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COMMENCEMENT 2011 Alumnae Quarterly

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SUMMER 2011 • Volume 84 • Number 3

also inside: Inauguration Announcement

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Highlights from Reunion Weekend

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A tribute to former Wilson president Lorna Duphiney Edmundson page 24


Contents: Feature Stories: 6

Commencement 2011

24 A tribute to former Wilson president Lorna Duphiney Edmundson

In Every Issue: 4

Message from the President

10 Odds & Evens: Alumnae News 30 ‘Mid A Group of Pines & Maples: News from Around Campus 33 Archives 34 Shaping the Future: Advancement News 38 Athletics 42 Class Notes 62 Life Lines

Cover Photo Daisy Chain at Commencement Ceremony.


Alumnae Quarterly SUMMER 2011 • Volume 84 • Number 3 Executive Editor Ann Terry

Managing Editor Emma Lewis

Copy Editor Cathy Mentzer

Contributing Writers

Alumnae Association of Wilson College Board of Directors President Paula Spezza Tishok ’71

Vice President Marian “Mimi” Stevenson ’74

Debra Collins Patricia Jerabek ’61 Cathy Mentzer Shelly Novak ’92 Ann Terry

Secretary

Contributing Photographers

Alumnae Trustees

Ruth S. Alpaugh ’61 James Butts Debra Collins Dianna Heim Pamela Lambert Emma Lewis Cathy Mentzer Shelly Novak ’92 Georgia Williams ’61

Design Jennifer Glosser

President of the College Barbara K. Mistick

Vice President for College Advancement Jeffrey Zufelt

Director of Communications Debra Collins

Patricia Markle Keffer ’96

Treasurer Jennifer Nickle Banzhof ’94

Nancy Kostas ’64 Tracey Leskey ’90 Marie Behler Schleicher ’68

Directors Jane Appleyard ’66 Linda Collenberg Bisaccia-Ammerman ’68 Cynthia Fink Barber ’73 Sandra Griggs Clark ’85 Mary Cramer ’91 Tina Robertson Dorsey ’92 Rita Handwerk Fisk ’64 Cazella Hinojosa Goodall ’70 Kendal Hopkins ’80 Kristina Heuck Knubel ’02 Laureen Lutz ’08 Rebecca Ross ’05 Susan Ross ’66 De-Enda Rotz ’05 Sarah Muller Smith ’85 Lorrie Rejoinis Trader ’05 Dorothy M. Van Brakle ’09

Nominating Committee Amy Allen Boyce ’73 Robin Herring ’07 Cathie Sunderland Jenkins ’71

Wilson College Alumnae Quarterly (USPS-685-580) is published quarterly by the Office of College Advancement and the Alumnae Association of Wilson College, 1015 Philadelphia Ave., Chambersburg, PA. Periodicals postage paid at Chambersburg, PA 17201 and additional post offices. Subscriptions are $15/year. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Wilson College Alumnae Office, 1015 Philadelphia Ave., Chambersburg, PA 17201-1285, 717-262-2010 or aq@wilson.edu. Opinions expressed are those of contributors or the editor and do not represent the official positions of Wilson College or the Alumnae Association of Wilson College.


MESSAGE From the President

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y first summer evenings at Wilson have afforded me the chance to explore on foot this gorgeous campus. During the course of my walks, I have discovered beautiful areas across the Main Green, gazing into the Conococheague, watching the proud strut of a horse at the equestrian center and viewing the expansive fields of the Fulton Farm. I am particularly struck by the beauty of the many historic buildings — Sharpe House, Norland and Edgar halls — as compared to Wilson’s beautiful state-of-the-art Brooks Science Complex. To me, this demonstrates one of Wilson’s special qualities — its willingness to hold onto that which is grounded in tradition, while at the same time being able to embrace that which is different and rich with new possibilities. So too, this issue of the Alumnae Quarterly demonstrates holding on and letting go as you will find published here, President Edmundson’s “State of the College” and highlights of the Wilson community honoring her for all that she accomplished during her presidency. The College is much stronger for her dedication and leadership, and I want to also thank Dr. Edmundson for her gracious assistance as I joined the community, and her kind offer of continued support. As you will read in the “State of the College,” Wilson is strong today but challenges remain, along with possibilities and new opportunities. Together, we must identify and recognize the opportunities that are right for Wilson and be ready to implement them for future growth and transformation. As someone who has both attended and worked at women’s schools, I have a lifelong commitment to the advancement of women. The challenge ahead will be to find new ways to break through the competitive educational universe. In my first weeks as your president, I have settled into my new home at Sharpe House and office in Edgar. I have attended two workshops focusing on the trends and challenges in higher education — a Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) Summit for Advancement Leaders and an institute for new presidents at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. These have refreshed and strengthened my thoughts on leadership and governance. I am also meeting with Trustees, Cabinet members, faculty groups and individuals. I am especially looking forward to meeting many of you during my inauguration celebration on Oct. 1, and at regional gatherings as I travel around the country this coming year. As Wilson’s president, I anticipate answering the question about the relevancy of a women’s college often. I’ve raised three daughters and know firsthand the value of transforming lives by fostering self-confidence and hope. At Wilson, I see a tremendous opportunity to lead a small college that can make a big difference in a complex global world. I look forward to working with all of you for the future of Wilson and generations of students to come. Sincerely, Barbara K. Mistick, D.M. President

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The Wilson College Board of Trustees requests the honor of your presence at the

Inauguration of

Dr. Barbara K. Mistick as the

Nineteenth President of Wilson College Saturday, the first day of October two thousand and eleven

at two-thirty in the afternoon on the Main Green

(if inclement weather, Thomson Hall) Chambersburg, Pennsylvania

Schedule of Events Friday, September 30

2 p.m. – Presentation by Mary-Linda Merriam Armacost, former Wilson president, "Pakistan Today," Brooks Auditorium 2 – 4 p.m. – Guided tours of the Richard Alsina Fulton Center for Sustainable Living and the Harry R. Brooks Complex for Science, Mathematics and Technology 4 – 5 p.m. – Presentation by Amy Ensley, Director, Hankey Center, “A History of Women’s Education, including Wild Wilson Women Alumnae.” 5 p.m. – Reception 6 p.m. – Scholarship Dinner featuring Trustee Emerita, Candace Straight 6́ 9

Saturday, October 1

8:30 – 11 a.m. – Campus presentations and demonstrations Equestrian demonstrations with Wilson students and faculty

Orchesis discussion at the studio

“Student-Faculty Research: Models of Excellence at a Small, Liberal Arts College”

“Faculty Scholarship at a College that Emphasizes Teaching: The Impact of the Mazur Scholarship”

If you would like to join us for the inauguration, or any of the weekend events, you must contact the Office of College Advancement at 1-866-446-8660 or linda.raimo@wilson.edu. Space is limited and reservations are required. Some meals may also require a fee.

11 a.m. – Home soccer game vs. Penn State Abington Noon – Lunch 2:30 p.m. – Inauguration 5:30 p.m. – Reception 6:30 p.m. – Lawn party and dinner with students

Sunday, October 2

10 a.m. – Chapel service 11 a.m. – Brunch Please visit www.wilson.edu for a detailed list of weekend activities.


COMMENCEMENT 2011

Wilson College’s 141st Commencement Ceremony

A Wonderful Day by Debra Collins

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COMMENCEMENT 2011

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elebration, gratitude and hope for bright futures describe the general feeling of Wilson College’s 141st Commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 22. Approximately 900 people attended. Smiling graduates and faculty members wearing robes and caps joined beaming parents on the green to celebrate the students’ well-earned achievements, hear words of inspiration and applaud the giving out of diplomas. The College conferred degrees on 104 undergraduate and graduate students, and granted 78 certificates to those completing the teacher intern program. “Today is a day that leads us into the infamous unknown that everyone calls the ‘real world,’” said Alaina Hofer, who delivered the senior class address on behalf of the College for Women. “It seems like only yesterday when we all leapt into college life.” Hofer listed a host of fond memories, starting with moving onto campus as freshmen and participating in Wilson traditions — Sarah Wilson Week and the Daisy Chain — and the “insufficiency of males…But we will seriously miss Wilson and the people,” she said. “The legacy we leave behind to the students is to get the best education and make it the best opportunity of your lives, but also to take the time to have fun and be carefree because life is too short,” she said. Jennifer Tucker addressed the crowd on behalf of the Adult Degree Program. She described the difficulties in completing her degree while being a mother. “I’m certain college is difficult at any age, but returning to college as an adult, particularly with young children, is challenging to a different degree,” she said. Tucker credited the faculty and administration for her success. “What I found at Wilson was an educational system that didn’t simply ask students to read and memorize the body of knowledge and ideas already available, but instead encouraged students to think, explore and develop their own ideas,” she said. Commencement Speaker Hazel Henderson — an evolutionary economist, futurist and leading advocate for sustainable and ethical development — told the crowd that it only took a day meeting with members of the College community and traveling with Wilson Class of 2011 President Alaina Hofer to feel at home in the Wilson family. Her message of “appreciating assets in the growing green economy” centered on remaining vigilant in green practices to preserve the important parts of life. “This microcosm of ‘the global village’ embodies the vision of Marshall McLuhan, the Canadian scholar who coined the phrase, ‘Yes, we humans all live in this evolving global village, sharing this beautiful planet with each other and all life forms. We are exiting the 300-year-old fossil-fueled Industrial Era, living in the Information Age and entering the Solar Age powered by free photons from our sun,’” she said.

Henderson encouraged graduates to act as socially responsible environmentalists. “As budding ‘planetary citizens,’ you can help shape the new forms of governance, sustainable economies based on ecological literacy and founded on fairness and justice,” she said. Wilson President Lorna Duphiney Edmundson, who retired in June, presided over the ceremony and continued in the environmental theme. “Graduates, Wilson has prepared you well for a life of accomplishment, honor and service as citizens of this great world,” she said. “All things are possible if you hold your aspirations high, stay true to yourselves and do your utmost to live a sustainable life as good stewards of the resources on this earth.” Edmundson provided Henderson’s book, Ethical Human Markets, as a gift to each graduate. “Read it, heed it, and — as we say at Convocation about your responsibilities in pursuing a Wilson education — make it your own,” she said. The College also conferred honorary doctorates to Henderson and the Rev. James D. Brown, pastor of Harrisburg’s Market Square Presbyterian Church and a former Wilson trustee. In addition, trustee emerita status was conferred to former trustee Carol Schaaf Heppner ’64.

“All things are possible if you hold your aspirations high, stay true to yourselves and do your utmost to live a sustainable life as good stewards of the resources on this earth.” ~ President Lorna Duphiney Edmundson

Moreover, President Edmundson was honored with the conferring of president emerita status, and Wilson’s new Board of Trustees Chair John W. Gibb announced that the atrium in the Harry R. Brooks Complex for Science, Mathematics and Technology is being named the Lorna Duphiney Edmundson Atrium. This is “in recognition of her tireless efforts on behalf of Wilson College,” according to Gibb. The naming is being underwritten by Linda Kaley Erkelens ’64. Also during the ceremony, Hofer and class secretary Elizabeth Bush presented the College with a gift from their class — a $1,010 check for the Wilson Fund. As the ceremony concluded, rain was imminent but the sunshine held long enough to conclude the celebration. By all accounts, it was a wonderful day.

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COMMENCEMENT 2011 Top Left: Monique Pare ’11, leads the seniors in singing the alma mater. Bottom Left: The Daisy Chain Below: President Lorna Duphiney Edmundson with Trudi Warner Blair ’76

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COMMENCEMENT 2011

Above: Graduates await their diplomas Right: Margo Luke, Marsha Baylor and Erica Seese Below: Gabriel Arias, from the Women with Children Program, accompanies his mother at graduation

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

Alumnae Association President’s Report June 2010 – June 2011

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very year at our Annual Meeting in June, we have an opportunity to reflect on past events and accomplishments throughout the year. We’re pleased to report that the Alumnae Association Board in conjunction with the Alumnae Relations Office has many accomplishments we want to share with you.

Alumnae Relations Office Last year we welcomed Dianna Heim to the Alumnae Relations Office in her new role as Assistant Director. Dianna is a magna cum laude graduate of Westminster College in New Wilmington, PA, with a degree in Telecommunications. Dianna is a former radio news and newspaper reporter. Her experience includes news and feature writing for regional magazines and newspapers, as well as serving as the director of marketing and public relations work for a retirement community and a regional bank. She is the author of a regional history of Cumberland Valley barns published by Shippensburg University Press. She has pursued master’s work in financial marketing, public relations and economics. Most recently, Dianna served as Assistant Director of the Wilson Fund and Stewardship in the Advancement Office. During this past year, Rita Dibble has worked closely with regional clubs by assisting in planning and organizing regional events. We are pleased to report that there is a possibility for two new regional clubs: one in Sarasota, Florida, and one in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Alumnae in Sarasota and Colombo hosted their first events this past year and look forward to hosting many more. Also, members of the Baltimore Club enjoyed a visit to campus in the spring where they toured the Brooks Complex, met with students in the Women with Children Program and enjoyed a dance performance by Orchesis. Also, in the spring, the Pittsburgh Club enjoyed a PowerPoint presentation by Jing Luan, Class of 2011, who spoke eloquently about her internship experience in India. Rita has been working with members of the Strategic Integrated Marketing Committee to develop and refine the content of the Alumnae pages of the new Wilson website, which is expected to go-live in August 2011. The Alumnae Relations staff continues to utilize Facebook as a meaningful way to reach

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out to alumnae of all ages. We currently have sites for over 22 classes where you can sign up to become a “fan.” We’re pleased to report that we have 1,339 fans representing several countries, including the United States, India, Canada, South Korea, United Kingdom, Pakistan and Jordan, with more fans joining each day. According to Facebook statistics, the most active users are in the 18-24 age group, as we would have expected, because this millennial group is the most technologically savvy. Rita and Dianna have been working diligently to make improvements to on-campus events, including additional programming such as Alumnae Colleges to encourage alumnae to return to Wilson. This year’s Reunion Weekend, based on the theme Moments in Memory, Moments of Expectation, was an eventful one that included a High Tea at Sharpe House for Pines and Maples Society donors.

Board and Association Activities During the past three years, we’ve examined ways to preserve the soundness and integrity of the Association by engaging in board education on a variety of topics, including leadership and governing models, the role of the Board and its committees, and the duties of directors. Our goal is to continually reinforce a common understanding of transparency, accountability and good governance – not only to ensure ethical and trustworthy behavior, but equally important, to develop strong practices that contribute to the effectiveness and long-term viability of the Association. Moreover, we are committed to strengthening the structure of the Board by preparing written guidebooks and procedures for committees and providing for succession planning. Many of you are aware that the Association was granted tax-exempt status in December 2000 as a 501(c)(3) charitable organization and is therefore dedicated to following a set of principles to ensure good governance. In recent years, we’ve developed and implemented sound fiscal policies for restricted and unrestricted funds and investment management. In addition, the Board approved and implemented Code of Conduct and Conflict of Interest policies last year. During the past few months, the Nominating Committee began developing a policy on self-assessment of Board members and plans to bring this policy forward for review and approval by the Board soon. As


ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News many of you know, these policies not only help to ensure ethical and trustworthy behavior, but also help to develop strong practices that contribute to the effectiveness of the Association. As part of our governance initiatives, the Executive Committee began the process of evaluating the committee structure of the Board due to some expressed concerns, specifically: 1) overlap in some operational areas, and 2) too many committees to manage effectively. The Executive Committee developed a restructuring plan that was approved by the Board in June 2010. Under the new streamlined structure, the Board now has the following standing committees: • Alumnae Engagement • Alumnae Finance • Alumnae Recognition and Stewardship • Heritage • Nominating • Student and Parent Relations In addition, the Board has one ad hoc committee, Alumnae Tours and Travel, whose members collaborate with the Alumnae Relations staff to provide alumnae with opportunities for travel. Last year, the Alumnae Tours and Travel Committee shifted its focus from international travel to domestic regional travel to provide alumnae an opportunity to tour California’s Napa Valley wine country. Timed for “the crush” of the grapes at peak season, alumnae sampled selected wines and learn about winemaking in a variety of venues. During the past few months, the Alumnae Travel Program began planning international trips once again. From October 8-17, 2011, you will be able to tour two of Italy’s best-loved regions, Chianti and the Italian Riviera, where you will enjoy Tuscan cuisine at a private cooking demonstration, wine tastings at the Castello di Monsanto, and journeys to the picturesque towns of Santa Margherita and Portofino. This trip is a tribute to President Lorna Edmundson for her many years of dedicated service to Wilson, and therefore, the Association welcomes alumnae, trustees and friends of the College to join us on this wonderful excursion. As a result of this new Board structure, we’ve been able to develop programs and initiatives that are more closely aligned with those of the College. For example, members of the Alumnae Recognition and Stewardship Committee have been working closely with Pam Lambert, Director of Development, to provide volunteers to assist in stewardship efforts. The alumnae volunteers are writing thank you notes and making phone calls to donors who have given to the Wilson Fund at levels less than $1,000. As of June 2011, these volunteers had contacted over 550 donors and will continue to provide support to the Development Office on an on-going basis.

In addition, the Heritage Committee has been looking for ways to preserve and restore the beauty of the campus and was instrumental in acquiring a handsomely refurbished antique sofa that is now located in the second-floor reading room of the Hankey Center. The sofa was a gift from the daughter of Ellen Van Looy Reed ’53 who had acquired the sofa from her greataunt. The Heritage Committee also assisted in providing funds to refurbish the Alumnae Relations Office and for a display cabinet in Lenfest. Amy Ensley, Director of the Hankey Center, is now working closely with the Heritage Committee to assist in acquiring funds for furniture to be used on the enclosed porch at the Hankey Center. One of the most rewarding things the Board considers is the selection of honorees for Association-conferred awards. During Reunion Weekend, we presented awards for Distinguished Alumna to Rosemary F. Bowler ’51, for the Tift College Award to Susan Breakefield Fulton ’61, and for the Outstanding Young Alumnae Award to Chaitri Hapugalle ’92 at a reception held at the Brooks Complex. Then, during Sunday brunch, we conferred a faculty award to Col. Alfred Kitts who significantly contributed to the revitalization of Wilson’s equestrian program. The Alumnae Finance Committee worked closely with Rita to ensure that our funds are appropriately budgeted and allocated. This weekend, the Board plans to review and approve the most recent audited financial report for calendar year 2010 with total excess revenue and support over expenses of $30,815, including both unrestricted and restricted funds. Four years ago, the Finance Committee, working in response to a request from the Class of 1966, developed an investment vehicle – the longterm Reunion Gift Fund to enable classes to plan ahead for their 50th reunion by providing a mechanism for long-term investing. All donations to class gifts are recognized as tax-deductible contributions in the year they are given and are listed in the College’s annual Donor Recognition Report. We have seven classes that have established long-term Reunion Gift Funds – the classes of 1961, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1970, 1974 and 1975. We’re pleased to report that we will be liquating our first Reunion Gift Fund this year for the Class of 1961 who have been able to accumulate $45,000 in contributions. In addition, the Class of 1962 has exceeded its goal of $25,000 for their reunion gift. Portions of both of these Reunion Gift Funds have been pledged to the Brooks Complex and will be matched by the Lenfest Challenge. Many of you are aware that alumnae who use the Wilson College Bank of America Credit Card help to provide funding for student internships. Since students majoring in veterinary medical technology and business studies are required to have internships, availability of these funds is often critical to the success of our students. This past year, the Pittsburgh Club of Wilson College collaborated with the Association, which allowed

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News us to broaden our outreach and provide funding amounting to over $3,600 to several outstanding students. Recently, we’ve looked for opportunities to provide funding for study-abroad programs for students like Jing Luan ’11 to study the comparison of health care policies between India and the US, and for Kacie Oberholzer ’12 to study at Hartpury College Equestrian Center in Gloucester, England. Kacie will receive hands-on experience in taking care of and training horses while using state-of-the-art therapy equipment. In addition, the Association sponsors two scholarships annually with endowed funds. The Legacy Scholarship established in 1969 is awarded to full-time, undergraduate students who are daughters or granddaughters of Wilson College alumnae. The Ethelbert Warfield Scholarship established in 1936 is awarded to undergraduate students, who have completed their junior year, on the basis of scholarship, general influence and financial need. During the past few years, the Association has awarded nearly $4,000 for Legacy scholarships and $6,500 for Warfield scholarships to deserving students. The Alumnae Association Board, Admissions Office and Student Development continue to collaborate in ways that strengthen the recruitment and retention of students. In January, the Board hosted an event with students called Conversations at the Commons in which nine students presented their experiences in research, leadership development, work-study programs and internships. This event received rave reviews from alumnae who were eager to learn about campus life and college experiences today. The students were so enthusiastic and lively that we plan to host another event like this next year. Then, during Premiere Weekend, Mary Ann Naso, VP of Enrollment, invited young alumnae to participate in panel

discussions with prospective students and parents where they discussed their careers and experiences beyond Wilson. According to Mary Ann, each group of students and parents were truly impressed to meet these Wilson alumnae. We also sponsored events and activities on campus in conjunction with Student Development, including the Etiquette Dinner and the everpopular Food for Finals Waffle night. The Board greatly values its role in the Wilson community and strives to find ways to strengthen relationships with administration, students and faculty. This year, the Board provided funding for the Performing Arts Series and Career Services and planned its annual off-campus dinner with students at the Main Street Deli Restaurant. This past year, the Board worked closely with Jennifer Glosser of 2Pug Design to develop a logo design for the Association that will be used on stationary and other printed materials. Jennifer developed several designs that were reviewed by the Board who then made its final selection in January. During Reunion Weekend this year, we were pleased to be able to utilize our new pines and maples graphic design and logo, which appear to resonate well with alumnae of every generation. We’re so thankful to have the opportunity to serve our alumnae and the Wilson community. Of course, you make it possible for Wilson to continue to thrive and serve new generations of students. So let’s work together to share our time, talent and treasure, to most effectively serve the Wilson community. Warmly, Paula S. Tishok ’71, President

Welcome

Emma Lewis, Alumnae Relations Publications Associate

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This spring the Alumnae Relations office welcomed a new Alumnae Relations Publications Associate and Managing Editor of the Alumnae Quarterly, Emma Lewis. Emma is a cum laude graduate from Shippensburg University where she majored in Communications and Journalism. Before coming to Wilson, Emma worked as a Legal Proofreader at the Legislative Reference Bureau in Harrisburg where she was responsible for proofreading resolutions, bills and amendments and assisting lawyers with the drafting documents to be presented to the General Assembly. Emma is excited to bring her editing and writing skills to the Quarterly and looks forward to working with the alumnae on continuing to improve the magazine.


2011

ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

Highlights from

Reunion Weekend

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Reunion Class Photos

Class of 1956

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Class of 1961

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Alumnae Trustees Report

July 2010 - June 2011

On March 1, 2011, the Board of Trustees announced the appointment of Dr. Barbara Mistick of Pittsburgh, PA, to be the next president of Wilson College, after a unanimous vote at the February Board of Trustees meeting President Edmundson reported on the continuing work of the Strategic Planning Committee for the 2010-2015 Strategic Plan for the College. The plan emphasizes three themes: “a transforming educational experience; distinctive innovative programs; and strong integrated planning and assessment.” It is a plan that the new president will be able to refine as needed.

Academic Affairs The Trustees approved a new Master of Arts in the Humanities. This new degree can be achieved through a 3+1 plan, which enables a student to complete the bachelor’s degree in three years and the master’s in the additional year. Distance learning (i.e., online courses) will be implemented by the Education Department beginning Fall 2011. J-term distance learning courses will begin in the future. The Trustees voted to eliminate the tenure cap for faculty and approved changes to faculty by-laws based on Middle States recommendations. These changes included: • A strengthened role for the Dean in adjunct and full-time faculty selection; • Instituting evaluations of division heads and part-time deans. A decision was made by the faculty to hold some of its sessions in executive session (without students or staff) in order to provide a climate for candid discussions of issues between the faculty and Dean. Members of the graduating class of 2011 were awarded their well-earned diplomas during Commencement on May 22. Five students graduated summa cum laude. Among the academic degrees and certificates conferred were: • 17 Masters in Education • 31 Bachelors of Arts • 51 Bachelors of Sciences • 2 Associates of Arts • 2 Associates of Sciences In addition, 87 students were awarded certification in teaching through Wilson’s Teacher Intern Program. At the May Trustees meeting, three students, each of whom received honors in the discipline, presented their research projects. The senior’s research demonstrates the high level of accomplishments by students, so Trustees were pleased to hear 20

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the following students: • Jessica Domanico, “No Improper Vehicle: Charlotte Smith and the Eighteenth Century Sonnet Revival,” English major. • Jennifer M. Tucker, “Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and Anxiety,” Psychology major. • Mariam Kalifeh, “The Effects of Water-Soluble Fiber Combined with Poly and Monounsaturated Fatty Acids on Plasma Lipoprotein Levels in Hypercholesterolemic Rats,” Biology and Chemistry major.

Building and Grounds The Creek Restoration Project to be done in collaboration with the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission and to be paid for by Norfolk Southern will be underway shortly with Wilson College acting as the general contractor. The dam has already been removed. This past winter, the existing steam heating system failed in the John Stewart Library causing significant damage to the interior walls and computer classroom. CenterPoint Engineering in Mechanicsburg was awarded the contract to complete the repair work based on their experience with similar projects in educational settings. Work will be accomplished during the summer months to cause the least disruption. Wi-fi will be campus wide by September 2011. Conversations continue concerning the Wilson Arboretum. A Facilities Capital Action Plan (FCAP) was prepared by Sodexo when they took over management of the Physical Plant in 2007. This plan was designed to identify deferred maintenance projects and shows that 12 buildings were built before 1911; the campus wide grounds and 7 buildings date from 1911-1931; one was built between 1931-1951; ten were built between 1951-1971 including a duplex house on Alexander Avenue that was willed to the College; and five buildings were built after 1991. The Brooks Complex was not included in the survey. Recently, Trustees received a full presentation by Sodexo management on the status of deferred maintenance projects.

College Advancement The Capital Campaign goal of $45 million has been exceeded by $2.8 million. Wilson Fund income continues to track ahead of last year; the goal of $1,169,000 is expected to be met. The Goodwin Challenge for 2011 Wilson Fund was met in March, but money is still needed to meet the Lenfest Challenge, which ends on December 31, 2011. Less than $650,000 is needed. Although the goal for the Brooks Complex has been met,


ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News there continues to be a great need to raise funds for the facility and the equipment contained within it. There is also a great need for increased giving for the Global Citizenship Initiative, faculty and staff development, technology acquisition, and building refurbishment. The Stabler Foundation awarded a $1 million grant for scholarships. The Newcombe Foundation awarded a $25,000 grant for scholarships to mature women students following a campus visit with ADP female students and Women with Children participants. The Strategic Integrated Marketing Committee has been charged to: “communicate and build brand awareness within the College community and to increase visibility of the College through coordinated efforts and consistent messaging for internal and external audiences.” The purpose of this marketing effort is to enhance the College’s reputation and to assist in increasing enrollment. A newly designed website, which will be more user friendly, is expected to be up and ready in July 2011. Signage for the College with the new logo is complete. Wilson’s new logo was awarded a silver medal at the Higher Education Marketing Awards Competition in the logo/letterhead category in March.

Enrollment Management and Student Life In February, an educational session was presented to the Board of Trustees focusing on recruitment, retention and risk management. The session gave insights to problems and possible solutions in each of those areas. Wilson College Government Association (WCGA) reported that the Executive Board held over 550 “office hours” during which students, faculty and staff visited to ask questions and receive answers. WCGA also had a regular column in The Billboard, supplemented by an Office of Student Activities newsletter. “Pizza Talk” with WCGA officers also has been established for the purpose of hearing/discussing student concerns. Student satisfaction with residence halls is moderated by recognizing that much needs to be done to enhance interior conditions. Essentially, students want everything “in good shape, working well, up-todate and functional.” Trustees toured the residence halls and the library and saw evidence of needs that students articulated. In the fall, single rooms for new students will be offered at an extra charge on a first come, first served basis. Disert and McElwain/Davison residence halls will be open to any student. Enrollment figures for the 2010-2011 academic year reflect a combined total of 796 students, as follows: CFW 317 ADP and TIP 442 M.Ed. 37 Retention for fall to spring was up from last year, and spring 2011 to fall 2011 is better than in previous years. New strategies seem to have helped. ADP counselors keep track of students who

have not achieved their degrees and are gratified when students re-enroll even after 20 years. Faculty are increasing their participation in the recruitment process by calling accepted students interested in their majors. Financial aid is still vital to students; therefore the financial aid staff must keep up with “ever-changing federal regulations.” Anxiety occurs when federal and state funds are delayed, reduced or eliminated. The Board of Trustees approved a 4% tuition increase, resulting in tuition fees of $28,745, and a 3% increase in room and board totaling $9,710 for the academic year 2011-2012. Trustees approved a change in the qualification requirement for ADP students from age 24 to four full years out of high school or the equivalent. This change will overcome lost revenue and headcount that an age requirement caused.

Finance Trustees reviewed forecasts for income and expense for fiscal year 2011 and anticipate a modest surplus at year-end. The surplus will be used to fund capital improvements. The Trustees approved a summer working budget for 2011-2012. The College is in the process of converting to a comprehensive, integrated computer system that will be used by all departments. The first modules of the new Datatel system that will go-live are financial modules. These are expected to be operational by July 1. The Datatel Project Manager has been working with a core team of Wilson staff to finalize a detailed project plan for implementation of the remaining system modules. The performance of the endowment continues to improve under the able management of the Solaris Advisors. The market value of the endowment as of March 31, 2011, was $62,953,762. Of this endowment figure, 58% is represented in the Quasi endowment and 42% is permanently restricted for various reasons, including scholarships, faculty/staff development, physical plant, library, etc. The value of the perpetual trust as of that same date was $10,962,925.

Trusteeship The Board of Trustees normally holds elections in May for new and renewing Trustees. This year, the Board also elected a new slate of officers for the three-year term 2011-2014. These officers are: Chair – John W. Gibb Vice-chair – Paula S. Tishok ’71 Secretary – Elizabeth V. McDowell ’59 Treasurer – Julie I. Englund John Gibb replaced outgoing Chair Trudi W. Blair ’76, who served a three-year term from 2008-2011. Respectfully submitted, Ellen Van Looy Reed ’53 Tracy Leskey ’90 Nancy Kostas ’64 Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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Alumnae Association

Alumnae Awards Presented a Alumnae Awards Criteria Distinguished Alumna Award Established in 1983 – presented at Reunion for alumnae who have distinguished themselves in their professional or voluntary careers and who have shown continuing service, interest and support in the growth and quality of Wilson College. They must have demonstrated service to the College that spans a period of five to ten years or longer. Outstanding Young Alumna Award Established in 1989 – presented at Reunion to honor alumnae who have graduated within the last 20 years and who have brought honor to themselves and to Wilson College through their intellectual and professional growth and their contributions to their communities through the professional and/or volunteer activities. Chaitri Hapugalle ’92, Susan Breakefield Fulton ’61 and Rosemary F. Bowler, PhD. ’51

Tift College Award Established in 1989 – presented at Reunion to an alumna who has demonstrated exemplary efforts to promote the continuing growth of Wilson College. This award is in appreciation for the example and assistance given by members of the Wilson family to the alumnae of Tift College in their efforts to save their college. Faculty Award Established in 1998 – presented at Reunion to an emeritus faculty member who has given a minimum of ten years of service to Wilson, has retired, and is not teaching elsewhere.

Start planning for Reunion Weekend 2012 and nominate your friends and classmates for an alumnae award. Nomination forms can be found online at www.wilson.edu/alumnae. Jennifer Nickle Banzhof ’94, Col. Alfred Kitts and Gretchen Kitts 22

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of Wilson College

ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

at Reunion Weekend 2011

Rosemary F. Bowler, PhD. ‘51 Distinguished Alumna Award Presented by Linda Fleit Rosemary F. Bowler, Ph.D.’s career has included teaching, school administration, writing and editing, and she is currently focusing on nonprofit governance consulting. She co-authored Learning to Learn, which was awarded the Margot Merek Book Award in 1998. She received the Learning Disabilities Network Board Leadership Award 2001, in recognition of her board service. She is a Life Long Learning Teacher, has recently completed a monograph for small, nonprofit organizations and retains special interests in the teaching of writing, the history of language and the classic detective story.

Susan Breakefield Fulton ‘61 Tift College Award Presented by Laurel Davis Woods ’61 Susan Breakefield Fulton has used her passion for ecology to support her alma mater into a position of preeminence. Her philosophy on philanthropy is best articulated in her own words, “When you choose to invest your money in endeavors that are close to your heart, you are making a choice about the future you want for yourself and your children.” In 1999, Susan gave Wilson the innovative Richard Alsina Fulton Center for Sustainable Living to honor her late husband, Dick, and underwrote the College’s first environmental sustainability conference. She has appeared on CNBC to give financial advice and currently serves as the president of FBB Capital Partners, a firm with $465 million under management.

Col. Alfred Kitts Faculty Award Presented by Jennifer Nickle Banzhof ’94 Col. Alfred Kitts, Faculty Emeritus significantly contributed to the revitalization of Wilson’s equestrian programs and dedicated several decades to the teaching of dressage, equestrian studies and management. Appointed in 1983 as Director of Equestrian Studies, he was named Professor of Equestrian Studies in 1992 and retired in 1998. The Kitts Arena at the Penn Hall Equestrian Center was dedicated in 2000. Col. Kitts’ enthusiasm, positive nature and profound love of horses established a program at Wilson that is regionally acclaimed and nationally recognized.

Chaitri Hapugalle ‘92 Outstanding Young Alumna Award Presented by Ellen Van Looy Reed ’53 At Wilson, Chaitri was an all-rounder who won many academic awards, sports colors and held many leadership positions. She was chosen as a Fellow Center Counselor of the Center for the Study of the Presidency. She earned a master’s in Public Policy in International Trade and Finance from Harvard University. She has worked as an economist, analyst and editor for the World Bank, IMF, Wall Street, Development Bank of Singapore and Fitch Credit Rating Agency. She was appointed as a special assistant to the President of Sri Lanka after the tsunami. Chaitri is currently a consultant with the World Bank and is an active alumna and mentor. Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

Thank You

President Lorna Duphiney Edmundson 2001 - 2011 Saying goodbye is never easy—especially to a president who during her ten years at the College has become an integral member of the Wilson family. President Edmundson came to Wilson with the goal that we should not just educate, but instead create global citizens who would go out into the world after leaving Wilson and help make it a better place. President Edmundson’s impact on Wilson can be seen not just in the physical changes to the campus and grounds, but also in the strengthening of a community that has worked together under her guidance to prepare Wilson for a bright future. Perhaps the greatest testament to President Edmundson’s legacy is that like so many of Wilson’s best past leaders she is leaving Wilson a better place than when she arrived.

President Edmundson and Trudi Warner Blair ’76 following the Commencemet ceremonies. During Commencement, former Board of Trustees chair, Trudi Warner Blair ’76, thanked President Edmundson for her services and announced that the Board of Trustees had, by unamimous vote, bestowed on Dr. Edmundson, the title of “President Emerita of Wilson College.” 24

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During her last two months as president, the Wilson family came together to not only say farewell, but also to pay tribute to her extraordinary service to the College and its community.

New Wilson Board of Trustees chair, John Gibb announces the naming of the Brooks Complex atrium to the Lorna Duphiney Edmundson Atrium in “recognition of her years of tireless effort on behalf of Wilson College.”


ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News “On behalf of the Board of Trustees, I would like to join all of the other speakers today to express our gratitude for your many years of service to Wilson College and your tireless commitment to the College’s cherished goals and traditions. This is a moment of both pride and sadness for the College: pride in all that has been accomplished during your presidency and sadness in the departure of an inspiring leader and friend.” ~ Trudi Warner Blair ’76, former Wilson Board of Trustees chair

President Edmundson is joined by her husband, Daniel, and alumnae Eleanor Martin Allen ’49 and Nancy Adams Besch ’48 following her on-campus farewell reception.

“Today, we honor Dr. Edmundson for her contributions to Wilson College and for her career as a leader dedicated to women’s empowerment…Because of her efforts, countess women, in the U.S. and abroad, have had the opportunity to pursue a transformational education.” ~ Dr. Mary Hendrickson, Dean of Faculty

Wilson faculty, staff and friends applaud as President Edmundson is honored.

President Edmundson receives a standing ovation at Reunion following her State of the College address. At the Alumnae Association’s General Meeting, President Edmundson was made an honorary member of the Alumnae Association of Wilson College. Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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President’s State of the College Address

Alumnae Reunion 2011 Alumnae Chapel, Thomson Hall

For more than 140 years, your alma mater, Wilson College, has waited patiently for each reunion class to return. Today it’s your turn. Welcome to Alumnae Reunion 2011. Standing here next year will be Presidentelect Dr. Barbara Mistick, who I am happy to say, is with us today. Won’t you help me welcome the 19th president of Wilson College, Dr. Barbara Mistick? She brings talent, experience and a deep commitment to women’s education, all of which will serve her well in the coming years. Ten years ago, in my inaugural address, I made three promises to you. I said we would: • Put the people of Wilson first in every decision we make, every action we take. • Extend our intellectual and geographical reach; broaden our thinking in encounters with other cultures; challenge old notions of how and where we teach; and embrace new technologies that deepen instruction and dialogue with students. • Be good stewards of Wilson College so that she endures and flourishes for generations to come. Along the way, we did find quite a few more things to integrate into our visioning and strategic planning processes. With your help, strong Trustee leadership and the good work of those on campus, we created Wilson’s first comprehensive strategic plan, entitled “Enduring Mission, Expanding Vision,” officially launched it in 2002 and updated it for 2004-09. Today we are well on our way to meeting the objectives of the Comprehensive Strategic Plan for 2010-15 that the Board approved last fall. Our first plan focused on strengthening academic and co-curricular programs, increasing enrollment, strengthening staffing, increasing employee compensation, creating a more robust financial foundation, and improving the campus environment and facilities to support our mission. 26

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In preparing the most recent plan, we used the vision and the themes that emerged from Wilson’s extensive branding research to which many of you contributed. The revised Mission Statement now embraces the populations we serve. The branding study also produced a new logo and graphic identity – Wilson College with Confidence – and developed three guiding principles for strategic planning: • Transforming Educational Experience • Distinctive Innovative Programs • Strong, Integrated Planning and Assessment As I now review some of the most important accomplishments, you will hear echoes of these three guiding principles, as well as my three inaugural promises. • Faculty compensation for sabbaticals was increased, making it economically feasible for faculty to take sabbatical leave. • Seven new faculty positions were created. • Highly qualified administrators and staff were hired in several formerly severely understaffed divisions, particularly in Learning Services, Student Development and College Advancement. • We hired an associate dean for academic assessment and institutional research, so at last we can dramatically improve our capacity to analyze all of the important data we gather, and use it to ratchet up our ability to inform decision making in a timely manner. • This year, we will hire a much-needed and long-awaited laboratory manager for the Brooks Complex, relieving faculty of the burden of setting up and taking down all labs. • We successfully completed the first fiveyear phase of the 10-year employee compensation enhancement plan. • Employee awards and recognition programs were established.

As a result of these things and many more, I am happy to report that annual employee attrition fell from approximately 27 percent 10 years ago to 8.25 percent today, beating the benchmark of 15 percent. With respect to new academic programs: • We developed six new interdisciplinary academic undergraduate programs that build on our strengths. They are also costeffective, combining existing coursework in creative ways to meet changing market demand: Biochemistry, Financial Mathematics, Environmental Sustainability, Business Sustainability and Environmental Management, Equine Journalism, and Sport Management. • We established Wilson’s first two master’s degrees, one each in education and humanities. • In athletics, we added soccer and lacrosse. We eliminated programs that are neither essential to our mission, nor cost-effective: • Bachelor’s and associate degrees in Legal Studies. • Associate degrees in Marketing, Early Childhood Education and Veterinary Medical Technology. • Recently, we suspended offering tennis due to low demand and staffing difficulties. Our employees and students must be able to study and work in facilities that support the curriculum and co-curriculum. To that end: • The Brooks Complex for Science, Mathematics and Technology, a LEED-certified building at the gold level, was completed, the first new construction since the late 1960s. • By the end of this summer, the entire campus – with the exception of the Equestrian Center and the farm, which present particular difficulties – will have wireless computer access. • We are in the midst of an 18-month computer software systems conversion that will result in a college-wide, integrated, data collection and reporting system for the first time in Wilson’s history.


ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News • By July, a greatly updated, interactive and more user-friendly website will be launched. We are making it through the recession with some grace because more than eight years ago, the Trustees, Cabinet and I pulled together to put our financial house in order, exercising financial discipline in anticipation of the inevitable economic downturns, one of which did, indeed, occur. Examples of the many conservative measures effectively taken include: • Diversifying college investments • Lowering the tuition discount rate • Reducing the endowment spending rate • Doubling net tuition revenue Therefore, when the recession hit, we had acquired some much-needed operational and financial flexibility to respond without cutting the muscle out of the College’s workforce. It also helped enormously that we were already embarked upon an ambitious $45 million campaign, and you were responding so quickly and wholeheartedly. While giving is down at most other colleges throughout the country, that is not the case at Wilson: • We have already raised $47.8 million for the Leading with Confidence campaign, exceeding the campaign goal, seven months before the close of the campaign.? • Included in the $47.8 million is nearly $30 million for the Brooks Complex, $5 million more than the $25 million goal. • Last fall, our auditors gave us a glowing report, noting that our comprehensive financial index (CFI) is far healthier than that at the many other small colleges with which they work. • And finally, Wilson’s total endowment – which Mary-Linda Merriam Armacost increased from $4 to $12 million and Gwen Jensen increased from $12 to $34.5 million – now stands at $73 Million. However, we are not rich. • Operating budgets remain painfully tight. • Markets are still volatile. • Families and students are in considerable financial pain, many worse off now than they were at the height of the recession. • Changing demographics indicate that more and more first-generation and needy students will be coming to college.

• It is difficult to predict fall enrollment this year. Something very curious and worrying is happening throughout private higher education. Enrollment deposits are down compared to last year, not just at Wilson, but at nearly all small private colleges. Where these students will ultimately go remains a mystery at this point. • It continues to be very challenging to recruit U.S. high school graduates to a woman’s college, although international women students seek us out. • With just under 800 students enrolled today, we have not made the kind of progress in enrollment growth that we had hoped to. Our biggest challenge to enrollment has been student retention. I strongly believe we are at a tipping point, at last having in place a very strong retention program that is beginning to get traction. We see evidence of this in 2011 fiscal year fall to spring retention, which is greatly improved, and large enrollments in summer session. I have confidence that we are on the right track. The Global Citizenship Initiative also has great promise for strengthening enrollment – our primary source of revenue. Once the Global Citizenship Initiative is fully funded, we know from well-established research that we will be able to maximize the opportunities to: • Attract more U.S. students to Wilson. • Retain more students. • Enroll more talented, international students at Wilson – students who are highly motivated and successful here. • Build on our international partnerships which have grown in number from three to nine in the past decade. Nonetheless, the economic and financial outlook for the future is complex: • It is not yet clear how much student financial aid will be forthcoming from the Commonwealth again this year. • Numbers of high school graduates in the Mid-Atlantic region will begin to track down again in the next few years. • Nearly every year, one more women’s college (most recently Rosemont) is forced to go co-ed. We cannot let that happen here.

Some argue that women’s colleges are artifacts of the past. Don’t believe it. Recent research reaffirms the women’s college advantage, an advantage that results in greater confidence and leadership ability, higher levels of accomplishment, more success in pursuing nontraditional careers for women, and a greater likelihood of attaining advanced degrees and rising to top professional positions. Today’s world needs these Wilson women and men as it never has before, if we are to address the vexing challenges of our time. Today, women – like Sarah Wilson, whose generosity made Wilson possible – also lead in philanthropy and are using their economic power to shape the world their children and grandchildren will inhabit. Alumnae, thank you for giving me the honor of serving as your president. You have inspired, energized and encouraged me. Promise me that you will do the same for Wilson’s 19th President, Dr. Barbara Mistick.

Dr. Lorna Duphiney Edmundson President, Wilson College Alumnae Chapel, June 4, 2011 President Edmundson’s full state of the college address is available online at www.wilson.edu, or if you do not have access to the internet, please contact the Alumnae Relations Office at 1-866-446-8660 to request a paper copy.

Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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Labyrinth Brings Peace and Balance to Wilson Alumna By Cathy Mentzer

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he ancient, meditative practice of walking a labyrinth is gaining a growing number of followers. One recent convert is Dr. Lynn Negus ’61, who designed and built a labyrinth at her home in Eugene, Oregon, in 2008. Described as an intricate combination of paths or passages in which it can be difficult to find one’s way or reach the exit, labyrinths are for some, a tool for personal, psychological and spiritual transformation. And, like thousands of people before her over the centuries, Negus finds peace, balance and a sense of renewal by walking the labyrinth’s path. “There are so many interpretations of labyrinths,” Negus said. “I still meet people who ask, ‘Is that like a maze or is that where you can get lost?’ And I say, ‘No, it’s not where you get lost, it’s where you come when you’re lost, and you can find your own path.’” Negus, a retired physician who spent her career in pediatrics and taught at the University of Southern California School of Medicine for many years, discovered the effect of labyrinths after the passing of her brother in 2007. While attending a retreat at Ghost Ranch in New Mexico led by her friend, the Rev. Dr. Margee Grimes Iddings ’61, she found walking the ranch’s Chartres labyrinth a revelation. “I was at a difficult time in my life, and it was very helpful to me to have a very initially disturbing walk in which (I thought), ‘My gosh, my life is really out of balance and I need to gain some balance and stability,’” said Negus. “It was just a very significant experience for me and it was at that point that I thought, ‘I’m going to have a labyrinth of my own.’” After returning to Oregon, Negus began planning a labyrinth that would eventually take about 18 months to complete. “I started planning it, reading, researching it, looking at different types,” she said. “I really wanted a Chartres labyrinth, but I thought it was too complex for me to do. And then I got into the more simple, but actually more ancient, Cretan (labyrinth).” It was Negus’ plan to construct the labyrinth entirely on her own, but when her old friend, Dorothy Richardson – who had been a Wilson field hockey coach when Negus attended the College – came to visit, the two collaborated to get the project started. “I was really a ‘doing’ kind of person,” Negus said. “The basis of meditation in movement and doing things was really why I started it all by myself. But then as life tells us, you need other 28

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people and so other people came and helped me build this. Dorothy was one and Margee was another, in terms of correspondence about it.” Richardson helped Negus lay out the labyrinth design with flags and also built an inukshuk, a stone landmark or cairn used by native peoples of the Arctic. When construction was completed, a dedication ceremony was held in which many people blessed Negus’ labyrinth. Iddings was asked to consecrate the grounds. A Native American woman performed a ceremony with another member of her tribe, and several friends gave blessings in both Hebrew and Aramaic. Since completing her labyrinth, Negus says she continues to learn about herself by walking its path and staying present in the moment. “The most wonderful thing about a labyrinth is that you come as you are and you discover who you are, and it can be a joyous thing, it can be a sad thing, it can be a meditative thing,” she said. “When I find my life taking on too much speed or too many pathways or too many requests to do this or that, it reveals to me that I still have the ability to just be quiet and listen.” Negus says the most rewarding aspect of the labyrinth has been the knowledge that other people – many she doesn’t even know - use and appreciate it, so much so that she had to build a path to it from the road to make it more accessible. “When I go down there, I see evidence that people have been there,” Negus said. Some have left stones or flags – even a dream catcher – at the site, but those who walk a labyrinth are said to leave something less tangible behind, according to Negus. “They imbue it with their spirits, with their power, with their feelings - and it gains a certain kind of spiritual strength,” she said. “People have described (experiencing) that to me. That’s one of the unexpected rewards.”


ODDS & EVENS Alumnae News

Pittsburgh Club Wilson Professor Brad Engle and Jing Luan ’11 join special guest, Wilson President-elect, Dr. Barbara Mistick at the Pittsburgh Club's spring meeting.

SAVE THE DATE! October 2, 2011 It’s never too early to start planning for your next class reunion! The Alumnae Relations Office will be holding a Reunion Weekend planning and training session for all interested class officers during the Alumnae Association’s Leadership Weekend. Although all classes are welcome to participate, attendance is highly recommended for those classes ending in a 2 or 7 who will be celebrating their reunions in 2012. Each participant will receive a Reunion Weekend planning handbook, as well as a draft weekend schedule and the opportunity to ask questions of the Alumnae Office staff. If you are interested in participating, please contact the Alumnae Relations Office for more information at alumnae@wilson.edu or 1-866-446-8660.

Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus

Tutoring Program for Migrant Children Finds a Home at Wilson By Cathy Mentzer

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Ben Gates (above) and Alicia Mills (below) participating in the tutoring program

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n March 1 Wilson College launched an after-school tutoring program for children in the Lincoln Intermediate Unit migrant education program. The program, which served 28 children in kindergarten through 5th grade, was held for one hour for four days a week. Dr. Lynn Newman, Wilson assistant professor of education, and Eric Mandell, LIU student support specialist, oversee the program with site coordinator Samantha Vance. Until March, the program had been held at a local church for the past 15 years. When Mandell learned that the church could no longer house the program, Newman expressed interest in bringing the program to Wilson and received approval from college administrators. The after-school program is housed in Wilson’s Harry R. Brooks Complex for Science, Mathematics and Technology. About 30 Wilson students, staff and others volunteer on a regular basis, according to Newman. “The program is doing extremely well, and both the tutors and students love their time together,” she said. “I have been extremely proud of our Wilson students and their dedication, passion and leadership in signing up for dates and making sure they are there on time, working hard with their students.” Mandell is grateful to Newman and Wilson for hosting the program, which he hopes will be held on the campus again next fall. “We had a program, but we needed a new home,” he said. “We wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for the Wilson College community.” Wilson tutors help children with homework, as well as with their reading and math skills. Many of the children are English as a Second Language (ESL) students whose families come from places like Mexico, Puerto Rico, Guatemala and Haiti, according to Mandell. A few Wilson professors have made volunteering a requirement of their classes, but many students simply choose to volunteer, including Ben Gates, a junior who changed his major from sociology to education as a result of the program. “I came in one time and I really liked it,” said Gates. “I like working with the kids. They’re a lot of fun, and I feel like many of them are coming a long way.” Another student, junior Alicia Mills, is majoring in environmental sustainability and volunteers because of a conversational Spanish class she is taking. “I love it,” Mills said. “What I try to do is work with each particular student’s needs. I like to see the impact from one week to the next.” In addition to helping the children, the tutoring program also provides experience for Wilson students who are majoring in education. Mandell said he appreciates the College’s commitment to experiential learning, as well as service learning. “A lot of places talk the talk but they don’t walk the walk,” he said. “Wilson College does.”


MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus Students from the Wilson College Political Science Association attended oral arguments at the United States Supreme Court on Monday, April 18, 2011. The cases for argument were Microsoft v. i4i, a major case on intellectual property, and Tapia v. United States, involving the role of rehabilitation in criminal sentencing. Pictured from left to right: Dr. Jill Hummer, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Hayley Glass ’11, Ian Irvin ’12, Christina Shick ’11 and Brie Anne Asbury ’12.

There is still time to join us for:

CHIANTI & the ITALIAN RIVIERA Experience the trip of a lifetime through two of Italy’s best-loved regions, Chianti and the Italian Riveria, on an eight-day trip Oct. 8-17, 2011. Beginning in Florence, the tour will immerse you in this historic, lovely city’s museums—Galleria d’Accademia and the Galleria degli Uffizi, among others—and offer you an opportunity to say farewell to President Lorna Duphiney Edmundson, who is retiring from Wilson in June after a decade of exceptional service to the College.

Call the Alumnae Office at 1.866.446.8660 to reserve your place on this Wilson College-exclusive trip!

Wilson Goes Phanatic! A Night at the Phillies Ballpark for Wilson Alumnae! September 20, 2011 • 7:05 p.m. Get your tickets now for this fun night when the Phillies face off against the Washington Nationals! Tickets are just $30 and available through the Alumnae Relations Office. Make checks payable to "Wilson College" and send to the Alumnae Relations Office, Wilson College, 1015 Philadelphia Ave., Chambersburg, PA 17201. Last day of ticket sales is Sept. 10, 2011. For more information, call 1-866-446-8660, ext. 3180.


MID A GROUP OF PINES & MAPLES News from Around Campus

Funded Study-abroad Program in India By Jing Luan ’11

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any people were convinced that I had made a poor cost-and-benefit analysis when I decided to join a study-abroad program organized by the University of Maryland last winter, which provided an opportunity to compare the public health policies and framework between India and the United States. The cost of living in an underdeveloped region for three weeks with the risks of getting malaria, they argued, clearly outweighed the potential benefit of getting “a few lessons, if any,” from a developing country that is entangled with so many challenges today. Fortunately, the doubt from others did not stop me from embarking onto this trip, which turned out to be one of the most memorable experiences I have ever had. The program was hosted by Manipal University in Mangalore, situated on the west coast of India with a tropical climate, where I was surrounded by lush palm trees, the emerald rice fields, and the “crazy” cars bumping and honking on the winding dusty road every day. I witnessed western culture clashing with Indian traditions through the advertisements of Sprite and Coke along the street and the wide variety of clothing styles chosen by students on campus. I also got a basic understanding of the poverty of the local community and captured a rudimentary understanding of the health care challenges faced by India through our program’s community diagnosis and lectures. The visits to the local community and the slums made me realize that my understanding of poverty was rather naïve and pushed me to explore deeper the underlying causes for poverty in the community. For the first time, I witnessed a number of families living in the Kutcha houses (made of mud, plastic sheets or hay) with insufficient ventilation, poor lighting, and inadequate sanitation, where infection and malnutrition are rife due to insufficient medical knowledge, literacy levels and poverty of the local population. I also observed gender inequality in access to basic education and in reproductive decision-making— girls stayed at home while boys go to school; women hardly played a role in deciding the number of children they bear. Despite all these, I was surprised by the passion for life and beauty demonstrated among the very same people through the colorful clothing, the Hindu shrine in the courtyard and the poetic names of the daughters in the family. I became utterly speechless after every visit, shocked and intrigued by the contrast between the hospitality and optimism of the hosts/hostesses and their living conditions. It was these people struggling to make both ends meet that made me realize how fortunate I am to have grown up with full access to education and health care, and further consolidated 32

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my aspiration to be a physician scientist and to serve people in the developing world in the future. Through in-class discussion on public health policies of India, Europe, the US and China, I learned that medical care services and delivery can be heavily restricted by a number of geographical and socio-economic factors besides the availability of the medical resources, including transportation, sanitation and literacy rate. Impressed by the tremendous medical progress that has been achieved in India, I started to recognize the values of primary health care-oriented health systems and public health programs in developing countries and became interested in becoming a volunteer of nongovernmental organizations in fields relevant to public health in the future. The exploration of India did not stop at the level of examining public health policies and health conditions of the local population. This mysterious land completely won me over with its pristine beauty of nature. When I drifted down the backwater of Kerala filled with water lilies blooming profusely, when I sat in the heart of the mountains of Munnar at night gazing at the lights from households far away, and when I stood at Endpoint listening to the chirps of birds and overlooking the Swarna River and the vibrant landscapes, I found at the bottom of my heart the simplest joy, which prompted me to re-examine my ideas of happiness. Looking back, it is hard to say that nothing has changed in me. Academically, I have come to understand the health care systems and many public policies adopted in India, China and the US under the guidance and challenges of excellent professors at Manipal University. I have learned that public health involves a number of socio-economic factors, in addition to the health care system, that can have significant impact on the health conditions of individuals, as well as the efficiency of health care delivery. Personally, the trip has provided me with an opportunity to evaluate my career goals and ambitions, and has taught me to cherish every opportunity and resource I have. I have also come to realize that like a person can never be judged based on his/ her appearance, a country should not be judged based on its economic development— if we had ignored the food, the striking landscapes, the diverse culture, and the hospitable people and focused solely on poverty and diseases in India, we would have easily missed a heaven in disguise. Finally, the experience fostered the development of a long-term friendship and scholarship across the globe, and equipped me with a deeper understanding of medicine, the world and myself.


From the

Archives

The Archivist as Curator By Amy Lucadamo, College Archivist

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ilson College: On the Books was the most recent exhibition on display at the Hankey Center running from February-June 2011. This exhibition explored the written record of Wilson College in a new way, actually in a variety of ways. My intention in selecting items to exhibit was to show pieces could be interesting either because of their format, their context or their contents. One piece was chosen because it exemplifies historic office equipment designed to make copies decades before mechanized duplication was possible. Not coincidentally, it also provides a great example of how involved President Reaser was in the studies of individual students. Just one page of this letter copying press book, is an illustration of both the labor-intensive process it took to produce only one copy in the early 1900s and the detailed attention that the president gave to one student’s struggles with geometry. Another item on view was the guest book kept by the residents of South Hall in the 1950s. As regulations in the Blue Book stated, “a student having an overnight guest from another dormitory or outside the College shall include the following in the Guest Book: 1. Own Name and room number. 2. Name and address of guest and length of visit. 3. Name of the appropriate Fire Lieutenant.” These overnight guests were, of course, all female. Male callers were allowed and could even be taken to a student’s room if it was between 9 a.m. and 5:15 p.m. and they were accompanied by a chaperone from the faculty, administration of the parent of a Wilson student. While the names and dates recorded in this guest book may not be interesting in themselves, the concept of the guest book as official record of visitors to the dormitory speaks volumes about the behavior Wilson expected from its students during the time from which it came. As the Blue Book moralized, “The reputation of a college depends in large measure upon the conduct of its students. Every student of Wilson College is under obligation at all times to govern her conduct in accordance with propriety and good taste, avoiding behavior that is unbecoming and conspicuous.” One interesting find among stacks of dusty, anonymous ledgers, suffering from red rot on their leather bindings, was a list of donors to the 70th Anniversary Fund conducted from 1938 to 1942. Fundraising on the heels of the Great Depression and during World War II must have required creativity. Evidence of this could be seen in the entries of pledges and donations to the Fund made with War Savings Bonds and Defense Savings Stamps. These are just a few examples of how history can be evoked from an old book if you examine it in new ways. It is also what can happen when the archivist gets to play curator. Stay tuned for upcoming exhibits online and at the Hankey Center. The C. Elizabeth Boyd ’33 Archives are open for research from 1:30-4:30 p.m. or by appointment.

Amy Lucadamo with the 1950s South Hall guest book.

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Marjorie Mulder Kohler ’50 By Cathy Mentzer

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arjorie Mulder Kohler ’50 was a pioneer in more ways than one. She worked in a predominantly male field of business, worked on the cutting edge of computer technology and was part of a cultural shift that would eventually make it acceptable for a woman to have an important career while also playing the role of wife and mother. In her early career, Kohler worked on the frontlines of computing when the industry was in its infancy. She was part of a team assembled by the legendary Grace Hopper, who is credited with being the “mother” of the seminal COBOL (Common Business-Oriented Language) computer programming language. Kohler worked on the Univac 1 (Universal Automatic Computer), a room-sized machine designed for the U.S. Bureau of the Census that today is described as the world’s first successful computer. At the 1981 National Computer Conference Pioneer Day, Kohler was listed as one of the Univac 1 trailblazers on the 30th anniversary of the computer’s introduction in 1951. “Our nation and the world owe a great debt to those indomitable innovators whose foresight three decades ago helped usher in the Information Society of today,” the NCC 1981 Pioneer Day program stated. Kohler, who passed away in March, spoke about her days working with Hopper and Univac during a 2009 recorded interview. She said that at the time, she and her colleagues realized they were working in uncharted territory. “Oh yes, we knew that, but we didn’t know how important it was going to be,” Kohler said. “We knew this was brand new and it was a lot of fun. Oh, it was terrific fun.” Kohler, who was the only student to major in physics in her entire class at Wilson, remembered hearing for the first time

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about computers from a Wilson College math professor. After graduation, her Wilson connection helped her land her first job. “There was a note on the bulletin board that Louis C. Green, a professor of astronomy at Haverford College, was looking for a research assistant,” Kohler said. Green’s brother happened to be on the Wilson College Board of Trustees. She interviewed for the position and Green hired her. “It had a great effect on my future life, since it led directly to Univac and also to meeting my husband,” she said. “It was sort of a defining moment.” For four years, Kohler assisted Green’s astrophysical research by helping prepare data for IBM relay calculators in New York City. “We did numerical solutions of differential equations,” she said. “In those days, you did this kind of thing with a piece of paper and a pencil and a Marchant calculator to do the numbers.” While Kohler enjoyed the work and was fond of Green, she felt after four years that it was “time to move on.” Through an introduction provided by Green, Kohler was interviewed by Hopper and Eckert-Mauchly Computer co-founder John Mauchly at a Philadelphia restaurant over lunch. Green also attended. “I can’t remember much about that first meeting except I was pretty much intimidated,” Kohler said. She got the job and was soon on her way to becoming a key player in the development of computers for widespread use by government and industry. “I got hired and, at the same time, I think a couple of other friends of mine came on board,” said Kohler. “(Hopper) ran what was called program research, which is exactly what it was. My first job was to flowchart the A-2 compiler.” At the same time, Hopper – who was then also a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy Reserve and would later become a rear


SHAPING THE FUTURE Advancement News

Kohler (left center) seated next to Dr. Grace Hopper, attends a lecture by Dr. Hopper at Temple University.

admiral – was working on a computer vocabulary of terms and their meanings for the entire industry. The team’s work was always evolving to meet changing demands, according to Kohler. “We needed to think about the business applications of the computer because while the first computers went to government installations, at this point people like General Electric and MetLife were buying Univac computers, and the real problem was to program the computer to get the job done,” she said. Kohler worked on the B-0 compiler, later known as FLOW-MATIC, which would become the basis for the breakthrough, universal programming language COBOL, introduced in 1959. Over the next 20 years, more computer programs were written in COBOL than any other language. In 1956, while working on the B-0 compiler project, Kohler married F. Peter Kohler, a medical student who went on to become a successful Philadelphia area urologist. She continued to work until she learned she was expecting her first child. After the birth of a daughter, Karen, in September 1957, Kohler went back to work on a part-time basis – something that was not common in most companies at the time. “Grace said, ‘You can work at home. Come in once a week,’ said Kohler, adding “I wasn’t the only young woman doing that. (Hopper) was extremely supportive to all the women who worked for her.” In the late 1950s, the Kohlers moved to Florida after Dr. F. Peter Kohler was called to military service. “Even then, I was doing some long-distance programming work,” Kohler said. The couple had their second child, Susan, in November 1960, before returning to the Philadelphia area in 1961. The Kohlers had a third daughter, Ellen, in 1963, and Marjorie decided to take a break from her career at that point. But by the time she was

ready to resume her career, Hopper had left Univac and returned to the Navy. Kohler eventually returned to the workplace in 1968, working in the computer department at Haverford College for several years. In the mid-1970s, she developed a computer program for her husband’s medical practice and would eventually work for him part time, maintaining the computers in his office. Years later, Kohler still revered her mentor. “She wasn’t a large person but boy, a definite personality,” Kohler told her interviewer in 2009. “She was constantly saying, ‘Try this, do this, do that.’ And we’d come back with some ideas and she’d say, ‘We’ll try it and see if it works.’” Kohler also remembered Hopper for her unorthodox attitude toward her female employees, who she pushed to take on leadership roles and more responsibility. “She used to tell the women, ‘You should be bucking for my job. You should be pushing. You should be trying to get ahead of where you are.’” Kohler felt that Hopper even had an impact on her daughters. “Inadvertently (she) did because I did work part time most of the time when they were growing up, and they all grew up thinking, well, mothers can work, mothers can do things,” Kohler said. “It happens all the time nowadays, but they just took it for granted.” Kohler was fond of saying she got a job that didn’t exist when she was at Wilson – computer programmer – and she credited her alma mater with preparing her well for the work she went on to do. “Wilson (provided) an exceedingly solid liberal arts education …” she said. “It gave me a good start.” When she was interviewed in 2009, Kohler said she still used a computer – primarily for word processing and email – with occasional help from any one of her seven grandchildren.

Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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SHAPING THE FUTURE Advancement News

enue 1015 Philadelphia Av 201-1279 17 PA , urg Chambersb 10 Telephone: 717.262.20 Fax: 717.262.2042

vancement Office of College Ad du n.e www.wilso son.org www.campaignforwl

, e Wilson Community

Dear Members of th

Society Challenge in win Pines & Maples od Go e th ed ish bl ta When I es well.  And, it has! would serve Wilson it at th l fu pe ho s wa dI May of 2010, I n, my late husband an ga be ge en all Ch e th when n, As I shared with you tion and preservatio education, conserva e:  lif in ns er nc co had three main of it is at the root mly believe the lack fir I .  N O TI CA U ED the highest being bal problems. of so many of our glo rticipated in the the 51 donors who pa k an th lly na rso pe I would like to e Wilson Annual tional $50,000 for th di ad an d ise ra we were from Challenge.  Together d to learn that 24 gifts se ea pl lly cia pe es s ue to give to Fund this year!  I wa at you will all contin th pe ho y m is  It rs. no available for new Wilson Fund do ge experience will be lle Co on ils W ur yo Wilson to ensure that y years to come. others for many, man important to all of ts in this economy is en stm ve in r ou ng gi allenge, Levera establish their own Ch to n io sit po a in be ight to our us!  To those who m rding and beneficial wa re , sy ea s It’ it. er nsid ncement I encourage you to co ffice of College Adva O e th t ac nt co y pl m ge.  Si beloved Wilson Colle . to find out the details Best wishes, ray Goodwin ’49 Thérèse “Terry” Mur

Thérèse “Terry” Murray Goodwin ’49

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SHAPING THE FUTURE Advancement News

Service to Wilson

Journey to Commitment By Patricia Layden Jerabek ’61

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ur class of 1961 has just celebrated its 50th reunion. All indicators suggest that renewing relationships with classmates, experiencing the Wilson campus and community again, and celebrating 50 years of life as alumnae were very special. Our Class Leaders cared much that the experience be meaningful for us and also bene ficial to the college. Working together, our class raised $45,000 for our class gift. After the generous Lenfest match, we will have increased Wilson’s resources by $90,000. Fifty years ago, I was a moderately appreciative graduate and a minimally active alumna. At this point, I am enthusiastically committed to supporting Wilson, with hopes that the College will thrive in fulfilling its mission and strategic plan. Here are some elements that transformed me. The first element is a love of learning as a tool of lifelong development. As a student 54 years ago, I liked Wilson, enjoyed my friends, appreciated opportunities to serve in leadership positions and was thankful for the opportunity to earn a degree, securing a middle-class life. I was not ablaze as a learner although I loved ideas and happily engaged in philosophical discussions. I studied chemistry and after graduation, worked as a research assistant at Johns Hopkins University. When I received an unsolicited invitation to teach math and science, I began a 40-year journey that included graduate school in economics and 20 years of university teaching. I discovered student–centered approaches to learning and the power of constructing and deconstructing knowledge. I was then ablaze as a learner. For Wilson students, I wish a love of learning through a broad range of educational approaches that accommodate diverse personality types, learning styles, talents and cultures. The second transformative element is an appreciation of the importance of educating women for responsibility and participation in all aspects of social and public life. I remember a poster from the 1920s which claimed that education for women would decrease their fertility. I expect that during Wilson’s 142 years, every obstacle has surfaced in terms of assumptions, stereotypes and resistance. At this point, doors to every profession are at least ajar. I want to support Wilson to be a state-of-the-art institution, understanding the spectrum of feminine cultures and responding with creative programs that challenge students, while supporting their learning and development.

Patricia Jerabek '61 and her husband Frank

The last element is recognition of the significance of educational endowments in supporting student programs, physical plant and addressing all elements of our institutional mission. As an undergraduate, I was quite unaware that every student’s academic program and the campus itself were subsidized by alumnae contributions. We all received gifts that our tuition payments could not have purchased. Now, with clarity about that, I have paid back my scholarship and will increase my future giving. I want to gift future students, as older alums gifted our generation. Of the Wilson offerings that I know, the Global Citizenship Initiative fascinates me most. If I can contribute by enriching student learning, raising funds for program development, encouraging curriculum to be responsive to students from a broad spectrum of cultural experiences, I will feel useful and happy in this life stage, in which generativity and wisdom are the currency of contentment and well-being. Service is second nature to me now. Frank and I were honored in New Mexico recently with a Silver Horizon Senior Hall of Fame award for lifetime community service, which inspires me to earn the mantle every day. I invite you to join me and share your talents and resources to strengthen our alma mater in preparation for a bright future. Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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WILSON ATHLETICS

Wilson College Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) Announces Award Recipients On Sunday, May 8th, at the annual Athletic Association Awards Picnic, the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) announced the 2010-2011 SAAC Awards recipients. The 2010-2011 academic year marks the tenth year of recognizing student-athletes who make an impact in their sport and the overall wellbeing and success of the athletic program. The committee compiles the nominations and selects a recipient for Rookie of the Year, Senior Athlete of the Year, and the Phoenix Award. Junior, Maggie Sipps (Philadelphia, PA/ Little Flower) was elected to receive the 2011 Phoenix Award. Sipps is a three sport athlete at Wilson College, as member of the field hockey, basketball, and softball teams and has proven herself and a fierce competitor and loyal teammate. On both the field and court, Maggie has a way of providing a spark and creating positive energy that makes everyone around her work harder. During the year, Sipps contributed to the success of each of her teams. On the field hockey field, Sipps recorded 4 goals and 2 assists. On the basketball court, she was the team’s defensive spark, totaling 31 steals for the season. At short stop, Sipps had a fielding percentage of .824 and batting average of .371 with 41 RBIs and 13 stolen bases. Freshmen, Vanessa Whitfield (Chambersburg, PA/ Chambersburg) was named

Wilson’s Rookie of the Year. Whitfield is a two sport athlete, as a member of the basketball and lacrosse teams. Her selection as Rookie of the Year had much to do with her impact on the basketball team this year. Whitfield led the Phoenix this season with 328 points (14.9 per game), 252 rebounds (11.45 per game), 32 steals, and 11 double doubles. She was also named North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) and Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) Division III Southern Player of the Week during the season. Alania Hofer (Dunncannon, PA/ Susquenita) was named the Senior of the Year. Hofer is a member of the soccer and basketball teams and has positively impacted both programs. Acting as a captain on both teams, Hofer has proven herself as a true leader in Wilson College athletics, leading by example, showing her heart and determination, and positively encouraging her teammates. In addition, she is an active member in numerous clubs and organizations, extending her leadership abilities throughout the campus. On the basketball court, Hofer totaled 225 points (10.2 per game) and 203 rebounds (8.1 per game) this season. During her career at Wilson, Hofer recorded 970 total points and 882 rebounds. Coach of the Year award is a new addition this year and was presented to head softball coach, Brett Cline for his excel-

lence in recruiting and dedication to the athletes and team. Under his leadership the softball team finished the season with an overall record of 22-13. The team won the NEAC South Division Championship and was the first Wilson College team to qualify for an ECAC post-season championship tournament. “The softball team’s success is a reflection of the time, energy and hard work Brett puts into the program,” says Athletic Director, Lori Frey, “It is my honor to present him with this award for all that he has done for the team, the program and the department.” 4 Year Letter Winners In order to be a “letter winner” in a sport, and athlete must compete in 75% of the competitions. According to athletic director, Lori Frey, “To accomplish that for 4 consecutive years requires dedication, discipline, luck and injury free bodies.” The following people have been fortunate enough to possess all those qualities. Beth Bush- Soccer and Gymnastics Megan Dennis- Field Hockey and Basketball Samantha Vance- Gymnastics Monique Pare- Gymnastics Victoria Wilcox- Field Hockey Liesel Troshak- Field Hockey Alaina Hofer- Basketball

Four-year Letter Winners (L-R): Sam Vance ’10, Alaina Hofer ’11, Victoria Wilcox ’11, Beth Bush ’11, Megan Dennis ’11

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Maggie Sipps ’12 with presenter Megan Dennis ’11

WILSON ATHLETICS

Spring Neac All-Conference Honors LACROSSE

Vanessa Whitfield ’14 with presenter Alaina Hofer ’11

Senior, Beth Bush (Pottstown, PA/ Homeschooled) was selected to the NEAC All-Conference First Team as a defender. For the season, Bush recorded 11 goals and 2 assists, totaling 13 points, with 34 ground balls and a shot on goal percentage of .634. Junior, Jami DeVanie (Boiling Springs, PA/ Cumberland Valley) was selected to the NEAC All-Conference Second Team as a midfielder. DeVanie recorded 33 goals and 3 assists, totaling 36 points, with 34 ground balls and a shot on goal percentage of .767

SOFTBALL

Maggie Sipps ’12 with Senior of the Year Alaina Hofer ’11

Brett Cline with Athletic Director Lori Frey

Sophomore, Brianna Smith (Berryville, VA/ Clarke County) was named the NEAC South 1st team All-Conference as a catcher. On the season, Smith had a batting average of .419 with 18 RBIs and was 20 for 23 in stolen bases. She also totaled 119 put outs, 22 assists, and has a fielding percentage of .953. Sophomore, Nicole Musser (Middletown, VA/ Sherando), earned NEAC South 2nd team all-conference and South Division Pitcher of the Year. Musser was 11-3 for the season, starting 15 of 19 game appearances for Wilson. She had an ERA of 2.46 while pitching a total of 98.2 innings, allowing 27 earned runs, and holding her opponents to a batting average of .223. Musser also recorded 106 strike outs, pitching 12 complete games with 3 shut outs and 1 save. Sophomore, Tara Fields (Berryville, VA/ Clarke County), earned NEAC South 2nd team All-Conference. In the outfield, Fields totaled 73 putouts with a fielding percentage of .976. At the plate, she batted .429 with 39 RBIs and was 14 for 16 in stolen bases. Sophomore, Tracey Artz (Sharpsburg, MD/ Williamsport) earned NEAC South 2nd team All-Conference. As a utility player, Artz had a batting average of .235 for the season with 20 RBIs and was 16 for 17 in stolen bases.

TENNIS Seniors, Mia and Tess Doyle (Smithsburg, MD/ HCC) were selected to the NEAC All-Conference First Team at No. 1 doubles. The pair was undefeated this season and won the NEAC Individual tennis championships title at #1 Doubles. Tess Doyle was also named to the NEAC All-Conference first team at #2 singles. Tess is also undefeated and clinched the NEAC individual tennis championships title. Mia Doyle was named to the NEAC All-Conference second team at #1 singles. Mia has a record of 11-3 on the season, and finished second in the NEAC Individual tennis championships.

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WILSON ATHLETICS

Mia and Tessa Doyle Inducted into Wilson’s Athletic Hall of Fame

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n May 8th, the Wilson College Athletic Association held their annual awards picnic, where senior tennis players Mia and Tessa Doyle (Smithsburg, MD/ HCC) were inducted into the Wilson College Gwendolyn Jensen Athletic Hall of Fame. In order to be eligible for the honor, nominees should have exhausted their intercollegiate eligibility, have achieved advanced level recognition for their athletic achievement and have contributed significantly to the overall athletic program.The Doyle’s began their athletic career at Wilson College in the fall of 2009 as transfer students from Hagerstown Community College and in their two years at Wilson College, Mia and Tessa have significantly impacted and contributed to the success of the Wilson College tennis team. As a doubles pair, the Doyle’s are 20-1 overall, suffering only one post-season loss during their career at Wilson. They were undefeated in the 2011 season and won the North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) Individual

Tennis Championship at No. 1 doubles. Both players have seen similar success in singles competition. In the 2010 season at No. 2 singles, Tessa Doyle turned in a record of 8-3, and earned at second place finish at the NEAC Individual Tennis Championship. In 2011, Tessa was undefeated with a 10-0 record and earned the NEAC Championship title at No. 2 singles. In the 2010 season, Mia Doyle went 9-1 in the regular season at No. 1 singles. In the finals of the NEAC Conference Singles Tennis Championship, Mia defeated the two-time defending champion from Keuka College, earning her the honor of NEAC Most Outstanding player. In the 2011 season, Mia again went 9-1 and earned a second place finish at NEAC Individual Championships. Both are incredible athletes and fearless competitors. Even with their countless achievements, the Doyle’s legacy at Wilson will be as true leaders and teammates. Under their leadership, the Wilson tennis team made their first NEAC Team Cham-

pionship appearance. As co-captains, they lead by example both on and off the court and can be found courtside cheering on their teammates. According to head tennis coach Mike Ricker, “They Doyle’s have changed the face of tennis at Wilson and have earned the respect they deserve as athletes.”

Spring Sports Wrap-up

Softball

Tennis

Highlight: The Wilson Softball team won the NEAC South Division Championship and then earned the #5 seed in the Eastern Colleges Athletic Conference (ECAC) South Region Softball Championship, then won the first round to advance to the Final Four Tournament. Recap: Early in March, the softball team kicked off the season with 6 consecutive losses followed by 8 consecutive wins The Phoenix tallied only 3 more losses during the regular season, to finish the 22-9. They dropped two games to Keuka College in the NEAC Championship. Next Season: The softball team returns the entire team next year and expects a solid recruiting class to add and build on their recent success.

Highlight: The tennis team made its’ debut at the North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) Team Championship seeded 4th. Recap: During regular season, the tennis team finished 6-6 overall and 3-3 in the NEAC. Sophomore, Sarah Loucks (York, PA/West York), and seniors, Mia and Tessa Doyle (Smithsburg, MD/ Smithsburg) qualified for the NEAC Individual Championship Tournament. The Doyle sisters finished the season 14-0 at #1 doubles and finished the season with the NEAC Double’s Title. Mia finished 2nd at #1 singles and Tessa ended with 1st team all conference honors at #2 Singles. Loucks finished 4th. Next Season: The tennis team loses four seniors and will face the challenges of replacing dominate players at the #1 and #2 singles and #1 doubles positions.

Lacrosse Highlight: Junior, Jami DeVanie (Boiling Springs, PA/Cumberland Valley) sets season scoring record for the Phoenix at 33 goals in 14 games. She surpassed her own previous record of 22 in a season. Recap: The 2011 lacrosse team finished its third year of competition and tallied 2 conference wins. Senior, Elizabeth Bush (Pottstown, PA/Homeschooled) earned NEAC 1st team All-Conference Honors and Jami DeVanie earned NEAC 2nd team All-conference Honors. Next Season: The team returns 12 players from this years roster, including leading scorers Jami DeVanie and Jessica Menard (Fallbrook, CA/Fallbrook). 40

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(Left)Tessa Doyle (right) Mia Doyle


WILSON ATHLETICS

Wilson Softball Team Earns First ECAC Bid in College History

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f you ask the Wilson College softball team if they are where they planned to be, the answer would be a resounding, “No!” However, when you look at their success and the history they have made this season, one may call to question their gratitude. Their story is not about a lack of gratitude, nor is it about them as individuals. It is about their journey, their team goals and for who they play. It’s about their legacy. At the end of last season, after their second consecutive trip to the NEAC Final Four, they knew they wanted to win the NEAC Softball Championship and play in the NCAA Super 8 Regional Tournament. However, we all know wanting something doesn’t make it happen, but working hard for it does. So that is where their journey began. Early this spring, the Phoenix kicked off the season with 6 consecutive losses, which could cause even the best players to doubt their abilities and their goals. However, they didn’t hesitate and they didn’t question their abilities. They only persevered and worked harder. Over the next 22 regular season games, they lost only 3. “Those losses came at great moments,” says junior, infielder, Maggie Sipps (Philadelphia, PA/Little Flower). “They allowed us to learn from them and work even harder.” The Wilson College softball team finished the regular season 22-9 overall and 18-2 in the NEAC, earning them the privilege of hosting the South Championship. They won all three games, including the championship game where Wilson faced Penn State Berks for the sixth time this season. The Phoenix started the game strong at the plate, scoring three runs in the first inning. Wilson would score two more runs in the second inning, and then one run in the sixth inning. Penn State Berks would load the bases several times late in the game but the Phoenix defense held them scoreless. Following the South Championship, Wilson hosted the NEAC North Champions, Keuka College, for the overall NEAC conference title. The championship tournament was the best of a three game series and the winner received an automatic bid to the

NCAA tournament. Wilson lost the first game 2-4 and the second game 3-5, finishing as the NEAC runner-up. The following week, the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) announced that Wilson College was the fifth seed in an eight team South Region Championship Tournament. The Phoenix faced the fourth seed, Stevenson University on the road, for the first round. During the regular season, Wilson dropped two close games to Stevenson, 3-6 and 2-3. According to Athletic Director, Lori Frey, “This is the first Wilson College team to qualify for an ECAC post-season championship tournament. We are proud of all the softball team’s accomplishments this season and hope they can continue their momentum and success.” Success is just what they found. The team won the first round of the ECAC Championship Tournament, defeating Stevenson University with a score of 2-1. The quarter-final win advanced the Phoenix to the ECAC final four double elimination tournament on Saturday, May 14th, held at Alvernia University. Wilson was the only team at the Final Four who had not played in an ECAC tournament in previous years. Unfortunately for the Phoenix, the excitement and nervousness was overwhelming and they dropped the first game against Misericordia University, 1-6. In the first elimination game, Alvernia used two big innings to upend Wilson 10-2, in five innings. According to head Coach Brett Cline, “This experience was exactly what we needed. Each and every game was important and they became instrumental in our development as a team. The next step is using the experience to improve and build upon our legacy.” So while the softball team isn’t content or satisfied, they do recognize that they have accomplished many things this year and each experience will make them a better team in the future. So when you see one of our softball players, I hope you recognize them for who they are and what they can accomplish. They do it for the Blue and White – for the pride in a college they love – they play for each other and they play for WILSON! Visit us at www.wilson.edu

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Thank you for supporting all things Wilson. www.campaignforwilson.org


1015 Philadelphia Avenue Chambersburg, PA 17201-1285

Take a trip with the Alumnae Association

April 14 to 22, 2012

Waterways of Holland • Belgium Cruising aboard the Deluxe m.s. AmaDante Come celebrate the beauty of Holland and Belgium in springtime, the optimal season for this culturally rich, seven-night cruise aboard the M.S. AMADANTE, showcasing river life along the Low Countries’ storied waterways. We invite you to join us and experience the wonders of Holland’s breathtaking tulip fields in full bloom and a special opportunity to attend the amazing FLORIADE 2012 World Horticultural Exposition, held only once every 10 years! Throughout the cruise, discover the true essence of life in the Low Countries. Our expert-guided tours explore three UNESCO World Heritage sites, including Amsterdam’s 16th- and 17th-century, house-lined canals, the historic windmills of Kinderdijk and the well-preserved, medieval jewel of Bruges. Experience the daily traditions at the legendary Aalsmeer Flower Auction and rich history and artistic legacy of the world-class Rijksmuseum.

Trip includes 7 nights priced from $2,795 per PAX (double occupancy). BIG savings if the trip is booked by September 9, 2011.

Call the Alumnae Office at 1.866.446.8660 for more information.


Alumnae Quarterly Summer 2011