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Bonnechere 2017 Information Guide

5 0 Bo t h nn a n ec n i he ve r r s e’s ar y

Win n er s of the Photo Contest

1st Place Francis Trudelle

2nd Place Wendy McRae

Park Information www.ontarioparks.com www.bonnecherepark.on.ca www.facebook.com/bonnecherepark @Bonnechere Park Office Address: Bonnechere Provincial Park 4024 Round Lake Road, RR5, Killaloe, ON K0J 2A0 Park Office......................................................... 613-757-2103 Reservations.................................................... 1-888-668-7275

Emergency Information In an emergency, contact park staff .............. 613-757-2103

Ambulance, Police, Fire ....................

911

3rd Place Christina Morrison Davis

Ontario Poison Centre..................................... 1-800-268-9017

Hospitals: Barry’s Bay ......................................................... 613-756-3044 Pembroke ........................................................... 613-732-2811

Send Us Your

Photos!

It’s your chance to be featured on the cover of our 2018 Information Guide Email jpgs to: bonnecherepics@gmail.com


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Bonnechere Provincial Park

Superintendent’s Message

RESERVATIONS

To make a reservation at Bonnechere Provincial Park or any other Provincial Park, call 1-888-668-7275 or visit www.ontarioparks.com. Reservations can be made 5 months in advance to your arrival date.

DISPOSING WASTE WATER

All black waste water (holding tanks) is to be held and disposed of at the trailer dumping station. Grey water (dish water, etc.) can be disposed of at the trailer dumping station or in the vault privies. Please do not dump your grey water on or around your site because it can pose health, environmental and aesthetic problems.

Garbage/Recycling/Organics

PLEASE SORT YOUR WASTE AND RECYCLING! Please deposit all campsite waste and recycling at the Waste Management Area (located off the main park road); not the garbage cans on the beach. If you don’t sort your waste, park staff have to manually remove all recycling from the waste. If you are not sure what goes where, you can refer to the list in the tabloid or on your campsite post. Waste should be disposed of on a daily basis to avoid any unwanted visits from wildlife. We are currently working towards offering organic composting at Bonnechere. Stay tuned for more details.

SMOKE FREE OUTDOOR SPACES

The park now has designated smoke free areas. These include the day use area and beach, the area around the comfort stations, the park office and the park trail. Please refer to staff or the park map for specific details. Jane Duff

Welcome to the Jewel of the Valley!! Bonnechere has a rich and enchanting history. 2017 is an incredibly momentous year…we are so happy you are here to help us celebrate! This year marks the 50th Anniversary of this wonderful park, and to make it even more special; the Friends of Bonnechere Parks celebrates its 25th! To commemorate the anniversaries, we have an exciting line up of events and activities between July 8 - 15 that is sure to have a little something for everyone…We also have many events planned for the rest of the summer…check inside and online for a full list. What’s new for this season you ask? There is a public washroom at the park office! The park store will be promoting healthy food choices AND you’ll find a water bottle filling station at the Davenport Centre, the park trail has been added to our Outdoor Smoke Free Spaces...and a few surprises… The Bonnechere Team is committed to providing exceptional customer service! It is our sincerest wish that you have an amazing experience while here and enjoy our hospitality. Truly yours, Jason Mask Park Superintendent

Ontario Parks Reservations 1-888-668-7275 (ONT-PARK) www.ontarioparks.com /ontarioparks /ontarioparks MNR #52143 ISSN 1916-4335 ISBN 978-1-4606-9233-2 (Print 2017 ed.) © 2017 Government of Ontario Printed in Canada

2017

LAUNDRY MACHINES

For your convenience, coin-operated washers and dryers are located at the Comfort Station. Change is available at the Park Office or Park Store. Wash - $2.00 Dry - $2.00 Loonies only.

SEASONAL PASSES

If you are a frequent user of Ontario Parks this might be the answer for you. You can purchase a Summer Day Use Pass at the Park Office that will allow you unlimited daily vehicle entry to all Ontario Parks from April 1 to November 30.

IMPORTANT CAMPSITE INFO

NON-RESERVABLE CAMPSITES. ALL park campsites are RESERVABLE. Once 85% of the campsites have been reserved the remaining 15% become non-reservable (aka First-Come-First-Serve sites). These non-reservable sites are non-specific and may change daily. Every Sunday at midnight, any of the remaining 15% non-reservable sites for the following 7 nights then become reservable, effectively making the park 100% reservable for those 7 nights to accommodate last minute reservations. RENEWING YOUR NON-RESERVABLE CAMPSITE Renewing/extending your stay on a non-reservable site CANNOT be guaranteed. It is possible that another customer could make a reservation for your site on your departure date. Please see park staff at the office to determine availability for extending your stay. We recommend checking with staff well in advance of your departure date if you are interested in extending your stay.

Saturday July 8, 2017 6:00 AM: Sunrise Ceremony 11:00 AM-3:00 PM: Opening Ceremonies beginning at the Davenport Centre 7:00 PM- 9:00 PM: Musical Entertainment Monday July 10, 2017 10:30 AM- 12:00 PM: Crafts and Letters for the Time Capsule at the Davenport Centre Tuesday July 11, 2017 10:30 AM- 2:00 PM: Guided Voyageur Canoe Tour of the Bonnechere River Wednesday July 12, 2017 7:00 PM- 9:00 PM: The History Buffs (Live and Interactive Concert) Thursday July 13, 2017 10:30 AM- 2:00 PM: Guided Voyageur Canoe Tour of the Bonnechere River 7:00 PM- 9:00 PM: Storytelling Campfire Friday July 14, 2017 11:00 AM: Kids Crafts 2:00 PM: Footprints in Time Hike Saturday July 15, 2017 11:00 AM- 2:00 PM: Closing Ceremony and Time Capsule burial. VACATING YOUR SITE The departure date indicated on your permit is the day your permit EXPIRES. You MUST vacate your campsite by 2:00 pm sharp that day unless you have made other arrangements and have validated a renewal/extension or new site. Our check-in/out times are the same time (2:00pm) There is limited time for park staff to clean campsites prior to the next arrival; please be prompt and on time in vacating your site. Campers leaving the park may visit any Ontario Park until 10:00 pm that day; just display your vehicle permit on your vehicle dashboard.

CAMPER MESSAGES

Park Staff will endeavour to ensure messages received at the Park Office will be delivered to your campsite at our earliest convenience; however, we make no time guarantee.

EXPECTING A FRIEND OR RELATIVE? Park staff are not allowed to give out any personal information gathered and kept after your registration. Revised legislation under the Freedom of Information and Privacy Prevention Act prevents the misuse or sharing of personal information which is gathered when you register to your campsite. If you have family or friends who are going be visiting, please inform them ahead of time of your campsite number so that they are able to locate you. Maximum 6 people per campsite.

The Bonnechere Book Tree In August 2014, Park, Friends of Bonnechere Parks and members of the Renfrew County Book Tree program celebrated the launch of the County’s sixth book tree. Made from the trunk of a massive white pine, estimated to be about a century old, Bonnechere’s Book Tree stands at the entrance to the Davenport Centre, overlooking the beach on Round Lake. The tree has several interesting components associated with it that make it truly emblematic of our connection with our natural and cultural heritage. It’s topped with an overturned Pointer Boat, which was built in 2002 by Pembroke resident Merril Burchart. It also highlights the importance of reading at all ages, and is a fantastic way to stimulate creativity and inspire the next generation. Across Renfrew County that Book Tree forest continues to grow and thrive while doing exactly what it was built to do – to provide barrier-free books in all communities. Park visitors and campers are invited to come by to leave a book, take a book, read a book. Then, sit under the tall pines and share a story.

Leave a Book, Take a Book, Read a Book


2017

Bonnechere Provincial Park

ALL WASTE MUST BE DEPOSITED AT THE WASTE MANAGEMENT AREA

RECYCLING Containers can be mixed together but must remain separate from paper. - Aerosol cans (empty) - Aluminum plates - Cardboard cans (frozen juice, peanuts, hot chocolate) - Cartons (milk, juice, cream) - Clam Shells (plastic produce & baker containers) - Egg cartons (plastic) - Glass bottles & jars (non-refundable) - Juice boxes - Plastic bottles, jugs, tubs & lids - Pop/juice cans - Firewood bags - Steel cans - Yogurt/pudding/applesauce cups

GARBAGE

- Plastic bags: bread, produce, outside milk bag, grocery - Styrofoam, candles, ceramics -Candy bar wrappers, cereal/cracker box liner, chip bags, cigarette butts -Cookie bags. crayons, dishes -Diapers/Wipes, disposable mop sheets -Dog/cat food bags, plastic wrap, rope -Feminine hygiene products - Foil (pouches/packets), toys, straws - Food packaging (deli meat, hot dog, wrappers, etc.), pet waste. Plastic cutlery, sandwich bags, rags & unusable clothing

PAPER/CARDBOARD RECYCLING Paper can be mixed together but must remain separate from containers. - Books - Boxboard (cereal, tissue) - Brown paper bags - Catalogues and magazines - Corrugated cardboard - Envelopes - Frozen food boxed - Greeting cards - Junk mail - Newspaper &flyers (including glossy) - Paper (coloured & white) - Paper towel rolls (empty) - Toilet paper rolls (empty) - Tissue paper - Wrapper paper (non-metallic)

ORGANICS

- Fruits, vegetable scraps - Meat, shellfish, fish products - Pasta, bread, cereal - Dairy products, egg shells - Coffee grounds, filters, tea bags - Tissues, napkins, soiled paper towels (used without cleaning products) - Candies, cookies, cake - Baking ingredients, spices - Plants including soil

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Wondering what to do with your empty propane cylinder? Her e’ s w h at to d o

H e r e ’ s w h at n ot to d o

Keep our parks beautiful, safe and litter-free! Because of risks to people and the environment: Single use (non-refillable) propane cylinders should be deposited in Orange • Don’t discharge leftover propane into Drop collection cages found in many the atmosphere, even if the cylinder Provincial Parks. Refillable tanks should comes with a device to do this. be refilled and reused as many times as • Don’t deposit any propane cylinders into it is safe to do so. your Blue Box. Single use cylinders may also be brought • Don’t put cylinders in the garbage. to an Orange Drop collection site. Visit When it comes to the environment, we all www.makethedrop.ca and search by postal have a responsibility! code to find out where to drop-off your cylinders and other household hazardous waste. Safely disposing of your propane cylinders ensures that any remaining gases will be captured and the metal, valves and other elements will be recovered and reused. Orange Drop is operated by Stewardship Ontario, the industry-funding organization responsible for managing household hazardous waste such as propane cylinders, paints, solvents, non-rechargeable batteries, and other products that require special care for recycling or safe disposal.

Take only memories, leave only footprints.

Pets in Provincial Parks July 21, 2017

FREE DAY-USE AT ALL PARKS OntarioParks.com/hphp #HPHP

Many visitors bring their pets to Ontario Parks. Visitors with pets have many responsibilities. Some of them include keeping their pet on a leash at all times, picking up after them, and ensuring they do not cause excessive noise or disturb others or wildlife. Signs mark where you cannot have your pets. There are places in the day use area that pets are permitted (refer to the map

on the back of the tabloid, the signs in the day use area, or ask park staff). Please note that pets are not allowed anywhere on the beach, this includes outside of the buoy line. If your pet wants to take a swim you can do this at the boat launch area. Please ask staff for further details. Enforcement staff at Bonnechere will be enforcing the rules regarding pets in the park.

Home Away From Home! Bears are not picky eaters Be BEAR WISE. Just like us, bears love hotdogs roasted over a campfire. But they will also chow down on candy wrappers, fish bait and toothpaste. Remember to clean your cooking equipment and secure food, garbage, and toiletries away from your tent. For more information on camping and bears, visit ontario.ca/bearwise.

Always call 911 in an emergency

Bonnechere Pine Shores Cottage

Call 1-866-514-2327 to report a sighting

ontario.ca/bearwise • 1-866-514-2327 • TTY 705-945-7641

Tired of roughing it? Are you ready to treat yourself to the comforts of home while enjoying a wonderful outdoor setting? If so Ontario Parks have the solution for you. We have accommodations that come equipped with everything you need to be comfortable. Dozens of Ontario Parks to choose from with options like yurts, rustic cabins, cottages and lodges. Check the Ontario Parks Guide or www.ontarioparks.com for a list of parks that offer these roofed accommodation options. Parks are still for you! Ask about Bonnechere’s Rustic Cabins and Cottage!


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Bonnechere Provincial Park

2017

The Friends of Bonnechere Parks

As they say in the movies, “we’ve come a long way, baby!” Twenty-five years ago, (1992) thenSuperintendent of Bonnechere Provincial Park, Jim Fraser, invited a group of interested Parks visitors and campers to attend an information session about “Friends of…” organizations. Before we left that meeting we had prepared a registration form to create the Friends of Bonnechere Parks as a registered not-for-profit organization with a view to supporting natural and cultural heritage work in the three parks under Jim’s purview.

Left: Merill Burchart, folk artist and woodworker, and Rory MacKay, author, avocational archaeologist and historian, with a reproduction of the Basin Depot cabin made by Merrill; circa 2000. Right: Archaeologist Peggi Armstrong with Graeme Fraser (right front), and Ross Taylor (right back). The FBP Annual Directors Award is named in Peggi’s honour.

Since then, the Friends of Bonnechere Parks have enjoyed a close relationship with staff and visitors to the parks as well as like-minded individuals and organizations to develop educational and fun programs for campers, parks visitors, teachers and students. Projects have included archaeological research in support of cultural heritage, environmental and wildlife research in support of local species at risk, animals and plants native to the parks and even invasive species that might put local plants, animals and the parks themselves at risk. We’ve published several publications over the years telling stories of the settlement and lumbering eras on the Little Bonnechere River, birds of the Upper Ottawa Valley, children’s books about “animal friends” in the parks, driving and hiking opportunities and more. Check out publications in the park store at the Davenport Centre near the beach area.

Left: Tom Ballantine, curator, historian and licensed archaeologist, and Park Superintendent Jim Fraser host a guided hike at the Basin Depot cabin; 2006. Right top: Avocational archaeologist and historian Dave Croft; 2002. Right bottom: Fred Blackstein; 2003.

In addition, we sponsor evening and some daytime programs throughout the summer, such as musical evenings, the annual wolf howl, etc. Your membership and/or donations to the Friends of Bonnechere Parks helps us to continue to support programming within and outside the park. Celebrate with us this summer!!!

www.facebook.com/bonnecherepark www.twitter.com/bonnechere www.bonnecherepark.on.ca friends@bonnecherepark.on.ca

Children participating in Kids Camp gather on the stage of the newly built Davenport Centre; 2000.

Left: Opening of the Daveport Cultural Centre. Sawing the white pine log are Ross Taylor (left) and Dennis Gorr (right). Standing in back are Brent Fredrick, Jim Fraser and Laurie Fraser; 2000. Right: FBP Board of Directors (clockwise from top) Ross Taylor, Laurie Fraser, Betty Biesenthal, Oleshia Van Dyke and Jane Duff.


2017

Bonnechere Provincial Park

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Walks of the Little Bonnechere River Historic Footsteps

McNaughton’s Walk

Although voyages of exploration started up the Ottawa River as early as 1613, these early explorers didn’t record much about the various rivers that fed this historic highway. In fact, it wasn’t until 1744 that Bellin drew the general course of the ‘R. de la Bonnechere’ on a map, but subsequent attempts by other adventurers were often incorrect.

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Finally in March 1847, James McNaughton was given the daunting task of accurately surveying the entire stretch of the Bonnechere River. But with each step, new and difficult challenges faced McNaughton and his crew. The snows of March gave way to thick ice in April, and May was a month of forest fires and smoke. And as summer approached, McNaughton described June’s swarming black flies as “bad, very bad and exceedingly bad.” In early August the crew began to survey the area from Round Lake upriver to the headwaters – the stretch we now call the Little Bonnechere River. This involved mapping all the meanders along today’s McNaughton’s Walk and the various park walking trails and riverside campsites. A Bonnechere River oxbow set against the fall colours.

The Sands and Time As you wander along the meandering shoreline take note of how the Little Bonnechere River has wandered back and forth over time as well.

Finally returning to Round Lake in late October, McNaughton took a sighting of the North Star from the sand beach where the Little Bonnechere enters into Round Lake. Imagine the brightness of the stars against the truly dark sky in that time long before cottage lights and patio lanterns.

McNaughton’s Walk sits atop a sand delta that formed over thousands of years as glacial meltwater spilled into an ancient lake – a much larger version of present-day Round Lake. Today’s shallow ponds and marshy wetlands only hint at the volume of water that this river once carried, but although the Little Bonnechere barely scratches the surface of the 100 metres of sand it flows across, it still leaves its mark.

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Turne rs

Rd

Gate House

RATING: Easy stroll with some hill areas. Excellent trail for a fitness walk. TYPE: Out and back to loop (~2km ). TIME: 40 to 60 minutes START/FINISH: Trailhead near River Loop campground, .4km from Park beach on Round Lake. HIGHLIGHTS: • variety of habitats • home to a diversity of small mammals and birds • meandering river • wetlands and beaver pond.

Alternately eroding and depositing sand, the Little Bonnechere moves repeatedly back and forth across the delta. Sometimes it even loops back on itself to create new streamlined channels, leaving abandoned riverbends in its wake. No wonder early travelers chose the Long Portage over land to avoid the Bonnechere’s seemingly endless meanders.

SURFACE: Gravel topped in most sections; needle-topped through pine plantations.

Recently abandoned channels still receive some flow, while older channels have grown into open marshes, cattails, shrubs and eventually treed swamps. Check out these water bodies for turtles and other wetland wildlife.

2017 Souvenir T-shirt and Mug VIsit the Park Store to pick up your 2017 souvenir t-shirt and mug.

VINTAGE T-SHIRT 100% Cotton Colour: Jade Dome Adult sizes: S M L XL XXL

$24.95 VINTAGE MUG Stoneware - 12oz White with Black trim Microwave and dishwasher safe

$12.95

Join the Friends of Bonnechere Parks As a charitable organization, the Friends (FBP) benefit a great deal from the volunteer efforts of a dedicated group of families, friends and campers who look upon Bonnechere Park as a special place. Our mandate is to support, protect and promote the natural and cultural resources of the Little Bonnechere watershed. We invite you to become a part of our group, help out with a special event, or ask about joining our Board of Directors.

FBP Membership Benefits • Opportunity to join FBP Board of Directors • Voting rights at FBP Annual General Meeting • Notice of upcoming special events and education opportunities • Insight into how you can help protect the Bonnechere’s natural and cultural heritage

FBP Membership Categories Individual: $10 | Family: $15 FBP Membership forms can be picked up at the Bonnechere Park Gate Office, the Davenport Centre or downloaded from our website: www.bonnecherepark.on.ca


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Bonnechere Provincial Park

2017

A single piece of firewood can destroy millions of trees. Did you know that transporting firewood allows invasive species such as the emerald ash borer to spread, as they hide under the bark where you can’t see them? Something as simple as bringing your own firewood when you travel to or from your favourite campsite could threaten and destroy thousands, even millions, of trees. Please leave firewood at home to prevent the spread of these pests. A better alternative is to purchase firewood locally around the park; however please check for pest infestation and avoid purchasing ash firewood. To help slow the spread of emerald ash borer Ontario Parks will continue to seize firewood transported from all areas regulated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). You could face penalties of up to $50,000 and/or prosecution if you move firewood out of an area regulated for a quarantined pest without prior approval from the CFIA. For more information and the latest updates about emerald ash borer and regulated areas, please visit www.inspection.gc.ca or contact the CFIA at 1-800-442-2342.

Park Store

Borrow Fishing Equipment for FREE

Located at the Davenport Centre

Something for the whole family!

Ice-Cream, Drinks, Coffee, Ice, Snacks, Kids Toys, Camping Supplies, Souvenirs, Clothing, Hats, Beach Supplies

HOURS: 7 Days a Week - 8:00 am – 10:00 pm

Looking for something to do? If you are looking for something active to do inside the park, please visit us at the Park Store and borrow a basketball, volleyball, horseshoes and more! Park staff can direct you to where the facilities exist.

For a complete list of 140 loaner sites, dates and locations for Travelling Tackleshare events please visit: tackleshare.com

BE PARKsmart - ASK ONTARIO PARKS’ STAFF ABOUT BORROWING A PFD!

WATER SAFETY –

IT’S YOUR RESPONSIBILITYY

PARKsmart PFD LENDING

PROGRAM

1) There are no lifeguards on our beaches. Parents, children are your responsibility. 2) Always supervise children and non-swimmers. This means watching them every second they are in the water. And when water is rough – STAY OUT! 3) Have children and non-swimmers wear a PFD when near the water. 4) Never swim alone. Everyone should always swim with a buddy. 5) Learn how to swim and learn prevention, water survival and rescue skills. 6) Offshore winds blow inflatables out into dangerous waters. Use inflatable rafts or toys in shallow water areas only. When wading into deeper water, why not swim in towards the shore? 7) Be responsible. Avoid alcohol when involved in waterrelated recreational activities. 8) Protect your neck. Never dive into shallow water from docks or shallow water. 9) If you suspect a drowning or any other type of water emergency, call 911 and/or contact the Park Office immediately.

Brought to you by:

F IRE W OOD & K INDLIN G

CAN BE PURCHASED FROM THE

PARK STORE*

Canoe & Kayak Rentals $35.00/day or $8.00/hourly

Paddleboard Rentals $40.00/day or $8.00/hourly

• Rentals are a first come first serve basis • Multiple days are available • All equipment is supplied by the park • Reservations are available

RENT ONE TODAY! *Prices, store hours and dates are subject to change without notice.

THANKS TO OUR SUPPORTING PARTNERS:

www.OntarioParks.com/PFDlending

A PROUD PARTNER OF ONTARIO PARKS


Bonnechere Provincial Park

June 10: Friends Day July 1: Canada Day Celebrations July 8 – 15: Bonnechere’s 50th Celebrations July 21: Free Day-Use – HPHP Events July 22: Little Ray’s Reptile Zoo August 5 : Apple Cider August 12 : Bike Rodeo August 19: Spirits Night August 25: Jared Lutes in Concert August 26: Wolf Howl September 1: Tom Thomson Was A Weatherman with Phil the Forecaster Chadwick Events shown in blue are sponsored by the Friends of Bonnechere Parks.

Algonquin land claim negotiations update On October 18, 2016 the Government of Canada, the Government of Ontario and the Algonquins of Ontario celebrated a major milestone in their journey toward reconciliation and renewed relationships by signing a historic Agreement-in-Principle (AIP). This is a key step toward a modernday treaty to resolve the Algonquins of Ontario land claim addressing an area of 36,000 square kilometres of their traditional territory in eastern Ontario that was never surrendered under a treaty. The signing of the AIP paves the way for continued negotiations toward a Final Agreement that will define the ongoing rights of the Algonquins of Ontario to lands and natural resources within the settlement area. What would the proposed settlement mean for Ontario Parks? • There are 13 operating provincial parks within the Algonquins of Ontario land claim territory, including Bonnechere. Opportunities to enjoy these parks will not be changed as a result of the land claim negotiations. They will continue to be available for the residents and tourists who visit them each year. • In fact, the overall result of the proposals set out in the Agreement-inPrinciple would be a net increase in the amount of parks and protected areas in the claim territory. • The proposed package includes recommendations for an addition to Lake St. Peter Provincial Park and a new 30,000-acre provincial park in the area of Crotch Lake in Frontenac County. The negotiators expect there will be about five more years of negotiation before the Algonquin land claim will be fully resolved. Public consultation opportunities will continue to be provided as the negotiations proceed. To learn more, including detailed information about the Ontario Crown lands proposed for transfer to Algonquin ownership, which include some non-operating park land, please visit the Ontario Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation website at: ontario.ca/algonquinlandclaim. You may also contact the Ontario negotiation team by calling 613-732-8081, tollfree at 1-855-690-7070, or e-mailing alcinfo@ontario.ca.

Children’s Programs are designed specifically for younger children and families. They include various natural and cultural topics such as Ottawa Valley geology, early pioneer life, fishing, and Ontario’s turtles. Programs usually involve various games and activities to get your blood pumping, and/or short guided walks to specific areas of the park. Guided Hikes are geared towards families and individuals of all ages. Typically lasting anywhere from 1 to 2 hours and beginning at the Davenport Centre these hikes cover a range of topics including tree identification, amphibian identification, nocturnal creatures, river invertebrate ecology, and Ontario’s archaeological history. Evening Programs typically consist entirely of a presentation by one of our interpreters or a special guest, or a short presentation followed by a guided walk through the park. These programs are designed for people of all ages and cover topics such as archaeology on the Bonnechere River, Ontario’s species at risk, invasive species, and nocturnal animals.

July 21, 2017

FREE DAY-USE OntarioParks.com/hphp #HPHP

Page 7 Make a Lasting Gift to Ontario Parks

1. Built on bare soil or exposed rock. 2. from the wind. 3. Located at least from the forest, overhanging branches or other flammable material. 4. Small. A small fire is best for cooking and is easier to control and put out. The forest is no place for a bonfire. : soak 5. with water then stir the ashes with a stick or shovel to uncover hot coals, and soak again.

AT ALL PROVINCIAL PARKS

CELEBRATE

2017 Calendar of Events

Camping and Summer Severe Weather Safety in Ontario

2017

6. A pail of and a shovel at hand to control the fire. 7. them at all times. For more information contact your local Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry Fire Office. © Registered Trademark of Partners in Protection Association.

ontario.ca/fireprevention

Provincial Parks are part of the fabric of Ontario; they’re part of our history, our culture, our natural environment. They play an essential role in preserving special landscapes for future generations. Every year thousands of people make new memories, connect with family and learn about the natural environment when they visit a park. The life of every Ontarian would be poorer without provincial parks. Ontario Parks is funded differently than many government departments. Only a small portion of the Ontario Parks’ budget comes from provincial taxes. Most of our funding comes from users; through day-use and camping fees, rentals, leases etc. This allows us to manage the day-to-day operations of the parks system but limits our ability to fund many deserving projects such as species at risk research, improving trails and providing educational programs for young people. Please consider supporting Ontario Parks through the Lasting Gift program at ontarioparks.com; whether it is a one-time donation, a gift to celebrate a loved one or part of your estate planning. You can also directly support this park by donating to the Friends of Bonnechere Parks.

Paid for by the Government of Ontario

Template 2A. FireSmart Campfire Ad colour (English) Revised January 2015

/ontarioparks

/ontarioparks

Many people enjoy the Ontario outdoors in spring and summer. With increased time spent outside, it's impor tant to know what to do when threatening weather approaches. Lightning is the most common danger associated with thunderstorms. Thunderstorms may also produce very strong winds, large hail, heavy rains and, in rare circumstances, tornadoes. Please take a few minutes to familiarize yourself with the safety tips below. A good way to stay current with the latest weather forecasts and warnings is to listen to Environment Canada's Weatheradio broadcasts. Most of Ontario's Weatheradio network transmits continuous weather information on special VHF-FM frequencies. Compact, battery-powered Weatheradio receivers are available in most electronics stores to monitor these broadcasts. At a few selected locations, low power broadcasts are transmitted on regular AM or FM bands. Environment Canada's Weatheradio Web site at http://www.msc.ec.gc.ca/msb/weatheradio/fact_sheet_e.cfm has a full list of transmitter locations. Being aware of your surroundings is another impor tant par t of staying safe outdoors. Identify in advance the places where you could take shelter if threatening weather approaches. Then if the skies darken and lightning is seen, you will know what to do and where to find the most appropriate shelter. Here are some tips on what to do if you encounter the following phenomena: Lightning, Strong Winds and Large Hail: &

I f in a tent or tent-trailer, move to the closest comfort station/washroom or your hard-topped vehicle.

&

If no shelter is available, seek refuge deep in a thick stand of trees. If no trees or only solitary trees are nearby, then find the lowest-lying area. Crouch down and cover your head.

Heavy Rain/Flash Floods: &

 void camping close to streams or rivers as heavy rain can cause water levels to rise rapidly. A

&

Never cross rain-swollen streams or rivers as the undercurrents could carry you downstream.

&

I f flash flooding does occur, get to higher ground immediately.

Tornadoes: &

 ove to a campground comfort station/washroom. Crouch and cover your head. M

&

If there is no comfort station or washroom nearby, evacuate your tent or camper van. Lie down flat in a low-lying area and cover your head with your hands.

&

DO NOT get into your vehicle to escape a tornado! Strong tornadoes can overturn vehicles.

Stay Informed and Stay Safe

Ontario By Bike For cyclists, the Ontario By Bike Network offers a variety of information on cycling in Ontario, inspiring visitors and residents to explore more by bike. Find great places to cycle, links to useful cycling maps and plan your day trip or multi day cycling itineraries with stops at certified bicycle friendly businesses enroute. View the on-line map with the location of and links to accommodations, restaurants, cafes, wineries, attractions, bike stores, tours and rental locations that all offer cyclists extra services and amenities, creating a positive experience and fuelling your desire to get back on the saddle to explore more of Ontario by bike. Visit www.ontariobybike.ca. Also, visit the Park Office for a variety of brochures highlighting some of our local cycling routes.


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Bonnechere Provincial Park

Join us in August for the

Kids

#30x30challenge

2017 marks the 150th anniversary of Confederation in Canada. As one of the founding members of Confederation, Ontario is celebrating with events and investments across the province showcasing Ontario’s innovative spirit, culture and diversity, and leaving a lasting legacy for the next 150 years. Visit Ontario.ca/150 to learn more.

ATTENTION

REPORT INVASIVE SPECIES Invasive species threaten our parks. Learn how to stop the invasion at ontario.ca/invasionON

Corner

Celebrating 50 years with Bonnechere! Find these words: FIFTIETH CELEBRATE CAMPING BONNECHERE FRIENDS DAVENPORTS

OntarioParks.com/hphp

2017

ANNIVERSARY RECREATION ROUNDLAKE PARK STORE FAMILY SUPERINTENDENT JOY

PICNICING FUN EXCITING PROVINCIAL PARK MAP SWIMMING WELCOME

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In a provincial park, every child should have the chance to explore nature. Start your passport to discovery today & join in on a province-wide adventure!

Camp under the stars date where

Follow a trail date where

Swim in a lake date where

Observe plants & wildlife date where

Follow #InvspON

For more outdoor adventures visit childrensoutdoorcharter.ca


2017

Bonnechere Provincial Park

Page 9

July 21, 2017

FREE DAY-USE AT ALL PARKS OntarioParks.com/hphp #HPHP

Acknowledge a job well done Help us select the next recipients of the Ontario Parks Partners Bursary program. Each year, our corporate partners recognize outstanding young people who work in Ontario’s provincial parks with an Ontario Parks Partners Bursary. Students who demonstrate exceptional customer service, initiative and leadership are eligible for the bursary. Recipients receive a grant of $500 towards their education. You can nominate any student working in Ontario Parks by completing a nomination form before September 15. Ask at the Park Office for details.

Experience the thrill and excitement of landing your first catch! Join a family-friendly Learn to Fish experience and learn how to identify fish, rig a rod and cast a line. Equipment and bait is provided. Visit ontario.ca/learntofish for a complete program schedule.

Thank you to our 2016 Bursary Partners:

ontario.ca/learntofish BLEED

Take only memories, leave only footprints.

B onnechere

Business Directory

This publication is made possible with the participation of local businesses and organizations. Show your appreciation by giving them your support. • Fresh CoFFee • GroCeries • ProPane exChanGe-a-Tank • Gasoline/Diesel • Movie renTal • FishinG TaCkle • CarDs • loTTo 649

Centre Food Market All in the heart of Round Lake Centre

613.757.3458 www.wilnotavern.com info@wilnotavern.com OPEN DAILY AT 11AM

O p e n d a i ly May 1st tO thanksgiving ExclusivE ly canadian

19 BOrutski st. WilnO, On, k0J 2n0

613-756-3010

www.facebook.com/wilnocraftgallery

The Big Chill

Ice Cream • Sundaes • Milk Shakes

The Fry Guys Located at

3186 Round Lake Rd | Round Lake, ON

613-757-1932

also Serving Homemade Pizza C A S H O N LY

Guided Tours underGround 7 days a Week May LonG Weekend To Labour day. Weekends unTiL ThanksGivinG. sepTeMber Weekday Tours aT 11 aM,1 pM, 3pM. Ask at the Park’s front desk for more information.

Take Hwy. 41 to Eganville then follow signs. Open 10 am to 4 pm

EganvillE, OntariO • Info: 613-628-CAVE(2283) www.bonnecherecaves.com


B onnechere

Business Directory

This publication is made possible with the participation of local businesses and organizations. Show your appreciation by giving them your support. The Township of Killaloe, Hagarty and Richards

Find your path…

Check Out

our website and facebook pages for dates and information about our 2017

IN THE MADAWASKA VALLEY

JULY 1 Canada Day in the Madawaska Valley JULY 8 Madawaska Valley Artisan Festival JULY 29–30 CO Blitz AUGUST 18 Taste of The Valley SEPT 16 There’s Art In Your Wood Pile Festival

SUMMER EVENTS! June 30th – July 1st

Canada Day Community Celebration

6 pm to 8 pm Fridays

Songs from the Park in Killaloe

July 22

Round Lake Flotilla

August 13th

Party in the Park – Music, Car Show in Round Lake

August 17th – 20th

An Irish Gathering

nd

THE TOWNSHIP OF

The Railway Station

19503 Opeongo Line (Hwy 60), Barry’s Bay 613-756-5885 • tourism@madawaskavalley.ca

www.killaloe-hagarty-richards.ca

ART GALLERY • MUSEUM • VISITOR CENTRE B A R RY’S BAY | C O M B E R M E R E | W I L N O Festivals, markets, boutique shopping, museums and art galleries just 30 minutes away in the Madawaska Valley. www.madawaskavalley.ca • www.therailwaystation.ca

Naturally Spirited!KillaloeHagartyRichards Killaloe: An Irish Gathering

John Yakabuski, MPP B a r ry ’ s B ay

Open 24 hours

Renfrew-Nipissing-Pembroke

84 Isabella Street, Unit 6 Pembroke, On K8A 5S5 613-735-6627 • 1-800-267-2515 john.yakabuskico@pc.ola.org

- Experience -

OTTAWA RIVER

HIGH ADVENTURE & FAMILY RAFT TRIPS FORESTERS FALLS • 1-800-461-7238

Become a Member of the Friends of Bonnechere Parks

MADAWASKA RIVER

FAMILY RAFT TRIPS • CANOE & KAYAK BARRY’S BAY • 1-888-652-5268

Ottawa River Provincial Park

RV PARK

Pavilion

For more info go to

Keetch’s Building Supplies EganvilleEganville Country Depot Keetch’s Building Supplies Country Depot

613-757-2616

www.bonnecherepark.on.ca 613-628-2272 613-628-2272 Hwy 41- 60 West, Eganville

ing centrescentresNEW building 613-757-2616

6 North Street, Killaloe

6 North Street, Killaloe

C.A. Reiche & Sons ltd.

Shop

613-735-4104 oNliNE 613-628-2272 16 613-757-2616 Hwy 613-628-2272 41, Pembroke

41- 60 West, Eganville aloe6 North Street,Hwy Hwy 41- 60 West, Eganville with Killaloe

Reiche & Sons C.A.ltd. Reiche & Sons ltd.

13-735-4104 613-735-4104

Hwy 41, Pembroke

C.A. Reiche

www.careiche.ca

Hwy 41, Pembroke

PainterS of the WilderneSS come and viSit our gaLLerieS, By appointment.

www.wildwomenartists.ca

Waterfront Campsites

Sauna Hot Showers

Fishing

With over 30 years on the mighty Ottawa, we know it well. Rafting, kayaking, shing and tubing are the best ways to experience the vast maze of islands in the park. Our exclusive location adjacent to the Provincial Park is perfect for hikers, mountain bikers and horseback riders. 10% off Rafting and Activities | Code: PP10 $5 off/person/night camping | Code: OPP5

RiverRun Bay

Tubing

1.800.267.8504

RiverRunRafting.com

Forester’s Falls, ON

Hwy 41- 60 West, Eganville

C.A. Reiche Sons ltd. 613-735-4104 Supplies Eganville Country Depot& Country etch’s Building Supplies Eganville Depot Hwy 41, Pembroke

Cabins

Pub

Rafting

building centres building centres

Canada’s Best Whitewater

Forest Campsites

pr in t • de s ign • we b Business Cards Banners invoiCes Letterhead notepads LaBeLs envelopes Logo design laminating Brochures digital Copies cheQues raffle tiCkets Posters newsletters Bookmarks magazines canVas Prints & muCh more

very competitive pricing for web design call 1.800.339.5662 for details

www.willowpublishing.com

Joyce BurKhoLder 888 WilnO SOuth rd WilnO | 613.756.9283

Kathy haycocK

341 WittKe rd eGanville | 613.628.1388

...if you can think it, we can ink it!

Linda SorenSen

1012 O’Grady Settlement rd KillalOe | 613.756.0478


2017

Bonnechere Provincial Park

Page 11

Summary of Provincial Park Offences T

here is one basic rule in Ontario Parks: Have respect and consideration for your fellow visitors and the park environment. The following table lists some of the more common laws enforced in provincial parks. Under the Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves Act, the registered permit holder is responsible for the conduct of all campsite

occupants and could be charged with an offence based on the actions of the occupants of the registered campsite. The Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves Act and other legislation governing behaviour in provincial parks can be reviewed at provincial park offices and on the e-laws website at www.e-laws.gov.on.ca. These laws are enforced by

Offence

Minimum Fine

Alcoholic Beverages • Have liquor in open container other than residence (campsite) • Consume liquor in other than residence • Have open container of liquor in vehicle • Person under 19 years having liquor • Being intoxicated in a public place • Unlawfully have liquor in listed park (during alcohol ban) Rowdyism / Noise • Use discriminatory, harassing, abusive or insulting language or gestures • Make excessive noise • Disturb other persons • Operate audio device in prohibited area Storing Wildlife Attractants • Unlawfully store wildlife attractants

Refuse • Litter or cause litter • Fail to keep campsite / facility clean • Fail to restore campsite / facility to original condition Vehicles • Unlawfully take motor vehicle into park or possess or operate it • Speeding –more than 20 km/hr • Operate vehicle off roadway • Disobey stop sign

Parking • Park vehicle in area not designated • Fail to display permit on parked vehicle Pets • Permit domestic animal to be without leash • Permit domestic animal to make excessive noise • Permit domestic animal to be in designated swimming area or on a beach • Permit domestic animal to disturb people • Permit domestic animal to be in a posted prohibited area Environmental Protection • Damage/deface/remove crown property • Disturb/harm/remove natural object • Cut/remove/harm plant or tree • Kill plant or tree • Disturb/kill/remove/harm/harass animal Camping Permit • Fail to vacate and remove property from campsite on permit expiry • Unlawfully occupy campsite • Camp over time limit

Camping Equipment/Persons • Place more than 3 pieces of shelter equipment on campsite • Place more than one tent-trailer, house trailer or self-propelled camping unit on campsite • Excessive number of persons occupying campground campsite/interior campsite Campfires • Start fire other than in fireplace or designated place • Start fire where notice of fire hazard is posted Fireworks • Possess fireworks • Ignite fireworks

$100.00 $100.00 $175.00 $100.00 $50.00 $100.00

$150.00

$75.00

Explanation If you are 19 years of age or older, you are permitted to possess or consume alcoholic beverages on a registered campsite only. Many parks enforce a complete alcohol ban on Victoria Day and for the preceding ten days. An alcohol ban is also in effect at Sibbald Point Provincial Park on Labour Day and for the preceding five days. During these time frames, possession of alcohol is prohibited everywhere within parks imposing the alcohol ban. Provincial Parks are established to provide a setting for peaceful and natural experiences. Rowdy behaviour which includes excessive noise, obscene language or gestures, is not permitted. You cannot disturb any other person or interfere with their enjoyment of the park any time of the day or night. Operation of an audio device (such as a radio, stereo, TV, etc.) in a radio free area is prohibited.

$125.00

Do not maintain or store potential wildlife attractants, including food or beverages, food preparation or storage equipment, cooking devices or utensils, garbage or recycling products, scented products or any other item that is likely to attract wildlife.

$125.00

Deposit all garbage and litter in the containers provided to discourage wildlife from becoming pests. Campsites and/or facilities must be clean at all times to eliminate potential hazards to parks visitors and wildlife.

$125.00 $100.00 $125.00 $85.00 (plus 3 demerit points)

Off-Road vehicles are not permitted in Provincial Parks because of the environmental damage they cause. Licenced motor vehicles may be operated on roads only. All provisions of the Highway Traffic Act apply on all park roads. Each vehicle in the park must have a valid permit. Bicycles are only allowed on park roads and on designated bike trails.

$30.00

$75.00

$125.00 $125.00 $125.00 $150.00 $150.00

$75.00 $125.00 $75.00

All vehicles must park in a designated area and display a valid park permit. You must prominently display your valid park permit on your dashboard.

For health and safety reasons, your pet must be under control and on a leash not exceeding 2 meters at all times. You must ensure your pet does not damage or interfere with campsite vegetation or wildlife. You must ensure your pet does not interfere with others enjoyment of the park. Pets are not permitted in the swimming area, on the beach or in a posted prohibited area at any time.

To maintain the park as a natural setting, the removal of natural objects is prohibited. All vegetation, wildlife and natural features are protected in provincial parks. This includes the cutting of any live growth and the damage of any natural or other object. You may not take any fallen or dead wood from a provincial park for the purpose of a campfire or other such intent. You are required to vacate and remove all property from your campground campsite or interior campsite by 2:00 p.m. on the date your permit expires so that others may have access to it. The maximum length of stay in a Provincial Park campground is 23 consecutive nights and 16 consecutive nights on an interior campsite, to ensure park visitors have an equal opportunity to enjoy our campsites and limit environmental impact.

$75.00

Without a limit on the amount of camping gear allowed, campsites would quickly deteriorate, becoming larger, eventually destroying the surrounding vegetation. The maximum number of campers allowed per campground campsite is six persons and the maximum number of campers allowed on an interior campsite is nine persons.

$150.00

Fireplaces are designated by park staff for safety reasons. Restricting fires to these locations greatly reduces the risk of forest fires. At any time during a fire ban no person is permitted to have a fire unless otherwise stated by the Park Superintendent.

$100.00 $150.00

Hours of Closing • Enter park after closing hours • Remain in park after closing

Provincial Park Wardens who have all the power and the authority of a member of the Ontario Provincial Police within a provincial park. Many of the listed offences could result in eviction from a provincial park. Evicted visitors are prohibited from re-entering any Provincial Park for a period of 72 hours. Fines do not include the victim fine surcharge.

$125.00

Possession or use of fireworks is prohibited in Provincial Parks at all times. They constitute a fire hazard and disturb visitors who wish to enjoy the park in a peaceful manner.

Only registered campers are allowed in a provincial park during the posted hours of closing (10 p.m. to 8 a.m.).

Fines are subject to change. This is not a complete listing of offences; please refer to the specific legislation.


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Trailhead FIT Museum-on-a-Stick Book Tree Wildlife Viewing Platform

Private

Davenport Centre & Park Store

Round Lake

No Pets Allowed On Beach

Outdoor Smoke-Free Spaces: Day Use Area, Beach, Playgound, Comfort Stations, Park Office and FIT Trail

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Pet-Free Area Electrical Sites Radio-Free Sites Laundry

Paths Water Taps Vault Toilets P Parking

Roads

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Boat Launch

It’s your chance to be featured on the cover of our 2018 Tabloid: bonnecherepics@gmail.com

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54

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Email jpgs to: bonnecherepics@gmail.com

2018 Information Guide

It’s your chance to be featured on the cover of our

Photos!

Send Us Your

*Prices, store hours and dates are subject to change without notice.

RENT ONE TODAY!

• Reservations are available

• All equipment is supplied by the park

• Multiple days are available

• Rentals are a first come first serve basis

$40.00/day or $8.00/hourly

Paddleboard Rentals

*

$35.00/day or $8.00/hourly

Canoe & Kayak Rentals

PARK STORE

*

CAN BE PURCHASED FROM THE

F IRE W OOD & K INDLIN G

Bonnechere Provincial Park 2017 Information Guide  

Bonnechere Provincial Park 2017 Information Guide