Page 1

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN PORTFOLIO WILL ROWLAND


TABLE OF CONTENTS - AC ENTERTAINMENT - AMPHITHEATER AT UVA - MAX/MIN COMPETITION WINNER - NASHVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL - NEW ORLEANS MARKET - NASHVILLE BOATHOUSE - INTEGRATIONS - PROFESSIONAL - ABROAD

Fall 2010 Spring 2011

Will Rowland cargocollective.com/WillRowland wrowland@utk.edu 865.356.0920

Fall 2011 Fall 2011 Spring 2012 Fall 2012 2013-2014

Bachelor of Architecture University of Tennessee 2009-2014


AC ENTERTAINMENT 300 Block South Gay St., Knoxville, TN

AC Entertainment, a prominent concert promotor located in Knoxville, TN, worked in conjunction with one second year studio to challenge the students to produce a design for a new headquarters. This building, guided by the driving concept of the interaction between solid and void, provides retail on the groud floor, office space on the second and third floors, and a performance space on the fourth floor. These spaces, flanked on one side by a massive open air atrium, provide a fluid, open environment in which creative minds can thrive.

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1


In order to create more usable floor area without compromising the concept of solid and void, a series of “floating spaces� were added to the design of the building. The addition of these spaces allowed for additional retail space on the ground floor, conference rooms on the second and third floors, and an open air viewing platform on the fourth floor.

2


UVA EXTERIOR EXHIBITION CENTER University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

3


Done as a week long charette, this project was meant to provide an exhibition space on a site of our choosing on the campus of the University of Virginia, with the site selected being adjacent to the lawn in close proximity to the rotunda. Beginning with the octagon, one of Thomas Jefferson’s favorite geometries, a basic shape was created in plan on which the exhibition space would be able to sit. Then, through the overlaying of octagons in plan, masses were extruded to create the eventual form of the space, a structural glass pavilion resting on a granite plinth. During the day, the space would act as a place to display public art or student work, while at night the entire pavilion would be lit up to act as a beacon for the surrounding campus.

4


MAX_min COMPETITION WINNER University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

Established in honor of the School of Architecture’s former director, Max Robinson, MAX_min is a recurring annual design competition that encourages making maximum design impact with the least possible means. Each of the competition’s projects will impact the College of Architecture and Design, the University of Tennessee, and the State of Tennessee. The 2011 competition served as a call for multiple scales and interpretations of the theme assembly. As designers, why do we gather? What does it mean to come together to consider ideas in design? What is the minimum requirement to foster meaningful exchange? What is the maximum opportunity for sharing ideas with others? The interpretation of “assembly,” as it applies to scope, to scale and context, to space and use, is the critical question and the critical tool in the development of the project. Designers were called to put forward their best ideas for a studio review space within the Reading Room Courtyard in the Art and Architecture Building. Our approach involved terracing the landscape, creating a natural classroom setting as well as a beautiful space to relax between classes. The garden includes native plants that are acclimated to the environment and require minimal maintenance while also providing a natural landscape that inspires creative thought. By revitalizing the space, the Reading Room Courtyard is able to be transformed from a campus afterthought to a vibrant and elegant exterior classroom meant to inspire creative thought and community.

5


TGÄOGCUWTKPIVJGNCPFUECRG=?

#ICTFGPETGCVGFHQTVJGRWTRQUGQH NGKUWTGGFWECVKQPCPFDGCWV[CUVJG # #KVUGNHRTGUGPVUKVUGNHCUCVGCEJKPI VQQNHQTUVWFGPVUQHCTEJKVGEVWTGCPF FGUKIP 2TQHGUUQTUQHNCPFUECRGCPFFGUKIPIKXG NGEVWTGUUVCPFKPIKPHTQPVQHVJGKTOQUV RQYGTHWNGFWECVKQPCNCRRCTCVWUVJG ICTFGP #UVCKTCNNQYKPICEEGUUKPVQVJGICTFGP

6JGCORJKVJGCVGTCNNQYUHQTCVTCPUKVQT[ VJGCVGTUETGGPVQRTQLGEVUVWFGPVYQTM CPFVKOGNGUUOQXKGU #UVCIGVJCVCNNQYUHQTEQPXGTUCVKQPUQH VJGNCPFUECRG

4GIKQPCNNCPFUECRGICTFGP 

GFKDNGICTFGP



YCVGTICTFGP



UJCFGICTFGP

 

FGEKFWQWUVTGGU =RTGUGTXCVKQPQHGZKUVKPI?

(KNNGFYKVJPCVKXGRNCPVUVJCVCTG CEENKOCVGFVQUQKNUCPFENKOCVG6JGUG KPFKIGPQWURNCPVUTGSWKTGOKPKOWO HGTVKNK\GTCPFNGUUYCVGT 8GTVKECNEKTEWNCVKQPHQEWUGFD[UNGPFGT GXGTITGGPUVJCVCNNQYHQTDGVVGTHNQYKPVQ VJGPGYNCPFUECRGICTFGP

UKVGRNCPž

6


SOBRO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 5th Avenue South, Nashville, TN The Sobro Elementary School is being proposed to further efforts to revitalize downtown Nashville. Located at the corner of 5th Avenue and Lea Avenue, this project is part of a collective effort to improve urban density and vitality. This school is meant to act as a catalyst for residential growth in the heart of Nashville and provide an extra amenity that could help to attract young families, and the services they require, into the downtown area.

7

PARTI

SOLID/VOID

BASIC MASSING


GROUND FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

8


The overall concept driving the design of the building was one of transparency. Transparency can be defined in two ways: literally and phenomenally. Literal transparency can be defined as the inherent quality of a substance, such as glass, while phenomenal transparency is defined as simultaneous perceptions of different spatial locations within the same space. This concept was applied to the design process by providing a sense of transparency to the community at large, which involved dividing the program into two parts: essential school functions and functions that might be shared with the community. These functions were then divided into two separate buildings, allowing the community to use the building containing shareable program after school hours while maintaining the security of the school building. In addition to the typical program found in an elementary school, “flex spaces� were provided on the ground floor, with each space allowing the students to experience a different aspect of the Cumberland River (water, sand, and clay) and further the execution of the concept of phenomenal transparency.

9


The form of the school was defined by the existing streets adjacent to the site and an alleyway to the north of the building. Circulation was another major driver for the school, and so the program was laid out in such a way that there would be only one major circulation path through the building facing the interior courtyard, providing a sense of security from the surrounding city. In the surrounding site, the landscape is terraced to provide park space as well as a playground for the children. In addition to landscaping the site on which the school is located, the site directly to the south was included in the design, creating additional space for playing fields as well as space for a skate park and a skate center. This was another opportunity to provide a connection to the community and create an additional amenity for the community surrounding the school.

10


NEW ORLEANS MARKET 1235 North Peters Street, New Orleans, LA New Orleans is a city that boasts a confluence of culture unlike any other American city. Its unique cultural makeup has helped New Orleans evolve into a city that is completely its own, fostering the melting pot ideals that Americans hold dear, while all the while emerging as one of the most diverse and dynamic cities in America. Our project of designing a new market in the French Quarter posed many challenges, not the least of which was how to remain true to a typology truly unique to New Orleans without becoming a slave to the traditional French Quarter aesthetic. My approach involved providing a connection to a riverside park while also bringing additional green space into the Quarter itself through the use of a green roof. An interpretation of the traditional New Orleans market is sheltered underneath the roof, as well as additional program meant to bring further vitality to a city which exudes vigor.

11 1

LOCATION

EXTRUSION

FOLDING

EXTENSION

PROGRAM MASS

EXTRA PROGRAM

STONES IN THE RIVER

CIRCULATION SKETCH


GROUND FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

12


13


14


COMMUNITY BOATHOUSE Nashville Riverfront, Nashville, TN The Nashville Community Boathouse is being proposed as an addition to the current Nashville Riverfront Plan to provide a facility for a rapidly growing rowing population. As an addition to the plan, the Boathouse would provide another theater of sport within downtown Nashville, while also serving as a catalyst for increasing pedestrian use of the Esplanade along the east bank of the river and encourage further development of adjacent areas, burgeoning the revitalization of the downtown as a whole. Programmatically, in addition to the attraction of the races themselves, the Boathouse also provides the appeal of a restaurant and bar that look out across the river to the downtown proper, an attraction that could serve even more exposure for the redevelopment of the downtown as well as the sport of rowing.

15


SITE PLAN

SITE SECTION

16


BOAT CIRCULATION DIAGRAM In developing the positioning of the Boathouse on the site, the circulation of the boats became a driving factor. From the flat portion of the site to the river, there is a 29’ elevation change which, when coupled with the immense length of the rowing shells, meant that making the transition from the Boathouse to the river needed to be as straightforward as possible.

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

TRANSFORMATION DIAGRAM The basic form of the project in plan was defined by the boat storage bays. The need for a main public entry as well as service entry led to the addition of two smaller masses attached at opposite ends of the boat storage bays. The need for additional circulation space to allow for movement between programmatic elements on the upper floor necessitated additional manipulation of the form in plan, splitting up the boat storage bays.

17

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

1. Public Entry 2. Meeting Area 3. Classroom

4.Men’s Locker Room 5. Women’s Locker Room 6. Exercise Space

7. Open Offices 8. Men’s Restroom 9. Women’s Restroom

10. Restaurant 11. Kitchen 12. Service Entry


BASIC MASSING DIAGRAM

ADDITION/SUBTRACTION DIAGRAM

18


19


1 2 3 4

16

5 6 17 21 22

7

35

36

38

18 19 20 39

23

24 8 9

25 10 11

37

28

26

27

1. STANDING SEAM COR TEN STEEL ROOF PANEL 2. RIGID INSULATION 3. 4” DEEP BY 5 1/4” WIDE TOUNGE IN GROOVE GLUE LAM DECKING 4. 2X10 DIAGRID STRUCTURAL MEMBER 5. 20” DIAMETER METAL SUPPLY DUCT 6. CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM 7. PROTEON SL LED LINEAR LUMINAIRE 8. 2” DIAMETER HANDRAIL 9. 1” DIAMETER PIPING AT 3.5” SPACING 10. STRUCTURALLY INSULATED PANEL 11. 6” X 12” GLUE LAM BEAM 12. 6” CONCRETE SLAB WITH UNDER SLAB VAPOR BARRIER 13. 4” CRUSHED STONE 14. COMPACTED EARTH 15. SPREAD FOOTING FOR THE COLUMN BEYOND 16. 12” GUTTER WITH HANGER 17. 12”X12” GLUE LAM BEAM 18. 2’X5’ COR TEN STEEL PANEL 19. PROPINK INSULATING SHEATHING 20. BATT INSULATION 21. 5/8” GYP BOARD 22. 6” TALL RECLAIMED WOOD PANELS 23. 2”X6” SOUTHERN PINE STUD 24. CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM 25. RECLAIMED OAK DECKING 26. PLYWOOD SHEATHING 27. 2”X4” SOUTHERN PINE JOIST 28. 12”X12” GLUE LAM BEAM 29. OPERABLE WINDOW 30. 12”X12” GLUE LAM COLUMN BEYOND 31. COLUMN TO FOUNDATION CONNECTION 32. 4” CRUSHED STONE 33. FOUNDATION DRAIN 34. RIGID FOAM INSULATION 35. BALCONY ROOF FLASHING 36. SOUTHERN PINE ROOF DECKING 37. PLYWOOD SHEATHING 38. 2”X8” SOUTHERN PINE JOIST 39. 12”X12” GLUE LAM COLUMN BEYOND

29

30

31

12 13

32

33

14

34

15

DETAIL WALL SECTION

WALL SECTION AXONOMETRIC 20


20 23” DIAMETER METAL RETURN DUCT ATTACHED TO GRATES IN THE CEILING

16” WIDE RECTANGULAR METAL SUPPLY DUCT SERVES THE PUBLIC ENTRY

23” DIAMETER METAL SUPPLY DUCT SERVES THE LOCKER ROOMS

16” WIDE RECTANGULAR METAL RETURN DUCT ATTACHED TO A GRATE ON THE WALL

21” DIAMETER METAL RETURN DUCT ATTACHED TO A GRATE IN THE WALL

13” WIDE RECTANGULAR METAL SUPPLY DUCT SERVES THE CLASSROOM THROUGH DIFFUSERS IN THE CEILING

21” DIAMETER METAL SUPPLY DUCT SERVES THE EXERCISE AREA

13” WIDE RECTANGULAR METAL RETURN DUCT ATTACHED TO A GRATE IN THE CEILING

16” DIAMETER METAL RETURN DUCT ATTACHED TO A GRATE IN THE WALL

18” DIAMETER METAL RETURN DUCT ATTACHED TO A GRATE IN THE WALL

16” DIAMETER METAL SUPPLY DUCT SERVES THE KITCHEN

18” DIAMETER METAL SUPPLY DUCTS SERVE THE OFFICE SPACE

20” DIAMETER METAL SUPPLY DUCTS SERVE THE RESTAURANT SPACE

20” DIAMETER METAL RETURN DUCT

SUPPLY

MECHANICAL FLOOR PLAN

RETURN

ZONE 1: 2 TON CARRIER 50 PTH GEOTHERMAL UNIT, 1400 CFM SERVING 700 SQUARE FEET

ZONE 4: 5.5 TON CARRIER PTH GEOTHERMAL UNIT, 3400 CFM SERVING 1700 SQUARE FEET

1

ZONE 2: 2 TON CARRIER 50 PTH GEOTHERMAL UNIT, 700 CFM SERVING 325 SQUARE FEET

2

4

ZONE 5: 10 TON CARRIER 50 VQP GEOTHERMAL UNIT, 2600 CFM SERVING 1350 SQUARE FEET

5

ZONE 6: 10 TON CARRIER 50 VQP GEOTHERMAL UNIT, 2500 CFM SERVING 1250 SQUARE FEET

ZONE 3: 2 TON CARRIER 50 PTH GEOTHERMAL UNIT, 1800 CFM SERVING 900 SQUARE FEET

3

ZONE 4: 5.5 TON CARRIER PTH GEOTHERMAL UNIT, 3400 CFM SERVING 1700 SQUARE FEET

HVAC ZONING PLAN 21

4

6

7

ZONE 7: 5.5 TON CARRIER PTH GEOTHERMAL UNIT, 1300 CFM SERVING 650 SQUARE FEET


22


THE THOMAS RESIDENCE 7984 Hooten Hows Rd, Nashville, TN

This 1,350 square foot private residence in Nashville is currently in Design Development and is expected to break ground in mid-March. Designed for a single client with no children, this contemporary home is meant to embody the principle of efficient living. Containing a master bedroom that includes a walk in closet and bathroom, an open plan kitchen and living area, a second floor study, and a basement that will function as a workshop with an option to be converted into a guest bedroom and bathroom, this home will be a unique addition to a neighborhood containing primarily ranch houses and provide the client with a comfortable living space.

23


Comments:

Owner: James R. Thomas III Project: 7984 Hooten Hows Rd Designer: Will Rowland

Ofŷce Floor Plan 0 1 2

4

8

N

Scale: 1/4” = 1’

24


Comments:

Owner: James R. Thomas III Project: 7984 Hooten Hows Rd Designer: Will Rowland

Ground Floor Plan 0 1 2

25

4

8

N

Scale: 1/4” = 1’


Comments:

Owner: James R. Thomas III Project: 7984 Hooten Hows Rd Designer: Will Rowland

Ground Floor Plan Layout 0 1 2

4

8

N

Scale: 1/4” = 1’

26


Comments:

Owner: James R. Thomas III Project: 7984 Hooten Hows Rd Designer: Will Rowland

North Elevation 0 1 2

27

4

8

Scale: 1/4” = 1’


Comments:

Owner: James R. Thomas III Project: 7984 Hooten Hows Rd Designer: Will Rowland

South Elevation 0 1 2

4

8

Scale: 1/4” = 1’

28


ABROAD

29


30


31


32


Printed Portfolio  

The printed version of my portfolio for architecture school.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you