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urged his colleagues to prove that “the Senate isn’t just a bunch of dowdy folks wearing dark suits and a red or blue tie.” Senator Diane Feinstein wasn’t going to let her male colleagues in the Senate steal the show. She urged her female colleagues to join the bipartisan fashion parade. “I watched the men preening in the Senate,” she said, “and I figured we should give them a little bit of a horse race.” And Senator Feinstein put her money where her mouth was. Without spending a single taxpayer dollar, she personally bought seersucker dress suits for eleven of her female Senate colleagues. Within a few years, Seersucker Thursday had become a great Senate tradition with nearly a third of the United States Senate donning seersucker each year on the third Thursday of June. They posed side-by-side on the Senate floor for a photograph, and then join each other for ice cream in the Capitol dairy bar. For a brief period of time, the federal government began to function again. By the year 2000, the federal budget had been balanced, and our lawmakers were paying off the national debt. You could call this a coincidence, but you could also call it a bipartisan seersucker solution to America’s problems. Seersucker Thursday was actually a restoration of a long seersucker tradition in Washington.

Bill Haltom | 165

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