semester course paired with Drawing II

A STYLE is born! Continue your exploration of painting by delving into some personal expression. Students will paint with watercolor, acrylic and be introduced to oil paints on a variety of surfaces such as cardboard, paper, and canvas. The opportunity exists for students to stretch their own canvases and work in a large format. You will explore different styles of painting as you begin to develop your own unique style. Expression of emotion and use of imagination are part of building your painting skills. A journal is required for this course as well as adding to your digital portfolio. Course:

ABSTRACTION

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Semester course paired with Crafts

This course requires imagination, the willingness to experiment and an open mind! All abstraction is based in reality but distorted in some way. Student will explore abstraction through drawing, clay, painting and mixed media. This course is great for the student who wants to push his/her imagination to its limits. The ability to think abstractly will benefit the student in both art and other academic disciplines. The ability to see things in a different format will be encouraged. A journal is required for this class. Course:

CRAFTS

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Semester course paired with Abstraction

What actually is a “craft” and how does it differ from art? Come find out! This semester-long course allows the students to pursue various crafts such as card making, weaving, ceramics, macramé, paper mache and Scherenschnitte. It is a course that is very hands-on and requires no previous art experience although a journal is required. Course: DRAWING III

Prerequisite: Drawing II and Painting II Credit: 0.5 Semester course paired with Painting III

Are you looking to build your portfolio? Then this is the course for you! Colleges look for portfolios that have a diverse collection of work, such as portraits, still life, figure drawings as well as an understanding of a variety of techniques and media. We will continue to explore the meaning of art and explore art mediums to develop your own personal style. You will refine your drawing skills t h r o u gh t h e use o f various media. Projects will be linked to global events that are happening in today’s society. You will also create from observation and explore your own imagination to help develop your personal style. A sketch journal is required for this class and you will continue to add to your digital portfolio to keep a record of your progress and also display your work. Course: PAINTING III

Prerequisite: Drawing II and Painting II Credit: 0.5 Semester course paired with Drawing III

Do you have a desire to learn more about Drawing and Painting? In this class we will continue to explore and experiment with oil, acrylic, and watercolor and paint on a variety of surfaces. Wilson High School

Program of Studies 2012-13 Page 25


You will stretch your own canvases and begin to paint on a large scale. You will be encouraged to explore different mark making techniques to help you develop and build your own individual style as well as incorporating the styles and techniques of famous painters. A sketch journal is required for this class and you will continue to add to your digital portfolio to keep a record of your progress and also display your work. Course: SCULPTURE

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Semester course paired with Ceramics

Do you like to build things or work with your hands? If you enjoy working with wire, plaster, cardboard, and found objects, then this course is for you! This course concentrates on developing technical skills as well as artistic appreciation and understanding of successful three-dimensional artwork. Studio projects will be linked to the discussion of art historical topics and/or the applications of sculpture in modern societies. You will use a variety of methods, including assemblage, carving, and modeling. Weekly sketchbook assignments are required in this course. Course: CERAMICS

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5 Semester course paired with Sculpture

Got CLAY? Do you want to learn how to hand build and throw on the wheel? Ceramics is designed for the beginner through the advanced art student. You will explore the many uses of clay, from the simple handmade forms of early cultures to the extremely varied application of clay in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s society. Ceramics will increase your understanding and application of the elements and principles of design, knowledge of specific artists, and the functionality of clay throughout history. You will have the opportunity for creative expression through the use of your imagination and acquired skills. Teacher demonstrations will be provided showing a variety of ceramic hand-building techniques as well as throwing on the wheel. A variety of glazing techniques will be shown. Weekly sketchbook assignments are required in this course. Course: ADVANCE CERAMICS Prerequisite: Sculpture/Ceramics Credit: 1.0

Clay and Sculpture: The Sequel! This course is open to any junior or senior who has successfully completed the sculpture/ceramics course. In this course, students will continue to explore various ceramic construction techniques, such as hand-building with slabs and coils and sculpting. A great deal of time will be spent learning how to throw on a potterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wheel. Various glazing techniques will be explored. Students will learn how to reclaim clay, create slip, mix glazes, experiment with alternative firing techniques, and how to load and unload a kiln. Weekly sketchbook assignments are required for this class and you will build a digital portfolio to keep a record of your progress and also display your work. Course: ADVANCED PLACEMENT ART HISTORY Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Credit: 1.0

This course is designed to provide an understanding and enjoyment of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within historical and cultural contexts. No prior experience in art history is assumed. Students who have done well in other courses in the humanities (such as Wilson High School

Program of Studies 2012-13 Page 26


history and literature) or in any of the studio arts are especially encouraged to enroll. The students examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and the present from a variety of cultures. Students learn to look at works of art critically, intelligently, and sensitively, and to analyze what they see. Many colleges and universities offer advanced placement and/or credit to students who have performed successfully on the AP Art History Examination. Course: ADVANCED PLACEMENT STUDIO ART

Prerequisite: Drawing II and Painting II and permission of an art teacher Credit: 1.0

Students registering for this course select a concentration in drawing, 2D design, or 3D design. Whichever area is chosen, the creation of a portfolio is required. Each portfolio consists of three sections — quality, concentration, and breadth. Exact deadlines must be met throughout the school year in order to fulfill the requirements of this advanced course. Possible awarding of college credit is based on presentation of the actual portfolio or through submission of slides for the 3D segment.

Course: Digital Drawing and Painting Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

Do you like to draw and paint? Do you like to use technology in your daily life? Check this OUT! This class will focus on traditional drawing and painting techniques but your actual artwork will be created on a computer! You will learn to draw and paint using a Wacom tablet and various software applications. We will explore traditional drawing subjects, such as still-life, landscapes, and portraits. We will also explore contemporary graphic design concepts such as character design, logo and packaging design. Weekly sketchbook assignments are required in this course.

BUSINESS Course:

CP ACCOUNTING I

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

Speak the language of business! Whether investing one’s hard-earned cash, running one’s own business, or moving up the corporate ladder, the basics of accounting are essential. Learn how every company records the financial transactions that generate revenue. This is a must-take class for everyone considering majoring in business as all colleges and universities require business students to complete two accounting courses. Course:

HONORS ACCOUNTING II

Prerequisite: CP Accounting I Credit: 1.0

Continue to advance your knowledge in accounting toward the equivalent of one semester of college accounting. Students who have completed Accounting I & II will be better equipped to succeed in a college accounting class. Students will use accounting software to produce financial documents. Again, this is a must-take class for everyone considering majoring in business as all colleges and universities require business students to complete two accounting courses. Course:

HONORS ACCOUNTING III

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Credit: 1.0

Take your accounting knowledge one step further. In Accounting III, students will be introduced Wilson High School

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to product costing or managerial accounting. This material is taught in the second required accounting course for business majors in college. Course:

PERSONAL FINANCE

Prerequisite: Freshmen only Credit: 0.5

This course is designed to give students awareness of what their roll is in the marketplace and sharpen their skills as a consumer. Each student will go through the process of researching a career, preparing career search documents, opening a checking account, renting an apartment, applying for credit, buying a car, and paying taxes. With this course students will be able to fulfill a portion of their graduation requirements by completing documents needed for their graduation project. Course:

FINANCE for Upperclassman

Prerequisite: Sophomore-Senior Credit: 0.5

This course is offered to any sophomore, junior or senior who did not have the opportunity to take Personal Finance their freshman year. This course is designed to give students awareness of what their roll is in the marketplace and sharpen their skills as a consumer. Each student will go through the process of researching a career, preparing career search documents, opening a checking account, renting an apartment, applying for credit, buying a car, and paying taxes. With this course students will be able to fulfill a portion of their graduation requirements by completing documents needed for their graduation project. Course:

INVESTING

Credit:

1.0

Prerequisite: Juniors and Seniors only

In this course students will take the next step in managing their money. In Personal Finance they learned to save; here they will learn where to invest the money they have saved. They will investigate the stock market, mutual funds, bonds and banking products as investment possibilities. They will learn to make investment selections based on risk and return. They will also learn the safe use of credit. Course:

SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING

Prerequisite: Juniors and Seniors only Credit: 0.5 Semester course paired with Entrepreneurship

Learn about the exciting and competitive world of marketing and advertising through the Sports and Entertainment Marketing course. Sports and entertainment are everywhere from the movie theaters, to the basketball court, and into the school. Students will learn about and apply marketing, management and entrepreneurial principles within the global economy through sports and entertainment connections. This class is an interactive experience in the world of marketing and advertising, as students will hear from guest speakers and participate in many hands on activities while making connections to key concepts of sports and entertainment marketing and advertising. Course:

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Prerequisite: Juniors and Seniors only Credit: 0.5

Semester course paired with Sports and Entertainment Marketing

Students learn how to be their own bosses, how to be entrepreneurs! They learn how to take their Wilson High School

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ideas and turn them into cash. They create a business plan including financing, marketing, and managing the operations of a business. Students then try the plan through helping a charitable organization, earning money that can benefit those in need. Course:

MICROSOFT OFFICE SPECIALIST

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

Get certified by Microsoft and receive college credit! The Microsoft Office Specialist class is designed to give every student the opportunity to get certified by Microsoft in Microsoft Office 2010 software. The class will include in-depth instruction of Microsoft Word 2010, Microsoft Excel 2010 and Microsoft PowerPoint 2010. At the conclusion of each section, each student will have the opportunity to take the Microsoft Office Specialist exam (MOS) and be certified by Microsoft. If you successfully pass all three certification exams, you have the opportunity to receive college credit. (Refer to the Microsoft Office Specialist website for details) Course: College Prep INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (Grade 12 & Elective)—will be blocked with EAST ASIAN: CULTURE & HISTORY Prerequisite: none; juniors and seniors Credit: 1.0 (0.5 Business and 0.5 Social Studies)

This course is a co-taught interdisciplinary Social Studies/Business offering which examines the history, culture, politics, economics, pop culture, and current events of East Asia. The Social Studies aspect will be taught from the perspective of how Asian culture impacts business practices. Students will then examine business protocol and marketing in East Asian cultures.

ENGLISH SCOPE & SEQUENCE FOR HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH Required Courses — You must choose one course from your grade level Grade

Integrated Approach

College Preparatory

Honors

9

American Studies II

College Prep English 9

Honors English 9

10

N/A

College Prep English 10

Honors English 10

11

N/A

College Prep English 11

Honors English 11

Historical Thought and Culture

College Prep English 12

12

AP English Literature and Composition AP English Language and composition

Elective Courses 9th grade •

Drama 1

Wilson High School

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th grade

• •

• •

• •

Drama 2 Professional Writing I

Drama 2 Drama 3

Drama 2 Drama 3

Program of Studies 2012-13 Page 29


• • •

Course:

COLLEGE PREP

Professional Writing I Professional Writing II Film and Literature

ENGLISH

• • • •

Drama 4 Professional Writing I Professional Writing II Film and Literature

9

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This is a literature-based course. Students strengthen their vocabulary skills; their speaking, listening, and writing skills; their grammar and usage skills; and their understanding and appreciation of various types of literature, including the novel. This course will provide students with the skills that are necessary to succeed in the college prep high school English programs.

Course:

HONORS

ENGLISH

9

Prerequisite: See “Honors and AP Course Criteria," Page 10 Credit: 1.0

Reading and writing independently comprise the core of this course. In addition to intelligence and diligence, prerequisites for success include self-discipline, initiative, and the ability to budget time. Several novels, assigned as independent reading, will be analyzed through class discussions, tests, and formal essays. In addition, grammar skills, vocabulary development, speeches, and other literature selections will be part of the everyday class schedule. Summer reading is required and selections will be assessed within the first few weeks of school.

Course:

AMERICAN STUDIES II (9th grade)

Prerequisite: None Credit: 2.0 (1 credit for English & 1 credit for Social Studies)

Although similar in scope and content to the standard course (see above), American Studies is an interdisciplinary course designed to examine the historical and literary movements of post1890 America. It is designed for the self-motivated student who can engage in independent inquiry, research, and reading. Students may participate in a variety of additional independent or group activities such as readings, oral reports, and research projects.

Course:

COLLEGE PREP

ENGLISH

10

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

The focus of this course is on composition and literature. Compositions are written on a regular basis. The course includes extensive vocabulary study. The study and analysis of novels, plays, poems, and short stories and the preparation and delivery of oral presentations are included. Course:

HONORS

ENGLISH

10

Prerequisite: See “Honors and AP Course Criteria," Page 10 Credit: 1.0

Students are provided the opportunity to develop a high verbal ability through frequent writing, reading, and speaking assignments. The class focuses on literary techniques and the skills required for independent study and research. Students will be required to read novels, plays, Wilson High School Program of Studies 2012-13 Page 30


short stories, and poetry. A summer reading list is required. In September, writing assignments will be used to assess the summer reading.

Course:

COLLEGE PREP

ENGLISH

11

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This course focuses on the study of American literature and the changing trends in American culture from the 1600s to the present. Numerous classic and contemporary American novels, plays, poems, and short stories are read, analyzed, and critiqued. A research paper is required of all students. A major emphasis is placed on essay composition and SAT preparation. Course:

HONORS

ENGLISH

11

Prerequisite: See â&#x20AC;&#x153;Honors and AP Course Criteria," Page 10 Credit: 1.0

This course is designed for highly motivated juniors with above-average ability. To succeed in this course, a student must be capable of substantial independent study and must spend approximately one hour out of class for each hour in class. In addition to intelligence and diligence, prerequisites for success include self-discipline, initiative, and the ability to budget time. Students are expected to demonstrate above-average writing skills and to have mastered all the basics of English grammar and mechanics. In addition, students are expected to complete and comprehend frequent, lengthy, independent reading assignments in American literature. Class discussion and vocabulary study are also integral components of the course. A summer reading list will be distributed in June; required works must be completed by the date of the first class meeting in August. A research paper is required of all students. Course:

COLLEGE PREP

ENGLISH

12

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This course features a survey of British and international literature. One semester will focus on the literature to 1789; the second will deal with literature from 1789 to the present; exceptions may apply for some works. Students will read poems, plays, novels, and short stories in the historical context; this will not be the sole approach to assigned readings. Although expository writing is stressed, creative pieces will be assigned. Vocabulary development and communications skills are also important facets of this course. Course: COLLEGE PREP HISTORICAL THOUGHT AND CULTURE (Grade

12)

Prerequisite: None Credit: 2.0 (1 credit for English & 1 credit for Social Studies)

This course is designed to be an interdisciplinary class which will fuse World History and World Literature while at the same time having a philosophical backbone that would guide the course. The ultimate aim of the course is for students to evaluate how global societies throughout history answered essential questions generated by each branch of philosophy. The end goal is to have students generate their own opinions on these issues through the spectrum of their own place in history. Wilson High School

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Course: COLLEGE PREP FILM and LITERATURE (Grades 11 and 12) Credit: 1.0

The Film and Literature course takes students on a journey through both classic works of literature and contemporary films while honing their critical thinking, reading, writing, and communication skills. Selected readings include "Serious Game", Hamlet, and excerpts from The Great Gatsby, among others; films, paired with readings, include The Lion King and The Wizard of Oz. Join us in our travels to Detroit and beyond as two young men pursue their hoop dreams. Visit a dollhouse that is not overly welcoming, and get to know a freshman who learned a thing or two about the mob and iguanas. Find out if Martin Guerre returned - and if he would have fared better in America. See a rugged waterfront; French trenches filled with moral choices, cowardice, and paths of glory; and find out if Dr. Zhivago did more than write poetry. Understand that some crimes can not pass as misdemeanors, and learn that it is possible to find midwinter laughter in Hamlet and that Vienna and Paris are for lovers. Did you know that Cairo still holds a purple rose; some translations in Japan are never lost on the way to Oz? So, if The Lion King rules in Africa, get ready, through this course, to discover The New World! Course:

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPOSITION

ENGLISH LITERATURE AND

Prerequisite: See “Honors and AP Course Criteria," Page 10 Credit: 1.0

The Advanced Placement Program is a nationwide, cooperative educational endeavor of secondary schools, colleges and universities, and The College Board. AP literature and composition includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods arranged in a thematic manner. The intense concentration on language use in this course enhances the student’s ability to develop stylistic maturity in writing prose. The AP course develops the use of interpretive skills as students learn to read and write with increasing complexity and sophistication. Reading materials are chosen from selected AP suggested reading lists and consist of materials classified as canonical and non-canonical. Summer reading selections are discussed in class. In May of each year, students take the national AP exam for possible college credit.

Course:

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPOSITION

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND

Prerequisite: See “Honors and AP Course Criteria," Page 10 Credit: 1.0

AP Language and Composition provides a rigorous AP English course that compliments AP English Literature and Composition and provides an opportunity for further study of Nonfiction as well as advanced composition skills. The College Board suggests curriculum for the course “places a strong emphasis on the development of proficient reading and writing skills. In particular, thorough, efficient reading and contextual understanding of rigorous nonfiction materials and the ability to write organized and developed pieces that demonstrates a strong stylistic and expressive command over the English language. As well as engaging in varied writing tasks, students become acquainted with a wide variety of prose styles from many disciplines and historical periods, and gain understanding of the connections between writing and interpretive skill in reading. Concurrently, to reflect the Wilson High School

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increasing importance of graphics and visual images in texts published in print and electronic media, students are asked to analyze how such images both relate to written texts and serve as alternative forms of texts themselves. In addition, the informed use of research materials and the ability to synthesize varied sources (to evaluate, use, and cite sources) are integral parts of this course.” In May of each year, students take the national AP exam for possible college credit.

Course: DRAMA 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9th grade

This initial course is open to freshmen who are interested in drama and theatre arts. DRAMA 1 is a web-based course that extensively utilizes web 2.0 resources to address the Pennsylvania Arts and Humanities standards. This full year course is performance driven and deals primarily with theatre acting techniques and methods. Students will engage in analysis and evaluation of performance, theatre history, vocabulary, and application of theatre competencies as they relate to other disciplines. Course: DRAMA 2 Prerequisite: DRAMA 1 or Teacher Recommendation Level: 10th / 11th / or 12th grade

This full year course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors who are interested in investigating drama and theatre arts. Successful completion of DRAMA 1 is a prerequisite for the course. DRAMA 2 is designed to reinforce and refine skills introduced in DRAMA 1. DRAMA 2 is a web-based course that extensively utilizes web 2.0 resources to address the Pennsylvania Arts and Humanities standards. Particular emphasis is placed upon the development of the performance ensemble. Students will investigate in detail the production aspects of make-up, costume, body movement, voice and diction, and line interpretation in preparation for performance of a selection of the following: period plays, melodramas, children’s theatre or reader’s theatre. Monologues, scenes, one act plays and fully staged productions may be part of the course. Course: DRAMA 3

Prerequisite: DRAMA 2 or Teacher Recommendation Level: 11th or 12th grade

This advanced full year course is open to junior and senior students who wish to pursue the study of acting and gain further training in character development, analysis and stage direction. Successful completion of DRAMA 2 is a prerequisite for the course. DRAMA 3 is designed to reinforce and refine skills introduced in DRAMA 1 & 2. DRAMA 3 is a web-based course that extensively utilizes web 2.0 resources to address the Pennsylvania Arts and Humanities standards. Particular emphasis is placed upon the development of advanced acting and directing techniques. Students will have the opportunity to direct scenes and prepare presentations for the public. Monologues, scenes, one act plays, and fully staged productions may be part of the course. Course: DRAMA 4

Prerequisite: DRAMA 3 or Teacher Recommendation Level: 12th grade

This advanced full year course is open to senior students who wish to pursue the study of acting and gain further training in character development, analysis and stage direction. Successful completion of DRAMA 3 is a prerequisite for the course. DRAMA 4 is designed to reinforce Wilson High School

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and refine skills introduced in DRAMA 1, 2, & 3. DRAMA 4 is a web-based course that extensively utilizes web 2.0 resources to address the Pennsylvania Arts and Humanities standards. Particular emphasis will be placed on independent projects, theatrical productions, and cross-curricular assignments as requirements of the course. Students wishing to pursue theatre beyond high school will have the opportunity to explore career opportunities in the arts. Monologues, scenes, one act plays, and fully staged productions will be created as part of the course.

Course: PROFESSIONAL WRITING I Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This course is designed for students interested in exploring and developing their skills in the professional writing arena. The first semester is devoted to journalistic writing forms such as the straight news, features, reviews, editorials, columns, and sports. The second semester focuses on creative writing, including fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry. Students in this elective course will be writing frequently while honing their skills. Students are expected to offer their work for in-class, peer critique as well as submit work periodically for contests or publication. Course: PROFESSIONAL WRITING II Prerequisite: Professional Writing I and the course teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recommendation Credit: 1.0

This course is designed for students wishing to develop further the writing skills learned in Professional Writing I. During the first semester, students will learn and apply skills in editing and layout of journalistic material while continuing to improve their writing style. During the second semester, they will apply these editing and layout skills to a creative writing project of their choosing including but not limited to poetry, science fiction, romance, juvenile literature, travel literature, journalism, non-fiction, or playwriting. Students are expected to offer their work for in-class, peer critique as well as submit work periodically for contests or publication.

READING Course: READING STRATEGIES 9 Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Credit: 1.0

This course is designed for 9th grade students who demonstrate the need to increase their reading proficiency. Reading material will consist of contemporary novels and other genres of literature. The course focus will be upon independent reading, responding to literature through discussion and writing, skill and strategy instruction, and extending critical reading skills needed for content literacy. Students will be placed in this class based upon results of the 4Sight testing, PSSA scores, and teacher recommendations. Course: READING STRATEGIES 10 Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Credit: 1.0

This course is designed for 10th grade students who demonstrate the need to increase their reading proficiency. Reading material will consist of contemporary novels and other genres of literature. The course focus will be upon independent reading, responding to literature through Wilson High School Program of Studies 2012-13 Page 34


discussion and writing, skill and strategy instruction, and extending critical reading skills needed for content literacy. Students will be placed in this class based upon results of the 4Sight testing, PSSA scores, and teacher recommendations. Course: READING STRATEGIES 11 Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Credit: 1.0

This course is designed for 11th grade students who demonstrate the need to increase their reading proficiency. The focus for the first semester is PSSA test preparation to ensure that all students will be successful on the state test. Reading material will consist of contemporary novels and other genres of literature. The course focus will be upon independent reading, responding to literature through discussion and writing, skill and strategy instruction, and extending critical reading skills needed for content literacy. Students will be placed in this class based upon results of the 4Sight testing, PSSA scores, and teacher recommendations.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES Food and Consumer Sciences Options 9th grade 10th Grade • Investigating Foods •Understanding Relationships • Fashion and Interior Design

• • • •

Food Preparation Understanding Relationships Child Development Fashion and Interior Design Textile and Clothing Construction

11th Grade • • • • • •

Food Preparation Chef's Course Understanding Relationships Child Development Early Childhood Fashion and Interior Design Textile and Clothing Construction

12th grade • • • • • •

Food Preparation Chef's Course Understanding Relationships Child Development Early Childhood Fashion and Interior Design

Textile and Clothing Construction

Student Instructional Aide

Course: Investigating Foods Prerequisite: 9th Grade Only Credit 1.0

Learn about the science of food as you bake and cook a variety of culinary delights. Students will explore how foods play an important part of each person’s life and how health and well-being is impacted by one’s food choices. In addition to food preparation, students will learn about food safety in a culinary environment. Wilson High School

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Course: FOOD PREPARATION

Prerequisite: 10th, 11th and 12th grade Credit 1.0

Students will practice the science of baking quick breads, yeast breads, cakes and frostings, pies, and pastries and the science of cooking eggs, milk and milk products, fruits, vegetables, meats, vegetarian, and pastas. Nutrition, meal planning, table settings, and manners are included. Learn about cake decorating and constructing gingerbread houses. Course: CHEF’S COURSE

Prerequisite: Food Preparation Credit: 1.0

This course offers students the opportunity to master the art of cooking. Units included are food preservation, entertaining and garnishing, cake decorating, gingerbread houses and functional foods. Students will complete an appliance demonstration during which they can show off their cooking skills...bam! Travel around the world through the foods of 16 different countries. Course: UNDERSTANDING RELATIONSHIPS Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This course focuses on the establishment of good relationships with friends, families, teachers, boy/girl friends, and, eventually, husbands/wives. The student will learn practical interactive skills in communication — the basis for all successful life relationships — while gaining a better understanding of himself/herself. The course will also give insight on preparing and adjusting to marriage, pregnancy, childbirth, and parenting. Course: CHILD DEVELOPMENT Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

The focus of this course is understanding and developing practices that nurture and guide children through developmental stages, in particular of the preschool child. Students will analyze the stages of emotional, social, physical, and intellectual growth of children. This course is designed to help students develop and practice observation skills through their work with the children in the child-care center. Course: EARLY CHILDHOOD

Prerequisite: Child Development Credit: 2.0

This course is designed to provide the opportunity for occupational awareness, exploration, and on-site training for careers related to childcare and early elementary education. The students will practice developing and using lesson plans, learning centers, bulletin boards, and bibliographies. First aid, safety precautions, and emergency procedures will be studied and utilized when appropriate. Students will analyze developmentally appropriated practices in their work with children in the childcare center/elementary classroom. A student taking this course for 2 credits will work in the childcare center or elementary classroom (K-3) for an average of two class periods, three days per week, or a minimum total of 120 hours during the school year. Unless the student chooses to work in the high school child care classroom or a classroom at the Whitfield elementary school, it is the responsibility of the parent to provide the student’s transportation to and from the field site as a driver or as a passenger. Wilson High School

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Course: STUDENT INSTRUCTIONAL AIDE PROGRAM

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the SIA program is based on completion of an acceptable application, including student career goals and teacher recommendation, submitted to the program coordinator. Credit: 1.0

This is a program that enables students to serve as aides to a classroom teacher (K-12) by tutoring individual pupils, working with small groups of pupils, and performing other classroom duties. The program is designed to give the student an insight into the field of education. Since the number of applications may exceed the openings available, those students who are most highly recommended will be considered first. This program is suitable for students interested in becoming teachers. Unless the student chooses to work in an elementary classroom at the Whitfield elementary school, it is the responsibility of the parent to provide the student’s transportation to and from the field site as a driver or as a passenger. This class meets for two periods. An application packet may be obtained in the Counseling Office. Course: FASHION AND INTERIOR DESIGN Prerequisite: None Credit 1.0

Explore the world of fashion and interior design! Learn about clothing and textile design, fabrics, clothing construction, “the runway”, wardrobe care and shopping. Interior design – an excellent approach to understanding the concepts and principles of planning personal space. Includes decorating, designing, and the use of color and the basics of furniture styles. Students will design and create projects, hear guest speakers, go on field trips and explore career options. Students are required to purchase supplies for this class; therefore, students will incur individual costs for projects. Course: Textile and Clothing Construction Prerequisite: Fashion and Interior Design Credit 1.0

Are you interested in careers in clothing and textiles? Do you want to learn how to sew and develop your creative skills with fabrics? Then this is the course for you! Create projects using commercial patterns and supplies to meet the individual student’s needs and fashion sense. Students will be involved in flat pattern measuring, fitting methods, pattern drafting and sewing techniques. Students are required to purchase supplies for this class; therefore, students will incur individual costs for projects.

MATHEMATICS High School Mathematics Course Selection Progression College Prep College Prep Traditional Traditional College Prep (Math/Science/ (Social Studies/English Business Majors) Extended Algebra /Art Majors)

Honors Mathematics

CP Algebra 1 or Algebra 1

CP Algebra 1

CP Algebra 1

CP Algebra 1

CP Geometry

CP Geometry

CP Geometry

CP Geometry

CP Algebra 2-A

CP Algebra 2

CP Algebra 2

CP Algebra 2

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CP Algebra 2-B

Pre-Calculus

Statistics

Honors Pre-Calculus

Algebra 3

Calculus

AP Statistics

AP Calculus A/B

AP Calculus A/B

AP Calculus B/C

Statistics or AP Statistics may be taken simultaneously with any other math course as long as the prerequisites have been met.

Course: ALGEBRA I (9th grade if not taken successfully previously) Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra or Algebra I-A Credit: 1.0

This course will cover the full curriculum of the CP Algebra I class using a concept-driven approach. It will include numerous exercises to help students develop a deeper understanding of the topics with the additional practice needed to reinforce the skills. Course: CP GEOMETRY

Prerequisite: Algebra I, CP Algebra I, or CP Algebra I-B Credit: 1.0

This course emphasizes the mathematical structure of geometry. Topics studied include: methods of reasoning, angle relationships, perpendicular and parallel lines, congruent and similar polygons, properties of polygons, right triangle trigonometry, area and volume of figures, circles, and coordinate geometry. Course: CP ALGEBRA II-A

Prerequisite: Geometry or CP Geometry Credit: 1.0

This course will cover the first half of the CP Algebra II curriculum. It will include numerous exercises and the extended time necessary to help students develop a deeper understanding of the topics. It will also provide students with the additional practice needed to reinforce the skills. Course: CP ALGEBRA II-B

Prerequisite: CP Algebra II-A Credit: 1.0

This course will cover the second half of the CP Algebra II curriculum. It will include numerous exercises and the extended time necessary to help students develop a deeper understanding of the topics. It will also provide students with the additional practice needed to reinforce the skills. Course: CP ALGEBRA II

Prerequisite: Geometry or CP Geometry Credit: 1.0

The course will begin with a review of basic algebra concepts, with an emphasis on solving equations and problem solving. Topics studied in Algebra II include inequalities, linear equations, polynomials, factoring, polynomial equations, rational expressions, radicals, and complex numbers. Quadratic equations, polynomial equations, and logarithms will also be discussed. Although students are welcome to purchase their own calculators, the school will Wilson High School

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provide TI-84 calculators for classroom use to those students who have not purchased one on their own. Course: ALGEBRA III/FUNCTIONS Prerequisite: Algebra II or Algebra II-B Credit: 1.0

This course is intended to provide a problem-based approach to the study of mathematics. Topics will include algebra, geometry, probability, statistics, and discrete mathematics. Each unit presents relevant mathematics in an applied real-world context. The focus will be to develop important procedural skills while acquiring a deeper conceptual understanding which will enhance the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ability to apply learned skills in new situations. An emphasis is placed upon problem-solving and mathematical reasoning. Course: PRE-CALCULUS

Prerequisite: CP Algebra II, or Algebra II-B Credit: 1.0

This course begins with review of algebra topics. It is designed to provide a student with the basics of trigonometry (triangle solutions, inverse relations, trig function graphs, vectors, and trig equation solutions), analytic geometry (line, coordinate geometry, and conic sections), and introduction to calculus concepts. Course: HONORS PRE-CALCULUS

Prerequisite: CP Algebra II (with teacher recommendation) Credit: 1.0

This course is designed to provide a student with in-depth knowledge of trigonometry, including all of the topics covered in trigonometry and analytic geometry, but also trigonometric proofs, linear and angular velocity, vectors, polar graphing, and limits. This course will also provide an introduction to probability and statistics, as well as an introduction to Calculus. All of the various math topics covered in this course will be applied to real-world situations through word problems, chapter projects, and writing assignments.

Course: STATISTICS AND SELECTED TOPICS

Prerequisite: CP Algebra II, Algebra II-B Credit: 1.0

This course is designed to provide a student with the basics of descriptive stats (measures of spread and location, histograms, distribution tables, and regression lines), probability, inferential stats (binomial and normal distributions, and hypotheses testing) Although students are welcome to purchase their own calculators, the school will provide TI-84 calculators for classroom use to those students who have not purchased one on their own. Course: ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS

Prerequisite: Pre-AP Pre-Calculus or Statistics and Selected Topics Credit: 1.0

The topics for AP Statistics are divided into four major themes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. The AP Statistics course will follow the outline for the Advanced Placement Course as prescribed by the College Entrance Examination Board. Students are encouraged to earn college credit and possible advancement by demonstrating their competence on the AP examination in May. Wilson High School

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Course: CALCULUS 1

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus, Honors Pre-Calculus, or Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry Credit: 1.0

The course will begin with a review of pre-calculus concepts. Some of the calculus topics discussed will include limits, differentiation, related rates, curve sketching, graphing, integration, logarithmic functions, exponential functions, volumes, and surface areas of solids. Applications of these topics will be included throughout the course. Although students are welcome to purchase their own calculators, the school will provide TI-84 calculators for classroom use to those students to those students who have not purchased one on their own. Course: CALCULUS 2

Prerequisite: Calculus 1 Credit: 1.0

This course will begin with a review of Calculus 1. It will then cover in detail integration techniques, differential equations and slope fields, integration by parts, solids of revolution, the shell method, cross sections, arc length, geometric series, parametric equations, vectors, polar equations, convergence of series, polar area, and polynomial approximations. Although students are welcome to purchase their own calculators, the school will provide TI-84 calculators for classroom use to those students to those students who have not purchased one on their own. Course: ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS

Prerequisite: Pre-AP Pre-Calculus Credit: 1.0

The AP Calculus course will follow the outline for the Advanced Placement Course AB and BC as prescribed by the College Entrance Examination Board. Students are encouraged to earn college credit and possible advancement by demonstrating their competence on the AP examination in May. Although students are welcome to purchase their own calculators, the school will provide TI-84 calculators for classroom use to those students to those students who have not purchased one on their own.

MUSIC All music courses except AP Music Theory may be taken more than one year for credit. Course:

MUSIC APPRECIATION â&#x20AC;&#x201C; GRADES 9-12

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This course will be an overview of music history, keyboard skills, and beginning music theory. Course:

SYMPHONIC BAND

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Credit:

1.0

The Wilson Symphonic Band is a two-semester course dedicated to the performance of quality band literature. The Symphonic Band will perform at a number of concerts and community events throughout the school year. Emphasis of the course is on the love of life Wilson High School

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and the uplifting of the human spirit that comes from positive human and musical interaction. The student will improve skills as both an individual and an ensemble performer, while enhancing knowledge of music history and critical listening skills. *One sectional per week will also be included. COURSE:

JAZZ CLASS

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Credit:

1.0

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to perform and encounter music of the jazz, rock, and stage band idioms. This group is designed for the advanced instrumentalist. The styles of music performed will allow the students to gain access to more difficult musical concepts that are not consistently part of the marching or concert band repertoire. A combination of improvisation, ear training, basic theoretical knowledge, and performance will serve as the focus of this course. There also will be an emphasis on the history of jazz with a focus on the style development. Course:

ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Credit: 1.0

This course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to create and analyze music. The content will focus on a combination of ear training, writing, music history, and analysis of music. It is essential that a student have performance skills on any instrument — wind, percussion, string, voice, or keyboard. This course is strongly recommended for the student considering music as a college major or career. Students are encouraged to earn college credit by demonstrating their competence on the AP examination in May. Students are required to do several assignments during the summer as preparation for this course. Course:

ORCHESTRA

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

The orchestra is composed of violin, viola, cello, and string bass students. This class is designed for students with at least two years of experience on an instrument. Students will learn progressive performance and musicianship skills. Course:

CONCERT CHOIR

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

Concert Choir - Concert Choir is a two-semester course dedicated to the performance of quality chorus literature. Students will improve vocal technique and develop a high level of musicianship. Diverse repertoire will foster an understanding of the power of music across cultures. Public performance is an outgrowth of this course, including school, community, and civic events. Course:

WOMEN’S CHORALE

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

Women’s Chorale is a two-semester course dedicated to the performance of quality treble choir literature. Musicianship skills and female vocal technique are emphasized. Diverse repertoire will foster an understanding of the power of music across cultures. Wilson High School

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Public performance is an outgrowth of this course, including school, community, and civic events.

Course:

BAND/CHORUS

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Credit: 1.0

The Band/Chorus option is for those students that want to participate in both Band and Chorus and do not have room in their schedule to allow for these electives to be scheduled separately.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH Course:

FITNESS FOUNDATIONS- 9th Grade Required Physical Education

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

This course is designed to introduce students to various physical activity components that will help students develop and implement self designed fitness plans that adhere to goals set forth by each student. Units of instruction include benefits of fitness, goal setting and tracking techniques, health and skill related fitness components, cardiovascular endurance activities and muscular strength and endurance activities. The course will also introduce instruction in water safety, water survival, swimming strokes, snorkeling, water games, water aerobics & swimming as a lifelong fitness choice. Appropriate attire for the pool includes a one piece swimsuit for the females and a properly secured swimsuit for the males. Length of course: 1 Semester (Meets 6 days a cycle) Course:

BOYS STRENGTH/FITNESS MANAGEMENT I (10-12 elective) GIRLS STRENGTH/FITNESS MANAGEMENT I (10-12 elective)

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Credit: 1.0

This course meets six days per six-day cycle for an entire school year. Strength and conditioning skills and techniques are taught; several different principles of training are implemented. By using progressive resistance exercise (PRE), flexibility exercises, plyometric form running drills, and aerobic activity programs, a student will develop/maintain a high level of physical conditioning throughout the year. A studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s evaluation is based on quarter testing in strength and fitness (girls use the Marine Corps test), as well as completion of all prescribed work. This course is not limited to students participating in varsity athletics. This course may be taken more than one year for credit. Students may have to purchase elective physical education uniforms. Course: BOYS STRENGTH/FITNESS MANAGEMENT II (10-12 elective) Wilson High School Program of Studies 2012-13 Page 42


GIRLS STRENGTH/FITNESS MANAGEMENT II & III (10-12 elective)

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Credit: 1.0

This course meets six days per six-day cycle for an entire year. Entrance into the course is by staff recommendation only. Advanced techniques of progressive resistance exercise (PRE) are implemented in this course, as well as in-depth study of theory in exercise science. Students recommended for this course will enter with a strong background in strength and conditioning principles and be highly motivated. Evaluation of students is based on end-of-quarter testing for strength and fitness levels and knowledge of the principles being studied. Students are required to purchase a uniform for the class. Attendance and participation are very important aspects of this course. Girls Stength/Fitness may have the opportunity to design and implement an individualized program. Course:

NET GAMES- PHYS. ED. (elective 10-12)

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

This course meets six days per six-day cycle for one semester. Students will engage in activities that will increase their knowledge of the importance of lifetime physical activity for personal health and wellbeing. Through physical activity, this course will apply movement concepts to learning and the development of motor skills, game rules and strategies, sport skill development/mastery, self-assessment and goal setting. This course will also provide opportunities for interaction, challenge self-expression, and develop communication skills and healthy interpersonal relationships. Activities and opportunities for co-ed activities will include tennis, badminton, volleyball, ping pong/table tennis, pickle ball, team handball, and basketball.

Course:

RECREATIONAL GAMES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; PHYS. ED. (elective 10-12)

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

This course meets 5 periods per week for one semester. Students will apply movement concepts to the learning and development of motor skills along with strategies and game rules, sport skill development and self assessment and goal setting. Students will be instructed in the skills, rules and courtesies of each activity aimed at promoting fitness as well as developing an appreciation for recreational activities for enjoyment in adult life. Co-ed recreational activities in this course will be floor hockey, indoor soccer/speedball, golf, Frisbee activities, flag football and softball. Daily teacher assessment will include proper dress for activities, participation in activities, attitude (with instructor and classmates), group interaction, and skill development /mastery and knowledge of rules. Course:

STUDIO AEROBICS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; PHYS. ED. ELECTIVE (10-12 elective)

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

This focus of this course is designed for students who desire to train in activities that will increase cardio-respiratory fitness. Activities and exercises will include, but are not limited to Cardio, Kickboxing, Step Aerobics, Team Training, Pilates, Yoga, Aerobic Dance, Flirty Girl Fitness, Zumba Fitness, Music Dance Video participation and an introduction to choreography and the creative process.

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Course:

DANCE WORKSHOP – PHYS. ED. (10-12 elective)

Prerequisite: Strong interest in Dance and Theatre Arts Credit: 0.5

This focus of Dance Workshop will be to challenge both the body and mind through classes in dance technique, choreography, history, pedagogy, and performance. It will improve body intelligence through increased physical and psychological awareness of the body, understanding of body mechanics, and articulation of physical character so to provide a strong foundation for acting and dance performance. It will also provide the student with an introduction to dance as an art form as well as relate information regarding various aspects of dance. Topics include a brief history of dance, dance styles, dance in education, and dance production. Course:

PERSONAL FITNESS – PHYS. ED. (elective 10-12)

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

This course meets six days per six-day cycle for one semester. This course is designed with body composition and exercise in mind to help students’ improve their quality of life through regular physical activity. A student-centered approach will be used while teaching psychomotor, cognitive and affective aspects of physical fitness. A heavy emphasis will be placed upon each student attaining a healthy level of personal physical fitness as well as demonstrating and understanding all aspects of body composition, flexibility, muscular strength and endurance and cardio respiratory efficiency. Understanding of basic techniques, knowledge and strategies for optimal fitness performance testing, value of aerobic activities and fitness guidelines to help develop students’ own personal fitness workouts will be stressed. The course will also emphasize the health and skill related fitness components and how to incorporate them into fitness workouts. Students will be assessing and adjusting their own fitness programs throughout the course in coordination with the instructor. Designing/creating and implementing a personal fitness program using fitness components will be part of student assessment. Course:

FIRST AID AND CPR (AMERICAN RED CROSS COURSES) (10-12 elective) NOTE: This course does not meet the physical education requirement; it is solely an elective

Prerequisite: none Credit: 0.5

This course meets six days per six-day cycle for an entire semester. The purpose of this course is to help participants identify and eliminate potentially hazardous conditions in the environment, recognize emergencies and make appropriate decisions for first aid care. This course teaches skills that participants need to know to give immediate care for life threatening emergencies, suddenly ill/injured people until more advanced medical care arrives. Students have the opportunity to receive ARC certifications in adult, child, and infant CPR/AED and basic first aid. Mere enrollment in this course does not guarantee certification in either course. Course:

WELLNESS THROUGH YOGA (10-12 elective)

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

The focus of this course is to provide an introduction to the art of yoga, through the development of the physical, mental, emotional and social aspects of wellness. This course will allow the students to develop an understanding of their body, mind and self through a variety of physical postures and movement sequences. Students will gain the knowledge to improve stress management skills, physical fitness, and emotional wellness Wilson High School

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using various learning activities. Students will apply the proper skills to strengthen, align and balance their body, while focusing their mind through relaxation techniques to manage stress. Course:

HEALTH (10th grade)

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

Health is required for sophomores and meets six days per six-day cycle for an entire semester. Instructional units included in the course are the following: mental health, tobacco and alcohol education, medications and other drugs, nutrition, non-communicable diseases, human sexuality, reproductive health, sexually transmitted diseases, and AIDS education. Course:

VIRTUAL HEALTH

Prerequisite: Staff recommendation Credit:

0.5

Virtual Health is a state standard-based course designed for organized, self-motivated, computer savvy, independent learners. The class is ideal for those learners that cannot fit the classroom- based instruction into their schedules, would like to explore the world of on-line education, and/ or wish to free-up their structured schedules. The entire class is conducted on-line without any face-to-face instruction with a teacher. In general, students are responsible for two lessons each week that are submitted digitally to their instructor using the Blended Schools Website. Each lesson contains three to five assignments (digital discussion boards, health skills practices, health skills activities, real world connections, video reactions, on-line article assessments, lesson assessments). All communication is conducted via email or digital discussion board submissions. The instructor has daily office hours to answer any questions or concerns. Course:

MAINSTREAM HEALTH ISSUES (10-12 Health elective) NOTE: This course does not meet the physical education requirement; it is solely an elective

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

In an ever changing world, health related information is constantly being changed and new trends are created. Using the internet, magazines, newspapers, and other media sources, students will form their own views and opinions on such topics as: human sexuality, drugs and alcohol, stress, physical fitness, nutrition, governmental influence on health and mental health. In this course, students will engage in the discussion of a current health topic and openly debate their opinion and views. Through this open exchange of opinions on relevant health topics, students will also gain the knowledge to be considerate and open to other studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opinions and views. Course:

VIRTUAL DRIVER EDUCATION --10th grade

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.25

Virtual Driver Education is an online course, hosted by Moodle, based on the Pennsylvania Department of Education Content Expectations. Through multiple media avenues, students will explore traffic statistics, fundamental driving skills, traffic laws, perceptions of driving, and physical and emotional conditions that affect drivers. Students will also be introduced to 21st century computer skills and gain an understanding on how to manage taking an online course. The students are provided support through online communication tools (email or instant messaging) or by meeting the instructor Wilson High School

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during daily office hours held throughout the school day. Virtual Driver Education is also a prerequisite course for the Behind the Wheel program. A student is eligible to sign up for the Behind the Wheel program upon completion of Virtual Driver Education, having earned a final course grade of 75% or higher. Information on Behind the Wheel can be found on Mr. Driesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; website.

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SCIENCE SCIENCE SEQUENCE High School 9th

High School 10th

High School 11th

Honors Physics

Honors Chemistry

Honors Biology

1 credit

1 credit

1 credit

or

or

or

CP Physics

CP Chemistry

CP Biology

1 credit

1 credit

1 credit

High School Electives

Astronomy Human Biology Forensics Environmental Issues ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES (9th, 10th, 11th, 12th grade students can take AP courses) AP Biology 1.6 credits

AP Environmental Science 1.2 credits

AP Chemistry 1.4 credits AP Physics C Mechanics 1.2 credits

AP Physics C Electricity & Magnetism 1.2 credits See Prerequisites

Course: COLLEGE PREP (CP) PHYSICS Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This activity based course provides a conceptual overview of the basic principles of mechanics, electricity, light, sound, and wave mechanics. Laboratory work reinforces the subject material discussed in the classroom. Reasoning skills are emphasized over mathematical problem solving. Course: HONORS PHYSICS Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This course follows a traditional physics course sequence encountered in introductory college physics classes and the AP courses: kinematics (1D, 2D, and circular motion), forces, mechanical energy, electricity, light, and sound. Mathematical problem-solving and reasoning skills are both emphasized. Laboratory work (hands on and computer simulated) reinforces the presented subject material. Course: ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) PHYSICS MECHANICS Prerequisite Physics and Calculus taken previously or concurrently Credit: 1.2

This course provides an in depth study of the basic concepts of mechanics. Mathematical aspects will be emphasized with the use of vector components, vector products, trigonometric functions, and calculus. Students will perform several data focused laboratory exercises per quarter. The course will follow the prescribed Advanced Placement curriculum. Students are required to take the AP examination in May to possibly earn college credits. Wilson High School

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Course: ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) PHYSICS ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM Prerequisite: Physics and Calculus taken previously or concurrently Credit: 1.2

This course provides an in depth study of the basic concepts of electromagnetism. Mathematical aspects will be emphasized with the use of vector components, vector products, trigonometric functions, and calculus. Students will perform several data focused laboratory exercises per quarter. The course will follow the prescribed Advanced Placement curriculum. Students are required to take the AP examination in May to possibly earn college credits. Course: THE PHYSICS OF ASTRONOMY Prerequisite Physics, Biology and Chemistry Credit: 1.0

Physics concepts will be applied to study astronomy topics. The physics of our solar system, stars and their evolution, galaxies and the universe as a whole will be studied. Only a basic mathematical background will be needed. Laboratory investigations and computer simulations will be used to supplement classroom work. Course: VIRDITIONAL HONORS PHYSICS Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This course covers parallels the traditional Pre-AP physics course. As part of the Envision Academy this course utilizes virtual laboratories, video demonstrations, and self-directed study in an on-line environment. Students will meet in the classroom on an as needed basis to perform hands on laboratories and to take examinations. Course: COLLEGE PREP (CP) CHEMISTRY Prerequisite: College Prep Physics Credit: 1.0

Chemistry deals with the structure and composition of matter and the changes that matter undergoes during chemical reactions. Students will develop an understanding of energy, atomic structure, chemical bonding, the arrangement of the Periodic Table, and chemical equations. An emphasis on algebra will be used to aid in the understanding of concepts. Course: HONORS CHEMISTRY Prerequisite: Honors Physics or CP Physics with teacher recommendation Credit: 1.0

This course is designed to study concepts of chemistry in depth. The topics covered include composition of materials, atomic structure, bonding, heat energy, acids-bases, and stoichiometry. Laboratory work supplements theoretical concepts. Course: ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CHEMISTRY Prerequisite: Honors Chemistry Credit: 1.4

This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the mole concept, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, acid-base theory, chemical equilibrium, and kinetics. Students will use scientific graphing calculators. The course material and laboratories are based on the prescribed Advanced Placement curriculum. Students are required to take the AP examination in May to possibly earn college credits. Students are required to do some Wilson High School

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review preparations during the summer previous to this course.

Course: COLLEGE PREP BIOLOGY Prerequisite: College Prep Physics and College Prep Chemistry Credit: 1.0

The CP Biology course is designed to prepare the student for the college level biology curriculum. Technologies and laboratory activities that require the ability to collect and evaluate data and synthesize conclusions are major components of this course. The course includes the core principles of biology as established by the National Education Standards and the Pennsylvania Science Standards. These core principles include cell biology, genetics, evolution and ecology. Course: HONORS BIOLOGY Prerequisite: Honors Chemistry and Honors Physics or CP Chemistry and CP Physics with teacher recommendations Credit: 1.0

This course is designed for students who are planning to major in biology or another life science in college, as well as to prepare students to take AP Biology during their senior year. The major concepts of Biology will be explored from both the micro- and macroscales and will include such topics as: biochemistry and the molecular basis of life, cellular organization and function, genetics and heredity, evolution and the origin of life, taxonomical classification of organisms, and the interactions of organisms with their environment. Lab experiments will reinforce course concepts, and students will be expected to utilize critical thinking skills and methods of scientific inquiry to further their knowledge of science as a process. Course: ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) BIOLOGY Prerequisite: Honors Biology Credit: 1.6

This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory course taken by biology majors during their freshman year. Its aim is to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. The primary emphasis will be on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on memorizing terms and technical details. Essential to this understanding are a grasp of science as a process; personal experience with scientific inquiry; recognition of themes that integrate the major topics; and application of biological knowledge and critical thinking to environmental and social concerns. A.P. Biology labs comprise as much as 30% of the course; they incorporate the use of modern equipment to allow students to learn to use the equipment properly and arrive at accurate data in their experiments. Students are required to take the AP exam in May to possibly earn college credits. Several assignments must be completed during the summer in preparation for this course.

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Course: AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Prerequisite: Honors Biology Credit: 1.2

This course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science that includes a laboratory and field investigation component. Emphasis is placed on the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world (ecology). We will then use ecological principles to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Field trips provide on-site experiences; the cost for these trips will be the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility. (Included among these experiences is a five-day field trip to the Marine Science Consortium at Wallops Island, Virginia) Strong analysis and synthesis skills will be developed and used extensively in all work done in this course. Students are required to take the AP exam in May to possibly earn college credits. Several assignments may be required during the summer in preparation for this course. Course: HUMAN BIOLOGY Prerequisite: Physics, Biology, and Chemistry Credit: 1.0

This course is designed for the high school student interested in physical therapy, practical nursing, radiology, dental hygiene, or other health-related fields. Success in this elective requires that students be self-motivated and be able to work independently without traditional direct instruction from the teacher. The student will study the various systems and organs of the human body and the structure and function of each. The course will also include a study of the diseases and malfunctions of each system and organ. Some laboratory investigations will be required, including dissection of a sheep brain, eye, and kidney. Course: ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES Prerequisite: Physics, Biology, and Chemistry Credit: 1.0

Environmental Issues is a course that is developed around the concept of researching contemporary Environmental issues and discussing possible and probable solutions. These current issues will be analyzed through the lenses of the social sciences, natural sciences, economics, and the ethics of American and other world cultures. Emphasis will be placed on concepts such environmental problems and their causes, and sustaining biodiversity, natural resources, environmental quality, and human societies for future generations. The ultimate goal of environmental education is to motivate people to become actively involved in solving environmental problems. Developing students into members of society who know how to analyze problems, present and discuss solutions, is the ultimate goal of this course. Course: FORENSIC SCIENCE Prerequisite: Physics, Biology, and Chemistry Credit: 1.0

This course explores the application of science to determine facts used in the criminal justice system. Course content will explore the many different aspects of forensic science including: crime scene analysis, physical evidence and their properties such as hair, fiber, and soil, and chemical analysis such as blood and DNA. Students will develop precision in obtaining and analyzing data, and communicating results through the use of lab reports, case Wilson High School

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studies, and projects. Note: Students are warned that the course does contain graphic material.

SOCIAL STUDIES

Scope and Sequence for Wilson School District Secondary Social Studies 2012-2013 Wilson Southern and Wilson West Middle Schools 6th Grade: Global Studies I 7th Grade: Global Studies II 8th Grade: United States History I

Wilson High School College Prep Thread1

Advanced Placement Thread1

9th Grade: Choose One

9th Grade:

• United States History II • Virtual US History II • American Studies2 10th Grade: Choose One

• AP United States History

• America & the World • Virtual America & the World 11th Grade: Choose One

• AP World History

• Civics • Virtual Civics 12th Grade: Students must choose course(s) totaling 1.0 credit

• AP US Government & Politics

Wilson High School

10th Grade

11th Grade:

12th Grade: Choose At Least One

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• Contemporary Issues A (0.5 credit)

All of these courses are year long

(offered 1st semester)

• Contemporary Issues B (0.5 credit) (offered 2nd semester)

• US Combat I—SpanishAmerican War to WW I (0.5 credit) (offered 1st semester)

• US Combat II—WW II (0.5 credit) (offered 1st & 2nd semesters)

All of these courses are 1.0 credit • • • •

AP Psychology AP Microeconomics AP European History AP United States History (If not already taken)

• AP US Government and Politics (If not already taken)

• US Combat III—Cold War, Korea, Vietnam, & Persian Gulf • AP World History (0.5 credit) (offered 2nd semester)

(If not already taken)

• Psychology(0.5 credit) (offered 1st & 2nd semesters)

• Sociology (0.5 credit) (offered 1st & 2nd semesters)

• The History of Revolution (0.5 credit) (offered 1st & 2nd semester)

• The Global & National Impact of American Pop Culture (0.5 credit) (offered 1st & 2nd semester)

• Historical Thought and Culture2 (1.0 social studies credit & 1.0 English credit) (full year course)

• Nazi Germany and the Holocaust( 1.0 credit) (full year course)

East Asia: Culture & History /International Business3 (0.5 social studies credit & 0.5 business credit)

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(full year course—semester SS, semester business)

• Technological Impacts4 (0.5 social studies credit & 0.5 technology credit) (full year course)

1 Students are not delegated to any particular thread. They may cross into different threads during their tenure at the high school. 2

These courses are designed as an integrated, inter-departmental class. Students will receive 1.0 social studies credit and 1.0 English credit. 3

This course will be blocked with the Business department (half-year SS, half-year International Business). The student will receive 0.5 credits for Social Studies and 0.5 credits for Business.

4

This course will be co-taught with the Technology and Engineering department. The student will receive .5 credits for Social Studies and .5 credits for Technology and Engineering.

Secondary Social Studies-Elective Course 9th Grade Choices

10th Grade Choices 11th Grade Choices 12th Grade Choices

• Contemp. Issues A

• Contemp. • Issues A

(if space is available)

• Contemp. Issues B

(if space is available)

• Contemp. Issues B (if space is available)

(if space is available)

• US Combat I (if space is available)

• Contemp. Issues A (if space is available)

• Contemp. Issues B

(if space is available)

• US Combat III Wilson High School

• Contemp. Issues B

(if space is available)

• US Combat I

• US Combat I

• US Combat I

(if space is available (if not already taken)

(if space is available (if not already taken)

(if not already taken)

• US Combat II • US Combat II • US Combat II

• Contemp. Issues A

(if space is available (if not already taken)

• US Combat III (if space is available (if not already taken)

(if space is available (if not already taken)

• US Combat III (if space is available (if not already taken)

• US Combat II (if not already taken)

• US Combat III (if not already taken)

Program of Studies 2012-13 Page 53


• The Global & • The Global & National National • The Global & Impact of Impact of National • The Global & American American Impact of National Pop Culture Pop Culture American Impact of (if space is available) (if space is available) Pop Culture American (if not already taken) (if not already taken) (if not already taken) Pop Culture (if space is available) • East Asia: • East Asia: Culture & Culture & • East Asia: History/ History/ Culture & • East Asia: History/ Culture & International International History/ Business Business International Business (if space is available) (if space is available) International (if space is available)

Business (if space is available)

(if not already taken)

(if not already taken)

(if not already taken)

• The History of Revolution

• The History of Revolution

(if space is available)

(if space is available)

• The History of Revolution

(if not already taken)

(if not already taken)

• AP US History • AP US History (if space is available)

(if space is available)

• AP US History

(if not already taken)

(if not already taken)

(if not already taken)

• AP World History (if space is available) (if not already taken)

• AP World History (if not already taken)

• AP Psychology (if space is available)

• AP European History (if space is available)

• Psychology (if space is available)

• Sociology Wilson High School

• AP Psychology (if not already taken)

• AP European History (if not already taken)

• Psychology (if not already taken)

Program of Studies 2012-13 Page 54


(if space is available)

• Nazi Germany & the Holocaust (if space is available)

• Technological Impacts (if space is available)

Sociology (if not already taken)

• Nazi Germany & the Holocaust (if not already taken)

• Technological Impacts (if not already taken)

• AP US Government & Politics (If not already taken)

Course: College Prep UNITED STATES HISTORY II (Grade 9) Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

United States History II is a comprehensive study of the development of the economy, government, and foreign policy of the United States from 1890 to the present. The evolution of America’s society and culture will be reviewed. Additionally, the survey course focuses on the people, ideas, and events that have helped shape modern America. In addition to learning the skills used by the historian, the student is taught to view our nation’s history as a continuous process of change and growth. Course: College Prep VIRTUAL UNITED STATES HISTORY II (Grade 9) Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

Virtual United States History II course follows the same curriculum scope and sequence as regular US History II; however, instruction will be entirely self-driven with the teacher serving as a facilitator to assist students in their self-discovery. The teacher will post assignment and activities designed to guide and challenge students during their self inquiry. Students may occasionally meet with the classroom teacher however, the majority of the study will be self-guided. Students should be self-motivated and MUST have out-of-school access to the internet. Course: College Prep AMERICAN STUDIES II (Grade 9)

Prerequisite: None Credit: 2.0 (1 credit for English & 1 credit for Social Studies)

Although similar in scope and content to the standard course (see above), American Studies is an interdisciplinary course designed to examine the historical and literary movements of post1890 America. It is designed for the self-motivated student who can engage in independent inquiry, research, and reading. Students may participate in a variety of additional independent or group activities such as readings, oral reports, and research projects. Wilson High School

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Course: Advanced Placement UNITED STATES HISTORY (Grade 9 & Elective) Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Credit: 1.0

Taught on the college level, AP United States History follows the prescribed Advanced Placement curriculum. This course will focus on selected topics critical to the understanding of the formation and development of the nation. The course will also prepare students for the study of history on the college level by developing writing, research, and examination skills required by typical college courses. Students are encouraged to earn college credit and possible advancement by demonstrating their competence on the AP exam. The completion of a summer reading list and accompanying assignments may be required throughout the summer. Course: College Prep AMERICA & THE WORLD (Grade 10) Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

America & the World course is an updated and improved version of our former 10th grade course, World Cultures. The new course will retain the most important and vital concepts that were presented in World Cultures, however a new emphasis will require students to develop a detailed understanding of how the United States interacts with other nations. Topics included in the new course will consist of (but not be limited to) US foreign policy, international politics, cultural studies, and comparative religions. Areas to be studied will change according to current world conditions; however a detailed examination of the Middle East, China, and India will regularly take place. Course: College Prep VIRTUAL AMERICA & THE WORLD (Grade 10) Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

Virtual America & the World course follows the same curriculum scope and sequence as regular America & the World; however, instruction will be entirely self-driven with the teacher serving as a facilitator to assist students in their self-discovery. The teacher will post assignment and activities designed to guide and challenge students during their self inquiry. Students may occasionally meet with the classroom teacher however; the majority of the study will be self-guided. Students should be self-motivated and MUST have out-of-school access to the internet. Course: Advanced Placement WORLD HISTORY (Grade 10 & Elective) Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Credit: 1.0

Taught on the college level, AP World History follows the prescribed Advanced Placement curriculum. The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of changes in global frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. It emphasizes relevant factual knowledge, leading interpretive issues, and skills in analyzing types of historical evidence. Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms an organizing principle to address change and continuity throughout the course. Specific themes provide further organization to the course, along with consistent attention to contacts among societies that form the core of world history as a field of study. The completion of a summer reading list and accompanying assignments may be required throughout the summer. Wilson High School

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Course: College Prep CIVICS (Grade 11) Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This course will offer students a strong introduction to government, citizenship, and the American economic and legal systems. The foundations of political and economic democracy, citizen interaction in the economy, citizen rights and responsibilities, government and citizen interaction on local, state, and national issues, global interdependence, and citizen influence of public policy are major units that will be addressed throughout the course. Course: College Prep VIRTUAL CIVICS (Grade 11) Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

Virtual Civics course follows the same curriculum scope and sequence as regular Civics; however, instruction will be entirely self-driven with the teacher serving as a facilitator to assist students in their self-discovery. The teacher will post assignment and activities designed to guide and challenge students during their self inquiry. Students may occasionally meet with the classroom teacher however, the majority of the study will be self-guided. Students should be self-motivated and MUST have out-of-school access to the internet. Course: Advanced Placement UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (Grade11 & Elective) Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Credit: 1.0

Taught on the college level, AP US Government and Politics follows a prescribed Advanced Placement curriculum. Students will study the principles of the United States government and politics. It places primary emphasis on the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. Students will study political parties, interest groups, public policy, and civil rights. They are encouraged to earn college credit and possible advancement by demonstrating their competence on the AP exams. The completion of a summer reading list and accompanying assignments may be required throughout the summer. Course: Advanced Placement PSYCHOLOGY (Grade 12 & Elective) Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Credit: 1.0

Advanced Placement Psychology follows the prescribed AP curriculum. Students will study psychology from a historical as well as scientific perspective. They are encouraged to earn college credit and possible advancement by demonstrating their competence on the AP examination. Students will participate in sheep brain and eye dissections. The completion of a summer reading list and accompanying assignments may be required throughout the summer. Course: Advanced Placement MICROECONOMICS (Grade 12 & Elective) Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Credit: 1.0

Taught on the college level, AP Microeconomics follows a prescribed Advanced Placement curriculum. Students will study the principles of micro-economics. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students are encouraged to earn college credit and possible advancement by demonstrating their competence on the AP exams. The completion of a summer reading list Wilson High School

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and accompanying assignments may be required throughout the summer. Course: Advanced Placement EUROPEAN HISTORY (Grade 12 & Elective)

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Credit: 1.0

Taught on the college level, AP European History follows the prescribed Advanced Placement curriculum. This course uses a multi-discipline approach to examine the period from the Renaissance to the modern era. Students are introduced to principles of research, historical study, and historical writing. The course is recommended to students who are considering college studies in history, pre-law, political science, or related fields. Students are encouraged to earn college credit and possible advancement by demonstrating their competence on the AP exam. The completion of a summer reading list and accompanying assignments may be required throughout the summer. Course: College Prep CONTEMPORARY ISSUES A (Grade 12 & Elective)

This section of CI will be offered during the first semester. Students may select both sections of CI to complete their mandatory 1.0 credit. Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

Students engage in an analysis of the issues, events, personalities, and places that comprise the current state of local, national, and global political, economic, and social developments. In this course the student will explore the cause-and-effect relationship of the events of our time and evaluate their possible impact on the future. Classroom activities include team competition for the Voguit Cup, participation in a survivor series debate tournament, and other interactive activities. Course: College Prep CONTEMPORARY ISSUES B (Grade 12 & Elective)

This section of CI will be offered during the second semester. Students may select both sections of CI to complete their mandatory 1.0 credit. Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

Students engage in an analysis of the issues, events, personalities, and places that comprise the current state of local, national, and global political, economic, and social developments. In this course the student will explore the cause-and-effect relationship of the events of our time and evaluate their possible impact on the future. Classroom activities include team competition for the Voguit Cup, participation in a survivor series debate tournament, and other interactive activities. Course: US Combat I (Grade 12 & Elective) This course is part of the former course entitled 20th Century American Conflict Offered 1st Semester Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

This semester course takes you from the top San Juan Hill to the bottom of the Trenches of the Western Front, from the brashness of Teddy Roosevelt to the reserve of Woodrow Wilson. See how the U.S.A. began what is now called “The American Century.” U.S.A. COMBAT I features the battles against the Spanish Empire the mosquito and yellow fever, to battles against the Kaiser, the mud, and the Cootie. “Remember the Maine” to “Rock of the Marne,” this course is supplemented with the use of historic period artifacts, primary sources, and popular culture video and audio. (This course can be taken individually and does not need to Wilson High School

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be in sequence.) Course: USA Combat II (Grade 12 & Elective) This course is part of the former course entitled 20th Century American Conflict Offered 1st Semester & 2nd Semester Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

This semester course exams the history of the American combat experience during 1941-1945, and is supplemented with the use of historic period artifacts, primary sources, and popular culture video and audio. It covers the war against Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. Information is presented from the point-of-view of the WWII combat soldier, marine, airman, and sailor. U.S.A COMBAT II explores all the major ground, air, and sea weapons and battles involving U.S. forces. Major components of the class are the actual stories of real regular American citizens, turned soldiers and marines, fighting Germans and Japanese, and enduring extreme hardships. (This course can be taken individually and does not need to be in sequence.) Course: USA Combat III (Grade 12 & Elective) This course is part of the former course entitled 20th Century American Conflict Offered 1st Semester Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

This semester course exams the history of the Cold War and the “hot” proxy wars fought in Korea and Vietnam resulting in over 100,000 U.S. killed. The Cold War was a protracted period of nuclear tension that began in the final days of WWII (1945) and ended with the fall of the Soviet Union (1991). In U.S.A. COMBAT III explore how WWII allies became PostWar enemies, the battles of Korea and Vietnam, how the “BOMB” scared people in America every day, and how the “Evil Empire” was brought down by a “Cowboy President” who stuck to his guns and bluffed his way to victory. This course is supplemented with the use of historic period artifacts, primary sources, and popular culture video and audio. (This course can be taken individually and does not need to be in sequence.) Course: College Prep PSYCHOLOGY (Grade 12 & Elective)

This course is part of the former course entitled Human Behavior Offered both 1st and 2nd semesters Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

This course is for college bound seniors who are interested in an introduction to psychology. This will be a project based course. Homework does not count except when it is a project or an essay. Students will be exposed to the history of psychology as well as fundamental principles that underlie the discipline such as memory, learning, personality, language, and brain function.

Wilson High School

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Course: College Prep SOCIOLOGY (Grade 12 & Elective)

This course is part of the former course entitled Human Behavior Offered both 1st and 2nd semesters Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

This course is for college bound seniors who are interested in an introduction to sociology. This will be a project based course. Homework does not count except when it is a project or an essay. Students will be exposed to the history of sociology as well as fundamental principles that underlie the discipline such as culture, social structure, group behavior, socialization, and family dynamics. Course: College Prep THE HISTORY OF REVOLUTION (Grade 12 & Elective) This course is a modification of the course entitled Military Hist. of West. Civ. Offered both 1st and 2nd semesters Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

The ultimate aim of this course is to examine why cultures revolt, what tactics are used, and how revolutions impact not only soldiers, but society as well. Building on that aim, students will examine the role that technology, morals, politics, and economics play in revolution. Four historical examples (American, French, Russian, & Chinese) will be examined as well as the modern Middle Eastern revolts. Course: College Prep THE GLOBAL AND NATIONAL IMPACT OF AMERICAN POP CULTURE (Grade 12 & Elective)

Prerequisite: None Credit: 0.5

This course is designed to examine how American popular culture has affected the political, social, and technological direction of the United States. Additionally the positive and negative impact that American culture has had on the modern global society will also be analyzed. Course: College Prep HISTORICAL THOUGHT AND CULTURE (Grade 12) Prerequisite: None Credit: 2.0 (1.0 credit for English & 1.0 credit for Social Studies)

This course is designed to be an interdisciplinary class which will fuse World History and World Literature while at the same time having a philosophical backbone that would guide the course. The ultimate aim of the course is for students to evaluate how global societies throughout history answered essential questions generated by each branch of philosophy. The end goal is to have students generate their own opinions on these issues through the spectrum of their own place in history. Course: College Prep NAZI GERMANY AND THE HOLOCAUST (Grade 12 & Elective)

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This course is designed to examine the rise, reign, and ultimate collapse of Hitler and the Nazi party throughout Germany. While many content areas will be examined, special emphasis will be placed on Hitlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social agenda resulting in the Jewish Holocaust.

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Course: College Prep EAST ASIAN: CULTURE & HISTORY (Grade 12 & Elective)â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will be blocked with INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 (0.5 credits in Social Studies & 0.5 credits in Business)

This course examines the history, culture, politics, economics, pop culture, and current events of East Asia. Because of the emergence of China, Korea, and Japan as major players in world politics and economics, students will develop a broader knowledge of this region. Course: College Prep TECHNOLOGICAL IMPACTS ON SOCIETY (Grade 12 & Elective) Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0 (Students will receive 0.5 Tech & Eng credit and 0.5 Social Studies credit)

This course focuses on the impacts that technology has on our daily lives. Students will engage in an analysis of how technology has affected the modern political, economic, and social landscape. Specific topics may include alternative fuels, communication devices, Web 2.0 technologies, technology and the economy, global implications of technology, technological innovation, technological effects on food and clothing, and technological literacy. Through a variety of student-centered instructional strategies such as collaborative research and debate, students will explore and evaluate the current and future influence that technological advancements have had on society. Additionally, students will be taught and required to use Web 2.0 tools for their learning and presentation tools.

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ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION The Technology and Engineering Department is comprised of two different types of courses: technology/computer classes, and engineering classes. Descriptions and class offerings are listed below.

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY PRE-ENGINEERING PROGRAM Project Lead the Way is a college recognized pre-engineering program designed to introduce students to the career of engineering. This program prepares students for the types of engineering classes they will be taking in college. All students can benefit by completing the entire program, or by taking a few of the classes. Students can also qualify for college credit by successfully completing the core courses and the final exam. The seven course listed below all fulfill the STEM requirement inside the STEM Academy. • Core Courses – Honors Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) – Honors Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) – Honors Principles of Engineering (POE) – Honors Digital Electronics (DE) – Honors Civil Engineering & Architecture (CEA) – Honors Computer Science and Software Engineering NEW – Honors Aerospace Engineering (AE) • Capstone Course – For 12th grade students only – Honors Engineering Design & Development (EDD)

Suggested sequence of studies engineering 9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

Required

Required

Class Options – Choose at least one

Required

Honors Introduction to Engineering Design (IED)

Honors Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM)

Honors Computer Science and Software Engineering - NEW

Honors Engineering Design & Development (EDD)

AND/OR

Honors Digital Electronics (DE)

Honors Principles of Engineering (POE)

Honors Civil Engineering & Architecture (CEA) Honors Aerospace Engineering (AE)

Additional Electives

Additional Electives

Additional Electives

Additional Electives

See engineering teacher

Any PLTW STEM courses

Any PLTW STEM courses

Any PLTW STEM courses

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Course:

HONORS INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN (IED)

Prerequisite: NONE Credit: 1.0

In this course, students use 3D solid modeling design software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems. Students will learn how to document their work and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. This course is designed for 9th or 10th grade students. The major focus of the IED course is to expose students to the design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, global and human impacts, engineering standards, and technical documentation. Course:

HONORS COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING

Category: CORE COURSE Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design Credit: 1.0

Computer Integrated Manufacturing bridges the gap between design and prototype. Students create projects on the computer using software programs such as Autodesk Inventor, EdgeCAM, RoboPro, RoboCELL, Adobe Illustrator, and more. Students are able to create their prototypes by learning to use a Laser Engraver, CNC 3-Axis Mill, Rapid Prototyping Machine, Robotic Arms, a 3-D Scanner, and other prototyping methods. This course exposes students to technologies that are on the cutting edge, and are simply unparalleled in any other atmosphere. Course:

HONORS PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (POE) PLTW

Prerequisite: Algebra I Credit: 1.0

This survey course of engineering exposes students to some of the major concepts theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Students have an opportunity to investigate engineering and high-tech careers and to develop skills and understanding of course concepts. Students employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. Students also learn how to document their work and communicate their solutions to peers and members of the professional community.

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Course:

HONORS COMPUTER SCIENCE AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING - NEW

Prerequisite: Algebra I Credit: 1.0

How does abstract logical thinking skills and computational power change our lives? This course will develop computational thinking skills in order to solve open ended, practical problems that occur in the real world. Students will eventually code their own applications and games in a multitude of working environments - including the creation of android applications for use on a provided Android smart phone or tablet. Students will also have the opportunity to create interactive web 2.0 software working with HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript.

Course:

HONORS DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (DE)

Prerequisite: Geometry or Algebra I Credit: 1.0

This course is the study of electronic circuits that are used to process and control digital signals. Digital electronics is the foundation of all modern electronic devices such as cellular phones, MP3 players, laptop computers, digital cameras, and high-definition televisions. The major focus of the DE course is to expose students to the process of combinational and sequential logic design, teamwork, communication methods, engineering standards, and technical documentation. This course is designed for 10th, 11th or 12th grade students. Course:

HONORS CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE (CEA)

Prerequisite: Algebra I Credit: 1.0

The major focus of this course is completing long-term projects that involve the development of property sites. As students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture they apply what they learn to the design and development of a property. The course provides teachers and students freedom to develop the property as a simulation or to students to model the experiences that civil engineers and architects face. Students work in teams, exploring hands on activities and projects to learn the characteristics of civil engineering and architecture. In addition, students use 3D design software to help them design solutions to solve major course projects. Students learn about documenting their project, solving problems, and communicating their solutions to their peers and members of the professional community of civil engineering and architecture. Course:

HONORS Aerospace Engineering

Category: CORE COURSE Prerequisite: Algebra 1 Credit: 1.0

The major focus of this course is to expose students to the world of aeronautics, flight and engineering through the fields of aeronautics, aerospace engineering and related areas of study. Lessons engage students in engineering design problems related to aerospace information systems, astronautics, rocketry, propulsion, the physics of space science, space life sciences, the biology of space science, principles of aeronautics, structures and materials, and systems engineering. Students work in teams utilizing hands-on activities, projects and problems and are exposed to various situations faced by aerospace engineers. In addition, students use 3D design software to help design solutions to proposed problems. Students design intelligent vehicles to learn about documenting their project, solving problems and Wilson High School

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communicating their solutions to their peers and members of the professional community. This course is designed for 11th or 12th grade students. Course:

HONORS ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT (EDD)

Category: SENIOR CAPSTONE COURSE Prerequisite: IED and two other PLTW courses Credit: 1.0

This course is an engineering research course in which students work in teams to research, design, and construct a solution to an open-ended engineering problem. Students apply principles developed in the four preceding courses and are guided by a community mentor. They must present progress reports, submit a final written report, and defend their solutions to a panel of outside reviewers at the end of the school year.

Technology and Computer Classes Part of the Technology & Engineering Department Course: Visual Design and Image Manipulation Category: 10, 11, 12 Grades Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This course is an introductory visual media and design course for students pursuing a journey in graphic or visual design. Students will work independently and within groups to use 21st century resources, photography, and graphic design applications like Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign to create marketable products. The course will follow and build upon the Adobe Visual Design curriculum. At the end of the course, the students will have the opportunity to acquire program certifications from Adobe System Inc. Course:

WEB DESIGN AND DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT

Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This course focuses on all aspects of web site design and creation. This course will focus on four key skill areas related to web design and digital content; project management and collaboration, digital design processes, research and communication, and professional web authoring tools. The course will start out with the fundamentals of web design and spiral into more challenging skills as the year goes on. Projects will focus on the entire process of real world web design, focusing on all of the steps from project planning to evaluation and website launch and implementation. This course will allow for Adobe certifications in Adobe Dreamweaver and Fireworks software. Course:

Digital Video & Computer Animation

Prerequisite: Credit: 1.0

None

This course introduces students to the latest in digital video production, post production, special effects and 2D/3D animation. All areas of video creation and production will be explored from determining audience to camera angles/shots, filming, editing, sound, titling and special effects. Students will also gain experience with DVD creation/authoring, as well as formatting video for web and devices. Students will also explore applications of 2D and 3D animation as they relate to video Wilson High School

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creation/production. Professional level software including Adobe Premiere, Soundbooth, Photoshop, After Effects and other programs will be utilized in this class. Students projects may include (but are not limited to) digital video commercials, documentaries, instructional videos, music videos, public service announcements, special events, newscasts and interviews. An Adobe Digital Video certification will be available for students that choose to pursue this option. Course:

Technology Innovation for Design and Communication

Prerequisite: Credit:

1.0

This course is a project based technology research course in which students will work independently and within diversely skilled groups to research, develop, design and create solutions to their own, school, community, or worldwide technology communication needs. Students will get to use an array of digital media production applications related to animation, audio production, desktop publishing, graphics design, photography, printing, programing, video production and web design to. It will also allow the students who plan on pursuing a post-secondary degree in a specific area of concentration to focus on acquiring one or more program certifications from Adobe Systems Inc. and learn to create a marketable product.

I-BEEM, an integrated Biology, English, Engineering, and Math course that transitions 9th grade students into the academic culture of Wilson High School. At the heart of this unique program is the requirement for students to conduct authentic research. This research process allows students to study real-world problems in the community and to learn about local issues by becoming active partners with community agencies.

WORLD LANGUAGES The Wilson World Languages department is committed to developing students who are able to communicate in the target languages. Working with a standards based curriculum, students are able to speak and write effectively in the language studied. Every course also offers a cultural component so that students come to understand the relationship between the practices and products of the country and the language itself. Students with an interest in languages or those who hope to pursue careers in international business, foreign relations, law or medicine are encouraged to double up on their language study. Once students have learned one language, their ability to learn a third skyrockets! Prepare yourself to compete globally by learning multiple languages! Course: FRENCH I Prerequisite: None 1.0 Credit:

This is a course in basic French with emphasis on communication. How to greet people in French and keep a conversation going, how to pronounce everyday terms or names in French, and how to ask and understand basic directions when traveling are among the main topics for speaking skills. Also included are the fundamentals of French sentence structure. Students study the French cultural heritage of art, history, cuisine, and customs. Course: Accelerated French I and II

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Prerequisite: None Credit: 1.0

This course is taught in French and is designed for those who are interested in progressing through levels I and II in one year’s time. Emphasis is on communication. How to greet people in French and keep a conversation going, how to pronounce everyday terms or names in French, and how to ask and understand basic directions when traveling are among the main topics for speaking skills. Also included are the fundamentals of French sentence structure. Students study the French cultural heritage of art, history, cuisine and customs. Students who successfully complete this course are prepared to continue their studies in French III the following year. * This course is perfect for students interested in mastering a second world language in high school. Course:

FRENCH II

Prerequisite: French I or equivalent Credit: 1.0

French II completes the presentation of the fundamentals of the French language through a conversational and communicative skills approach. Course:

FRENCH III

Prerequisite: Level II or equivalent Credit: 1.0

This is an intermediate level course in French. Students gain confidence in speaking about themselves and current events. Listening and speaking skills are developed to include specialized vocabulary and idioms. Reading and writing activities stress the understanding of verbs and expanded vocabulary. As major activity projects, students participate in simulated visits to French-speaking areas, sensitizing them to different customs, “survival vocabulary,” and cultural highlights. Course:

HONORS FRENCH IV

Prerequisite: Level III - or equivalent Credit: 1.0

This course focuses on heightening listening and speaking skills for conversation as well as reading and writing in the language. Students use French in the classroom not only for everyday expressions, questions, and answers, but also for oral and written summaries of articles, films, and literature in original French, for discussing personal opinions and reactions, and for pursuing cultural topics of student interest. The reading materials include excerpts of novels, short stories, and current French magazine and newspaper articles. Students are eligible for the trip to France in 2013. Course:

HONORS FRENCH V

Prerequisite: Level IV or equivalent Credit: 1.0

This class is conducted in French in a seminar atmosphere. Class discussions and individual and group projects help students polish their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills into lifelong assets. Materials for reading and listening include these topics: La France, Le Petit Prince, “Intrigues,” “Les Arts,” “Practical and Creative Writing,” and selected short stories and excerpts of novels. French V is strongly recommended for students who want to meet selective college language requirements. Students are eligible for the trip to France in 2013.

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Course: GERMAN I Prerequisite: None 1.0 Credit:

This is an introductory course in German. Basic speech patterns, vocabulary, and pronunciation are covered through conversational dialogues and intensive oral practice. Also included are essentials of grammar, everyday culture (such as behavior patterns of native speakers, geography, etc.), and the development of listening, reading, and writing skills. Course:

GERMAN II

Prerequisite: German I or equivalent Credit: 1.0

German II completes the presentation of the fundamentals of the language through a conversational and communicative skills approach. Course:

GERMAN III

Prerequisite: Level II or equivalent Credit: 1.0

German III is the final segment of the three-part “core curriculum” preceding the advanced German IV and German V offerings. Following extensive review, the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammar is completed during this course. In addition, listening and speaking skills are improved through structured activities, rudimentary reading and writing skills are expanded, and cultural awareness is enhanced. Special emphasis is placed on mastering basic verbs, time expressions, noun determiners, and adjective endings, as well as difficult sounds within the German phonetic system. Vocabulary expansion is more rapid than at any other point in the basic curriculum. In German III, students are expected to answer written and oral questions in complete sentences. By the end of the course, many classes are taught almost exclusively in German with near-normal fluency. A student’s cultural awareness is expanded on many fronts during this course, enabling a motivated student to function on an elementary level both linguistically and behaviorally within a foreign setting. Students are eligible for the trip to Germany and Austria in 2013. Course:

HONORS GERMAN IV

Prerequisite: Level III or equivalent Credit: 1.0

This course focuses on conversation and reading in the language as well as advanced grammar and vocabulary expansion. Students are expected to use German in the classroom not only for everyday expressions, directions, questions and answers, but also for discussion of literature, contemporary articles, and culture. German is also used by both students and the instructor for expressing personal opinions and reactions and for exploring subjects of mutual interest. Reading material includes actual literary works such as short stories and short novels as well as timely magazine and newspaper articles of moderate difficulty. Videos and tapes are used to increase listening comprehension, and writing skills are refined through assignments requiring paragraph and ultimately, essay-length responses. Students are eligible for the trip to Germany and Austria in 2013. Course:

HONORS GERMAN V

Prerequisite: Level IV or equivalent Credit: 1.0

This class is conducted in German in a seminar atmosphere and features various projects designed to build upon and polish writing, speaking, and listening skills. In addition to a core literature program including short stories, several novels, and a play, reading materials are chosen by interest of the class participants. Several points of advanced grammar are also Wilson High School

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addressed in this course. German V is strongly recommended for students who want to earn college credits for their proficiency through placement examinations at selective colleges. Students are eligible for the trip to Germany and Austria in 2013. Course: MANDARIN CHINESE I Prerequisite: N o n e 1.0 Credit:

This is a beginning course in Mandarin Chinese. Students will be introduced to basic Chinese conversations, including reading and writing characters. Emphasis will be on tones, pinyin, character stroke formation and stroke counts. Students will train their listening, speaking, and writing skills through daily drills and practices. Students will also learn to appreciate Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich diverse ethnic cultures and traditions. Various supplementary and contemporary materials will be used in the course, such as films, popular music, China online news links, CD readings, and workbooks.

Course: MANDARIN CHINESE II

Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese I or equivalent Credit: 1.0

Mandarin Chinese II continues the study from Mandarin Chinese I. Students will advance their understanding of Chinese language in grammar and usage. Furthermore, emphasis will be placed on writing and reading comprehension. Students will continue to enjoy contemporary Chinese films, music, and art. Course: MANDARIN CHINESE III

Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese II or equivalent Credit: 1.0

This is an intermediate level course in Chinese. Students will advance their study of Chinese language and culture through a variety of activities and materials from literature, cinematic art, news, and history. Fluency in speaking and deeper comprehension of grammar usage will be the focus. News articles, short essays and short stories will be used as part of learning materials. Course: Virtual Honors Chinese IV

Prerequisite: Chinese I, II, III Credit: 1.0

Honors Chinese IV offers students who are serious about continuing study of Chinese language to extend their study of the language in an academically more rigorous setting. Honors Chinese 4 will continue to focus on language learning and cultural understanding. Students will study the use of Chinese idioms in conversations. Traditional Tang and Song poetry, contemporary news and online articles will be part of the curriculum. Course: AP CHINESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE Prerequisite: Chinese I, II, III Credit: 1.0

This is a college level Mandarin Chinese. This course offers a more in-depth study of the native speaking and writing styles of the Chinese language and its diverse ethnic cultures and traditions, including the use of idiom and the common cultural practices in conversations and writings in various parts of China. This course also introduces classical literature, including the selected writings from such old Chinese classics as The Journey to the West, The Dreams of the Wilson High School Program of Studies 2012-13 Page 69


Red Chamber, Tang and Song Dynasty poetry and New Modern Chinese poetry. Students will also read selected passages from such notable contemporary writers such as Zhang Ai-Ling and Bai Xian-Yong. Online news articles, short modern fiction, poetry, and movie reviews will be included as part of the curricular study of Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contemporary lifestyle.

Course: SPANISH I Prerequisite: None

Credit: 1.0

This is a beginning course in Spanish. Basic speech patterns, vocabulary, and pronunciation are presented through conversational dialogues and oral practice. Also included are essentials of grammar, everyday culture (such as behavior patterns of native speakers, geography, etc.), and the development of listening, reading, and writing skills.

Course: ACCELERATED SPANISH I AND II Prerequisite: None

Credit: 1.0

This course is taught in Spanish and is designed for those who are interested in progressing through levels I and II in one yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time. Emphasis is on communication. How to greet people in Spanish and keep a conversation going, how to pronounce everyday terms or names in Spanish, and how to ask and understand basic directions when traveling are among the main topics for speaking skills. Also included are the fundamentals of Spanish sentence structure. Students study the Spanish cultural heritage of art, history, cuisine and customs. Students who successfully complete this course are prepared to continue their studies in Spanish III the following year. * This course is perfect for students interested in mastering a second world language in high school. Course: SPANISH II

Prerequisite: Spanish I or equivalent Credit: 1.0

Spanish II continues the presentation of the fundamentals of the language on a more complex level, expanding vocabulary and grammar while improving the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are encouraged to speak as much Spanish as they can at this level Course: SPANISH III

Prerequisite: Level II or equivalent Credit: 1.0

This is an intermediate level course in Spanish. Listening and speaking skills are developed to include specialized vocabulary and idioms. Reading and writing activities stress the understanding of verbs and expanded vocabulary. The reading of short stories and articles in Spanish builds further acquaintance with the cultural heritage of the native speakers. This course is taught entirely in Spanish and students are expected to use only Spanish in the classroom.

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Course: HONORS SPANISH IV

Prerequisite: Level III or equivalent Credit: 1.0

This course focuses on speaking, reading, writing and listening in the language. This course is taught entirely in Spanish and students are expected to speak only Spanish in the classroom. They will use Spanish for everyday conversations, questions and answers as well as for oral summaries of articles and films, discussions of personal opinions and reactions and presentations of topics of student interest. A cultural emphasis will be placed on Spain as they study its geography, art, music, customs and foods. Students are eligible for the trip to Spain in 2013. Course: HONORS SPANISH V

Prerequisite: Level IV or equivalent Credit: 1.0

The class is conducted in Spanish in a seminar atmosphere with frequent class discussions and projects. Students are expected to work on perfecting their writing and speaking skills. Material for reading and listening is chosen by interest of the class participants from topics such as: "La Felicidad," "Los problemas internacionales," "El Arte Moderno," "La Literatura Espanola," "Practical Letter Writing," and "La Historia de Espana." Students will discuss Spanish V is strongly recommended for students who want to meet selective college language requirements. Course: Spanish for Native Speakers 1

Prerequisite: must be a Native Spanish Speaker Credit:1.0

This course is designed to meet the unique needs of native Spanish Speakers. It will move at a faster pace than the traditional Spanish class. Students will improve their writing skills with more accurate spelling and use of accents. Cultural studies will allow students to learn more about their personal heritage and that of other students in the class. Students will continue to develop their speaking and reading skills with cultural materials and authentic texts. This course is taught in Spanish and students are expected to speak Spanish in the classroom. Course: Spanish for Native Speakers 2

Prerequisite: must be a Native Spanish Speaker Credit: 1.0

This course is designed to meet the unique needs of native Spanish Speakers. It will move at a faster pace than the traditional Spanish class. Students will work to develop style in their writing pieces as well as understand both fiction and non-fiction text. Students will consider issues related to Globalization as it relates to our world today. This course is taught in Spanish and students are expected to speak Spanish in the classroom.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS Course:

JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TRAINING COURSE (JROTC) I

Prerequisite: None; Grades 9-12 Credit: 1.0

The first year of Leadership, Education and Training (LET) course provides an introduction into the Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC). The programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to motivate young people to be better citizens. Activities to develop leadership and management skills are stressed. This course uses military skills to teach selfdiscipline, confidence, and pride in communication skills, promotes and encourages citizenship through participation in community service projects, and develops leadership Wilson High School

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potential. Students are required wear uniforms once a week. Course:

JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS’ TRAINING COURSE (JROTC) II

Prerequisite: JROTC I; Grades 10-12 Credit: 1.0

The second year of the Leadership, Education and Training (LET) course builds on what was learned during JROTC I, with an emphasis placed on further development of leadership ability, oral communications, drill and ceremonies, first aid skills and map reading. Students are placed in leadership positions and are expected to demonstrate the ability to work cooperatively with others. Course content prepares students to succeed both in school and after graduation. Students are required to wear uniforms once a week. Course:

JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS’ TRAINING COURSE (JROTC) III

Prerequisite: JROTC I& II; Grades 11 & 12 Credit: 1.0

The third year of the Leadership, Education and Training (LET) course places more emphasis on leadership within the JROTC cadet battalion. By taking on added responsibility, students gain more leadership skills to help them succeed during and after high school. Duties and responsibili- ties of a leader are applied to the areas of drill and ceremonies and American citizenship. Career opportunities include ROTC scholarship and military academy programs. Students are required to wear uniforms once a week. Course:

JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS’ TRAINING COURSE (JROTC) IV

Prerequisite: JROTC I, II, & III; Grade 12 Credit: 1.00

The final year of the Leadership, Education and Training (LET) course places primary emphasis on the practical application of the student’s leadership duties and responsibilities with the cadet battalion. Students receive practical experiences in problem-solving, group management, and challenges in leadership. Students apply the principles of the planning process, decision mak- ing/problem-solving process, and supervisory techniques in fulfilling course requirements. The importance of American history through the 20th Century is covered. The course uses group dynamics to plan and conduct inspections and ceremonies. Continued emphasis is placed on community service projects. Students are required to wear uniforms once a week. Course:

SCHOOL TO WORK

Prerequisite: Seniors and Juniors varies Credit:

After attending morning classes OR before attending afternoon classes, students in the school to work program are released from school to take part in a supervised Cooperative Education Work Experience. The program requires the students to work in an approved job during the school week through out the entire school year. Work hour reports and weekly job-duty logs are required. A certified teacher/coordinator visits the students in the work environment and offers guidance and suggestions for improving work performance. Students selecting School to Work need to complete an application (available in the Counseling Office or from any business teacher) and return it to Mrs. Focht in Room D425. Work Guidelines – Students must work a minimum of 15 hours per week. For those students under 18 years old, state and federal regulations require that you may work as many as 28 hours Monday through Friday. On Saturday and Sunday, you may work 8 hours daily, but you may not exceed 44 hours weekly. Wilson High School

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Wilson High School

2601 Grandview Boulevard West Lawn, PA 19609-9495 Telephone 610-670-0180 www.wilsonsd.org

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POS