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itude and your attitude. The first school is found in the Deep South, below what has become known as the Sweet Tea Line, which should not be confused with the Mason-Dixon Line. The Sweet Tea Line is the demarcation point that truly separates the North from the South. If you go into a restaurant or diner north of this line and order tea, the waitress or waiter will ask you two questions: Hot or cold? Sweetened or unsweetened? But if you order tea south of the Sweet Tea Line, you will be served iced tea already sweetened with sugar, no questions asked. Thomas contends that under the south-of-the-Sweet-TeaLine school of fashion thought, the seersucker season is determined by the church calendar. “On Easter Sunday,” Thomas writes, “ladies don their sundresses with heirloom pearls and white shoes, and gentlemen don their seersucker suits with bow ties and white bucks (extra credit for those who wear a hat).” In Charleston, Thomas witnesses the beginning of the seersucker season on Easter Sunday morning at St. Philip’s Church where, he says, “you will see … seersucker plumage in all of its puckered glory.” Thomas acknowledges, however, that even south of the Sweet Tea Line, folks put away their seersucker “as soon as the

Bill Haltom | 91

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