__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

Great Gray Owl

VOYAGEUR

INFORMATION GUIDE 2021

WHAT’S INSIDE Emergency Information.............................2 For Your Information.................................2 A Journey Through Voyageur's History.......4 Ticks and Lyme Disease.............................8 Southeastern Ontario Turtles...................12 Ecological Succession...............................17 Park Map.................................................19

Reservations: ontarioparks.com/reservations 1-888-ONT-PARK (1-888-668-7275)

Photo: Jacques Bouvier


For your information… Office Hours Summer season (June-Labour Day) 8:00 am - 10:00 pm Spring, fall and winter 8:00 am - 4:00 pm Reservation: To reserve a site, call the Ontario Parks Reservation service at 1-888-ONT PARK or on the web at www. ontarioparks.com. A non-refundable fee applies to all reservations. Cancellation: A penalty will be applied for any reservation cancellation. The amount is based on how long your reservation has been held. In Case of Emergency: In case of emergency contact any park employee immediately. Please note your campsite number and location. If park staff are unavailable, see the emergency phone numbers on page 2.

M.N.R.F. # 4625 ISSN 1714-3691 ISBN 978-1-4868-5071-6 PRINT © 2021 Government of Ontario/Gouvernement d’Ontario Printed in Canada/Imprimé au Canada

PARK INFORMATION

Park Office.............................. 613-674-2825, ext 0

1313 Front Road, Box/C.P. 130, Chute-à-Blondeau, ON, K0B 1B0 Park Warden........................................ 613-678-0434 Reservations.................................... 1-888-ONT-PARK ................................. ontarioparks.com/reservations

2

Water Safety – It’s Your Responsibility 1. There are no lifeguards on our beaches. Water safety is your responsibility at all times. 2. Take the steps to be safe around water. Learning how to swim and water survival techniques help keep us all safe. 3. Always supervise children and non-swimmers by watching them when they are in or around the water. 4. Ensure children and non-swimmers wear a Personal Flotation Device (PFD) in or around the water. 5. Swim in only designated swimming areas. When the water is rough, or conditions are not clear – STAY OUT! Never swim alone. You should always swim with a buddy. 6. Using a floatie? Offshore winds often blow inflatables out into dangerous waters. Ensure inflatable rafts or toys are used in shallow water areas only and pay attention to changing wind conditions. 7. Be responsible. Avoid substance use when involved in water-related recreational activities. 8. Protect your neck. Never dive into shallow or murky water. 9. If you suspect a drowning or any other type of water emergency, call 911 and contact the park office immediately. ­

Our beaches are unsupervised. When the water is rough, STAY OUT!

EMERGENCY INFORMATION

Ambulance, Police, Fire........................................911 Ontario Provincial Police.................. 1-888-310-1122 Hawkesbury General Hospital............. 613-632-1111 Poison Control Centre...................... 1-800-268-9017

Ontario Parks | Voyageur


Superintendent's Message Welcome to Voyageur Provincial Park! This past year has been challenging for us all with the pandemic. After a busy winter season, the park is ready to welcome you all back for a relaxing and enjoyable summer. More people are getting out to enjoy nature, and we are happy to accommodate new and returning visitors. Last summer saw record numbers throughout Ontario Parks, and those who visited Voyageur experienced this first-hand. Throughout the winter, improvements have been made to enhance the experience of our visitors at the Park Store. Upgraded cooking equipment and overall renovations of the building’s interior will surely entice campers and day-users alike to keep returning for more! As well, the Main Gate service desk has been improved to ensure everyone’s safety. The Outaouais hiking trail has been marked with new signs to better allow users to enjoy an alternative to the Coureur des Bois trail. A few friendly reminders we ask our guests to keep in mind (these and other important regulations are listed on page 16 of this tabloid for your convenience): Wildlife can become dependent on human food and garbage left lying around. Don’t forget, some animals like raccoons are expert scavengers and are able to unzip tents and open coolers to find a tasty treat. Please make sure all food is locked in your vehicle when left unattended, and all garbage is deposited in the appropriate bins located within each camping area.

Ontario Parks | Voyageur

An often-misunderstood offense, park regulations state that it is unlawful to burn brush such as logs, twigs, leaves, etc. that is found on or off your campsite. Many reptiles create habitat under dead trees and branches, and removing them may result in habitat loss for a salamander or a garter snake. Firewood and kindling can be purchased from the Park Store. Voyageur is a pet friendly park, however, in order for all to enjoy their stay, we ask our guests to please follow the park’s guidelines and regulations. Dog owners are reminded that pets must be kept on leash at all times, even when swimming. The park has a speed limit of 40 km/hr on the main roads and 20 km/hr in the campgrounds. Please respect these as they are in place to keep all of our guests and wildlife safe. Excessive noise is not allowed at any time….. please be mindful of other campers. As park employees, we pride ourselves with the service we provide. If at any point you feel we have not met our service commitments, please let us know so we may make the appropriate corrections. On behalf of Voyageur Park staff, thank you for choosing us and we hope that you enjoy your stay! Have a safe and happy summer! Jason Bernique - Park Superintendent Sabrina MacDowell – Assistant Park Superintendent

3


A Journey through Voyageur’s History Ontario Parks has a rich history, with each and every park having its own unique story. Algonquin Provincial Park was the first Ontario Provincial Park, established in 1893. Voyageur Provincial Park was established nearly 80 years later in 1971! Some of you may remember the park’s old name: Carillon Provincial Park. Presently, Voyageur is classified as a recreational park open for camping and day-use activities each year from May to Thanksgiving weekend, and Day-Use only throughout the winter season for cross country skiing. A total of 416 campsites are located in three campgrounds, Iroquois and Portage (located throughout a mix of woodland and fields) and Champlain, located in an old sugarbush. To modern visitors, Voyageur Provincial Park is a highly used recreational area with four beaches, hiking trails and a diverse wildlife population, but it didn’t used to be like this at all….. Voyageur’s story starts in the 1600s, back when it was an old, dense forest with lots of pine, spruce, hemlock and maple trees. In fact, the forest was so dense that the best way to travel through the area was not by land, but rather along the nearby river. Huron, Iroquois and Algonquin First Nation tribes fished along this river and used it for transportation, and subsequently this is how it got its name. The “Ottawa River” was named after the Algonquin term adawe, which means "to trade". This name was first given to the tribe which controlled the trade of the river, then applied to the river and eventually to the nearby city (adawa or Ottawa =

The Shanty 4

'trader'). Many people used the river as a highway; long before the Europeans came to North America there were extensive trade routes between different Native American tribes. After European settlers arrived, traffic up and down the river consisted of explorers, fur traders, and Voyageurs. Voyageurs were men hired to transport goods and furs by canoe to different trading posts. They would be hired by one of two competing companies at the time, the Hudson’s Bay Company (The Bay) or the North West Company. While traveling along the Ottawa River, the Voyageurs (and other travelers) had to pass through three sets of rapids that used to be found in the area surrounding the park. The first and longest set of rapids was the Carillon rapids, followed by the much smaller Chute-à-Blondeau rapids, and then the most dangerous Long Sault rapids. In total, these rapids were about 21km (13 miles) long, and were well known for being a big challenge to anyone crossing them. At the foot of almost every rapid small crosses could be seen, a testament to the paddlers who did not survive. After some time, roads were built along the shore in order to portage around these rapids. << “To portage” is a mode of transportation involving removing the canoe from the water and walking through the woods carrying it over your head, all the while carrying heavy packs of goods strapped to your back!>> While not easy, this was definitely safer than risking lives going through the rapids. With challenging landscapes to navigate through, it was not until the end of the 18th century that permanent settlement finally took place along the Ottawa River. At that time, a few settlers came to the area which is now within Voyageur Provincial Park’s boundaries. The land was divided into long lots perpendicular to the shoreline mainly used for farming, known as the Seigneurial System, which allowed for the maximum number of farmers access to shorelines for both transportation and irrigation uses. Settlers were also drawn to the area because of commercial fishing, as well as the enticement of a booming lumber industry. White Pine trees were very common in this area, standing nearly 100m tall and 5m around! They were widely used for building houses, and the high European Ontario Parks | Voyageur


demand for these trees fueled the timber trade for much of the 19th century. In turn, this also helped feed the pulp and paper industry, which played a big role in the development of the surrounding towns. The lumber industry contributed to economic development, clearing roads, building villages, and encouraged exploration. Many men were hired in the lumber business, including farmers during the slow winter months. They worked hard, cutting trees, squaring them off, and hauling them to the river banks by using horses. In the spring, skilled rivermen would float the cut logs down smaller rivers and waterways by standing on them and using a long pole to guide them. This was no easy task; often the logs would jam, where the log drivers would have to jump from log to log, using their pole to undo the jam! Unfortunately, this would at times prove to be fatal. Some men, however, were lucky enough to continue until they reached the Ottawa River. Once the rivermen arrived at the Ottawa River, they would tie the logs together into large timber rafts. These rafts had living and sleeping quarters, and could measure up to hundreds of metres across! The trip along the Ottawa River was an arduous and painstaking process, through which the raftsmen had to face unnavigable rapids and dangerous waterfalls. At each of these obstacles, the rafts had to be taken apart into smaller pieces (called cribs), brought around each obstacle, and then reassembled. The journey from the Upper Ottawa River to the province of Quebec would sometimes take as long as 2 years! One type of obstacle that had to be navigated is known as a chute, which is a narrow channel cut through a shallow rock shelf. One of the closest ones in this area was located near the present village of Chute-àBlondeau. To lessen the dangerous effects of navigating this obstacle along the river, this channel was cut through the shelf in the 1830s to a depth of about 4 metres (13 feet), making this rapid into a fall of about 1.2 metres (4 feet). This area became a popular stopping point for French-Canadian lumber men wanting to take a break, which resulted in many people settling here. A saw-mill was constructed that was powered by the chute, resulting in increased industry. A man named Blondeau also lived near the chute, and over time, lumber men designated the chute as that of Blondeau; Ontario Parks | Voyageur

The first Carillon Dam (1881) hence, the name “Chute-à-Blondeau”. Unfortunately, this man met his end by drowning there one day, which resulted in enhancing the nickname even more. As the population increased and travelling through the area became more common, dams and canals were built to increase the depth of the Ottawa River in order to drown the rapids, making navigation safer for all those passing through. The first canal system was built between 1819 and 1834 by the Engineers of the British army, consisting of the Grenville Canal, the Chute-à-Blondeau Canal and the Carillon Canal, which all together contained 11 locks. The origin of the name Carillon, Voyageur’s old name and the name of the town across the river, also came from a local inhabitant, derived from Philippe de Carrion, Sieur de Fresnoy, a Lieutenant in the Corignon regiment. He was granted control of a piece of land, where he carried on illegal fur trade with the coureurs des bois (unlicensed fur traders known as “wood-runners”). He later met Native Americans at the foot of the Long Sault, which they named “le poste de Carrion”. This was later established as a trading post, but was eventually destroyed by the Iroquois. The name, with time, evolved from Carrion to Carillon. In 1870, the “Canals Commission” wanted to make the Ottawa River even deeper between Lachine and Ottawa. So, between 1873 and 1882, a second canal system was built. This consisted of only two canals: Grenville and Carillon. This second Carillon canal was the original Carillon Dam, built by the Canadian Government at a cost of $1,350,000. Eventually, the railways offered a faster, more direct means of communication and transportation, and so what was once used for commercial and industrial 5


purposes became a popular area for pleasure boaters. This resulted in the Ottawa River changing from a commercial waterway to the now well-known tourist attraction. Between 1959 and 1963, Hydro-Quebec erected the present-day Carillon Dam. This dam completely submerged the rapids and provided power for the surrounding communities. The building of this dam, however, had some consequences. Many towns and villages along the Ottawa River were affected. The increased water levels were high enough to flood large parts of nearby towns, such as Hawkesbury. Approximately 1,052 hectares (2,600 acres) of land had to be expropriated, affecting about 30 farms, 35 commercial establishments and 200 residential properties. A few hundred farming properties that bordered the river outside of Hawkesbury were also flooded, including the farmland that is now Voyageur Provincial Park. Fortunately, the flooding was less than expected, so in 1964 the Eastern Ontario Development Association Waterway Committee issued a motion to initiate the construction of a provincial park. The Ministry of Natural Resources bought the land in the area, and development began in 1966. Five years later, the park

6

was declared officially open as Carillon Provincial Park. The park has relatively flat terrain with a mixture of open fields, bush and sheltered bays, and the flooding created wetland marshes where there were once farmers’ fields and woodlands. This gives the park a natural diversity for many types of animal habitats, and a variety of recreational uses. In the park’s early days, it was made up of less than 800 hectares. Today, the park has expanded to encompass a total of 1464 hectares (3618 acres). Due to some tourist confusion between this park and “Carillon Park” across the river in Quebec, the name was changed in 1994 to “Voyageur Provincial Park”, in memory of the brave Voyageur men that once traveled here along the Ottawa River. The park is surrounded by the antiquity of the past when at one time in history, men and women of courage and perseverance lived and died for the sake of colonizing a new world. So, the next time you are sitting on the beach enjoying sunshine and calm waters, close your eyes and imagine yourself in the time of the Voyageurs with the roaring sound of the rapids and the dark forest around you just waiting to be explored.

Ontario Parks | Voyageur


CAMPING 101 To experience the perfect camping trip, you need to know that… • The restaurant in the Park Store is the place to go if you need to eat or drink a little something (slush, ice cream, hot dogs, fries, hamburgers and more!) • You can get wood, ice, camping fuel and many other supplies at the Park Store. • Canoes, kayaks and paddle boats are available for rent at the Boat Rental beach. • Extension cords, and 15 Amp and 30 Amp adapters are available for rent at the park’s Registration Office. • Laundry facilities are located in each campground in the comfort stations.

Ontario Parks Beach Posting Fact Sheet Recreational water quality is routinely monitored at Ontario Parks designated beaches. Samples are tested at Public Health Ontario Laboratories for Escherichia coli (E.coli), an organism found in the intestines of warm-blooded animals. Water Quality Factors Recreational water quality is influenced by a number of factors, and can change between sampling periods. Influences include: • Heavy rainfall • Large numbers of waterfowl • High winds or wave activity • Large number of swimmers Beach Posting Ontario Parks staff post signage at beaches (example below) when E.coli levels in the water exceed provincial standards. Signage is placed to warn bathers that the beach Ontario Parks | Voyageur

water may be unsafe for swimming. Swimming in beaches that are posted for elevated bacterial levels may cause: • Skin infections/rash • Ear, eye, nose and throat infections • Gastrointestinal illness (if water is consumed) Beach postings are based on E.coli counts in beach water samples taken within the past 24 hours, and are removed when test results show bacterial levels are acceptable. Beach water quality can change at any time and guests should avoid swimming during and after storms, floods, heavy rainfall, or in the presence of large numbers of waterfowl. How you can help Ontario Parks guests can help maintain our beach water quality by following these simple guidelines: • Do not feed birds or other wildlife • Leave nothing behind - dispose of all garbage/food waste • Use designated pet beaches when swimming with your dog – pets are not permitted in Ontario Parks public beaches • Do not let children swim in soiled diapers • Do not use shampoos or soaps in lake water 7


Ticks and Lyme Disease Do ticks and Lyme disease make you wary of going outdoors this summer? By being aware of ticks and understanding the role they play in spreading Lyme disease you are taking the first step to protect yourself and your loved ones. There are many different species of ticks and not all of them carry Lyme disease. The most common tick you may encounter is the American Dog Tick, which does not carry Lyme disease. The only tick that carries Lyme disease in Ontario is the Blacklegged (Deer) Tick, Ixodes Scapularis. Both ticks can be found in wooded areas or tall grass habitats. Public Health Ontario’s “Ontario Lyme Disease Estimated Risk Areas map”) shows areas in Ontario where they estimate you are more likely to find blacklegged ticks. (Blacklegged ticks are known to feed on migratory birds and deer and as a result, they can be transported throughout the province. Therefore, while the potential is lower, it is possible for people to encounter Blacklegged ticks, or to be infected with Lyme disease from the bite of an infected Blacklegged tick, almost anywhere in the province. Ticks are most active in spring and summer, but can be found at any time of the year when the temperature is above freezing. Ticks feed slowly, and an infected tick must feed on a person for at least 24 hours in order to infect them with the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. Because of this delay, prompt detection and removal of ticks is one of the key methods of preventing Lyme disease. If you become infected from a tick bite, symptoms usually begin within 1 - 2 weeks, but can take as long as one month to begin. The “classic” symptom is a bulls-eye rash that can develop anywhere on the body; however, this rash may not occur in all cases. Early symptoms of Lyme disease can include flu-like symptoms such as fever, headaches, stiff neck, jaw pain, and sore muscles. If untreated, problems with the heart, nervous system, and joints can occur months or years later. Lyme disease is easily treated in the early stages so seek medical attention if you feel unwell. 8

When you are out in tick habitat you can better protect yourself by taking a few precautions: 1. Wear long sleeves and tuck your pants into your socks. 2. Wear light coloured clothing so you can detect ticks before they attach. 3. Use insect repellent containing “Deet” (please follow manufacturer’s directions). Apply it to your skin and outer clothing. 4. Conduct a tick check. Look on your clothes, body, children and pets. Pay close attention to your groin, scalp and armpits. 5. If you find a tick on your body, properly remove it and place it in a container. Contact your local health unit to inquire about having the tick sent for identification and testing. This test may take several months and is not diagnostic. Additionally, you may contact your family doctor for questions on Lyme disease. By following these simple suggestions, you can have a safe and enjoyable time exploring Voyageur. For more information please consult the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care’s website: https://www.ontario.ca/page/lyme-disease Blacklegged Tick (Ixodes scapularis) on a blade of grass.

These Blacklegged Ticks (Ixodes scapularis), are found on a wide range of hosts including mammals, birds and reptiles. Blacklegged Ticks Ixodes scapularis are known to transmit Lyme disease Borrelia burgdorferi, to humans and animals during feeding, when they insert their mouth parts into the skin of a host, and slowly take in the nutrient-rich host blood. Photo by: Jim Gathany, CDC Ontario Parks | Voyageur


Public Health Ontario Risk Map: https://www.publichealthontario.ca/-/media/ documents/l/2020/lyme-disease-risk-area-map-2020.pdf Found a Tick? DO • Use fine point tweezers • Grasp the tick as close to your skin as possible • Gently pull the tick straight out • Disinfect the bite area with rubbing alcohol or soap and water

GOING Camping?

Save tick (alive if possible) in a jar, with a piece of damp paper towel for identification and potential testing. Park staff can provide contact information for the local Health Unit, or alternatively you can take the tick to your family doctor for testing. Watch for symptoms and seek medical attention if you feel unwell or if you cannot safely remove the tick. DON’T • Grasp around bloated belly and squeeze the tick • Use a match, heat or chemicals to try and remove it • Twist the tick when pulling it out

Safe Campfires are: 1. Built on bare soil or exposed rock. 2. Sheltered from the wind. 3. Located at least three metres from the forest, overhanging branches or other flammable material. 4. Small. A small fire is best for cooking and is easier to control and put out. The forest is no place for a bonfire. 5. Put out as soon as possible: soak with water then stir the ashes with a stick or shovel to uncover hot coals, and soak again.

Safe Campfires have: 6. A pail of water and a shovel at hand to control the fire. 7. An adult tending them at all times. For more information contact your local Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry Fire Office. © Registered Trademark of Partners in Protection Association.

ontario.ca/fireprevention

BLEED

Paid for by the Government of Ontario

Ontario Parks | Voyageur

9


LEGEND | LÉGENDE

10

Beach Plage

Boat Launch Descente de bateaux

Camping

Comfort Station Installation sanitaire

Dog Beach Plage pour chien

Garbage Ordures

Gatehouse Bureau denregistrement

Group Camping Camping de groupe

Park Office Bureau du parc

Park Store Magasin du parc

Parking Stationnement

Picnic Area Aire de jour

Playground Terrain de jeu

Trailer Dumping Station Station de vidange

Trailer Filling Station Station de remplissage

Vault Toilet Latrine

Water Eau

Regular Campsite/Terrain régulier Electrical Campsite/Site avec électricité

Ontario Parks | Voyageur


History Lives Here Ontario’s first modern treaty is being negotiated right here

Mattawa

North Bay

Deep River

Algonquins of Ontario Settlement Area Boundary

Petawawa

Provincial Park

Pembroke

Hawkesbury

South River

Rockland Pikwàkanagàn

Whitney

Renfrew

Barrys Bay

Haliburton

Cornwall

Smiths Falls

Bancroft

Prescott

Sharbot Lake

Brockville

Kaladar

NOTICE TO PARK VISITORS

There have been recent sightings of Wild Boar in Voyageur Provincial Park. Wild Boar are not native to Ontario. They are an invasive species that has become a problem on the local landscape by individual animals escaping from captivity. They have a negative impact on local wildlife populations and ecosystems. Wild Boar weigh on average 250lbs and may be aggressive, especially protective females with young. All wild animals are unpredictable by nature so the public should avoid contact with these animals. Park visitors are reminded to keep their domestic animals leashed at all times to avoid unnecessarily provoking Wild Boar or any other wildlife. If you see a Wild Boar, please leave the area, but make note of the location as well as the number of animals, and report the information to park staff as soon as possible. Park Warden (C) 613-678-0434 613-674-2825 x 225 or via email to Jason.bernique@ontario.ca In the event of an emergency, please call 911

Ontario Parks | Voyageur

Orillia

Casselman

Carleton Place

Huntsville

Bracebridge

Ottawa

Arnprior

Madoc 50

Napanee

0

50 km

Kingston

Voyageur Provincial Park

is one of 13 operating Ontario Provincial Parks within the 36,000 square kilometre area that is subject to treaty negotiations involving Ontario, Canada and the Algonquins of Ontario. All 13 parks will continue to be available for public enjoyment. Learn more about the treaty making process at ontario.ca/algonquinlandclaim

CAMPERS AND DAY-VISITORS! Please help us keep parks clean and dispose of all garbage correctly. Garbage can result in humanwildlife conflict and become a hazard to park visitors. We suggest bringing a garbage bag with you to collect your trash and dispose of it at park designated garbage and recycling areas before heading home. We appreciate and encourage park-lovers who are committed to protecting our environment for the future.

11


Southeastern Ontario Turtles There are 8 native species of turtles that can be found in SE Ontario, seven of which are at risk. The most commonly found are Snapping Turtles (Chelydra serpentina) and Midland Painted Turtles (Chrysems picta marginata). Other more elusive species that are not as commonly seen are the Spotted, Blandings, Wood, Northern Map, Eastern Musk/Stinkpot, and Eastern Spiny Softshell Turtles. There is also one invasive species that has been introduced into the wild called the Red-Eared Slider. Sometimes turtles can be found near the water surface or sunbathing on rocks and logs that stick out of the water. They lead mainly aquatic lives, living and foraging in the water. Turtles are also often seen on roads. However, in addition to requiring air to breathe, they come onto land for a variety of reasons, such as migrating from their hibernation grounds to their summer habitats, sunbathing on the warm pavement, or looking for the best place to lay their eggs. Keep an eye out for our little friends! They have very strong shells but they are no match for vehicles. These behaviours most often occur in the late spring to early summer.

FUN FACTS • E. Musk/Stinkpot – named for a musky odor they release when threatened. They are very good climbers and can be found in trees near water to dry off to help remove leaches attached to them • Blandings – Identified by their bright yellow throat; can live to be 75 years old • Wood Turtles - Orange color on throat and legs; known to be quite intelligent. They use interesting methods to acquire food, ex: they stomp the ground to make worms come to the surface • E. Spiny Softshell – get half their oxygen by breathing through their skin in the water; can remain submerged for up to 5 hours 12

Females can sometimes lay clutches that have been fertilized by multiple males, therefore the eggs laid in the nest will be half siblings. The gender of the hatchlings is determined by genetics but can be influenced by the temperature of the nest during incubation. This is known as Temperature Sex Determination (TSD). Unfortunately, many turtle nests are scavenged before the eggs even have time to hatch. This, along with many individuals not surviving road accidents, puts major stressors on all species and makes it difficult for survival. Even though it’s possible, turtles should not be purchased as pets. They can live for a very long time, and they also harbor salmonella, which can be dangerous. If, however, one has already been purchased and you no longer want it, please do not release it into the wild. Not only is this how invasive species are introduced (Red-eared Sliders) it can introduce strange diseases to native species. Instead, contact the pet store where you bought it. Many places allow returns in an effort to reduce the introduction of invasives.

Ontario Parks | Voyageur


COMMON SNAPPING TURTLE Scientific Name: Chelydra serpentine SAR Status: Special Concern; hunting is now banned in Ontario Snapping Turtles, the largest freshwater turtle in Canada, can reach a weight of 4.5-16.0 kg and roughly 20-36 cm in length. With an average lifespan of 70 years, they have a dinosaur like appearance with long tails (often longer than their bodies!) that display triangular plates. They are opportunistic feeders, eating a variety of food such as fish, aquatic plants, amphibians, insects, other reptiles, small mammals and birds. Snapping turtles are cold blooded reptiles. This means that unlike warm blooded animals (like humans!) they control the temperature of their body using their environment. When they aren’t nesting or mating, Snapping Turtles enjoy shallow waters where they can hide in soft mud with their noses above water in order to breathe. They are not strong swimmers and tend to spend time at the bottom under the water walking around. Some of the most frequent sightings of Snapping Turtles are in early to mid-summer when the females are searching for the most suitable place to lay their eggs. They breed from March through June, and nest April to June. They prefer sandy or gravely areas like beaches, parking lots or along roadsides. They are most commonly seen on warm rainy days since these conditions soften the ground, making it easier to dig their nests. Why are Snapping Turtles so aggressive? Unlike many other turtles, Snappers have an incomplete plastron (Stomach plate), and are therefore more vulnerable.

How to Help a Turtle Cross the Road First, Be Safe! Make sure no cars are coming; wear gloves. Pay attention to the direction the turtle is traveling. If you move them the wrong way they will crawl right back. Option 1 - Pick them up: Approach the turtle from behind. DO NOT grab its tail! The tail is fused to its Carapace (upper shell) and if you pick a turtle up like this you could break its spine. Place your hands on either side of the shell with your thumbs on top and other fingers below. TAKE CAUTION with Snapping Turtles as they have long necks and can turn around and reach their back legs to bite you. Hold on tight and try to only lift them a little off the ground. This will ensure they do not fall too far if you drop them. Option 2 - The Wheelbarrow: If you do not wish to touch the turtle, slip a shovel (or likeobject) under its back legs, lift slightly and gently wheelbarrow them across the road. Option 3 - Notify a Park Ranger: You can always notify a park employee to help. Red-shouldered Hawk (adult)

VOYAGEUR BIRD FINDING GUIDE Check out this online guide of the birds who visit Voyageur Provincial Park! © Jacques Bouvier

https://jacques-miroiseur.smugmug.com/Birds/Birds-ofFar-Eastern-Ontario/My197birdsMes197oiseaux/

Ontario Parks | Voyageur

13


INVASIVE SPECIES ALERT: Invasive species are plants, animals or insects that are not native to our region and are a special concern when trying to protect Ontario’s biodiversity. While not all non-native species are invasive, those that are, are able to outcompete our native species because they have no natural predators to keep them under control. The bays of Voyageur Provincial Park are currently infested with a relatively uncommon aquatic invasive species called European Water Chestnut; this was the first place these plants were found in Ontario, back in 2005. Our goals at the park and surrounding area are to contain and prevent further spread of these plants to other waterways in our province, and eventually eradicate them from our waters completely. What is Water Chestnut? Water Chestnut (Trapa natans) is an annual plant from Europe and Asia that grows in shallow areas and forms dense mats which cover the entire surface of the water, growing so thick it becomes impossible to do recreational activites such as boating, fishing or swimming. This “carpet” of plants also blocks out sunlight, affecting populations of fish and invertebrates, and inhibits the growth of our native Water Lillies and Pondweed. While not every area is fully surface covered, this plant can be found in all bays within the park boundaries.

How Do They Spread? Water Chestnuts spread mainly by seeds, which grow from small white flowers on a floating “rosette”. They are an annual plant, which means they only reproduce by seed. This is a good thing, because it allows the us to control the spread by stopping any new seed production. The negatives: any seeds produced can remain viable in the substrate for over 10 years, and each seed can produce up to another 300 seeds if left untouched each year! Luckily however, the majority germinate within the first few years, drastically reducing the seed bank in a relatively short amount of time. These seeds are large, about the size of a loonie, and have barbed tips which allows them to stick to fur/feathers of animals, boats, trailers and even bathing suits. They can cause injury, and if they drop in a new location, can further spread the invasion. Also, if the rosette is cut off the stem and allowed to float away it will grow new roots and continue to produce seeds. What is Ontario Parks doing about this invasion? A team of park staff works from May to October harvesting plants to prevent seed production. This is done by specially made boats that cut the top (the seed-producing rosette) off the plant, and then another boat collects and brings these cut plants to shore to be composted. Handpicking from canoes, in chest waders or from a motor boat is also done in the areas of more sporadic growth. If you are on Iroquois Beach, you may notice a bright orange floating barrier across the bay; this is installed to prevent cut rosettes from floating away as the work is being done. Has there been any success? After more than a decade of control, positive results are being seen in all areas! By stopping new seed production, the existing seed bank gets further reduced each year. Champlain Bay has been cleared 100% of all plants every summer since 2009, and it is now at the point where it takes less than 1 day/ month to monitor the entire bay, mostly to remove plants that may have been brought in by other

14

Ontario Parks | Voyageur


boats. In the cleared areas of Iroquois Bay there is a noticeable difference in the density of plants growing in early spring between areas that have never been cleared and areas that have been cleared for the past 4-6 years. In fact, research done in the park suggests that after at least 4 years of stopping any new seed production leaves us with a 95% reduction of viable seeds left in the seed bank! What can YOU do to help? Please be sure to inspect and clean your boats & trailers thoroughly to prevent spreading to other areas Pick off all seeds and plants that may be “stuck” on ropes, buoys, motors or trailers and throw them into the garbage or into specially marked seed containers located on all beaches, the Boat Launch and at the Main Gate Please stay out of infested areas to avoid cutting the rosettes off their stems, allowing them to float away and spread seeds If you launch your boat from Iroquois Bay, try to leave the area by driving down the middle through the “cleared” channel to avoid unknowingly transporting plants stuck on motors to other locations on the Ottawa River

Firewood Restrictions Bringing firewood when you travel to or from your favourite provincial park may seem harmless but can spread invasive species such as insects, plants and diseases. Many of these species are hidden in the wood and are difficult to detect. Millions of trees have already been infected. Help us reduce the spread by; • Leaving firewood at home • Purchasing kiln-dried firewood where available • Buying local

Ontario Parks | Voyageur

Help keep our beaches safe (the seeds are very sharp!) by assisting staff in picking up washed up seeds and placing them in the seed containers If you are concerned that you may have found a new location, PLEASE LET US KNOW! You can tell any staff member or call the Invading Species Hotline at 1-800-563-7711 Volunteer! We are always looking for more help, so if you want to help protect our environment please contact the Water Chestnut Supervisor at jean.malboeuf@ ontario.ca or leave a message with the Main Gate staff, and we will gladly have you be a part of our team!

If you move firewood out of an area regulated for a quarantined pest without prior approval from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) you could face penalties of up to $50,000 and/or prosecution. For more information on firewood movement restrictions and the latest updates about emerald ash borer and other regulated pests, please visit www.inspection.gc.ca or contact the CFIA at 1-800442-2342. 15


Summary of Provincial Park Offences

There is one basic rule in Ontario Parks: Have respect and consideration for your fellow visitors and the park environment. The following table lists some of the more common laws enforced in provincial parks. Under the Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves Act, 2006, the registered permit holder is responsible for the conduct of all campsite occupants and could be charged with an offence based on the actions of the occupants of the registered campsite. The Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves Act, 2006 and other legislation governing behaviour in provincial parks can be reviewed at provincial park offices and on the e-Laws website at www.ontario.ca/laws. These laws are enforced by provincial park wardens who have all the power and authority of a member of the Ontario Provincial Police within a provincial park. Many of the listed offences could result in eviction from a provincial park. Evicted visitors are prohibited from re-entering any provincial park for a period of 72 hours. Minimum fines listed below do not include court costs or victim fine surcharge. Offence

Alcoholic Beverages • Having liquor in open container in other than residence (campsite) • Consuming liquor in other than residence • Driving or having care or control of a motor vehicle with open or unsealed container of liquor • Person under 19 years having liquor • Being intoxicated in a public place • Unlawfully have liquor in listed park (during liquor ban) Rowdyism / Noise • Use discriminatory, harassing, abusive or insulting language or gestures • Make excessive noise • Disturb other persons • Operate audio device in prohibited area Storing Wildlife Attractants • Unlawfully store wildlife attractants

Min. Fine

Explanation

$ 100.00 $ 100.00

If you are 19 years of age or older, you are permitted to possess or consume liquor (beer, wine, spirits) only on a registered campsite.

$ 175.00 $ 100.00 $ 50.00 $ 100.00

Drivers are responsible for ensuring that liquor is properly stored while in a vehicle. Liquor must be in a container that is unopened and the seal unbroken or is packed away and not accessible to any person in the vehicle.

$ 150.00 $ 150.00 $ 150.00 $ 75.00

Many parks enforce a complete liquor ban on Victoria Day and for the preceding ten days. A liquor ban is also in effect at Sibbald Point Provincial Park on Labour Day and for the preceding four days. During these time frames, possession of liquor is prohibited everywhere within parks imposing the liquor ban. Provincial parks are established to provide a setting for peaceful and natural experiences. Rowdy behaviour, which includes excessive noise, or obscene language or gestures, is not permitted. You cannot disturb any other person or interfere with their enjoyment of the park any time of the day or night. Operation of an audio device (such as a radio, stereo, TV, etc.) in a radio-free area is prohibited.

$ 125.00

Do not maintain or store potential wildlife attractants, including food or beverages, food preparation or storage equipment, cooking devices or utensils, garbage or recycling products, scented products or any other item in a manner that is likely to attract wildlife.

Refuse • Litter or cause litter • Fail to keep campsite / facility clean • Fail to restore campsite / facility to original condition

$125.00

Deposit all garbage and litter in the containers provided to discourage wildlife from becoming pests. Campsites and/ or facilities must be kept clean at all times to eliminate potential hazards to parks visitors and minimize human-wildlife conflict.

Vehicles • Unlawfully take motor vehicle into park or possess or operate it • Speeding –more than 20 km/hr • Operate vehicle off roadway • Disobey stop sign

$ 125.00 $ 100.00 $ 125.00 $ 85.00

Off-road vehicles are not permitted in provincial parks because of the environmental damage they cause.

$ 30.00

All vehicles must park in a designated area and display a valid park permit. You must prominently display your valid park permit on your dashboard.

Parking • Park vehicle in area not designated • Park vehicle in prohibited area • Fail to display permit on parked vehicle Pets • Permit domestic animal to be without leash • Permit domestic animal to make excessive noise • Permit domestic animal to be in designated swimming area or on a beach • Permit domestic animal to disturb people • Permit domestic animal to be in a posted prohibited area Environmental Protection • Damage / deface / remove Crown property • Disturb / harm / remove natural object • Disturb / cut / remove / harm plant or tree • Kill plant or tree • Disturb / kill / remove / harm / harass animal

(plus 3 demerit points)

$ 75.00

$ 125.00 $ 125.00 $ 125.00 $ 150.00 $ 150.00

Camping Permit • Fail to vacate and remove property from campsite on permit expiry • Unlawfully occupy campsite • Camp over time limit

$ 75.00 $ 125.00 $ 75.00

Camping Equipment / Persons • Place more than 3 pieces of shelter equipment on campsite • Place more than one tent trailer, travel trailer or self-propelled camping unit on campsite • Excessive number of persons occupying campground campsite / interior campsite

$ 75.00

Campfires • Start or tend fire other than in fireplace or designated place • Start or tend fire where notice of fire hazard is posted Fireworks • Possess fireworks • Ignite fireworks Hours of Closing • Enter park after closing • Remain in park after closing

$ 150.00

$ 100.00 $ 150.00 $ 125.00

Licenced motor vehicles may be operated on roads only. You must follow the rules of the road and remember that the Highway Traffic Act applies on all park roads. Each vehicle in the park must have a valid provincial park permit. Bicycles are only allowed on park roads and on designated bike trails.

For the protection of wildlife and other park visitors, your pet must be under control and on a leash not exceeding 2 metres at all times. You must ensure your pet does not damage or interfere with vegetation or wildlife. You must also ensure your pet does not interfere with others’ enjoyment of the park. Pets are not permitted in the swimming area, on the beach or in a posted prohibited area at any time.

To maintain the park as a natural setting, the removal of natural objects is prohibited. All vegetation, wildlife and natural features are protected in provincial parks. Cutting any live growth or damaging any natural or other object is prohibited. You may not take any fallen or dead wood from a provincial park for the purpose of a campfire or other such intent.

You are required to vacate and remove all property from your campground campsite or interior campsite by 2:00 p.m. on the date your permit expires so that others may have access to it. The maximum length of stay on a provincial park campground campsite is 23 consecutive nights and 16 consecutive nights on an interior campsite to ensure park visitors have an equal opportunity to enjoy our campsites and limit environmental impact.

Without a limit on the amount of camping gear allowed, campsites would quickly deteriorate, becoming larger, eventually destroying the surrounding vegetation. The maximum number of campers allowed per campground campsite is six persons and the maximum number of campers allowed on an interior campsite is nine persons.

Fireplaces are designated by park staff for safety reasons. Restricting fires to these locations greatly reduces the risk of forest fires. For the prevention of forest fires, a park superintendent may give notice of a fire hazard and implement a fire ban. At any time during a fire ban no person is permitted to have a fire unless otherwise stated by the park superintendent. Possession or use of fireworks is prohibited in provincial parks at all times. They constitute a fire hazard and disturb visitors and wildlife who wish to enjoy the park in a peaceful manner.

Only registered campers are allowed in a provincial park during the posted hours of closing.

Fines are subject to change. This is not a complete listing of offences; please refer to the specific legislation.

16

Ontario Parks | Voyageur


The Importance of Ecological Succession Ecological succession is defined as the process through which a natural community of plants changes over time. Communities begin with pioneering species such as lichens, mosses, and fungi and the complexity of the community increases with time as more soil develops. This process is called primary succession and occurs when there is no soil already present for plants to grow in, such as after a lava flow or glacier retreat. More commonly seen is secondary succession, which is the plant community’s response to a disturbance. A disturbance can occur naturally, such as a tree falling or forest fire, or artificially, like clear cutting a forest or mowing a field. Grasses and smaller plants will generally colonize the area first, followed by larger shrubs and eventually trees. For example, if a fire burns part of a forest there will be no plants left growing, but the soil with nutrients and potentially buried seeds will remain. After the disturbance, annual grasses and other small plants will grow back first, followed perennial grasses, then small shrubs and eventually trees. Another example that happens quite frequently is when a tree falls in the forest. The tree disrupts the ground beneath it and opens up space in the canopy for more light to come through. The exposure to this direct sunlight then allows small seedlings to more rapidly grow. A great place where you can see secondary succession in action in the park is the old baseball field on the way to the Park Store. For several years this field was mowed to be a recreational area by park employees, but recently the park has begun to allow re-naturalization to occur. The succession observed FUN FACT: The life of a boreal forest actually relies on disturbance from forest fires. There are a number of different ways that fire is important to the plant communities. Several trees such as the Jack Pine and Lodgepole Pine require heat from a fire to release their seeds. The fire also creates ideal conditions for new trees to grow because it helps release nutrients in the soil and gets rid of competing plants. Ontario Parks | Voyageur

in this area will be slightly different than if a natural disturbance such as a forest fire had occurred; this is because the area was controlled by humans for a number of years, therefore the first and second stages of annual and perennial plants are already well established. Some of the plants currently identified in the field include: Milkweed, Queen Anne’s Lace, Lamb’s Quarter, Ragweed, Buckthorn (invasive), and Foxtail. One important piece of information to note is that often in large, exposed areas which have been previously disturbed, the habitat is vulnerable to the encroachment of invasive species. Ideally, native species would become well-established, allowing for strong competition for any invasive plants. Unfortunately, in such a large area invasive species may grow first and take over, which prevents the native species from establishing a stable community. This is why it is so important to be vigilant about not transporting invasive species to new regions! Careful monitoring of the specific populations growing can also help by allowing for a rapid response to control any invasive species that may appear. Finally, if necessary, a more proactive approach of reintroducing native species by planting young, healthy specimens is an option to help ensure the longevity of preserving habitat. Please take a minute to stop by and observe the old baseball field, read the interpretive sign and see how many different species you can see!

SPONSORS OF THIS GUIDE / SPONSORS DE CE GUIDE This publication is made possible with the participation of local businesses and organizations. Show your appreciation by giving them your support. Cette publication est rendue possible par la participation des enterprises et organizations locales. Veuillez montrer votre appréciation par leur donner votre soutien.

456 County Road 17 Hawkesbury, ON A QUICK 10 MINUTES FROM THE PARK.

17


SPONSORS OF THIS GUIDE / SPONSORS DE CE GUIDE This publication is made possible with the participation of local businesses and organizations. Show your appreciation by giving them your support. Cette publication est rendue possible par la participation des enterprises et organizations locales. Veuillez montrer votre appréciation par leur donner votre soutien.

1560 Cameron St. & Hwy. 17, Hawkesbury, ON

613-632-9215

OPENING HOURS / HEURES D’OUVERTURE Monday - Friday • lundi - vendredi - 7 am - 9 pm Saturday / samedi • Sunday / dimanche - 7 am - 6 pm 65+ ONLY to serve you BETTER, WE ARE OPEN at 7 am - 8 am DAILY

Daniel and Caroline Asselin, STORE OWNERS

Guided Kayaking Tours RENTAL PACK AGES · WATER TA XI SHUTTLES National Park Island Camping and Cabin Rentals 110 K ATE STREET · GANANOQUE, ONTARIO

613-463-9564

www.1000islandskayaking.com

VANKLEEK HILL FAIR ONTARIO

CANADA

EST. 1844 Vankleek Hill Agricultural Society

AUGUST 19TH - 22ND 2021 www.vankleekhillfair.ca

ROULOTTE.CA

YOU’VE GOT THE DREAM. WE HAVE THE RV.

HOURS: Monday to Wednesday - 9 to 5 Thursday and Friday - 9 to 6, Saturday - 9 to 4 SUNDAY CLOSED GATINEAU

(L’ANGE-GARDIEN)

819 643-5106

102, chemin des Fabriques (Québec) J8L 0A9

18

PLANTAGENET 613 673-3737

5753 Country Rd 17 (Ontario) K0B 1L0

2567, Hwy 17, L’Orignal, ON K0B 1K0

613.675.4612 • 1.888.675.4612 www.lorignalpacking.ca Ontario Parks | Voyageur


Ontario Parks | Voyageur Boat Launch Descente de bateaux Group Camping Camping de groupe Trailer Dumping Station Station de vidange

Beach Plage

Gatehouse Bureau denregistrement

Playground Terrain de jeu

Trailer Filling Station Station de remplissage

Park Office Bureau du parc

Camping

Vault Toilet Latrine

Park Store Magasin du parc

Comfort Station Installation sanitaire

LEGEND | LÉGENDE

Voyageur

Water Eau

Parking Stationnement

Picnic Area Aire de jour

Garbage Ordures

Regular Campsite/Terrain régulier Electrical Campsite/Site avec électricité

Dog Beach Plage pour chien


Ontario Parks | Voyageur Boat Launch Descente de bateaux Group Camping Camping de groupe Trailer Dumping Station Station de vidange

Beach Plage

Gatehouse Bureau denregistrement

Playground Terrain de jeu

Trailer Filling Station Station de remplissage

Park Office Bureau du parc

Camping

Vault Toilet Latrine

Park Store Magasin du parc

Comfort Station Installation sanitaire

LEGEND | LÉGENDE

Water Eau

Parking Stationnement

Picnic Area Aire de jour

Garbage Ordures

Regular Campsite/Terrain régulier Electrical Campsite/Site avec électricité

Dog Beach Plage pour chien


Parcs Ontario | Voyageur Boat Launch Descente de bateaux Group Camping Camping de groupe Trailer Dumping Station Station de vidange

Beach Plage

Gatehouse Bureau denregistrement

Playground Terrain de jeu

Trailer Filling Station Station de remplissage

Park Office Bureau du parc

Camping

Vault Toilet Latrine

Park Store Magasin du parc

Comfort Station Installation sanitaire

LEGEND | LÉGENDE

Water Eau

Parking Stationnement

Picnic Area Aire de jour

Garbage Ordures

Regular Campsite/Terrain régulier Electrical Campsite/Site avec électricité

Dog Beach Plage pour chien


Parcs Ontario | Voyageur Boat Launch Descente de bateaux Group Camping Camping de groupe Trailer Dumping Station Station de vidange

Beach Plage

Gatehouse Bureau denregistrement

Playground Terrain de jeu

Trailer Filling Station Station de remplissage

Park Office Bureau du parc

Camping

Vault Toilet Latrine

Park Store Magasin du parc

Comfort Station Installation sanitaire

LEGEND | LÉGENDE

Water Eau

Parking Stationnement

Picnic Area Aire de jour

Garbage Ordures

Regular Campsite/Terrain régulier Electrical Campsite/Site avec électricité

Dog Beach Plage pour chien


Chouette lapone

VOYAGEUR

2021 GUIDE D’INFORMATION

À L’INTÉRIEUR Information d’urgence...............................2 Pour votre information..............................2 Un voyage dans l’histoire Voyageur...........4 Tiques et maladie de Lyme........................8 Les Tortues du Sud-Est de l’Ontario..........12 La succession écologique.........................17 Carte du parc...........................................19

Bureau du parc...................... 613-674-2825, ext 0 Information d’urgence.................................... 911

Photo: Jacques Bouvier


Pour votre information… Heures de bureau : Saison estivale (juin-fête du travail) 8h00 à 22h00 Printemps, automne et hiver 8h00 à 16h00 Réservation : Pour réserver un emplacement, téléphonez au service de réservation des Parcs Ontario au 1-888- ONT PARK ou au site www.ontarioparks.com. Un frais de réservation non remboursable est applicable. Annulation : Une pénalité sera imposée sur le montant de votre réservation. Le pourcentage dépend du moment où la réservation a été faite. En cas d’Urgence En cas d’urgence, demandez l’aide d’un employé immédiatement. Prenez en note votre numéro d’emplacement et de l’endroit précis. Si un employé n’est pas disponible, voir les numéros de téléphone d’urgence à la page 2.

M.N.R.F. # 4625 ISSN 1714-3691 ISBN 978-1-4868-5071-6 PRINT © 2021 Government of Ontario/Gouvernement d’Ontario Printed in Canada/Imprimé au Canada

INFORMATION DU PARC

Bureau du parc......................613-674-2825, ext 0 1313 Chemin Front, Box/C.P. 130, Chute-à-Blondeau, ON, K0B 1B0 Gardien du parc....................................613-678-0434 Réservations.................................... 1-888-ONT-PARK ..................................ontarioparks.com/reservations

La sécurité nautique : c’est votre responsabilité 1. Nos plages n’ont pas de sauveteurs. La sécurité nautique est votre responsabilité. 2. Surveillez toujours vos enfants et les nonnageurs. Quand vos enfants sont dans l’eau, ne les quittez pas des yeux, ne serait-ce qu’une seconde. Ne vous éloignez pas de la zone désignée pour la baignade. Et quand l’eau est agitée - NE VOUS BAIGNEZ PAS. 3. Demandez aux enfants et aux non-nageurs de porter un gilet de sauvetage quand ils sont près de l’eau. 4. Ne nagez jamais seul. Ayez toujours quelqu’un avec vous. 5. Apprenez à nager et apprenez la prévention et les techniques de sauvetage et de survie en eau. 6. Les vents de terre poussent les pneumatiques dans les eaux dangereuses. Les radeaux et les jouets gonflables ne doivent être utilisés que dans les eaux peu profondes. Si vous marchez jusque dans une eau plus profonde, pourquoi ne pas revenir vers le rivage à la nage? 7. Soyez responsable. Ne consommez pas d’alcool quand vous vous adonnez à des loisirs nautiques. 8. Protégez votre cou. Ne plongez jamais à partir d’un quai ou d’un autre endroit où l’eau est peu profonde. 9. Si vous pensez que quelqu’un s’est noyé ou que vous apercevez une situation d’urgence dans l’eau, faites le 911 ou communiquez immédiatement avec le bureau du parc. ­

Nos plages ne sont pas surveillées. Quand les eaux sont agitées, N’Y ALLEZ PAS!

INFORMATION D’URGENCE

Ambulance, Police, Pompiers............................... 911 Police provinciale de l’Ontario.......... 1-888-310-1122 Hôpital Général de Hawkesbury...........613-632-1111 Centre anti-poison............................ 1-800-268-9017


Message du Surintendant Bienvenue au parc provincial Voyageur ! L'année dernière a été difficile pour nous tous avec la pandémie. Après une saison hivernale chargée, le parc est prêt à vous accueillir pour un été relaxant et agréable. De plus en plus de gens sortent pour profiter de la nature et nous sommes heureux d'accueillir les nouveaux visiteurs et ceux qui reviennent. L'été dernier, Parcs Ontario a enregistré un nombre record de visiteurs et ceux qui ont visité Voyageur en ont fait l'expérience. Tout au long de l'hiver, des améliorations ont été apportées pour améliorer l'expérience de nos visiteurs au magasin du parc. L'équipement de cuisine amélioré et les rénovations générales de l'intérieur du bâtiment inciteront sûrement les campeurs et les utilisateurs d'un jour à revenir pour en profiter plus ! De même, le bureau de service de l'entrée principale a été amélioré pour assurer la sécurité de tous. Le sentier de randonnée de l'Outaouais a été balisé avec de nouveaux panneaux pour mieux permettre aux usagers de profiter d'une alternative au sentier du Coureur des Bois. Quelques rappels amicaux que nous demandons à nos hôtes de garder à l'esprit (ces règlements et d'autres importants sont énumérés à la page 16 de cette brochure pour votre commodité) : Les animaux sauvages peuvent devenir dépendants de la nourriture humaine et des déchets laissés sur place. N'oubliez pas que certains animaux, comme les ratons laveurs, sont des charognards experts et

qu'ils sont capables d'ouvrir les tentes et les glacières pour y trouver un mets savoureux. Veuillez vous assurer que toute nourriture est enfermée dans votre véhicule lorsqu'elle est laissée sans surveillance et que tous les déchets sont déposés dans les poubelles appropriées situées dans chaque zone de camping. Une infraction souvent mal comprise : le règlement du parc stipule qu'il est illégal de brûler des broussailles telles que des bûches, des brindilles, des feuilles, etc.... qui se trouvent sur votre emplacement de camping ou à proximité. De nombreux reptiles créent un habitat sous les arbres et les branches morts et leur enlèvement peut entraîner la perte d'un habitat pour une salamandre ou une couleuvre. Vous pouvez acheter du bois de chauffage et du bois d'allumage au magasin du parc. Le parc Voyageur est un parc accueillant pour les animaux de compagnie, mais pour que tous puissent profiter de leur séjour, nous demandons à nos invités de respecter les directives et les règlements du parc. Nous rappelons aux propriétaires de chiens que leurs animaux doivent être tenus en laisse en tout temps, même lorsqu'ils sont dans l'eau. La vitesse dans le parc est limitée à 40 km/h sur les routes principales et à 20 km/h dans les campings. Veuillez les respecter car elles sont en place pour assurer la sécurité de tous nos hôtes et de la faune. Le bruit excessif est intoléré en TOUT temps.... Veuillez être attentif aux autres campeurs. En tant qu'employés du parc, nous sommes fiers du service que nous offrons. Si, à un moment donné, vous estimez que nous n'avons pas respecté nos engagements en matière de service, veuillez nous le faire savoir afin que nous puissions prendre les mesures appropriées. Au nom du personnel du parc Voyageur, nous vous remercions de nous avoir choisis et nous espérons que vous apprécierez votre séjour ! Passez un été sûr et heureux ! Jason Bernique - Surintendant du parc Sabrina MacDowell – Surintendante adjointe du parc

Parcs Ontario | Voyageur

3


Un voyage dans l’histoire Voyageur Le réseau des parcs de l’Ontario se démarque par sa richesse historique et chaque parc a sa propre histoire. Le parc provincial Algonquin, établi en 1893, fut le premier parc provincial de l’Ontario. Le parc provincial Voyageur fut établi presque 80 ans plus tard en 1971! Certains d’entre vous se souviendront de son ancien nom parc provincial Carillon. Présentement, le parc Voyageur est considéré comme un parc de loisirs et est ouvert au public pour le camping et l’utilisation de jour, à partir de mai jusqu’à la fin de semaine de l’Action de Grâce et, pour l’utilisation de jour seulement, pendant la saison hivernale, pour le ski de fond. Le parc compte 146 emplacements de camping qui sont répartis dans trois campings, soit Iroquois et Portage (situés dans des boisés et des champs) et Champlain, qui est situé dans une ancienne érablière. Pour les visiteurs d’aujourd’hui, le parc provincial Voyageur est un espace récréatif très fréquenté. Il dispose de quatre plages, des sentiers de randonnée et une population faunique diversifiée, mais jadis, le parc n’était pas comme il est maintenant… L’histoire du parc Voyageur commence autour des années 1600, à l’époque où il était une ancienne forêt dense renfermant des pins, des sapins, des pruches et des érables. En fait, la forêt était si dense que la meilleure façon de voyager dans la région n’était pas sur terre mais plutôt de naviguer

La bicoque des bûcheron 4

sur la rivière à proximité. Les tribus des Premières Nations Huron, Iroquois et Algonquin pêchaient le long de cette rivière et s’en servaient comme voie de transport et, par conséquent, d’où elle tira son nom. La « Rivière des Outaouais » provient de l’algonquin « adawe », signifiant vendre. Beaucoup de gens naviguaient déjà sur la rivière – bien avant l’arrivée des Européens en Amérique du Nord, des voies commerciales importantes existaient entre les différentes tribus amérindiennes. Après l’arrivée des colons européens, les explorateurs, les commerçants de fourrure et les voyageurs empruntaient fréquemment la rivière. Les voyageurs étaient des hommes embauchés pour apporter en canot des biens et des fourrures à des postes de traite. Ils étaient embauchés par une ou deux entreprises concurrentes, soit la Compagnie de la Baie d’Hudson (La Baie) ou la Compagnie du NordOuest. En parcourant la rivière des Outaouais, les voyageurs devaient négocier trois séries de rapides d’une longueur de 21 km. Au pied de presque chaque rapide, des petites croix étaient visibles, celles-ci rendant hommage aux pagayeurs qui n’avaient pas survécu. Après un certain temps, des routes furent construites sur la rive pour contourner par portage ces rapides. Avec des paysages difficiles à naviguer, ce n’est qu’à la fin du 18ème siècle qu’un établissement permanent fut établi sur la rivière des Outaouais, des endroits qui se trouvent aujourd’hui à l’intérieur du parc provincial Voyageur. Des pins blancs étaient des arbres très communs dans cette région et ceux-ci avaient une hauteur de près de 100 m et une circonférence de 5 m! Ils étaient utilisés abondamment pour la construction des habitations et la forte demande européenne de ces arbres contribua au développement du commerce du bois pendant une grande partie du 19ème siècle, jouant un rôle important dans le développement des villes avoisinantes. Le commerce du bois contribua au développement économique, à l’ouverture des routes, à la construction des villages et à encourager l’exploitation. Des hommes faisaient un travail dur, soit l’abattage des arbres, l’équarrissage et le halage Parcs Ontario | Voyageur


à la rivière à l’aide de chevaux. Au printemps, des draveurs expérimentés dirigeaient les troncs flottants sur les petites rivières et les voies navigables en se tenant en équilibre et en utilisant une gaffe pour les guider. Ce travail n’était pas facile car souvent les billots s’arrêtaient et les draveurs devaient sauter d’un tronc à l’autre et utiliser leur gaffe pour les débloquer. Malheureusement, ce travail s’avérait parfois fatal. Certains hommes réussissaient toutefois à atteindre la rivière des Outaouais. Une fois arrivés, ils reliaient les billots pour former des radeaux de bois. Ces radeaux avaient des espaces prévus pour vivre et dormir et pouvaient mesurer jusqu’à 100 mètres de largeur. Le voyage sur la rivière des Outaouais était difficile et laborieux : les draveurs devaient faire face à des rapides non navigables et à des chutes d’eau dangereuses. À chacun des obstacles, les radeaux devaient être défaits en petites pièces (appelées brelles), celles-ci transportées autour des obstacles et rassemblées à nouveau. Le voyage à partir du cours supérieur de la rivière des Outaouais jusqu’à la province du Québec prenait parfois jusqu’à 2 ans! L’un des obstacles qu’ils devaient traverser était une chute, un canal étroit passant à travers un plateau rocheux peu profond. L’une des chutes les plus proches dans cette région était située près du village de Chute-à-Blondeau. Pour minimiser les effets dangereux de traverser cet obstacle, un canal fut creusé à travers le plateau en 1830 à 4 mètres (13 pieds) de profondeur transformant ainsi cette rapide en une chute d’environ 1,2 mètre (4 pieds). Cet endroit devint un point d’arrêt pour de nombreux bûcherons canadiens français et beaucoup de gens finirent par s’y établir. Une scierie fut construite et fut activée par la force de la chute, entraînant l’augmentation de l’industrie. De plus, un homme nommé Blondeau habitait à proximité de la chute et au fil du temps, les bûcherons ont désigné la chute Blondeau; d’où vient le nom « Chute-à-Blondeau ». Malheureusement, cet homme aurait péri noyé un jour, ce qui a renforcé davantage le nom donné. Au fur et à mesure que la population augmentait et Parcs Ontario | Voyageur

Le premier barrage de Carillon (1881) que les gens voyageaient davantage dans la région, des barrages et des canaux furent construits pour approfondir la rivière des Outaouais afin de noyer les rapides et rendre la navigation plus sécuritaire pour ceux qui devaient y traverser. Le premier système de canalisation fut construit entre 1819 et 1834 par les ingénieurs de l’armée britannique, ce dernier composé du canal de Grenville, du canal de Chute-à-Blondeau et du canal de Carillon. Le tout comportait 11 écluses. En 1870, la Commission des Canaux recommanda d’approfondir la rivière des Outaouais entre Lachine et Ottawa. De 1873 à 1882, on construisit donc un deuxième système de canalisation. Celui-ci comportait seulement deux canaux : ceux de Grenville et Carillon. Ce deuxième canal de Carillon fut le barrage d’origine de Carillon et fut construit par le gouvernement du Canada au coût de 1 350 000 $. Éventuellement, les chemins de fer furent un moyen plus rapide et plus direct de communication et de transport et ce qui était auparavant une voie navigable utilisée à des fins commerciales et industrielles devint un endroit populaire pour la navigation de plaisance. La rivière des Outaouais a donc changé sa vocation commerciale en vocation touristique. De 1959 à 1963, Hydro-Québec érigea un barrage à Carillon. Ce barrage a enfoui complètement les rapides et fournit de l’énergie aux communautés avoisinantes. La construction de ce barrage donna lieu à de sérieuses conséquences. Plusieurs villes et villages sur la rivière des Outaouais furent touchés. Le barrage éleva le niveau d’eau au point d’inonder des grandes parties des villes à proximité, telles 5


que Hawkesbury. Quelques 1 052 hectares (2 600 acres) de terrain furent expropriés, soit 30 fermes, 35 établissements commerciaux et 200 propriétés résidentielles. Quelques centaines de propriétés agricoles qui longeaient la rivière à l’extérieur de Hawkesbury furent également inondées, y compris la terre agricole qui est maintenant le parc provincial Voyageur. Heureusement, l’inondation ayant été moins forte que prévue, le Comité de la voie navigable de l’association d’aide au développement de l’Est de l’Ontario présenta une motion pour entreprendre la construction d’un parc provincial. Le ministère des Richesses naturelles acheta des terres dans cette région et le développement débuta en 1966. Cinq ans plus tard, le parc ouvrit officiellement, sous l’appellation parc provincial Carillon. Le terrain du parc est plutôt plat et comporte des champs ouverts, des baies abritées et des baies entourées d’arbrisseaux. L’inondation a créé des terres humides où il y avait autrefois des champs agricoles et des terrains boisés. Le parc offre une diversité naturelle pour plusieurs types d’habitats fauniques et une

6

variété d’utilisations récréatives. Au début, le parc couvrait moins de 800 hectares. Aujourd’hui, le parc s’étend sur une superficie de 1 464 hectares (3 618 acres). En raison d’une certaine confusion auprès des touristes entre ce parc et le « parc Carillon » situé de l’autre côté de la rivière au Québec, le nom fut changé en 1994 pour devenir le parc provincial Voyageur, en mémoire des braves voyageurs qui parcouraient la rivière des Outaouais. Le parc est riche par son passé historique où des hommes et des femmes doués de courage et de persévérance vivaient et mouraient pour coloniser un nouveau monde. La prochaine fois que vous serez assis sur la plage jouissant du soleil et des eaux calmes, fermez les yeux et imaginez-vous au temps des voyageurs, avec le bruit fracassant des rapides et la forêt sombre autour de vous qui n’attend que d’être explorée.

Parcs Ontario | Voyageur


CAMPING 101 Pour vivre une expérience mémorable de camping, vous devez savoir que… • Si vous avez envie de casser la croûte ou de boire un petit quelque chose, vous n’avez qu’à arrêter au restaurant du Magasin du parc (slush, crème glacée, hot dogs, frites, hamburgers et plus encore!) • Vous pouvez acheter du bois, de la glace, de l’huile et d’autres items au Magasin du parc. • La location de canots, kayaks et pédalos est disponible à la plage de Location de bateaux. • La location de rallonges électriques et d’adapteurs 15 Amp et 30 Amp est disponible au Bureau d’enregistrement du parc. • Laveuses et sécheuses situées à l’une des stations de douche dans chacun des terrains de camping.

Feuille de renseignements sur les avis concernant les plages de Parcs Ontario La qualité des eaux utilisées à des fins récréatives est couramment surveillée aux plages désignées de Parcs Ontario. Les échantillons sont analysés aux laboratoires de Santé publique Ontario pour l’Escherichia coli (E. coli), un organisme que l’on trouve dans les intestins des animaux à sang chaud. Facteurs de la qualité de l’eau Un certain nombre de facteurs influent sur la qualité des eaux utilisées à des fins récréatives et cela peut changer entre les périodes d’échantillonnage. Ces influences comprennent : • Les pluies abondantes • La sauvagine en grands nombres • Les grands vents ou l’action des vagues • Le grand nombre de nageurs Avis concernant les plages Le personnel de Parcs Ontario affiche des panneaux aux plages (exemple ci-dessous) lorsque les niveaux d’E. coli dans l’eau dépassent les normes provinciales. Les panneaux sont mis en place pour avertir les baigneurs que l’eau de la plage pourrait être impropre à la baignade. La baignade sur les plages où des panneaux indiquent des niveaux bactériens élevés pourrait causer ce qui suit : • Des infections/ Parcs Ontario | Voyageur

éruptions cutanées • Des infections des oreilles, des yeux, du nez et de la gorge • Une maladie gastro-intestinale (si l’eau est consommée) Les avis concernant les plages se fondent sur la teneur en E. coli dans les échantillons d’eau de plage prélevés au cours des derniers 24 heures, et ils sont retirés lorsque les résultats de l’analyse indiquent que les niveaux bactériens sont acceptables. La qualité de l’eau de plage peut changer en tout temps. Les clients devraient éviter la baignade pendant et après une tempête, une inondation ou des pluies abondantes, ou lorsque de nombreux oiseaux aquatiques sont présents. Comment contribuer Les clients de Parcs Ontario peuvent contribuer à maintenir la qualité de l’eau des plages en respectant ces simples lignes directrices : • Ne nourrissez pas les oiseaux ni d'autres animaux sauvages. • Ne laissez rien derrière vous. Débarrassez-vous correctement de toutes vos ordures et de tous vos résidus alimentaires. • Lorsque vous voulez vous baigner avec votre chien, utilisez uniquement les plages où sont autorisés les animaux de compagnie. Les animaux de compagnie sont interdits sur les plages publiques de Parcs Ontario. • Ne laissez pas les enfants se baigner si leurs couches sont souillées. • N'utilisez pas de shampooing ni de savon dans l’eau des lacs. 7


Tiques et maladie de Lyme Vous craignez de sortir en plein air l’été à cause des tiques et de la maladie de Lyme? En vous informant sur les tiques et en comprenant leur rôle dans la propagation de la maladie de Lyme, vous faites le premier pas pour vous protéger, vous et vos proches. Il existe de nombreuses espèces de tiques, mais toutes ne sont pas porteuses de la maladie de Lyme. La tique la plus commune que vous pourriez rencontrer est la tique américaine du chien, qui n’est pas porteuse de la maladie de Lyme. La seule tique porteuse de la maladie de Lyme en Ontario est la tique aux pattes noires (Ixodes scapularis). On trouve ces deux tiques dans des habitats forestiers ou d'herbes hautes. La « Carte des zones considérées à risque pour la maladie de Lyme en Ontario » de Santé publique Ontario indique où l’on risque de trouver des tiques à pattes noires. La tique aux pattes noires est un parasite des oiseaux migrateurs et des chevreuils, ce qui signifie qu’elle peut être transportée partout dans la province. Par conséquent, même si les probabilités sont faibles, on peut rencontrer des tiques à pattes noires, ou être infecté par la maladie de Lyme à la suite de la morsure d'une tique infectée, n'importe où dans la province. Les tiques sont plus actives au printemps et en été, mais on en trouve toute l’année si la température est au-dessus de zéro. Les tiques s’alimentent lentement, et une tique infectée doit se nourrir d’une personne pendant au moins 24 heures pour l’infecter par la bactérie qui cause la maladie de Lyme. En raison de ce délai, une des principales méthodes de prévention de la maladie de Lyme consiste à détecter la tique et à l'enlever rapidement. Si vous êtes infecté à la suite d'une morsure de tique, les symptômes apparaissent après une ou deux semaines, mais peuvent prendre jusqu'à un mois avant de se manifester. Le symptôme « classique » est une éruption cutanée en forme de cible qui peut apparaître n'importe où sur le corps; cependant, cette éruption ne se manifeste pas dans tous les cas. Les premiers symptômes sont semblables à ceux de la grippe : fièvre, maux de tête, raideur 8

dans le cou, douleur aux mâchoires, courbatures. Non traitée, la maladie de Lyme peut provoquer des problèmes cardiaques, du système nerveux et des articulations des mois ou des années plus tard. Comme cette maladie est facilement traitable aux premiers stades, consultez un médecin si vous ne vous sentez pas bien. Quand vous êtes dans un endroit où il y a des tiques, prenez ces précautions pour vous protéger : 1. Portez des vêtements à manches longues et rentrez le bas de vos pantalons dans vos chaussettes. 2. Portez des vêtements de couleur claire afin de mieux repérer les tiques avant qu’elles ne s'attachent. 3. Utilisez un insectifuge contenant du DEET (suivez le mode d’emploi du fabricant). Appliquez le produit sur votre peau et sur l’extérieur de vos vêtements. 4. Vérifiez qu’il n’y a pas de tiques. Examinez vos vêtements, votre corps, ainsi que ceux des enfants et des animaux de compagnie. Portez une attention particulière à l'aine, le cuir chevelu et les aisselles. 5. Si vous trouvez une tique sur votre corps, retirez-la et mettez-la dans un contenant. Contactez l’unité sanitaire de votre région qui vous dira comment la faire identifier et l’analyser. Cette analyse peut prendre plusieurs mois et n’est pas un diagnostic. De plus, contactez votre médecin de famille si vous avez des questions sur la maladie de Lyme. En suivant ces simples conseils, vous pouvez explorer le parc Voyageur en sécurité et en toute tranquillité d’esprit. Pour plus de renseignements, veuillez consulter le site du ministère de la Santé et des Soins de longue durée de l’Ontario à https://www.ontario.ca/fr/page/ maladie-de-lyme. Carte des zones considérées à risque de Santé publique Ontario : https://www.publichealthontario.ca/-/media/ documents/l/2020/lyme-disease-risk-area-map-2020.pdf?la=fr Parcs Ontario | Voyageur


Vous avez trouvé une tique? CE QU’IL FAUT FAIRE • Utilisez des pinces à épiler à pointe fine. • Saisissez la tique aussi près de votre peau possible. • Tirez-la tout droit, doucement, mais fermement. • Désinfectez l’endroit de la morsure avec de l’alcool à friction ou du savon et de l’eau. Gardez la tique (en vie si possible) dans un bocal, avec un papier essuie-tout humide pour son identification et des tests potentiels. Le personnel du parc vous donnera les coordonnées de l’unité sanitaire de la région. Vous pouvez aussi apporter la tique à votre médecin de famille pour qu’il la fasse vérifier.

DU CAMPING À L'HORIZON?

C’est la saison des feux de végétation n’en soyez pas la cause

Surveillez d’éventuels symptômes et consultez un médecin si vous ne vous sentez pas bien ou si vous ne pouvez pas enlever la tique de façon sécuritaire. À NE PAS FAIRE • Attraper la tique par son ventre gonflé et l’écraser. • Tenter d’enlever la tique avec une allumette, de la chaleur ou des produits chimiques. • Tourner la tique quand vous la retirez. Les feux de camp sécuritaires sont :

Tique à pattes noires (Ixodes scapularis) sur un brin d’herbe.

1. Montés sur un sol nu ou une surface rocheuse. 2. Abrités du vent. 3. Situés à au moins trois mètres de la forêt, de branches surplombantes ou d’autres matières inflammables. 4. Petits. Un petit feu convient mieux à la cuisson des aliments et il est plus facile à maîtriser ainsi qu’à éteindre. La forêt n’est pas un endroit qui convient aux feux de joie. 5. Éteints dès que possible. Arrosez abondamment avec de l’eau, brassez les cendres à l’aide d’un bâton ou d’une pelle afin de découvrir les charbons ardents et arrosez de nouveau.

Les feux de camp sont sûrs quand : 6. Un seau d’eau et une pelle se trouvent à proximité afin de maîtriser le feu. 7. Un adulte s’occupe d’eux en tout temps.

Ces tiques à pattes noires (Ixodes scapularis) vivent sur une vaste gamme d’hôtes, y compris des mammifères, des oiseaux et des reptiles. Les tiques à pattes noires (Ixodes scapularis) propagent la maladie de Lyme, Borrelia burgdorferi, aux humains et aux animaux quand elles s’alimentent. Elles insèrent leurs parties buccales dans la peau de l’hôte et en sucent le sang riche en éléments nutritifs. Photo : Jim Gathany, CDC

Parcs Ontario | Voyageur

Pour plus d’information, contactez le bureau d’incendie du ministère des Richesses naturelles et des Forêts de votre localité. ® Marque déposée de Partners in Protection.

ontario.ca/preventiondesincendies

BLEED

Payé par le gouvernement de l’Ontario

9 COLOUR AD following Firesmart template #2


LEGEND | LÉGENDE

10

Beach Plage

Boat Launch Descente de bateaux

Camping

Comfort Station Installation sanitaire

Dog Beach Plage pour chien

Garbage Ordures

Gatehouse Bureau denregistrement

Group Camping Camping de groupe

Park Office Bureau du parc

Park Store Magasin du parc

Parking Stationnement

Picnic Area Aire de jour

Playground Terrain de jeu

Trailer Dumping Station Station de vidange

Trailer Filling Station Station de remplissage

Vault Toilet Latrine

Water Eau

Regular Campsite/Terrain régulier Electrical Campsite/Site avec électricité

Parcs Ontario | Voyageur


L’ histoire vivante Le premier traité modern de l’Ontario est en cours de négociations dans notre région

Mattawa

North Bay

Deep River

Zone d’établissement Algonquins of Ontario

Petawawa

Parc provincial

Pembroke

Hawkesbury

South River

Rockland Pikwàkanagàn

Whitney

Renfrew

Barrys Bay

Haliburton

Cornwall

Smiths Falls

Bancroft

Prescott

Sharbot Lake

Brockville

Kaladar

Orillia

AVIS AUX VISITEUR DU PARC

Des sangliers ont récemment été aperçus dans le parc provincial Voyageur. Les sangliers ne sont pas indigènes de l’Ontario. Il s’agit d’une espèce envahissante qui pose un problème à l'échelle locale depuis que des bêtes en captivité se sont enfuies. Ils nuisent aux populations sauvages et à l’écosystème. Les sangliers pèsent en moyenne 250 lb et peuvent être agressifs, surtout les femelles protectrices de leurs bébés. Tous les animaux sauvages étant imprévisibles, il faut éviter tout contact avec eux. Nous rappelons aux visiteurs du parc de tenir leur animal domestique en laisse en tout temps afin d’éviter de provoquer inutilement les sangliers et les autres espèces sauvages.

Casselman

Carleton Place

Huntsville

Bracebridge

Ottawa

Arnprior

Madoc 50

Napanee

0

50 km

Kingston

Parc Provincial Voyageur

est l’un des 13 Parcs Ontario opérationnel contenu sur les 36 000 kilomètres carrés faisant l’objet de négociations de traités entre l’Ontario, le Canada et les Algonquins de l’Ontario. Les 13 parcs continueront d’être accessibles au public. Pour en savoir plus sur le processus d’élaboration des traités à ontario.ca/fr/page/revendication-territoriale-des-algonquins

À TOUS LES CAMPEURS ET VISITEURS DE JOUR! Aidez-nous à garder les parcs propres en jetant les déchets à leur place. Les déchets risquent d’attirer les animaux sauvages, ce qui peut mettre les visiteurs en danger. Il est conseillé de se munir d’un sac de poubelle pour y mettre ses déchets et de jeter le sac, avant de partir, dans les zones désignées pour les déchets et le recyclage du parc. Nous apprécions et encourageons les amoureux de la nature qui sont déterminés à protéger les parcs pour l’avenir.

Si vous voyez un sanglier, quittez les lieux, notez l’emplacement et le nombre d’animaux et signalez cette information au personnel du parc dès que possible. Gardien du parc 613-678-0434 (cellulaire) 613-674-2825, poste 225 ou jason.bernique@ ontario.ca En cas d’urgence, appelez le 911.

Parcs Ontario | Voyageur

11


Les Tortues du Sud-Est de l’Ontario Il existe 8 espèces indigènes de tortues qui peuvent être trouvées dans le sud-est de l’Ontario, dont sept sont en danger. Les plus communes sont la Chélydre serpentine (Chelydra serpentina) et les tortues peintes (Chrysems peinte picta marginata). D’autres espèces plus inaccessibles qui ne sont pas aussi couramment observées, sont la tortue ponctuée, tortue mouchetée, tortue des bois, tortue géographique, tortue musquée et tortue molle à épines. Il y a aussi une espèce envahissante qui a été introduit dans la nature appelée tortue à oreilles rouges. Les tortues peuvent parfois être trouvées près de la surface de l’eau ou à prendre le soleil sur les rochers et les rondins qui sortent de l’eau. Elles mènent des vies principalement aquatiques, vivant et cherchant leur nourriture dans l’eau. Les tortues sont également souvent vues sur les routes. Cependant, en plus d’avoir besoin d’air pour respirer, elles viennent sur la terre ferme pour une variété de raisons, telles que la migration de leur lieu d’hibernation vers leur habitat d’été, ou pour prendre le soleil sur l’asphalte chaud, ou encore à la recherche du meilleur endroit pour

FAITS INTÉRESSANTS • L a tortue musquée de l’Est - nommée pour l’odeur musquée qu’elle libère lorsqu’elle est menacée. C’est une très bonne grimpeuse et elle peut être trouvée dans les arbres près de l’eau pour se sécher et aider à éliminer les sangsues qui se sont attachées • La Tortue mouchetée - identifiée par sa gorge jaune vif ; elle peut vivre jusqu’à 75 ans • La Tortue des bois - couleur orange sur la gorge et les pattes, connue pour être très intelligente. Elle utilise des méthodes intéressantes pour obtenir de la nourriture, p. ex : elle piétine le sol pour faire sortir les vers en surface • La tortue-molle de l’Est à épines - récupère la moitié de son oxygène en respirant par la peau lorsqu’elle est dans l’eau ; peut rester immergée jusqu’à 5 heures

12

déposer leurs œufs. Soyez vigilants pour nos petites amies ! Elles ont de très fortes carapaces, mais elles ne résisteront pas aux véhicules. Ces comportements se produisent le plus souvent à la fin du printemps jusqu’au début de l’été. Les femelles peuvent parfois pondre des couvées qui ont été fécondés par plusieurs mâles ; par conséquent, les œufs pondus dans le nid seront demi-frères. Le sexe du nouveau-né est déterminé par la génétique, mais peut être influencé par la température du nid pendant l’incubation. Ceci est connu sous le nom de Détermination du Sexe par la Température (DNT). Malheureusement, beaucoup de nids de tortues sont détruits et vidés avant même que les œufs n’aient le temps d’éclore. Ceci, en plus de nombreux individus ne survivant pas aux accidents de la route, sont d’importante source de stress sur toutes les espèces et rendent la survie difficile. Même si cela est possible, (les tortues à oreilles rouges) les tortues ne devraient pas être achetées comme animaux de compagnie. Elles peuvent vivre pendant très longtemps, et elles sont également porteuses de salmonelles, ce qui peut être dangereux. Si, toutefois, une tortue a déjà été achetée et que vous n’en voulez plus, veuillez ne pas la relâcher dans la nature. Non seulement c’est la façon dont les espèces envahissantes sont introduites (les tortues à Oreilles rouges), mais elles peuvent aussi contaminer les espèces indigènes avec des maladies étranges. Au lieu de cela, contactez le magasin d’animaux de compagnie qui vous l’a vendue. De nombreux endroits acceptent que vous rendiez l’animal dans un effort pour réduire l’introduction d’espèces envahissantes. Parcs Ontario | Voyageur


TORTUE CHÉLYDRE COMMUNE Nom scientifique : Chelydra Serpentine Statut SAR : préoccupant ; la chasse est maintenant interdite en Ontario La Chélydre serpentine, la plus grosse tortue d’eau douce au Canada, peut atteindre un poids de 4.5 à 16.0 kg et environ 20 à 36 cm de longueur. Avec une durée de vie moyenne de 70 ans, elles ont l’apparence d’un dinosaure avec une longue queue (souvent plus longue que leur corps !) qui présentent des plaques triangulaires. Elles sont opportunistes, mangeant une variété d’aliments tels que poissons, plantes aquatiques, amphibiens, insectes, autres reptiles, petits mammifères et oiseaux. La Chélydre serpentine est un reptile à sang froid. Cela signifie que, contrairement aux animaux à sang chaud (comme les humains !) elle contrôle la température de son corps à l’aide de son environnement. Quand elle ne couve ou ne s’accouple pas, la Chélydre serpentine aime les eaux peu profondes où elle peut se cacher dans la boue avec son nez au-dessus de l’eau pour respirer. Ce n’est pas une excellente nageuse et a tendance à passer son temps au fond de l’eau, à se promener. Certaines des plus fréquentes observations de tortues serpentines sont au début ou au milieu de l’été quand les femelles sont à la recherche de l’endroit le plus adapté pour pondre leurs œufs. Elles se reproduisent de mars à juin, et pondent leurs oeufs d'avril à juin. Elles préfèrent des zones sableuses ou de gravier comme les plages, terrains de stationnement ou le long des routes. Elles sont plus fréquemment observées lors des chaudes journées de pluie puisque ces conditions ramollissent le sol, ce qui facilite le creusement de leurs nids.

Comment aider une tortue à traverser la route D'abord, soyez prudent ! Assurez-vous qu'aucune voiture ne s'approche ; portez des gants. Faites attention à la direction dans laquelle la tortue se déplace. Si vous les déplacez dans le mauvais sens, elles reviendront tout de suite. Option 1 - Ramassez-les : Approchez la tortue par derrière. Ne l'attrapez pas par le queue! La queue est soudée à la carapace (carapace supérieure) et si vous soulevez une tortue de cette façon, vous risquez de lui briser la colonne vertébrale. Placez vos mains de chaque côté de la carapace, les pouces sur le dessus et les autres doigts en dessous. PRENEZ GARDE avec les tortues serpentines car elles ont un long cou et peuvent se retourner et atteindre leurs pattes arrière pour vous mordre. Tenez-vous bien et essayez de ne les soulever que légèrement du sol. Ainsi, elles ne tomberont pas de trop haut si vous les laissez tomber. Option 2 - La brouette : Si vous ne souhaitez pas toucher la tortue, glissez une pelle (ou un objet similaire) sous ses pattes arrière, soulevez-la légèrement et faites-la traverser la route en brouette. Option 3 - Prévenir un garde forestier : Vous pouvez toujours demander l'aide d'un employé du parc. Buse à épaulettes (adulte)

OÙ ET QUAND OBSERVER LES OISEAUX À VOYAGEUR Consultez en ligne ce guide des oiseaux du parc provincial Voyageur © Jacques Bouvier

https://jacques-miroiseur.smugmug.com/Birds/Birds-ofFar-Eastern-Ontario/My197birdsMes197oiseaux/

Parcs Ontario | Voyageur

13


ALERTE AUX ESPÈCES ENVAHISSANTES: Les espèces envahissantes sont des plantes, des animaux ou des insectes qui ne sont pas indigènes à notre région et constituent une préoccupation particulière lorsqu'on essaie de protéger la biodiversité de l'Ontario. Bien que toutes les espèces non indigènes ne soient pas envahissantes, celles qui le sont, sont capables de supplanter nos espèces indigènes car elles n'ont pas de prédateurs naturels pour les contrôler. Les baies du parc provincial Voyageur sont actuellement infestées par une espèce aquatique envahissante relativement peu commune, la châtaigne d'eau ; c'est le premier endroit où l'on a trouvé ces plantes en Ontario, en 2005. Nos objectifs au parc et dans les environs sont de contenir et de prévenir la propagation de ces plantes dans d'autres cours d'eau de notre province et éventuellement de les éradiquer complètement de nos eaux. Qu'est-ce que la châtaigne d'eau ? La châtaigne d'eau (Trapa natans) est une plante annuelle originaire d'Europe et d'Asie qui pousse dans les zones peu profondes et forme des tapis denses qui recouvrent toute la surface de l'eau, devenant si épais qu'il devient impossible de pratiquer des activités de loisirs telles que la navigation de plaisance, la pêche ou la natation. Ce "tapis" de plantes bloque également la lumière du soleil, ce qui affecte les populations de poissons et d'invertébrés et empêche la croissance de nos nénuphars et potamots indigènes. Bien que toutes les zones ne soient pas entièrement recouvertes, on peut trouver cette plante dans toutes les baies situées dans les limites du parc. Comment se propagent-elles ? Les châtaignes d'eau se propagent principalement par les graines, qui poussent à partir de petites fleurs blanches sur une "rosette" flottante. Il s'agit d'une plante annuelle, ce qui signifie qu'elle ne se reproduit que par les graines. C'est une bonne chose, car cela nous permet de contrôler la propagation en arrêtant toute nouvelle production de graines. Le point négatif : les graines produites peuvent rester viables dans le substrat pendant plus de 10 ans et chaque graine 14

peut produire jusqu'à 300 autres graines si elle n'est pas touchée chaque année ! Heureusement, la majorité des graines germent au cours des premières années, ce qui réduit considérablement la banque de graines en un temps relativement court. Ces graines sont grandes, de la taille d'une pièce d’un dollar, et ont des extrémités barbelées qui leur permettent de se coller aux poils/plumes des animaux, des bateaux, des remorques et même des maillots de bain. Elles peuvent causer des blessures et si elles tombent dans un nouvel endroit, elles peuvent propager davantage l'invasion. De plus, si l'on coupe la rosette de la tige et qu'on la laisse flotter au loin, de nouvelles racines pousseront et continueront à produire des graines. Que fait Parcs Ontario pour lutter contre cette invasion ? Une équipe d'employés du parc travaille de mai à octobre à la récolte des plantes pour empêcher la production de graines. Cette opération est effectuée à l'aide de bateaux spécialement conçus qui coupent le sommet (la rosette productrice de graines) de la plante, puis un autre bateau recueille et ramène ces plantes coupées sur la rive pour les composter. La cueillette manuelle à partir de canots, de bateaux à moteur ou avec des cuissardes est également pratiquée dans les zones où la croissance est plus sporadique. Si vous êtes sur la plage d'Iroquois, vous remarquerez peut-être une barrière flottante orange vif qui traverse la baie ; elle est installée pour empêcher les rosettes coupées de dériver pendant le travail. Y a-t-il eu des succès ? Après plus d'une décennie de contrôle, des résultats positifs sont observés dans tous les domaines ! En stoppant la production de nouvelles graines, la banque de graines existante est réduite davantage chaque année. La baie Champlain a été débarrassée

Parcs Ontario | Voyageur


de toutes les plantes chaque été depuis 2009 et il faut maintenant moins d'un jour par mois pour surveiller l'ensemble de la baie, principalement pour enlever les plantes qui ont pu être apportées par d'autres bateaux. Dans les zones dégagées de la baie d'Iroquois, on constate une différence notable dans la densité des plantes qui poussent au début du printemps entre les zones qui n'ont jamais été dégagées et celles qui l'ont été au cours des 4 à 6 dernières années. En fait, les recherches effectuées dans le parc suggèrent qu'après au moins 4 ans d'arrêt de toute nouvelle production de graines, il reste une réduction de 95 % des graines viables dans la banque de graines !

d'Iroquois, essayez de quitter la zone en passant par le milieu et en empruntant le chenal " dégagées " pour éviter de transporter sans le savoir des plantes coincées sur des moteurs vers d'autres endroits de la rivière des Outaouais.

Que pouvez-VOUS faire pour aider ? Veillez à inspecter et à nettoyer soigneusement vos bateaux et remorques afin d'éviter toute propagation à d'autres endroits.

Bénévoles ! Nous avons toujours besoin d'aide, alors si vous voulez aider à protéger notre environnement, veuillez contacter le superviseur des châtaignes d'eau à l'adresse jean.malboeuf@ontario. ca ou laissez un message au personnel de l'entrée principale, et nous serons heureux de vous compter parmi les membres de notre équipe !

Enlevez toutes les graines et les plantes qui peuvent être "collées" sur les cordes, les bouées, les moteurs ou les remorques et jetez-les à la poubelle ou dans les conteneurs à graines spécialement marqués situés sur toutes les plages, à la rampe de mise à l'eau et à l'entrée principale. Restez à l'écart des zones infestées pour éviter de couper les rosettes de leurs tiges, ce qui leur permettrait de flotter et de répandre des graines. Si vous mettez votre bateau à l'eau à partir de la baie Le transport du bois de chauffage depuis ou vers votre parc provincial préféré peut sembler inoffensif, mais cela risque de propager des maladies et des espèces envahissantes, comme les insectes et les plantes. Beaucoup de ces organismes nuisibles sont cachés dans le bois et difficiles à déceler. Des millions d’arbres ont déjà été infectés. Pour aider à freiner la propagation, il faut : • Laisser le bois de chauffage à la maison; • Acheter du bois séché au four, si possible; • Acheter le bois de chauffage localement. Si vous prenez du bois de chauffage d’une zone en quarantaine à cause d’organismes nuisibles sans Parcs Ontario | Voyageur

Aidez à assurer la sécurité de nos plages (les graines sont très pointues !) en aidant le personnel à ramasser les graines échouées et à les placer dans les conteneurs à graines. Si vous craignez d'avoir trouvé un nouvel emplacement, VEUILLEZ NOUS LE FAIRE SAVOIR ! Vous pouvez le dire à n'importe quel membre du personnel ou appeler la ligne d'assistance sur les espèces envahissantes au 1-800-563-7711.

l’autorisation de l’Agence canadienne d’inspection des aliments (ACIA), vous êtes passible d’une amende allant jusqu’à 50 000 $ ou de poursuites, voire les deux. Pour avoir plus de renseignements sur les restrictions en matière de déplacement du bois de chauffage et des mises à jour sur les organismes nuisibles réglementés, dont l’agrile du frêne, visiter www.inspection. gc.ca ou contacter l’ACIA au 1 800 442-2342. 15


Sommaire des infractions commises dans les parcs provinciaux Parcs Ontario a une règle de base : il faut toujours avoir du respect et de la considération pour les autres visiteurs et pour l’environnement dans les parcs provinciaux. Le tableau ci-dessous présente certaines des dispositions des lois les plus fréquemment mises en application dans les parcs provinciaux. Selon la Loi de 2006 sur les parcs provinciaux et les réserves de conservation, le titulaire de permis inscrit est responsable du comportement de tous les occupants d’un emplacement de camping et pourrait être déclaré coupable d’une infraction attribuable à la conduite des autres occupants de cet emplacement. Vous pouvez consulter la Loi de 2006 sur les parcs provinciaux et les réserves de conservation et les autres lois régissant le comportement dans les parcs provinciaux aux bureaux des parcs provinciaux et en ligne à partir du site www.ontario.ca/fr/lois. Ces lois sont mises en application par les gardiens des parcs provinciaux, qui ont tous les pouvoirs d’un membre de la Police provinciale à l’intérieur des parcs provinciaux. Un grand nombre des infractions présentées ci-dessous peuvent donner lieu à l’éviction d’un parc provincial. Il est interdit à tout visiteur évincé d’entrer à nouveau dans quelque parc provincial que ce soit pour une période de 72 heures. Les amendes minimales indiquées ci-dessous n’incluent pas les frais de justice ni la suramende compensatoire. Infraction Boissons alcoolisées • Posséder de l’alcool dans un contenant ouvert ailleurs que sur le lieu de résidence (emplacement de camping) • Boire de l’alcool ailleurs que sur le lieu de résidence • Conduire un véhicule motorisé ou disposer ou être aux commandes d’un tel véhicule avec un contenant d’alcool ouvert ou non scellé • Personne âgée de moins de 19 ans en possession d’alcool • Ivresse dans un lieu public • Posséder de l’alcool illégalement dans un parc désigné (lorsque l’alcool y est interdit) Chahut/Bruit • Utiliser un langage ou des gestes discriminatoires, agressifs, méprisants ou insultants • Faire trop de bruit • Déranger d’autres personnes • Faire fonctionner un appareil audio dans des endroits où c’est interdit Conservation de produits qui attirent les animaux sauvages • Garder illégalement des produits qui attirent les animaux sauvages

Ordures • Semer des ordures ou causer ce résultat • Omettre de tenir l’emplacement de camping/l’installation propre • Ne pas remettre l’emplacement de camping/l’installation à son état initial Véhicules • Entrer dans un parc illégalement avec un véhicule ou posséder ou faire fonctionner un véhicule illégalement dans un parc • Rouler trop vite – à une vitesse de plus de 20 km/h • Conduire un véhicule ailleurs que sur la route • Ne pas respecter un panneau d’arrêt Stationnement • Garer un véhicule dans un endroit non désigné à cette fin • Garer un véhicule dans une zone interdite • Omettre de placer le permis en vue dans un véhicule garé Animaux domestiques • Ne pas tenir un animal domestique en laisse • Ne pas empêcher un animal domestique de faire du bruit excessif • Permettre à un animal domestique de se trouver dans une aire de baignade désignée ou sur une plage • Laisser un animal domestique déranger les gens • Permettre à un animal domestique de se trouver dans un endroit où il est indiqué que la présence d’animaux domestiques est interdite Protection de l’environnement • Endommager, dégrader ou enlever la propriété de la Couronne • Déranger, endommager ou enlever un objet naturel • Perturber, couper, enlever ou endommager une plante ou un arbre • Tuer une plante ou un arbre • Troubler, tuer, enlever, blesser ou harceler un animal Permis de camping • Omettre de quitter les lieux ou d’enlever ses biens d’un emplacement de camping après l’expiration du permis de camping • Occuper un emplacement de camping illégalement • Camper après que le délai autorisé a pris fin Équipement de camping/Nombre de personnes • Installer plus de trois pièces d’équipement servant d’abri sur un emplacement de camping • Installer plus d’une tente-caravane, une caravane ou une unité de camping automotrice sur un emplacement de camping • Avoir un nombre excessif de personnes qui occupent un emplacement de camping ou un emplacement de camping sauvage Feux de camp • Allumer ou tenter d’allumer un feu de camp ailleurs que dans le foyer aménagé ou dans un endroit désigné • Allumer ou tenter d’allumer un feu de camp lorsqu’il est indiqué qu’il existe un risque d’incendie Feux d’artifice • Posséder des feux d’artifice • Allumer des feux d’artifice Heures de fermeture • Entrer dans un parc après l’heure de fermeture • Rester dans un parc après l’heure de fermeture

Amende minimale 100,00 $ 100,00 $ 175,00 $ 100,00 $ 50,00 $ 100,00 $

150,00 $ 150,00 $ 150,00 $ 75,00 $ 125,00 $

125,00 $

125,00 $ 100,00 $ 125,00 $ 85,00 $

Explication Si vous avez 19 ans ou plus, vous pouvez posséder ou consommer des boissons alcoolisées (bière, vin, eau-de-vie) uniquement dans un emplacement de camping désigné. Il revient au conducteur de s’assurer que l’alcool dans un véhicule est convenablement rangé. L’alcool doit être dans un contenant non ouvert dont le sceau n’est pas brisé ou doit être convenablement rangé et inaccessible à toutes les personnes présentes dans le véhicule. De nombreux parcs mettent en vigueur une interdiction d’alcool complète le jour de la fête de la Reine et les dix jours qui le précèdent. Une interdiction d’alcool est également en vigueur au parc provincial Sibbald Point le jour de la fête du Travail et les quatre jours qui le précèdent. Pendant ces périodes, il est interdit d’être en possession d’alcool dans tous les endroits du parc concernés par l’interdiction d’alcool. Les parcs provinciaux ont été établis pour offrir une expérience paisible dans la nature. Tout chahut, y compris le bruit excessif, et le langage ou des gestes obscènes sont interdits. À toute heure du jour ou de la nuit, il est défendu de déranger les autres ou de nuire à l’agrément que leur procure le parc. Il est interdit de faire fonctionner un appareil audio (radio, stéréo, téléviseur, etc.) dans les endroits où l’utilisation d’une radio est défendue. Il est interdit de conserver ou de garder des produits qui pourraient attirer les animaux sauvages, y compris des aliments ou des boissons, de l’équipement servant à la préparation ou à l’entreposage des aliments, des appareils ou des ustensiles de cuisine, des déchets ou des produits de recyclage, des produits parfumés ou tout autre article, d’une façon qui est susceptible d’attirer les animaux sauvages. Vous devez jeter tous les déchets dans les contenants fournis à cette fin pour décourager les animaux sauvages de devenir nuisibles. Les emplacements de camping et les installations doivent être maintenues propres en tout temps afin d’éliminer tout risque pour les visiteurs et de réduire au minimum les conflits entre humains et animaux sauvages. Il est interdit de conduire des véhicules ailleurs que sur la route dans les parcs provinciaux afin d’éviter de causer des dommages à l’environnement. Les véhicules automobiles inscrits peuvent circuler uniquement sur la route. Il faut respecter les règles de la route et se rappeler que le Code de la route s’applique à toutes les routes du parc. Tous les véhicules dans le parc doivent être dotés d’un permis de parc provincial valide. Les bicyclettes sont autorisées uniquement sur les routes du parc et dans les sentiers cyclables désignés.

(et 3 points d’inaptitude)

30,00 $

75,00 $

125,00 $ 125,00 $ 125,00 $ 150,00 $ 150,00 $

75,00 $ 125,00 $ 75,00 $

75,00 $

150,00 $

100,00 $ 150,00 $ 125,00 $

Tous les véhicules doivent être garés dans un endroit désigné et un permis valide du parc doit être visible dans chaque véhicule. Vous devez placer votre permis de parc valide bien en vue sur le tableau de bord.

Pour protéger les animaux sauvages et les autres visiteurs du parc, votre animal domestique doit être sous votre contrôle et être attaché à une laisse d’une longueur maximale de deux mètres en tout temps. Vous devez vous assurer que votre animal domestique ne nuit pas à la végétation de l’emplacement de camping et à la faune du parc et ne les endommage pas. Vous devez aussi vous assurer que votre animal domestique n’empêche pas d’autres personnes de profiter du parc. Il est défendu, en tout temps, aux animaux domestiques de se trouver dans les aires réservées à la baignade, sur les plages et dans les endroits où il est indiqué que la présence d’animaux domestiques est interdite.

Pour maintenir le milieu naturel des parcs, il est interdit d’en retirer les objets naturels. La végétation, les animaux sauvages et les caractéristiques naturelles des parcs provinciaux sont tous protégés. Il est interdit de couper toute végétation naturelle ou d’endommager tout objet naturel ou autre. Dans les parcs provinciaux, il est également interdit de ramasser du bois tombé par terre ou du bois mort pour faire un feu de camp ou pour d’autres raisons semblables.

Vous devez quitter votre emplacement de camping ou de camping sauvage et y avoir enlevé tous vos biens avant 14 h à la date d’expiration de votre permis pour que d’autres personnes puissent s’y installer. La durée maximale d’un séjour dans un terrain de camping d’un parc provincial est de 23 nuits consécutives et de 16 nuits consécutives dans un emplacement de camping sauvage. Ces règles ont pour but de limiter les répercussions environnementales et de donner à tous des chances égales de jouir du parc.

Si la quantité d’équipement de camping autorisée n’était pas limitée, les emplacements de camping se détérioreraient rapidement, deviendraient plus grands et mèneraient à la destruction de la végétation environnante. Le nombre maximum de campeurs autorisé par emplacement de camping est de six personnes et le nombre maximum de campeurs autorisé par emplacement de camping sauvage est de neuf personnes.

Les endroits où allumer un feu de camp sont désignés par le personnel de chaque parc pour des raisons de sécurité. La limitation des endroits où allumer des feux de camp permet de réduire grandement le risque de feu de forêt. Pour prévenir les feux de forêt, un directeur de parc pourrait signifier un avis de risque d’incendie et mettre en œuvre une interdiction de faire des feux. Lorsqu’une interdiction de feux de camp est en vigueur, personne n’a l’autorisation d’allumer de feu de camp à moins d’indication contraire donnée par le directeur du parc. Il est interdit en tout temps de posséder ou d’utiliser des feux d’artifice dans les parcs provinciaux. Les feux d’artifice constituent un risque d’incendie et dérangent les visiteurs désireux de séjourner paisiblement dans un parc ainsi que les animaux sauvages. Seuls les campeurs inscrits sont autorisés à se trouver dans un parc provincial pendant les heures de fermeture affichées (22 h à 8 h)

Les amendes sont susceptibles d’être modifiées. Cette liste d’infractions n’est pas exhaustive. Veuillez consulter la loi sur le sujet.

16

Parcs Ontario | Voyageur


La succession écologique La succession écologique est définie comme le processus par lequel une communauté naturelle de plantes change au fil du temps. Les communautés commencent par des espèces pionnières comme les lichens, mousses et champignons et la complexité de la communauté augmente avec le temps alors que plus de terre se développe. Ce processus est appelé la succession primaire et se produit lorsqu’il n’y a pas déjà de terre présente pour que les plantes poussent, comme par exemple, après une coulée de lave ou le recul des glaciers. La succession secondaire est plus communément connue ; il s’agit de la réponse de la communauté végétale à une perturbation. Une perturbation peut se produire naturellement, comme un arbre qui tombe ou un incendie de forêt, ou artificiellement, comme la coupe à blanc d’une forêt ou le fauchage d’un champ. Les herbes et les plantes plus petites coloniseront généralement d’abord la zone, suivies par de plus grands arbustes et finalement des arbres. Par exemple, si un feu brûle une partie d’une forêt, il n’y aura pas de plantes qui poussent, mais le sol, avec des éléments nutritifs et potentiellement des graines enterrées, restera. Après la perturbation, les graminées annuelles et autres petites plantes vont pousser en premier, suivies des graminées vivaces, arbustes et finalement les arbres. Un autre exemple qui se passe assez fréquemment, est lorsqu’un arbre tombe dans la forêt. L’arbre perturbe le sol sous lui et ouvre un trou dans la canopée ; ainsi plus de lumière traverse. L’exposition à cette lumière du soleil directe permet alors à de petites plantules de se développer plus rapidement.  Un bon endroit où vous pouvez voir la succession secondaire en action dans le parc est l’ancien terrain de baseball sur le chemin du magasin du parc. Pendant plusieurs années, ce terrain a été tondu par les employés du parc pour être une zone de loisirs, mais le parc a récemment permis que la ré-naturalisation se produise. La succession observée dans ce domaine sera légèrement différente que si une perturbation naturelle, comme un feu de forêt, s’était produite ; c’est parce que la zone était contrôlée par l’homme Parcs Ontario | Voyageur

pendant un certain nombre d’années, donc la première et deuxième étape de plantes annuelles et vivaces sont déjà bien établies. Certaines des plantes actuellement identifiées dans la zone comprennent : Asclépiade, Carotte sauvage, chénopode blanc, herbe à poux, nerprun (envahissante) et sétaire. Une information importante à noter est que, souvent, dans de grandes zones exposées, qui ont été perturbées par le passé, l’habitat est vulnérable à l’invasion des espèces envahissantes. Idéalement, les espèces indigènes devraient être bien établies, permettant une forte concurrence pour les plantes envahissantes. Malheureusement, dans une si grande zone, les espèces envahissantes peuvent pousser en premier et envahir, ce qui empêche les espèces indigènes d’établir une communauté stable. C’est pourquoi il est si important d’être vigilants à ne pas transporter d’espèces envahissantes dans de nouvelles zones ! La surveillance attentive des populations spécifiques qui poussent peut également contribuer à permettre une réponse rapide afin de pouvoir contrôler les espèces envahissantes qui peuvent apparaître. Enfin, si nécessaire, une approche plus proactive de la réintroduction d’espèces indigènes par la plantation de jeunes spécimens sains est une option pour aider à assurer la longévité de la préservation de l’habitat.  Veuillez prendre une minute pour vous arrêter et observer l’ancien terrain de baseball, lire le panneau d’interprétation et voir combien d’espèces différentes vous pouvez voir ! LE SAVIEZ-VOUS :  La vie d’une forêt boréale s’appuie effectivement sur la perturbation causée par les incendies de forêt. Le feu est important pour les communautés végétales d’un certain nombre de façons différentes. Plusieurs arbres tels que le pin gris et le pin tordu latifolié ont besoin de la chaleur d’un incendie pour libérer leurs graines. Le feu crée également des conditions idéales pour le développement de nouveaux arbres parce qu’il aide à libérer des éléments nutritifs dans le sol et à se débarrasser des plantes concurrentes. 17


SPONSORS DE CE GUIDE / SPONSORS OF THIS GUIDE Cette publication est rendue possible par la participation des enterprises et organizations locales. Veuillez montrer votre appréciation par leur donner votre soutien. This publication is made possible with the participation of local businesses and organizations. Show your appreciation by giving them your support.

MAISON

MACDONELL - WILLIAMSON HOUSE c.1817

Le café préféré des gens d’iciMC Tim Hortons et son mélange de café de première qualité Toujours frais fait, comme vous l’aimez.

TEMPORARILY CLOSED DUE TO COVID-19. VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE DETAILS FOR RE-OPENING. YOUR SUPPORT IS ALWAYS WELCOME! TEMPORAIREMENT FERMÉ EN RAISON DE COVID-19. CONSULTEZ NOTRE SITE INTERNET POUR PLUS DE DÉTAILS SUR LA RÉOUVERTURE. VOTRE SOUTIEN EST TOUJOURS LE BIENVENU! T E A RO O M / S A L O N D E T H É G E N E R A L S T O R E / M AGA S I N G É N É R A L EXHIBITS/EXPOSITIONS G RO U P H O U S E T O U R S / V I S I T E S D E G RO U P E S

Take Highway 417 east or 40 west to Exit#1 for Pointe Fortune. Direction : Prenez l’autoroute 417 est ou 40 ouest jusqu’à la sortie #1 pour Pointe Fortune.

613.676.2228

25 RUE DES OUTAOUAIS | CHUTE-À-BLONDEAU, ON

www.mwhouse.ca

HAWKESBURY ON: 418 MAIN ST. E. | 458 HWY 17 | 1000 MCGILL ST. 35 RUE MAPLE | GRENVILLE, QC 5630 HWY 34 | VANKLEEK HILL 1725 COUNTY RD 4 | L’ORIGNAL

Service 24/7 Towing Services

Natural skin care for your precious pack maikannature

maikannaturesoinscorporels

www.maikannature.com

18

Light & Medium Duty Flatbed Service Local & Long Distance Transport Services de remorquage Léger & semi-lourd Service de plateforme Transport local & longue distance

613-632-2337 Fax: 613-632-3363 leductowing@gmail.com @remorquageleductowing

3060 Hwy 34 Hawkesbury, ON K6A 2R2

Parcs Ontario | Voyageur

Profile for Willow Publishing

Voyageur Guide 2021 Guide d'information  

Voyageur Provincial Park / Parc Provincial Voyageur

Voyageur Guide 2021 Guide d'information  

Voyageur Provincial Park / Parc Provincial Voyageur

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded