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sun begins to set on Labor Day.” Thomas acknowledges that “it can remain swelteringly hot until mid-November in the Deep South, but Southerners of the Easter-morning-to-Labor-Day-evening school suffer through the heat after Labor Day to avoid the glares of older ladies in church and around town.” Thomas confesses that he “would rather be uncomfortable in [his] pew wearing wool than comfortably wearing seersucker on a Sunday morning post-Labor Day and receiving the stern glare from one of the Grand Dames. It’s just not worth it.” The second school of thought – Memorial Day to Labor Day – is followed north of the Sweet Tea Line for obvious reasons. It’s still cold in Boston on Easter Sunday, and warm weather generally doesn’t arrive in the North until late spring. But the second school also has many followers in the South and throughout other warmer parts of the United States as folks regard seersucker as summer wear, and the unofficial start to summer is Memorial Day weekend. Andrew Thomas has noted that there is “an in-between school of thought between the first school and the second school, among people who believe that seersucker is appropriate on Easter but white shoes are not appropriate until after Memo-

92 | Milk and Sugar: The Complete Book of Seersucker

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