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N E W! Check-In Process PAG E 2

BONNECHERE

2021 INFORMATION GUIDE

PARK INFORMATION

EMERGENCY INFORMATION

Park Office...................................................................... 613-757-2103

Fire, Police and Ambulance............................................................... 911

4024 Round Lake Road, Killaloe, ON K0J 2A0

Ontario Provincial Police................................................1-888-310-1122

Reservations........................................... ontarioparks.com/reservations

Telehealth Ontario......................................................... 1-866-797-0000

........................................................1-888-ONT-PARK (1-888-668-7275)

Hospitals Barry’s Bay, 7 St Francis Memorial Drive........................... 613-756-3044 Pembroke, 705 MacKay Street.......................................... 613-732-2811 Poison Control................................................................1-800-268-9017

@BonnecherePP


Superintendent’s Message On behalf of the staff at Bonnechere Provincial Park, it is our pleasure to welcome you to a new season at our beautiful campground. While still mid-pandemic, we hope you experience peace, comfort and relaxation along the river, at the beach, on the trails and around the campfire.  Our friendly and accommodating staff are committed to ensuring that all park visitors have a safe and enjoyable experience. We’re counting on everyone to do their part to stop the spread of COVID-19. Nothing is more important than the health and wellbeing of all of our visitors.  From our park family to yours, we wish you a safe, healthy and memorable season outdoors!  Kelly Draves, Acting Park Superintendent

Camper Information Reservations

To make a reservation at Bonnechere Provincial Park or any other provincial park, call 1-888-668-7275 or visit www.ontarioparks.com. Reservations can be made 5 months in advance to your arrival date.

NEW! P  ermitless Camping & Check-In Process

For The 2021 Season At Bonnechere

To reduce wait times and traffic at the park office we have made changes to our check in process. Campers must have a digital or paper copy of their confirmation while staying in the park. A printed permit is not required on campsite posts or on vehicle dashboards. Upon arrival, campers may now proceed directly to their campsite. To check-in, please call 1-613-757-0039 during office hours to verify arrival, campsite occupant names, and licence plate information. If arriving after office hours, please proceed to your site and call the check-in line the following morning. Additional vehicles and day use vehicles must still obtain a permit in person from the park office for their vehicle dashboard.

Important Campsite Information

You must vacate your campsite by 2:00 pm sharp on your date of departure. Check in time is 2:00 pm for the next campers to your campsite. There is a limited time for park staff to clean campsites prior to the next arrival; please be prompt and on time in vacating your campsite. Campers leaving the park may remain in the park for day use until 10:00 pm or any other Ontario Park until posted hours of closing.

Disposing Waste Water

All black waste water in holding tanks is to be held and disposed of at the trailer dump station. Grey water such as dish water, can be disposed of at the trailer dump station or in the vault privies. Please do not dump your grey water on or around your site because it can pose health, environmental and aesthetic problems.

Garbage / Recycling / Organics

PLEASE SORT YOUR WASTE AND RECYCLING! Please deposit all campsite waste, recycling and compost at the waste management area that is located off the main park road. Do not use the garbage cans at the beach for campsite waste. Refer to the list of waste, recyclables and organics in this information guide or on your campsite post. Waste should be disposed of on a daily basis to avoid any unwanted visits from wildlife. All firewood bags are to be disposed of in the garbage as they are not recyclable. Please do not leave them on your campsite post.

Smoke Free Outdoor Spaces

The park now has designated smoke free areas. These include the day use area and beach, the area around the comfort stations, the park office and the park trail.

Laundry Machines

Coin operated washers and dryers are available for use at the main comfort station. Change is available at the park store. Wash - $2.00 Dry - $2.00. Loonies Only.

Seasonal Daily Vehicle Permits

Seasonal and annual permits have always offered the best value for frequent users to Ontario Parks. The pass allows unlimited day-use of all Ontario Parks. Please note that seasonal and annual permits do not guarantee park entry at parks with limited capacities. Valid dates for 2020 and 2021 seasonal permits have been extended, as outlined below: Original

*NEW*

2020 Annual Permit

Valid until December 31, 2020

Valid until December 31, 2021

2021 Annual Permit

Valid until December 31, 2021

Valid until December 31, 2022

2021 Summer Permit

Valid between April 1- November 30, 2021

Valid between April 1 - November 30, 2021 and April 1 November 30, 2022

Radio Free Area

Visitors to Bonnechere Provincial Park can enjoy a radio free zone. Campsites consisting of site numbers 201 – 215 are radio free. No operation of radios or other devices that amplify sound are allowed. The use of these devices with personal headphones is permitted.

Customer Comments

We like to hear from you! Please visit www.ontarioparks.com/contact to leave us your comments. If it’s an issue that needs immediate attention, please visit the park office.

AED (Automated External Defibrillator) There are 3 AED’s located within Bonnechere Park. If you have an emergency, the locations are as follows: #1

Park Office (available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week) Located on the outside of the building, to the right of the front door.

#2 Park Store (available during store hours)  Located inside the Davenport Centre foyer, to the left of the double door entrance.

#3

Park Office (available during office hours) Located inside the Park Office, at the back-exit door.

Camper Messages

Park Staff will endeavor to ensure messages received at the park office will be delivered to your campsite at our earliest convenience; however, we make no time guarantee.

O U R

C O V E R

Top photo: Kelly Draves Bottom left photo: Ann Chevrier Bottom right photo: Tim Courtney

M.N.R.F. #52077 (6.5 K. P.R., 07 02 28) ISSN 1916-4335 ISBN 978-1-4868-5193-5 (Print) © 2021 Government of Ontario Printed in Ontario, Canada


Pets

Visitors with pets have many responsibilities. • Pets must remain on a leash at all times and be no longer than 2 meters in length. • Pick up after your pet.

2021 Fees

Bonnechere Provincial Park May 21, 2021 - October 12, 2021

Fees based on information available at the time of printing. HST included in prices. *Reduced rates for Ontario Senior over 65 & Ontario Persons with Disabilities

CAMPGROUND Tall Pines, River Loop, Sandy Flats

• Ensure they do not cause excessive noise or disturb others or wildlife.

Basic $43.79/night • River $47.46/night Electrical $49.44/night • High Demand Campsites $52.55/night

• Pets are not allowed anywhere on the beach. This includes the sand and inside or outside the buoy line.

ROOFED ACCOMMODATIONS

• Pets wanting to take a swim can do so at the boat launch area. • Please refer to the park map on the back. The grey shaded areas indicate where pets are not allowed.

Extension Cords

30 AMP and 15 AMP extension cords are available for rent from the Park Office for a fee of $5.00 per night. A $100.00 deposit is required.

Main Comfort Station Cleaning Times

Rustic Cabins

$115.83/night** $766.71/week*

Pine Shores Cottage

$214.70/night** $1497.25/week*

Maximum of one family or 4 adults

Maximum of one family or 6 adults

** 1 week minimum during peak season ** 2 night minimum during non-peak season Peak Season: June 26, 2021 - September 4, 2021

ADDITIONAL VEHICLE

Firewood Warning

The main comfort station will be closed each day from 10:30 am to 12:00 pm and again at 5:00 pm to 6:30 pm so staff can complete a thorough clean and disinfection. During these closure times, you can use the flush toilets located at mini comfort station in the Sandy Flats campground or the vault toilets located throughout the park.

Bringing firewood when you travel to or from your favourite provincial park may seem harmless but can spread invasive species such as insects, plants and diseases.

Additional Vehicles

Many of these species are hidden in the wood and are difficult to detect.

All additional vehicles in the park must possess a valid permit. Only one vehicle is allowed to be parked on a campsite. All other vehicles must park in the additional vehicle parking lots located throughout the park or in the day use parking lot.

ALL WASTE MUST BE DEPOSITED AT THE WASTE MANAGEMENT AREA

RECYCLING Containers can be mixed together but must remain separate from paper. - Aerosol cans (empty) - Aluminum plates - Cardboard cans (frozen juice, peanuts, hot chocolate) - Cartons (milk, juice, cream) - Clam Shells (plastic produce & baker containers) - Egg cartons (plastic) - Glass bottles & jars (non-refundable) - Juice boxes - Plastic bottles, jugs, tubs & lids - Pop/juice cans - Steel cans - Yogurt/pudding/applesauce cups

GARBAGE

- Plastic bags: bread, produce, outside milk bag, grocery - Styrofoam, candles, ceramics -Candy bar wrappers, cereal/cracker box liner, chip bags, cigarette butts -Cookie bags. crayons, dishes -Diapers/Wipes, disposable mop sheets - Dog/cat food bags, plastic wrap, rope - Feminine hygiene products - Firewood bags - Foil (pouches/packets), toys, straws - Food packaging (deli meat, hot dog, wrappers, etc.), pet waste. Plastic cutlery, sandwich bags, rags & unusable clothing

Ontario Parks I Bonnechere

PAPER/CARDBOARD RECYCLING Paper can be mixed together but must remain separate from containers. - Books - Boxboard (cereal, tissue) - Brown paper bags - Catalogues and magazines - Corrugated cardboard - Envelopes - Frozen food boxed - Greeting cards - Junk mail - Newspaper & flyers (including glossy) - Paper (coloured & white) - Paper towel rolls (empty) - Toilet paper rolls (empty) - Tissue paper - Wrapper paper (non-metallic)

ORGANICS

- Fruits, vegetable scraps - Meat, shellfish, fish products - Pasta, bread, cereal - Dairy products, egg shells - Coffee grounds, filters, tea bags - Tissues, napkins, soiled paper towels (used without cleaning products) - Candies, cookies, cake - Baking ingredients, spices - Plants including soil

$14.13/night

Millions of trees have already been infected. Help us reduce the spread by; • Leaving firewood at home • Purchasing kiln-dried firewood where available • Buying local If you move firewood out of an area regulated for a quarantined pest without prior approval from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) you could face penalties of up to $50,000 and/or prosecution. For more information on firewood movement restrictions and the latest updates about emerald ash borer and other regulated pests, please visit www.inspection.gc.ca or contact the CFIA at 1-800-442-2342.

The Ontario Parks Turtle Protection Project Did you know all eight of Ontario’s turtle species are now at risk? Visit the park store to purchase your turtle merchandise. Proceeds from your purchase of this collection will help fund our Turtle Protection Project. For more information on this project, please visit OntarioParks.com/donate 3


CAMPERS AND DAY-VISITORS! Please help us keep parks clean and dispose of all garbage correctly. Garbage can result in human-wildlife conflict and become a hazard to park visitors. Blacklegged Tick Ixodes scapularis on a blade of grass. These Blacklegged Ticks Ixodes scapularis, are found on a wide range of hosts including mammals, birds and reptiles. Blacklegged Ticks Ixodes scapularis are known to transmit Lyme disease Borrelia burgdorferi, to humans and animals during feeding, when they insert their mouth parts into the skin of a host, and slowly take in the nutrient-rich host blood. Photo by: Jim Gathany, CDC

Ticks and Lyme Disease Do ticks and Lyme disease make you wary of going outdoors this summer? By being aware of ticks and understanding the role they play in spreading Lyme disease you are taking the first step to protect yourself and your loved ones.

We suggest bringing a garbage bag with you to collect your trash and dispose of it at park designated garbage and recycling areas before heading home. We appreciate and encourage park-lovers who are committed to protecting our environment for the future.

There are many different species of ticks and not all of them carry Lyme disease. The most common tick you may encounter is the American Dog Tick, which does not carry Lyme disease. The only tick that carries Lyme disease in Ontario is the Blacklegged (Deer) Tick, Ixodes Scapularis. Both ticks can be found in wooded areas or tall grass habitats. Public Health Ontario’s “Ontario Lyme Disease Estimated Risk Areas map”) shows areas in Ontario where they estimate you are more likely to find blacklegged ticks. (Blacklegged ticks are known to feed on migratory birds and deer and as a result, they can be transported throughout the province. Therefore, while the potential is lower, it is possible for people to encounter Blacklegged ticks, or to be infected with Lyme disease from the bite of an infected Blacklegged tick, almost anywhere in the province. Ticks are most active in spring and summer, but can be found at any time of the year when the temperature is above freezing. Ticks feed slowly, and an infected tick must feed on a person for at least 24 hours in order to infect them with the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. Because of this delay, prompt detection and removal of ticks is one of the key methods of preventing Lyme disease. If you become infected from a tick bite, symptoms usually begin within 1 - 2 weeks, but can take as long as one month to begin. The “classic” symptom is a bullseye rash that can develop anywhere on the body; however, this rash may not occur in all cases. Early symptoms of Lyme disease can include flu-like symptoms such as fever, headaches, stiff neck, jaw pain, and sore muscles. If untreated, problems with the heart, nervous system, and joints can occur months or years later. Lyme disease is easily treated in the early stages so seek medical attention if you feel unwell. When you are out in tick habitat you can better protect yourself by taking a few precautions: 1. Wear long sleeves and tuck your pants into your socks. 2. Wear light coloured clothing so you can detect ticks before they attach. 3. Use insect repellent containing “Deet” (please follow manufacturer’s directions). Apply it to your skin and outer clothing. 4. Conduct a tick check. Look on your clothes, body, children and pets. Pay close attention to your groin, scalp and armpits. 5. If you find a tick on your body, properly remove it and place it in a container. Contact your local health unit to inquire about having the tick sent for identification and testing. This test may take several months and is not diagnostic. Additionally, you may contact your family doctor for questions on Lyme disease. By following these simple suggestions, you can have a safe and enjoyable time exploring Bonnechere Provincial Park. For more information please consult the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care’s website: https://www.ontario.ca/page/lyme-disease Public Health Ontario Risk Map: https://www.publichealthontario.ca/-/media/ documents/l/2020/lyme-disease-risk-area-map-2020.pdf

FOUND A TICK?

DO • Use fine point tweezers • Grasp the tick as close to your skin as possible • Gently pull the tick straight out • Disinfect the bite area with rubbing alcohol or soap and water • Save tick (alive if possible) in a jar, with a piece of damp paper towel for identification and potential testing. Park staff can provide contact information for the local

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Health Unit, or alternatively you can take the tick to your family doctor for testing. • Watch for symptoms and seek medical attention if you feel unwell or if you cannot safely remove the tick. DON’T • Grasp around bloated belly and squeeze the tick • Use a match, heat or chemicals to try and remove it • Twist the tick when pulling it out

Photo by Amanda Phanenhour

Discourage uninvited guests

Bears are attracted to anything that looks or smells like food. Items like unwashed utensils, food packaging, toiletries and trash are tasty treats for bears. Be BEAR WISE when camping: • Don’t leave food or scented items unattended on your campsite • Pack and store these items in your vehicle, out of sight, with windows closed • Clean food preparation areas promptly after use • Routinely take your garbage to the park’s waste depot

Let's all be Bear Wise Always call 911 in an emergency Call 1-866-514-2327 to report a sighting ontario.ca/bearwise

Ontario Parks I Bonnechere


FEATHERED FRIENDS OF THE PARK B

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American Woodcock

Goldfinch

Red Tailed Hawk

Bald Eagle

Grackle

Red Winged Blackbird Ring billed gull

Barred Owl

Great Blue Heron

Belted Kingfisher

Green Heron

Robin

Bittern

House Wren

Ruffed grouse

Black Capped Chickadee

Kestrel

Sandhill crane

Blue Jay

Killdeer

Sparrow

Bufflehead

Mallard

Tanager

Canada Goose

Merganser

Turkey vulture

Canada Jay

Mourning Dove

Veery

Cardinal

Nuthatch

Vireo

Common Loon

Osprey

Warbler

Crow

Phoebe

Waxwing

Downy Woodpecker

Pine Grosbeak

Wood duck

Falcon

Rail

THERE ARE 2 SPECIES OF BIRDS STILL HIDING IN THERE! COLLECT THE LEFT OVER LETTERS TO FIND THEM! 1. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Hint #1: These woodpeckers leave a distinctive grid pattern of holes in the trees they visit! 2. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _ Hint #2: You might not be able to see these birds but you can often hear them at night singing their name over and over and over and over and over…..

Borrow Fishing BorrowEquipment Fishing Equipment for FREE for FREE

Borrow Fishing Equipment for FREE Borrow Fishing Equipment for FREE

Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker. Photo by Andrea Coulter

Wondering what to do with your empty propane cylinder? Ontario Parks strongly encourages visitors to use refillable propane cylinders and to reuse them as many times as safe to do so. This helps to keep our parks litter-free and reduce waste! Single use (non-refillable) propane cylinders should be deposited in Orange Drop collection cages found in many provincial parks. Single use cylinders may also be brought to an Orange Drop collection site. Visit www.makethedrop.ca and search by postal code to find out where to drop-off your cylinders and other household hazardous waste. Safely disposing of your propane cylinders ensures that any remaining gases will be captured and the metal, valves and other elements will be recovered and reused. Orange Drop is responsible for managing household hazardous waste such as propane cylinders, single-use batteries, empty oil containers and other products that require special care for recycling or safe disposal. Because of risks to people and the environment: •

For a complete list of 140 loaner sites, dates and locations for

For a complete list of 140 loaner dates and locations for for Travelling For a complete For list of a complete 140 loaner list sites, ofsites, 140 dates loaner and sites, locations dates and locations for Travelling Tackleshare events please visit: tackleshare.com Tackleshare events please visit: tackleshare.com Travelling Tackleshare Travelling events Tackleshare please visit: events tackleshare.com please visit: tackleshare.com Brought to you by:

Brought to you by:

iNaturalist

Brought to you by:

• •

 on’t discharge leftover propane into the atmosphere, D even if the cylinder comes with a device to do this. Don’t deposit any propane cylinders into your blue box. Don’t put cylinders in the garbage.

When it comes to the environment, we all have a responsibility!

Know what kind of wildlife has been seen in your park. Share what you’ve seen with others. DownloaD the app to your mobile device or use your computer. More than 190,000 sightings in our parks Nearly 7,000 species

inaturalist.ca/projects/ontario-parks

iNaturalist Canada is run by the Canadian Wildlife Federation, the Royal Ontario Museum, and iNaturalist.org at the California Academy of Sciences.

Ontario Parks I Bonnechere

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ABOUT THE

FRIENDS

The Friends of Bonnechere Parks (FBP) acknowledges that Bonnechere Provincial Park is located on unceded territory of the Algonquin Anishinaabe Nation. We’re honoured to celebrate the history, heritage and culture of the original Indigenous caretakers of this land. The FBP was established in 1992 to preserve and protect the natural and cultural heritage of the Little Bonnechere River, which flows from Algonquin Park east to Round Lake. Our primary goal is to promote awareness of the area’s natural and cultural heritage through educational programming and infrastructure development towards building healthy community. Working in partnership with Ontario Parks, our volunteer organization supports various initiatives including: • active outdoor play opportunities for children • experiential activities for people of all ages and abilities • accessible outdoor spaces and features • Footprints in Time enhanced trails • conservation awareness programs to help save Ontario turtles and birds • cultural heritage activities such as Archaeology Day and Spirits Night • natural heritage events including the ever-popular Wolf Howl • Winter Magic in partnership with the Killaloe Community Resource Centre

Walks of the Little Bonnechere River – Popular Hiking Guide Republished Originally published almost two decades ago, this highly popular self-guided hiking booklet has been reprinted and is once again available for purchase at the bookstores in both Bonnechere and Algonquin Provincial Parks. Walks of the Little Bonnechere River is a selfguided tour book featuring ten hikes along one of the Ottawa Valley’s historic waterways. Historian Roderick MacKay and ecologist Mark Stabb bring to life the cultural and natural features of each site to tell the story of the people and places which make this area unique. Popular hikes include the Footprints in Time Trail at Bonnechere Park, and at various stops as one travels northwest along Turners/Basin Road into Algonquin Park. Visit an original stopping place at the Lafleur Homestead, or climb to the top of Egg Rock for a scenic view of Stringers Lake. For a more challenging excursion, hike the Old Tote Road in to High Falls, the former site of an historic log dam and timber chute. It’s a great way to learn more about the story of Canadian settlement while walking your way towards a healthier lifestyle. Detailed trail information is provided for each hike, including Rating, Type, Distance, Highlights and Surface. To help hikers find

the various trailheads, the booklet also includes the Start/ Finish and UTM coordinates for each trail. As well, watch for the trailhead signs, located off White Mountain Chute Trail and Turners Road/Basin Road (formerly the Old Bonnechere Road), northwest of County Road 58 at Bonnechere, Ontario. Walks of the Little Bonnechere River was developed by the Friends of Bonnechere Parks in cooperation with the Ottawa Valley Tourist Association and The Friends of Algonquin Park. We gratefully acknowledge the staff of Bonnechere Provincial Park, who manage and maintain these trails for the enjoyment of all. The sum of the whole is this: walk and be happy, walk and be healthy. The best way to lengthen our days is to walk steadily and with a purpose. ~ Charles Dickens

We are passionate about promoting Bonnechere Park as a community hub and make every effort to engage visitors, residents, volunteers, partners and community leaders. We invite you to learn how you can get more involved. Please contact us through our website or ask a volunteer for more information: look for Jane Duff the FBP Park Ambassador on a campsite near you this summer. You can also support the Friends with the purchase of our branded merchandise available at the Park Store. Enjoy your visit, and be sure to come back soon! Our Nature | Our Culture bonnecherepark.on.ca

Photos (clockwise from upper left): Popular trails published in Walks of the Little Bonnechere River include the Footprints in Time Trail at Bonnechere Park, Lafleur Homestead, Egg Rock and High Falls. 6

Ontario Parks I Bonnechere


Recalling the Former Forest The closer one gets to the headwaters of the Bonnechere the harder it is to believe that this modest creek transported the giant pines of the past. These white and red pines, which were often more than 300 years old, up to 40 m tall and 120 cm in diameter, had to have survived repeated ground fires but likely got their start following a conflagration hundreds of years earlier. Try to identify the pine trees amidst the cedar, spruce and hardwoods springing up around the clearing. White pine has five long, soft needles in a bundle, while red pine needles are stiffer, stouter and come two to the bundle. White pine has grayish barks, while older red pine trees develop the characteristic reddish bark. Since loggers harvested the biggest and best trees for decades, you will note that older trees are rare here so it’s good to know that the Little Bonnechere River now flows through protected parklands designed to ensure that some of the oldest pine specimens survive for future generations.

Farm or Village?

Everyone loves a good mystery and McIntyre’s Clearing certainly provides one. In the 1870s several lumber companies established a cluster of operations buildings in this area.

Map

Almost a century later, while researching Spirits of the Little Bonnechere, author Rory MacKay recorded memories of what came to be known as ‘the Village’ but none of the surviving settlement children could remember its exact location. The 1889 survey indicates that William McIntyre’s family had cleared ten acres, cut the marsh grasses (beaver hay) for their cattle and sheep and ran a successful stopping place on this site. In 1892 when the black diphtheria epidemic struck the McIntyre family, uncle Dennis McGuey made a daily 10-km journey upriver to care for the family and do the chores. Though the log house and outbuildings are long gone, ruins of the root cellar still exist while evidence of the stables is little more than a collection of uniform square mounds scattered across the clearing. It may be that evidence of the long lost village is buried here as well or is it elsewhere along the Little Bonnechere? Either way it’s a mystery still waiting to be solved. So while you stand on the shores of the McIntyre clearing looking across the tree lined ridges of the Little Bonnechere River valley ask yourself this question: Am I looking for the Village or am I looking from the Village?

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McIntyre’s Clearing RATING: Easy (wear long pants) TYPE: In and out DISTANCE: 1.2 km TIME: 1 hour START/FINISH: 44.5 km from Cty Rd 58 (western terminus of Basin Road). Follow trail markers to parking and trailhead. HIGHLIGHTS: • Site of remote pioneer homestead: • beautiful of pine covered hills • river/marsh habitat SURFACE: Roadway; natural forest floor; open field UTM: 18T 268110 E 5074250 N

JOIN THE FRIENDS! As a charitable organization, the FBP benefit a great deal from the volunteer efforts of a dedicated group of families, friends and campers who look upon Bonnechere Park as a special place. Our mandate is to support, protect and promote the natural and cultural resources of the Little Bonnechere watershed. We invite you to become a part of our group, help out with a special event, or ask about joining our Board of Directors.

• Voting rights at FBP Annual General Meeting • Notice of upcoming special events and education opportunities • Insight into how you can help protect the Bonnechere’s natural and cultural heritage

FBP Membership Benefits

FBP Membership forms can be picked up at the Bonnechere Park Gate Office, the Davenport Centre or downloaded from our website: www.bonnecherepark.on.ca

• Opportunity to join FBP Board of Directors Ontario Parks I Bonnechere

FBP Membership Categories Individual: $10 | Family: $15

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Algonquins of Ontario Treaty Negotiations Update Since the early 1990s, treaty negotiations have been underway to resolve the Algonquins of Ontario Aboriginal rights and title claim. The claim is based on the Algonquin assertion that they have Aboriginal rights and title to the Ontario portions of the Ottawa and Mattawa River watersheds that have never been extinguished. The Province of Ontario, Canada and the Algonquins of Ontario continue to work together as negotiation partners, attempting to achieve the province’s first modern treaty. Ontario Parks is actively involved with the Ontario negotiation team working to support the treaty making process. Once a final treaty is reached, implementation will take place over a period of time. Bonnechere Provincial Park is one of 13 operating Ontario provincial parks within the 36,000 square kilometre settlement area that is subject to the treaty negotiations. All 13 parks continue to be available for the enjoyment of all users. The treaty will include a chapter that will address matters such as Algonquin cultural recognition within the territory’s parks and protected areas, Algonquin involvement in park planning, the potential for an Algonquin stewardship program, and provisions to support Algonquin economic opportunities and training related to parks and protected areas. The negotiating parties have agreed that ecological integrity will be the first priority in the management of parks and protected areas in the settlement area. A significant expansion of the protected area system in eastern Ontario is being recommended as part of the treaty negotiations. This includes recommendations for an expansion of Lake St. Peter Provincial Park in Hastings County and the creation of a new provincial park in the area of Crotch Lake in Frontenac County. Public consultations on these proposals are expected to take place later in 2020. The treaty negotiation process is an important example of how Ontario is taking action to build better relationships with Indigenous communities. To learn more about the Algonquins of Ontario treaty negotiations, please visit the Ontario Ministry of Indigenous Affairs website at: ontario.ca/algonquinlandclaim or the Algonquins of Ontario website at: tanakiwin.com. You may also contact the Ontario negotiation team by calling 613-732-8081, toll-free at 1-855-690-7070, or e-mailing alcinfo@ontario.ca.

History Lives Here Ontario’s first modern treaty is being negotiated right here

Mattawa

North Bay

Deep River

Algonquins of Ontario Settlement Area Boundary

Petawawa

Provincial Park

Pembroke

Hawkesbury

South River

Rockland Pikwàkanagàn

Whitney

Renfrew

Barrys Bay

Haliburton

Cornwall

Smiths Falls

Bancroft

Prescott

Sharbot Lake

Brockville

Kaladar

Orillia

Casselman

Carleton Place

Huntsville

Bracebridge

Ottawa

Arnprior

Madoc 50

Napanee

0

Kingston

50 km

Ontario Parks Beach Posting Fact Sheet

Recreational water quality is routinely monitored at Ontario Parks designated beaches. Samples are tested at Public Health Ontario Laboratories for Escherichia coli (E.coli), an organism found in the intestines of warm-blooded animals.

Water Quality Factors

Recreational water quality is influenced by a number of factors, and can change between sampling periods. Influences include: • Heavy rainfall • Large numbers of water fowl • High winds or wave activity • Large number of swimmers

Beach Posting

Ontario Parks staff post signage at beaches (example at right) when E.coli levels in the water exceed provincial standards. Signage is placed to warn bathers that the beach water may be unsafe for swimming. Swimming in beaches that are posted for elevated bacterial levels may cause: • Skin infections/rash • Ear, eye, nose and throat infections • Gastrointestinal illness (if water is consumed) Beach postings are based on E.coli counts in beach water samples taken within the past 24 hours, and are removed when test results show bacterial levels are acceptable. Beach water quality can change at any time and guests should avoid swimming during and after storms, floods, heavy rainfall, or in the presence of large numbers of waterfowl.

How you can help

Ontario Parks guests can help maintain our beach water quality by following these simple guidelines: • Do not feed birds or other wildlife • Leave nothing behind- dispose of all garbage/food waste • Use designated pet beaches when swimming with your dog – pets are not permitted in Ontario Parks public beaches • Do not let children swim in soiled diapers • Do not use shampoos or soaps in lake water

Water Safety – It’s Your Responsibility

1. There are no lifeguards on our beaches. Water safety is your responsibility at all times. 2. Take the steps to be safe around water. Learning how to swim and water survival techniques help keep us all safe. 3. Always supervise children and non-swimmers by watching them when they are in or around the water. 4. Ensure children and non-swimmers wear a Personal Flotation Device (PFD) in or around the water. 5. Swim in only designated swimming areas. When the water is rough, or conditions are not clear – STAY OUT! Never swim alone. You should always swim with a buddy. 6. Using a floatie? Offshore winds often blow inflatables out into dangerous waters. Ensure inflatable rafts or toys are used in shallow water areas only and pay attention to changing wind conditions. 7. Be responsible. Avoid substance use when involved in water-related recreational activities. 8. Protect your neck. Never dive into shallow or murky water. 9. If you suspect a drowning or any other type of water emergency, call 911 and contact the park office immediately. ­

Bonnechere Provincial Park

is one of 13 operating Ontario Provincial Parks within the 36,000 square kilometre area that is subject to treaty negotiations involving Ontario, Canada and the Algonquins of Ontario. All 13 parks will continue to be available for public enjoyment. Learn more about the treaty making process at ontario.ca/algonquinlandclaim

Photo by Kelly Draves 8

Ontario Parks I Bonnechere


Summary of Provincial Park Offences There is one basic rule in Ontario Parks: Have respect and consideration for your fellow visitors and the park environment. The following table lists some of the more common laws enforced in provincial parks. Under the Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves Act, 2006, the registered permit holder is responsible for the conduct of all campsite occupants and could be charged with an offence based on the actions of the occupants of the registered campsite. The Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves Act, 2006 and other legislation governing behaviour in provincial parks can be reviewed at provincial park offices and on the e-Laws website at www.ontario.ca/laws. These laws are enforced by provincial park wardens who have all the power and authority of a member of the Ontario Provincial Police within a provincial park. Many of the listed offences could result in eviction from a provincial park. Evicted visitors are prohibited from re-entering any provincial park for a period of 72 hours. Minimum fines listed below do not include court costs or victim fine surcharge. Offence Alcoholic Beverages • • • • • •

Having liquor in open container in other than residence (campsite) Consuming liquor in other than residence Driving or having care or control of a motor vehicle with open or unsealed container of liquor Person under 19 years having liquor Being intoxicated in a public place Unlawfully have liquor in listed park (during liquor ban)

Min. Fine $ 100.00 $ 100.00

If you are 19 years of age or older, you are permitted to possess or consume liquor (beer, wine, spirits) only on a registered campsite.

$ 175.00 $ 100.00 $ 50.00 $ 100.00

Drivers are responsible for ensuring that liquor is properly stored while in a vehicle. Liquor must be in a container that is unopened and the seal unbroken or is packed away and not accessible to any person in the vehicle. Many parks enforce a complete liquor ban on Victoria Day and for the preceding ten days. A liquor ban is also in effect at Sibbald Point Provincial Park on Labour Day and for the preceding four days. During these time frames, possession of liquor is prohibited everywhere within parks imposing the liquor ban.

Rowdyism / Noise • • • •

Use discriminatory, harassing, abusive or insulting language or gestures Make excessive noise Disturb other persons Operate audio device in prohibited area

Storing Wildlife Attractants •

Unlawfully store wildlife attractants

$ 150.00 $ 150.00 $ 150.00 $ 75.00 $ 125.00

Refuse • • •

Litter or cause litter Fail to keep campsite / facility clean Fail to restore campsite / facility to original condition

Vehicles • • • •

Unlawfully take motor vehicle into park or possess or operate it Speeding –more than 20 km/hr Operate vehicle off roadway Disobey stop sign

Explanation

Provincial parks are established to provide a setting for peaceful and natural experiences. Rowdy behaviour, which includes excessive noise, or obscene language or gestures, is not permitted. You cannot disturb any other person or interfere with their enjoyment of the park any time of the day or night. Operation of an audio device (such as a radio, stereo, TV, etc.) in a radio-free area is prohibited. Do not maintain or store potential wildlife attractants, including food or beverages, food preparation or storage equipment, cooking devices or utensils, garbage or recycling products, scented products or any other item in a manner that is likely to attract wildlife.

$125.00

Deposit all garbage and litter in the containers provided to discourage wildlife from becoming pests. Campsites and/or facilities must be kept clean at all times to eliminate potential hazards to parks visitors and minimize human-wildlife conflict.

$ 125.00

Off-road vehicles are not permitted in provincial parks because of the environmental damage they cause.

$ 100.00 $ 125.00 $ 85.00

Licenced motor vehicles may be operated on roads only. You must follow the rules of the road and remember that the Highway Traffic Act applies on all park roads. Each vehicle in the park must have a valid provincial park permit. Bicycles are only allowed on park roads and on designated bike trails.

(plus 3 demerit points)

Parking • • •

Park vehicle in area not designated Park vehicle in prohibited area Fail to display permit on parked vehicle

$ 30.00

All vehicles must park in a designated area and display a valid park permit. You must prominently display your valid park permit on your dashboard.

$ 75.00

For the protection of wildlife and other park visitors, your pet must be under control and on a leash not exceeding 2 metres at all times. You must ensure your pet does not damage or interfere with vegetation or wildlife. You must also ensure your pet does not interfere with others’ enjoyment of the park. Pets are not permitted in the swimming area, on the beach or in a posted prohibited area at any time.

Pets • • • • •

Permit domestic animal to be without leash Permit domestic animal to make excessive noise Permit domestic animal to be in designated swimming area or on a beach Permit domestic animal to disturb people Permit domestic animal to be in a posted prohibited area

Environmental Protection • • • • •

Damage / deface / remove Crown property Disturb / harm / remove natural object Disturb / cut / remove / harm plant or tree Kill plant or tree Disturb / kill / remove / harm / harass animal

$ 125.00 $ 125.00 $ 125.00 $ 150.00 $ 150.00

Camping Permit • • •

Fail to vacate and remove property from campsite on permit expiry Unlawfully occupy campsite Camp over time limit

$ 75.00 $ 125.00 $ 75.00

Camping Equipment / Persons • • •

Place more than 3 pieces of shelter equipment on campsite Place more than one tent trailer, travel trailer or selfpropelled camping unit on campsite Excessive number of persons occupying campground campsite / interior campsite

Campfires • •

Start or tend fire other than in fireplace or designated place Start or tend fire where notice of fire hazard is posted

Fireworks • •

Possess fireworks Ignite fireworks

Hours of Closing • •

Enter park after closing Remain in park after closing

$ 75.00

$ 150.00

To maintain the park as a natural setting, the removal of natural objects is prohibited. All vegetation, wildlife and natural features are protected in provincial parks. Cutting any live growth or damaging any natural or other object is prohibited. You may not take any fallen or dead wood from a provincial park for the purpose of a campfire or other such intent.

You are required to vacate and remove all property from your campground campsite or interior campsite by 2:00 p.m. on the date your permit expires so that others may have access to it. The maximum length of stay on a provincial park campground campsite is 23 consecutive nights and 16 consecutive nights on an interior campsite to ensure park visitors have an equal opportunity to enjoy our campsites and limit environmental impact. Without a limit on the amount of camping gear allowed, campsites would quickly deteriorate, becoming larger, eventually destroying the surrounding vegetation. The maximum number of campers allowed per campground campsite is six persons and the maximum number of campers allowed on an interior campsite is nine persons. Fireplaces are designated by park staff for safety reasons. Restricting fires to these locations greatly reduces the risk of forest fires. For the prevention of forest fires, a park superintendent may give notice of a fire hazard and implement a fire ban. At any time during a fire ban no person is permitted to have a fire unless otherwise stated by the park superintendent.

$ 100.00 $ 150.00

Possession or use of fireworks is prohibited in provincial parks at all times. They constitute a fire hazard and disturb visitors and wildlife who wish to enjoy the park in a peaceful manner.

$ 125.00

Only registered campers are allowed in a provincial park during the posted hours of closing.

Fines are subject to change. This is not a complete listing of offences; please refer to the specific legislation.

PARK STORE

Open 7 days a week until Labour Day 9 am – 9 pm

PARK OFFICE

Monday to Thursday • 9 am – 7 pm Friday to Sunday • 9 am – 8 pm Effective June 25 - September 5 *Hours subject to change without notice

Ontario Parks I Bonnechere

AVAILABLE AT PARK OFFICE 24 HOURS A DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK LOCATED OUTSIDE AT THE PARK OFFICE, TO THE RIGHT OF THE MAIN DOOR

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NOW AVAIL ABLE TO RENT - CORCL

Campground Rules

• No excessive noise, profanity, or insulting language at any time. • All trees (living or dead) and plants are protected.

• Alcoholic beverages are permitted on registered campsites only. • Campsite must be kept clean and sanitary at all times – littering is prohibited. • Fires must be set in firepits only – do not move the firepit. • One vehicle and 3 (three) pieces of shelter equipment per campsite.

• Maximum 6 (six) people per campsite. • Possession of fireworks (including sparklers) and firearms is prohibited.

HappyCamper 10

Copyright © Christine Briggs 2021. All rights reserved. http://colourinchristinebriggs.com

For more info on how to CORCL, scan this QR code!

• Pets must be leashed at all times and are not permitted in the day use area.

Ontario Parks I Bonnechere


LOCAL SERVICES This publication is made possible with the participation of local businesses and organizations. Show your appreciation by giving them your support.

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For community events, services, tourism and local business listings check out our Facebook page or our website www.killaloe-hagarty-richards.ca

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613-633-9118

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Don’t be disappointed RESERVE YOUR SITE NOW! 11

1-888-668-7275 | www. ontarioparks.com Ontario Parks I Bonnechere


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Ontario Parks I Bonnechere

Closed Trail

Email jpegs to: bonnecherepics@gmail.com

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PLEASE ASK PARK STORE STAFF IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN MULTIPLE DAYS.

SAFETY KITS ANDSTORE PADDLES MUST BE RETURNED TO THE STORE BY 9:00DAYS PM PLEASE ASK PARK STAFF IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN MULTIPLE

SAFETY KITS AND PADDLES MUST BE RETURNED TO THE STORE BY 9:00 PM

BOAT LAUNCH AREA BY 9:00 PM.

RENTALS MAY BEGIN AFTER 9:00 AM AND MUST BE RETURNED TO THE BOAT RENTALS MAY BEGINLAUNCH AFTER 9:00 AMBY AND MUST AREA 9:00 PM.BE RETURNED TO THE

SAFETY KIT & PADDLES ARE PROVIDED SAFETY KIT & PADDLES ARE PROVIDED

FOR LOAN THIS SEASON

LIFEJACKETS ARE AVAILABLE LIFEJACKETS NOTSEASON AVAILABLE FOR LOANARE THIS

FLAT RATE OF $35.00 EACH

FLAT RATE OF $35.00 EACH

CANOE // KAYAK CANOE KAYAK/ / PADDLEBOARD / PADDLEBOARD CORCL RENTALS RENTALS

Firewood bags are to be disposed of in the garbage.

Available at the park store

FIREWOOD – $10/BAG KINDLING – $7/BAG

Profile for Willow Publishing

Bonnechere 2021 Information Guide  

Bonnechere Provincial Park 2021 Information Guide

Bonnechere 2021 Information Guide  

Bonnechere Provincial Park 2021 Information Guide

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