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1984 after a two-year head start in Japan. Initial releases were heavily weighted towards classical music. Record stores faced challenges with marketing – just how much shelf space to dedicate to a brand new format. Originally CDs were sold in cardboard packaging and shrink-wrapped that were 6” wide and 12” tall so that two CDs side by side could fill the same space as a traditional album. Eventually consumer backlash against excessive packaging waste led the music companies to eliminate the cardboard boxes. Even Talking Heads front man David Bryne had encouraged music buyers of his CDs to complain about the environmental waste. By 1993 the long box went the way of McDonald’s Styrofoam containers. MiniDiscs (MD): In the early 1990’s Sony was looking for a replacement for the CD. They developed a small digital tape Digital Audio Tape or DAT. It did find it’s way into professional studios but the recording units proved too expensive for the average consumer. Enter the MD player; a 70 minute mini-CD encased in a plastic case. The players were roughly the size of the Sony Walkman and had the advantage over CDs in that the music was easily accessible on the disc. Although popular in Japan the format never caught on in the U.S. as Sony (not surprisingly) was the only major company to release their artist’s music on the format. Columbia House: A now defunct mail order membership from Columbia Records. They offered to send a new member up to 13 albums for 1¢ on the condition that you would buy an agreed upon number of albums at regular price. Think of it as the analog, snail mail version of iTunes. AOR: Album Oriented Rock. A radio station play format that began in earnest in the early 70s which featured the longer cuts of

10 | The World’s Hardest Music Trivia

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