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ARROWHEAD

2021 INFORMATION GUIDE

Welcome to Arrowhead! Welcome to Arrowhead Provincial Park and our 50th anniversary! Whether it is your first time, or you are a frequent visitor, there are many things to see and do right here in the park and in Muskoka. We are well known for our private campsites, private sandy beaches, and winter activities including cross country skiing and skating. During this past year amidst the pandemic, we have seen the interest and demand for outdoor spaces rise and we will continue to deliver on that need. Please continue to pay special attention to signage outlining any restrictions within our facilities including capacities and other information pertaining to COVID-19 within the park. Challenge yourself to visit Arrowhead in all four seasons. That’s right, Arrowhead is now open all 4 seasons, offering opportunities for camping, and hiking giving you more time to re-connect with nature and recharge the soul. Challenge yourself to complete one or all of

WHAT’S INSIDE Introduction.................................................... 2 Reservations and Camp Fees........................... 4 Making Memories........................................... 5 Maps........................................................ 9 - 12 Arrowhead Activities..................................... 15 50 Years of Arrowhead.................................. 16 What does it take to make the Ice Trail?........ 17

our hiking trails, or just unwind and explore our sandy beaches. In the winter enjoy over 40km of cross-country ski trails, our renowned iceskating trail, or a frosty night hot tenting. Check out our Park Store for some great park swag year-round or enjoy a different side of the park by renting some gear including canoes, kayaks, skates and skis (pending any restrictions). Our priority is to help you have a safe, pleasant and enjoyable experience. If you feel we are missing something or have ideas to improve your park, we welcome your feedback as we strive for excellence. Thank you for visiting and we wish you an enjoyable and memorable experience. Jason Dwyer, Park Superintendent


Introduction to Arrowhead

Our Future Your Experience

Arrowhead Provincial Park first opened for camping in 1966 but was officially designated as a park in 1971. Happy 50th Birthday Arrowhead! The park is approximately 1237 hectares and contains Arrowhead Lake and Mayflower Lake. In the summer the park offers three campgrounds with a combined total of 374 campsites, of which 201 of them are electrically serviced. In addition to this we also have 10 cabins and one fully equipped Prospector Tent site. 

Arrowhead is a true gem in Muskoka and it is our goal to help reduce our ecological footprint in the park. Over the coming years we will be doing several projects to help with this effort. Two projects we will highlight are our efforts to work towards centralizing our waste and recycling depot, and a rethink of our trail network.

We are fortunate to have an inland lake which offers several beaches and swimming areas within walking distance to most of the campgrounds.   Explore the trails and check a few items off your bucket list such as Big Bend Lookout. This is a glacial delta formed by the deposition of sand and gravel from the late great glacial Lake Algonquin. Here you will see exposed layers of sand and silt which constantly erode up to 1 metre per year. This is one of the most photographed locations in our park.

Shifting our efforts to one centralized waste and recycling depot will reduce our footprint on our landscape (moving from currently four depots to one), but more importantly pull a major bear attractant out of the campgrounds. We are early on in planning and will be reviewing areas that were previously developed along the main park roadway for this location. Stay tuned! Your interest in trails has peaked and what we saw last season was a need for more four-season trails with the ability to navigate throughout the park without walking on our busy roads. As we continue with this landscape design you will have the ability to navigate throughout the park to almost any location with limited interaction of our park roads. Most of these trails are existing but may have only been used during the winter months. In addition, thinking with our eco hat on, where possible we will be reducing areas that have separate winter and summer trails combining them as one and rehabilitate the other. Jason Dwyer O U R

C O V E R

Photo by Andrea Coulter

M.N.R.F. #52077 (25 K. P.R., 07 02 28) ISSN 1713-9708 ISBN 978-1-4606-5760-7 (2021 ed.) © 2021 Government of Ontario Printed in Ontario, Canada

PARK INFORMATION

EMERGENCY INFORMATION

Park Office...................................................................... 705-789-5105

Fire, Police and Ambulance............................................................... 911

451 Arrowhead Park Road, Huntsville, ON P1H 2J4 Reservations........................................... ontarioparks.com/reservations ........................................................1-888-ONT-PARK (1-888-668-7275)

Park Warden.............................................................. Cell: 705-571-2029 .............................................................Main Park Phone: 705-789-5105 Poison Control................................................................1-800-268-9017

/ArrowheadPP

@arrowheadprovpark

@arropark


Park Store and Arrowhead’s Swag

Rentals Summer/Winter

Whether you are tenting, staying in a pop-up trailer, or pulling in with an RV; whether you are solo camping, camping with a friend, camping with family, or just in for the day to explore, our year-round Park Store, located in the Visitor Centre has something for everyone!

Arrowhead Provincial Park offers rentals to our visitors year-round, for your outdoor activity needs! In the spring, summer and fall we offer canoes, kayaks, stand-up paddleboards and bicycles. In the winter, we rent cross country skis, ice skates and snowshoes.

The Park Store carries everything from toiletries, MSR Camping Gear, trailer décor and camp-ware, to groceries, candy and chocolate bars. New this season is our in-house Arrowhead Branded clothing and apparel line that features designs’ exclusive to Arrowhead and designed by Arrowhead. Not to mention, made with the comfiest materials that are sure to become your new favourite camp hoodies or t-shirts!

For summer rentals, you are charged a $100 deposit to a credit card in addition to the equipment fee, then refunded the deposit upon equipment return. You are provided with paddles, life jackets (PFDs), helmets and safety kits according to the equipment you rent. You are required to wear a PFD when renting a watercraft, and those under 18 are required to wear a helmet when riding a bicycle. The summer rentals may be reserved up to 24 hours in advance and must be reserved in person. NEW in 2021: bicycle child carriers.

If you forgot your book, or would like to learn about specific species, wildflowers, or river systems (just to name a few), the Park Store has a variety of educational books for your reading needs. The Park Store also provides a variety of products from local artisans such as Maple Syrup and Honey products, as well as Ontario Parks merchandise. We feature sustainable camping product alternatives such as reusable drink-ware/straws, reusable beach bags, and eco-friendly camping gear, such as bamboo plates, cutlery, and reusable scrubbies and dish towels! We also have beverages, firewood, ice & ice cream! Don’t worry if you forgot the key ingredients for s’mores - we also have you covered! Kaila

Park Office Hours Spring & Fall

In the winter, we rent traditional and technical snowshoes, walking poles, classic and skate skis, boots and poles, hockey and figure skates, and a cross country ski child carrier. We rent this equipment frequently so there are no reservations available; first come first serve only. Ski equipment and the child carrier are rented as full day and half day increments while snowshoes and skates are 3-hour increments. You may rent ski boots and poles on their own if you forgot yours at home – as long as they match the bindings that we rent at the park! We also offer accessible rentals for skiing and skating. Please speak with a staff member for further details! When you’re done enjoying your allotted time, return your rentals where you got them from so others can enjoy them too. Late fees may apply, so be sure to watch the time! Rentals are inspected daily for the safety of our visitors. Megan Picknell

Sunday to Thursday Friday Saturday

9:00 am – 4:00 pm 9:00 am – 7:00 pm 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Daily

8:30 am – 9:00 pm

Daily

9:30 am – 4:00 pm

Daily

8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Daily

9:00 am – 9:00 pm

Daily

9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Summer Winter

Hours subject to change

Park Store Hours Spring & Fall Summer Winter

Hours subject to change

Equipment Rentals CANOES, KAYAKS, BIKES, WATER MATS & STAND UP PADDLEBOARDS 2 Hours............................................................................................ $20 4 Hours............................................................................................ $40 (price plus HST)

$100 SECURITY DEPOSIT ON A CREDIT CARD IS REQUIRED PAYMENT BY CASH, VISA, MASTERARD, DEBIT ACCEPTED

SUMMER EQUIPMENT RENTAL HOURS Open daily 9:00 am – 7:00 pm

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Reservations and Camp Fees It’s always a good idea to make a reservation when planning a trip to Arrowhead Park, particularly during July or August. Once you have been here and discovered the many assets of Arrowhead, you may want to strategize a little for your next visit. We recommend that you keep your Arrowhead Park Visitor Guide and circle campsites that you may want to camp on in the future. This information will be helpful if you want to make a reservation. Reservations must be made in the name of the person who is arriving to pick up the camping permit. Reservations cannot be reassigned from one person to another person at the time of arrival; this is contrary to the Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves Act.

Late Arrivals – Quiet Please!

Reservation Fees

Missing person? In the case of a missing person, please note the time and location the individual was last seen. Contact a Park Warden for assistance and to file a report.

(call centre and in park).................................................................... $13.00 (online)............................................................................................. $11.00

Change/Cancellation Fees

(call centre and in park).................................................................... $10.50 Reservations may be made as early as five months in advance of your arrival date. Reservations must be made under the name of the person who picks up the camping permit.

If you have a reservation, please go ahead and find your site. Please register at the office by 10 am or your site is considered a “no show” and could be sold.

What is a Park Warden?

Arrowhead Provincial Park Wardens are the front-line workers responsible for educating and enforcing the rules and regulations within the park, while ensuring the safety of our visitors. You will frequently find us patrolling campgrounds, trails and beaches, or just saying hello to visitors at Natural Heritage Education events!

Need a Warden? In case of an emergency, please call 911. If in need of a Park Warden, please call the duty officer cell phone at 705-571-2029. If you see a Warden, feel free to say hello! We may just have a sticker for you! Park Warden Knight

Multiple reservations in the same name for the same time period are not allowed.

Vehicles on Your Campsite

One vehicle is included in the purchase of your campsite permit – all other vehicles must purchase an “Additional Vehicle Permit” at the time of registration. At Arrowhead one additional vehicle may be parked on a campsite (if there’s enough room) for a total of two vehicles on a campsite. All other vehicles must be parked in separate designated parking areas away from your campsite.

About Your Campsite

Campsites must be vacated by 2 p.m. and roofed accommodations by 10:00 a.m. on the day of permit expiry. Failure to do so is an offence and you may be fined. Check in for campsites is 2 p.m. and roofed accommodations check in is 5:00 p.m. Limit of 3 shelters (only 1 of which may be a trailer/RV) plus a dining shelter on a campsite. A maximum of 6 people per campsite are allowed. Please plan accordingly. Fires are only permitted in the fire pit provided on your campsite. Do not move any firepits. Removal of vegetation living or dead to start a fire is an evictable offence. Please respect the park environment and help us keep the park looking natural.

Fees to Change or Cancel Reservations

If you cancel your reservation or shorten your stay before your arrival, a penalty of 10 to 50 percent will be applied with a minimum penalty of $10.50 if cancelled through the call centre or $8.50 if cancelled online. The reservation fee is non-refundable. The percentage is based on how long your reservation has been held. One month or less = 10%; more than one month, up to two months = 20%, more than two months, up to three months = 30%, more than three months, up to four months = 40%, more than four months = 50%. Renewals are not guaranteed since the site may be reserved at any time. If you decide to leave early bring both copies of your permits to the Park Office before 12:00 pm and you will receive a full refund on all unused nights (less the reservation fee). If the change is completed after 12:00pm you will be charged the applicable camping fee for that night and receive a full refund for all remaining nights (less the reservation fee).

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First Impressions First impressions are important as they last well beyond that moment. We have been making first impressions on park visitors since 1971 when we first opened our doors as an Ontario Provincial Park. Our goal at the permit office is to leave a lasting impression on your stay and make it as enjoyable as possible! The hardworking staff at the permit office are always welcoming and are looking forward to sharing our knowledge and experiences with you to help you enjoy your park experience. Our office staff can answer any park questions you may have, sell you the appropriate permit, handle general inquiries, or even just to chat about your park experiences. We have a wealth of knowledge to share to help make your stay more memorable and we look forward to welcoming you to Arrowhead Provincial Park! Thunder

For Reservations Call: 1-888-ONT-PARK (1-888-668-7275) or visit our website at www.OntarioParks.com. Ontario Parks I Arrowhead


Making Memories We all look forward to those times when we can get away and disconnect from it all. Life gets busy and an opportunity for rest and relaxation is a welcome change. When you have a chance to visit Arrowhead and take in all the splendor nature has to offer, we make memories that last a lifetime. For some this may be a camping trip, a hike on our trails or maybe a ski and skate in the winter. There are so many ways to enjoy the beauty of Arrowhead all the while making wonderful memories with friends and family! Arrowhead has so much to offer its guests in all seasons and each visit to the park is a chance to experience something new and special. With the introduction of year-round camping, we are able to spend time enjoying the great outdoors any time of year. Winter camping can be challenging but is extremely rewarding and from personal experience I can tell you that the hot coffee tastes that much better and the wa rmth of the campfire even more divine! We are blessed to have some remarkably beautiful features within our park, some of which include the rushing waters at Stubb’s Falls, the magnificent views at Big Bend, and beautiful sandy beaches at Arrowhead Lake. When you get a chance to spend time here be sure to really take it all in and know that this truly is a special place. The memories you make here will be cherished for a lifetime! Amber

DO NOT LITTER! Campers and day-visitors! Please help us keep parks clean and dispose of all garbage correctly. Garbage can result in human-wildlife conflict and become a hazard to park visitors. We suggest bringing a garbage bag with you to collect your trash and dispose of it at park designated garbage and recycling areas before heading home. We appreciate and encourage park-lovers who are committed to protecting our environment for the future.

Keeping the Facilities Safe and Sanitized/Cabin Fever We wish you a wonderful and safe visit to the spectacular Arrowhead Provincial Park! For your fun and ours we have written some haiku poetry about our fabulous woodsy cabins and spotless washroom facilities. Enjoy, The Cleaning Crew Call of the Wild Cabin in the woods Rustic cedar, heart of pine Let the wild take you. Lay back by the fire Embrace the forest around you While marshmallows roast Stay at Arrowhead Make memories and relax With comfort and care

Spritz of the Cleaner Scrubbing and wiping Day and night to keep you safe Clean as a whistle! Cleaner everywhere Floor to ceiling, down below Even where you don’t go Sanitized for you To keep you safe from the flu So you can have fun

By Monica Janelle Guerin and Kealan David Ryan (A special thanks to Alex Miller for always being there to inspire us!)

Waste Diversion

Life of a Student in Arrowhead

Wherever humans settle down, garbage is sure to follow, and parks are no exception to this rule. Not only is garbage an eyesore, it creates an attractant for wildlife such as bears and raccoons, drawing them out of their natural habitats and diets, and contributing to problem behaviours. That’s why we need your help to keep Arrowhead clean, safe, and to keep our waste management program as “green” as the trees around you! For your convenience, we have animal-proofed garbage and recycling bins located at each campground’s Waste and Recycling Depot. We ask that you bring all your garbage and recyclables here to keep animals away from your campsite. Here are a few easy things you can do to help keep the park pristine:

Whether it’s our passion for camping or our love of the outdoors, there are many reasons why students enjoy working in all four seasons at Arrowhead Provincial Park. The opportunity to gain important life skills and develop life-long friendships are among those reasons why we return to this park season after season.

• Reduce your waste! Consider making use of reusable storage containers to keep your environmental footprint low. This is a great first step towards being an environmentally conscious camper. • Separate your cans, bottles, plastics, and firewood bags and put them in the designated recycling bins. Paper products are accepted too, but you may want to save those for starting your campfire! • Always make sure to dispose of your garbage regularly – otherwise bears and other animals are drawn into the campgrounds. • Dispose of your propane safely. We have designated “Orange Drop” bins at each waste depot to safely collect and recycle these items. Thank you for doing you part to keep our campsites and trails in tip top condition! Braden Bradford

Our days are diverse and no two days at the park are the same. There are always new faces to wave to and new projects to tackle. You’ll be able to find us welcoming excited families to busy campgrounds, cleaning, maintaining trails and leading interpretive hikes. We work hard every day to ensure that park facilities are maintained, pristine and ready for guests. We welcome visitors, issue park permits, and respond to customer inquiries. We support conservation efforts and help visitors connect with the natural and cultural resources found within the park. Whether you find us at the front gate, in the campground, or along a hiking trail, we are always eager to answer your questions and point out our favourite attraction in the park. As students in the park, we are able to get hands-on work experience and training all while working outdoors. The diversity of our job helps us discover our passions and amass new skills for our future careers. One of the best parts of the job is discovering our favourite hiking trails and best spots in the park to explore after work. You’ll find students working hard in every aspect of the park. We are proud to keep our park safe and inviting to visitors, while ensuring we are protecting the ecological integrity of the park. We enjoy what we do and love where we work. Audrey

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Weather Watch Camping and Severe Weather Safety

Many people enjoy the outdoors and so it’s important to know what to do when threatening weather approaches. Being aware of your surroundings is an important part of staying safe outdoors. Identify in advance the places where you could take shelter if threatening weather approaches. Here are some tips on what to do if you encounter the following phenomena: Lightning, Strong Winds and Large Hail If in a tent or tent-trailer, move to your hard-topped vehicle or seek shelter in the closest park facility. If no shelter is available, find the lowest-lying area. Crouch down and cover your head. Avoid being near the tallest object, such as an isolated tree. “30-30” Lightning Rule: Take appropriate shelter when you can count 30 seconds or fewer between the lightning and thunder, and remain sheltered for 30 minutes after the last thunder. Heavy Rain/Flash Floods Never cross rain-swollen streams or rivers as the undercurrents could carry you downstream. Tornadoes Move to a campground comfort station/washroom. Crouch and cover your head. If there is no comfort station or washroom nearby, evacuate your tent or camper van. Lie down flat in a lowlying area and cover your head with your hands. DO NOT get into your vehicle to escape a tornado! Strong tornadoes can overturn vehicles.

Water Safety – It’s Your Responsibility 1. There are no lifeguards on our beaches. Water safety is your responsibility at all times. 2. Take the steps to be safe around water. Learning how to swim and water survival techniques help keep us all safe. 3. Always supervise children and non-swimmers by watching them when they are in or around the water. 4. Ensure children and non-swimmers wear a Personal Flotation Device (PFD) in or around the water. 5. Swim in only designated swimming areas. When the water is rough, or conditions are not clear – STAY OUT! Never swim alone. You should always swim with a buddy. 6. Using a floatie? Offshore winds often blow inflatables out into dangerous waters. Ensure inflatable rafts or toys are used in shallow water areas only and pay attention to changing wind conditions. 7. Be responsible. Avoid substance use when involved in water-related recreational activities. 8. Protect your neck. Never dive into shallow or murky water. 9. If you suspect a drowning or any other type of water emergency, call 911 and contact the park office immediately. ­

Arrowhead is a “Bare Campsite” Park Keeping your campsite clean is the law. Under the Provincial Parks and

Environment Canada issues Severe Weather Watches as a heads up that severe weather is likely to develop within two to six hours. A Severe Weather Warning is issued as severe weather is occurring or just about to occur. A good way to stay current with the latest weather forecasts and warnings is to listen to Environment Canada’s Weatheradio broadcasts. Compact, battery-powered Weatheradio receivers are available in most electronics stores. Environment Canada’s Weatheradio website at: http://www.msc.ec.gc.ca/ msb/weatheradio/fact_sheet_e.cfm has a full list of transmitter locations. Environment Canada’s 24 Hour Weatheradio Broadcast Frequencies • North Bay 162.475 MHz • Algonquin Park 162.400 MHz • Orillia 162.400 MHz • Rosseau 162.550 MHz

If Your Child Becomes Lost Remain calm and notify any park staff. Park staff are trained to work as a team in the event of a missing child. They will likely have a radio and will notify all other park staff to commence a search for the child. It is important that one person remain on the campsite in case the child returns. It is also important that one person remains with a park staff member so that radio communications can be maintained throughout the search. What you need to tell park staff: Your name and campsite number; Your child’s name and age; what they are wearing; who they were with last; their last known location; relevant illnesses or injuries; what the child might be interested in ie: going on trails; following animal tracks, playing in the water etc.

Conservation Reserves Act Section 3(1): No Person shall maintain or store potential wildlife attractants, including food or beverages, food preparation or storage equipment, cooking devices or utensils, garbage or recycling products, scented products or any other item in a manner likely to attract wildlife. Violators are subject to $125 fine. Your cooperation is needed to “Bare Proof” your campsite.

What can attract a bear to my campsite?

The following are a few of the items that have been left out and brought bears onto campsites at Arrowhead Park: the perimeter of campsites • Food and Food related items • Any item associated with food • Bottles, cans open or closed • Bird feeders that could smell like food. • Any kind of food in an open or • Deodorant, scented soap • Sun-tan lotion; Insect repellent closed container • Pet food and bowls/containers • Toothpaste and toothbrush • Toothpaste spit onto the leaves • Coolers, both full and empty of the surrounding vegetation • BBQ or camp stove • Medicines • Garbage and recycling waste • Petroleum • Pots, pans, cutlery, dishes • Dish water emptied around

Firewood Regulations Bringing firewood when you travel to or from your favourite provincial park may seem harmless but can spread invasive species such as insects, plants and diseases. Many of these species are hidden in the wood and are difficult to detect. Millions of trees have already been infected. Help us reduce the spread by; • Leaving firewood at home • Purchasing kiln-dried firewood where available 6

• Buying local If you move firewood out of an area regulated for a quarantined pest without prior approval from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) you could face penalties of up to $50,000 and/or prosecution. For more information on firewood movement restrictions and the latest updates about emerald ash borer and other regulated pests, please visit www.inspection.gc.ca or contact the CFIA at 1-800-442-2342. Ontario Parks I Arrowhead


Summary of Provincial Park Offences There is one basic rule in Ontario Parks: Have respect and consideration for your fellow visitors and the park environment. The following table lists some of the more common laws enforced in provincial parks. Under the Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves Act, 2006, the registered permit holder is responsible for the conduct of all campsite occupants and could be charged with an offence based on the actions of the occupants of the registered campsite. The Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves Act, 2006 and other legislation governing behaviour in provincial parks can be reviewed at provincial park offices and on the e-Laws website at www.ontario.ca/laws. These laws are enforced by provincial park wardens who have all the power and authority of a member of the Ontario Provincial Police within a provincial park. Many of the listed offences could result in eviction from a provincial park. Evicted visitors are prohibited from re-entering any provincial park for a period of 72 hours. Minimum fines listed below do not include court costs or victim fine surcharge. Offence

Min. Fine

Alcoholic Beverages • Having liquor in open container in other than residence (campsite) • Consuming liquor in other than residence • Driving or having care or control of a motor vehicle with open or unsealed container of liquor • Person under 19 years having liquor • Being intoxicated in a public place • Unlawfully have liquor in listed park (during liquor ban) Rowdyism / Noise • Use discriminatory, harassing, abusive or insulting language or gestures • Make excessive noise • Disturb other persons • Operate audio device in prohibited area Storing Wildlife Attractants • Unlawfully store wildlife attractants Refuse • Litter or cause litter • Fail to keep campsite / facility clean • Fail to restore campsite / facility to original condition Vehicles • Unlawfully take motor vehicle into park or possess or operate it • Speeding –more than 20 km/hr • Operate vehicle off roadway • Disobey stop sign Parking • Park vehicle in area not designated • Park vehicle in prohibited area • Fail to display permit on parked vehicle Pets • Permit domestic animal to be without leash • Permit domestic animal to make • excessive noise • Permit domestic animal to be in designated • swimming area or on a beach • Permit domestic animal to disturb people • Permit domestic animal to be in a posted prohibited area

$ 100.00 $ 100.00 $ 175.00 $ 100.00 $ 50.00 $ 100.00 $ 150.00 $ 150.00 $ 150.00 $ 75.00

Provincial parks are established to provide a setting for peaceful and natural experiences. Rowdy behaviour, which includes excessive noise, or obscene language or gestures, is not permitted. You cannot disturb any other person or interfere with their enjoyment of the park any time of the day or night. Operation of an audio device (such as a radio, stereo, TV, etc.) in a radio-free area is prohibited.

Deposit all garbage and litter in the containers provided to discourage wildlife from becoming pests. Campsites and/or facilities must be kept clean at all times to eliminate potential hazards to parks visitors and minimize human-wildlife conflict.

$ 125.00 $ 100.00 $ 125.00 $ 85.00

Off-road vehicles are not permitted in provincial parks because of the environmental damage they cause.

$ 30.00

All vehicles must park in a designated area and display a valid park permit. You must prominently display your valid park permit on your dashboard.

(plus 3 demerit points)

Licenced motor vehicles may be operated on roads only. You must follow the rules of the road and remember that the Highway Traffic Act applies on all park roads. Each vehicle in the park must have a valid provincial park permit. Bicycles are only allowed on park roads and on designated bike trails.

For the protection of wildlife and other park visitors, your pet must be under control and on a leash not exceeding 2 metres at all times. You must ensure your pet does not damage or interfere with vegetation or wildlife. You must also ensure your pet does not interfere with others’ enjoyment of the park. Pets are not permitted in the swimming area, on the beach or in a posted prohibited area at any time. $ 75.00

$ 75.00 $ 125.00 $ 75.00

Hours of Closing • Enter park after closing • Remain in park after closing

Many parks enforce a complete liquor ban on Victoria Day and for the preceding ten days. A liquor ban is also in effect at Sibbald Point Provincial Park on Labour Day and for the preceding four days. During these time frames, possession of liquor is prohibited everywhere within parks imposing the liquor ban.

$125.00

Camping Permit • Fail to vacate and remove property from campsite on permit expiry • Unlawfully occupy campsite • Camp over time limit

Fireworks • Possess fireworks • Ignite fireworks

Drivers are responsible for ensuring that liquor is properly stored while in a vehicle. Liquor must be in a container that is unopened and the seal unbroken or is packed away and not accessible to any person in the vehicle.

Do not maintain or store potential wildlife attractants, including food or beverages, food preparation or storage equipment, cooking devices or utensils, garbage or recycling products, scented products or any other item in a manner that is likely to attract wildlife.

$ 125.00 $ 125.00 $ 125.00 $ 150.00 $ 150.00

Campfires • Start or tend fire other than in fireplace or designated place • Start or tend fire where notice of fire hazard is posted

If you are 19 years of age or older, you are permitted to possess or consume liquor (beer, wine, spirits) only on a registered campsite.

$ 125.00

Environmental Protection • Damage / deface / remove Crown property • Disturb / harm / remove natural object • Disturb / cut / remove / harm plant or tree • Kill plant or tree • Disturb / kill / remove / harm / harass animal

Camping Equipment / Persons • Place more than 3 pieces of shelter equipment on campsite • Place more than one tent trailer, travel trailer or self-propelled camping unit on campsite • Excessive number of persons occupying campground campsite / interior campsite

Explanation

$ 75.00

To maintain the park as a natural setting, the removal of natural objects is prohibited. All vegetation, wildlife and natural features are protected in provincial parks. Cutting any live growth or damaging any natural or other object is prohibited. You may not take any fallen or dead wood from a provincial park for the purpose of a campfire or other such intent.

You are required to vacate and remove all property from your campground campsite or interior campsite by 2:00 p.m. on the date your permit expires so that others may have access to it. The maximum length of stay on a provincial park campground campsite is 23 consecutive nights and 16 consecutive nights on an interior campsite to ensure park visitors have an equal opportunity to enjoy our campsites and limit environmental impact. Without a limit on the amount of camping gear allowed, campsites would quickly deteriorate, becoming larger, eventually destroying the surrounding vegetation. The maximum number of campers allowed per campground campsite is six persons and the maximum number of campers allowed on an interior campsite is nine persons.

$ 150.00

Fireplaces are designated by park staff for safety reasons. Restricting fires to these locations greatly reduces the risk of forest fires. For the prevention of forest fires, a park superintendent may give notice of a fire hazard and implement a fire ban. At any time during a fire ban no person is permitted to have a fire unless otherwise stated by the park superintendent.

$ 100.00 $ 150.00

Possession or use of fireworks is prohibited in provincial parks at all times. They constitute a fire hazard and disturb visitors and wildlife who wish to enjoy the park in a peaceful manner.

$ 125.00

Only registered campers are allowed in a provincial park during the posted hours of closing.

Fines are subject to change. This is not a complete listing of offences; please refer to the specific legislation.

ON PATROL – The Park Rules

Within a Provincial Park, a Park Warden has all the power and authority of a Police Officer. If you wish to speak with an enforcement officer, please contact any park staff, visit or call our park office. Complaints are confidential and will be investigated as soon as possible. Campfires A campfire is a wonderful thing. It’s nature’s television. There’s only one channel but everyone likes what’s on. Always remember though to remove nothing living or dead from around your campsite or elsewhere in the park to start or feed your fire. Also, never remove any kind of stick to cook a hotdog or marshmallow on. It’s the law, it’s a costly fine ($150.00) and it can get you evicted. A good alternative can be found in our park store. There we have both wooden and metal roasting sticks. Noise Please respect others. Excessive noise is not permitted at any time. Loud voices, radios, generators, barking dogs or musical instruments such as guitar playing may disturb other visitors and lead to a costly fine ($150.00) and/or an eviction. Vehicle Lock Remotes Please don’t use your lock remotes to lock your vehicle while in the park. The sound your vehicle makes when locking your door can travel great distances within a campground and especially at night. At times there may be over 500 vehicles in the park. That adds up to a lot of noise that disturbs others and detracts from the peacefulness that they came here to enjoy. Radio-Free Areas Radios, CD players and other amplified devices are prohibited on

Ontario Parks I Arrowhead

campsites 200-260 (Roads 1 to 4) in East River Campground. The same applies to South Lumby Campground (Sites 101-163). In these areas, you may only use your radios and other devices with headphones. Generators Generators are allowed to run between the hours of 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. only. Generators being used should be considered quiet generators with a rating of less than 67dB rating. Excessive noise regulations apply. Pets Dogs must be under control, supervised and secured by a leash not exceeding 2 m at all times. ($75 fine) Pets are not permitted on park bathing beaches. This is strictly enforced and carries a $75.00 fine. Please clean up after your pet. ($75 fine) Any pet causing excessive noise or disturbing another person is an evictable offence to the owner/handler and carries a fine of $150.00. Pet Exercise Area (see on the park maps on pg. 9). Accessed through Lumby campground, pet owners may have their pets off leash but they are still responsible to control their pets at all times in order to avoid conflicts with other pets or people. Pet Beach Access These are the stretches of waterfront between the designated public beaches and the Arrowhead Lake Bridge. Owners may take their pets into the water in this area however dogs must be kept on a leash.

7


DISCOVERY Programs In 1944, Ontario Parks hired its first seasonal park naturalist. Algonquin Provincial Park hired J.R. Dymond, the Director of the Royal Ontario Museum of Zoology at the time, to lead nature hikes within the park and visit children’s camps. The second provincial park in Ontario to introduce interpretive programs was Rondeau Provincial Park. Richard “Dick” Davy Ussher, hired in 1955, was the park’s first full-time naturalist. Later he went on to set up interpretive programs at Pinery Provincial Park. Today we have roughly 300 Discovery staff stationed in over 70 parks across the province – all endeavoring to engage visitors in exploring the diverse natural and cultural heritage features that make up our vast home. Why? To enhance visitor’s enjoyment of these special spaces, encourage appropriate use and protection of them, and cultivate dedicated park stewards to name a few reasons. Naturally, a few things have changed over the years, as the program grows and evolves to meet the changing interests of visitors. Most recently we have changed the name from Natural Heritage Education to Discovery. But don’t be mistaken, the Discovery Program is here to take this 75-year tradition of exploring and discovering parks into a new era. Arrowhead Park Naturalists offer education programs for children and adults from early July to Labour Day. They include nature and historical walks, evening programs with guest speakers, children’s crafts and games as well as opportunities to ‘Ask the Naturalists’! For a list of events, please ask Park Staff, or look for postings within the park!

Discourage uninvited guests

Bears are attracted to anything that looks or smells like food. Items like unwashed utensils, food packaging, toiletries and trash are tasty treats for bears. Be BEAR WISE when camping: • Don’t leave food or scented items unattended on your campsite • Pack and store these items in your vehicle, out of sight, with windows closed • Clean food preparation areas promptly after use • Routinely take your garbage to the park’s waste depot

Let's all be Bear Wise Always call 911 in an emergency Call 1-866-514-2327 to report a sighting ontario.ca/bearwise

iNaturalist

Know what kind of wildlife has been seen in your park. Share what you’ve seen with others. DownloaD the app to your mobile device or use your computer. More than 80,000 sightings in our parks Over 5,000 species

inaturalist.ca/projects/ontario-parks

iNaturalist Canada is run by the Canadian Wildlife Federation, the Royal Ontario Museum, and iNaturalist.org at the California Academy of Sciences.

8

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11


Ontario’s Protected Areas – Did you know? Ontario’s protected areas system includes 329 provincial parks and 294 conservation reserves covering an area equivalent to about 9 percent of the province. Arrowhead Provincial Park is one of 112 operating provincial parks that provide a wide variety of outdoor recreation and adventure experiences; including, car camping, day hiking, kayaking and canoeing. We have some of the finest beaches in the province! We also have natural heritage education programs that are enjoyed by children and adults alike. The remainder of the provincial parks and conservation reserves are considered non-operating and there are no camping or day use facilities available. These parks and reserves protect a variety of provincially significant natural features and spectacular landscapes across Ontario. Every year, close to 10 million visits are made to Ontario’s provincial parks. The Ontario Parks system is largely funded (80 per cent) through user fees and other park revenues such as firewood sales, canoe rentals and park stores. These fees and revenues are deposited in a Special Purpose Account that is used to support the management and operation of Ontario’s provincial parks. Currently, Ontario taxpayers contribute 20 per cent of the overall costs associated with managing all 329 provincial parks. (The remaining 80 per cent comes from user fees and other revenues). This allows Ontario Parks to invest in park operations while continuing to support its number one objective - protecting Ontario’s natural heritage for future generations.

Park History Land Acknowledgement: We would like to respectfully acknowledge that we are on the traditional territory of the Anishinaabeg, specifically the Chippewa, Ojibwa and Potawatomi peoples, under the terms of the Robinson-Huron Treaty #61 of 1850, and the Williams Treaties of 1923. We are grateful to be here. We hope you are too. Together, we honour all Indigenous peoples – First Nations, Métis and Inuit – for their cultures, their languages, their wise teachings and ways of being, their stewardship and protection of the lands and waters - and life - that have shaped this country since time began. Together, we commit to acknowledge, to learn, to educate, to create opportunity and to honour sacred places, and to take actions toward real Truth and Reconciliation in support of our commitment to wellness for all, and to walking the path together in respect, peace and harmony for future generations. G’chi miigwech. Thank you very much. Today when you think of Arrowhead, you may think about family traditions, cool summer nights, making s’mores around the campfire or the snowy days skiing and enjoying a hot chocolate. While these are your memories, have you ever thought about how the park came to be? What used to be here before? There is history everywhere you look in the park. Just after Canada became a self-governing Dominion in 1867, the land that encompasses Arrowhead Provincial Park, located in Chaffy Township, was surveyed by a man named Walter Beatty. The land was advertised as great for farming and was opened to settlers under the “Free Grants and Homestead Act” where they would receive 100 acres free, if they performed tasks required by the government. Most of the settlers quickly realized that this land was not adequate for agricultural use because of the rock beneath the surface and appealed much more to the logging industry. Under this act, settlers like Louis Roe and C.E. Stubb’s for which Roe Campground and Stubb’s Falls are named after, settled on their designated land and created what are called homesteads. There are several throughout the park, some remnants of which can be seen on the Homesteader and Beaver Meadow Trails.

Help Us Help You Arrowhead Provincial Park has a vast landscape of different species of trees and is home to many coniferous trees such as Spruce, White Pine, Balsam Fir’s, and Hemlock. Coniferous trees are a cone-bearing seed plant that have sensitive vascular tissue. When an axe or object is struck into one of these species of trees, it causes harm and “wounds” a tree. A tree will heal around the edges of the wound to prevent further injury however, the lifespan of the tree will be significantly shortened. Arrowhead Provincial Park also has a wide variety of deciduous trees such as Maples, Poplar, Birch, and Beech. These types of trees shed their leaves every Fall and go through a dormancy phase every Winter. A tree’s bark is like our skin, if it comes off it exposes the inner layer of live tissues to pathogens. Once the tree bark is removed, it will never fully grow back. Removal of tree bark has the same detrimental effects as striking a tree, the lifespan of the tree will be significantly shortened. Please remember not to strike an object or axe into a tree or strip bark from a tree. Help us protect the park for years to come! Jeff

Water Source and Distribution Can I drink the water? This is one of the most asked questions I encounter while testing the water daily. You may notice myself, or another member of the operations team performing daily chlorine residual testing in various designated locations. One thing you as a park user may notice while traveling throughout the campground are taps being left running, with signage identifying “flushing in progress”. This flushing is essential to keep the water fresh during periods of lower water consumption. Fresh water has higher chlorine residuals, hence increasing disinfection. If you can resist the urge to shut off the water tap, it will be appreciated. Where does Arrowhead get its water from? Arrowhead has two sources of water to supply all campsites and buildings, Mayflower lake and the East River aquifer. The main summer system has water drawn from spring fed Mayflower lake, pumped to the main water processing plant, filtered, and treated with UV and chlorine disinfection. The treated water is then stored in a reservoir chamber that provides gravity fed water pressure to the entire summer system. Therefore, we can provide water during power outages; gravity does all the work, no hydro is needed. Since Arrowhead is a year-round facility, a second water source was established to provide water during the winter months. A drilled well provides water for the east river comfort station year around, and the visitor center during the winter months. How can we be sure the water is safe to drink? Weekly water samples are provided to Public Health Ontario to test for potential bacterial counts. In the event of an adverse (bad) sample, of the drinking water the tap and area effected will be posted “Do not drink”, or “boil water advisory, please boil your water for 5 minutes prior to consumption”, depending on the issue. Adverse water samples can be derived from an issue with the water itself, or at the point of use. Simple things such as a dirty tap, contaminated from food waste from dish washing can cause an adverse sample. The Ontario parks web site (include hyper link) lists all advisories for drinking water and designated swimming areas, for each provincial park. Please use this as a reference point if you have any concerns. When you see a park staff member testing the water, feel free to stop and ask them any questions that you may have, they will be glad to answer them. Thanks, Jason C

The history of many families is within our boundaries so please stay on the trail, respect the land, and take only pictures when you leave! Jess Kumka and Megan Picknell Ontario Parks I Arrowhead

13


14

Ontario Parks I Arrowhead


ARROWHEAD ACTIVITIES

The Trails of Arrowhead

Fishing Trips

While visiting Arrowhead, you may want to take advantage of one of the four hiking trails or two cycling and hiking trails. If you decide to go, here are a few things to keep in mind:

Arrowhead Provincial Park has two lakes that provide fishing opportunities. The smaller of the two is Mayflower Lake which is located across from the park office. This lake is stocked with Speckled Trout that vary in size from pan fry up to several pounds. Arrowhead Lake is located in the heart of the park. It contains large and smallmouth bass as well as pan fish (perch and sunfish). There is also a chance of catching a speckled trout. All of these fish can be caught by Fishing from shore or in a canoe. So pull out your rods and head to the lake because you may catch yourself a trophy. Rainbow Trout

Speckled Trout

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Sport Fishing Licence

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PLEASE REMEMBER: No motorized watercraft allowed in Arrowhead Provincial Park (including electric trolling motors)

Paddling Arrowhead

Can you imagine yourself paddling in the early morning mist on Arrowhead Lake - sun peeking over the hills; a loon silently swimming nearby? Paddling by canoe or kayak is an excellent way to explore the aquatic side of Arrowhead. Canoes, kayaks and paddleboards are available for rent at the Park Store during the spring, summer and fall. Mayflower and Arrowhead Lake Both are protected from strong winds so wave action is generally slight. Both offer lovely shorelines to explore and good wildlife viewing opportunities. Little East River to Stubb’s Falls Many people enjoy paddling slowly down the river. Along the way look for signs of beaver and aquatic plants such as Arrowhead and Cardinal flowers. Access the Little East River at the Arrowhead Lake bridge. Pull out for Stubb’s Falls on the right side of the river before the foot bridge. A number of liftovers may be necessary due to lower water levels later in the season. Distance - 2 km. Round Trip Paddling time - 1.5 hours Stubb’s Falls to Big Bend Lookout From Stubb’s Falls you can then, if you wish, portage around the falls and continue down the Little East River. When you reach the Big East river, head up stream (left) to get a bottom view of Big Bend Lookout. This route is navigable in spring and early summer only. If in doubt, check with staff about current water levels. Distance from falls - 8 km Round Trip Paddling time - 6 to 8 hours

Trail Etiquette

• If you do take your dog hiking, make certain that it stays under control on a leash no more than 2m in length, and please clean up after it. • If you smoke make certain that your cigarette is completely extinguished when you are finished and carry the butt out with you. • Take nothing except photographs. Leave wildflowers and other plants for others to enjoy. Removal of anything living or dead is an evictable offence with a $125.00 fine.

Trail Safety

• Use the map found in the centre of this guide to help you locate trailheads and waypoints on our trails. • We recommend taking a day pack with compass, map, whistle, rain gear, hat, sunscreen and insect repellent. Cell phones may work on several of the trails and can be useful to call for help should an accident or emergency occur. • Drink water before the hike and take water and snacks with you on the trail. • Wear appropriate footwear that fits well and gives adequate support. i.e. hiking boots • When the weather is warm cotton clothing is not much of a problem. However as the weather cools, and cotton becomes wet with perspiration, such clothing tends to stay wet and will wick the heat away from you and can lead to hypothermia. • Use high tech fabrics to stay warmer, drier and safer. • Know your limitations. If you do not hike or walk on uneven terrain very often, begin with an easier, shorter trail such as Stubb’s Falls. For more of a challenge, try Arrowhead Lake Trail and Beaver Meadow Trail. • Mosquitoes and black flies are attracted to our body warmth and release of carbon dioxide, both pretty hard to turn off. Try wearing protective, lighter coloured clothing, and avoid perfumed soaps and shampoos.

Mountain Biking at Arrowhead

Arrowhead has two mountain biking trails to enjoy. The Arrowhead Lake Cycling Trail begins at the Beach Area One parking lot and will lead you on a 5 km trek around Arrowhead’s largest lake (skill level moderate). Another route is to take a ride on the Lookout Cycling Trail (skill level medium to difficult). It starts and ends at the parking lot across from the park office and it’s about 3 km long. So get out and ride! If you forgot your bikes, you can always rent some at the Visitor Centre. Maps for these trails can be found in the centre of this guide.

Big East River This route is navigable in spring and early summer only. Paddling the Big East is an excellent way to appreciate the oxbows and / sandy banks of the river. Start at the Williamsport Bridge. This is a 10 minute drive from the park and accessed via Muskoka Road #3 and the Williamsport Road. There is parking on the left side just before the bridge. Paddling downstream, the current can be quite strong for the first few kilometres. The river meanders through mixed forest and there are many fine small beaches along the way. The sand cliffs are numerous. Please respect their fragile nature and DO NOT CLIMB on the banks. Mid-way down the river you will find the 23 metre bank of the Big Bend Lookout. Continue on and keep an eye open for the Little East River (right hand side). Travel upstream and portage around Stubb’s Falls on the left hand side. Continue your paddle to Arrowhead Lake. Distance - 10 km. Paddling time one way - 3 to 5 hours If you wish to go for a paddle, please proceed to the Park Store. Here, you will find reasonable rental rates with a variety of options. Ontario Parks I Arrowhead

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50 years of Arrowhead This 1966 Manual of Instructions to Permit Issuers in Provincial Parks was printed the same year the property for Arrowhead Park was purchased. The park first opened for camping in 1966 while the first Master Plan was still being written and would not be approved until 1967. Arrowhead would not be regulated as a Provincial Park until 1971. The Schedule of Fees indicates $1.00 for a Daily Vehicle Permit at the time of printing. Coincidently the average adult wage in Ontario at the time was $1.00/hour. Much has changed over the last 50 years since Arrowhead became a Provincial Park, yet some things have come full circle. Until 1977 there were 21 km of snowmobile trails in the park but users found a higher quality of public trails outside the park and so the park’s focus turned towards cross country skiing. From 1969-1977 the park averaged only 7 skiers per winter. This quickly jumped in the winter of 77-78 to 3,585 skiers. Today we see about 10,000 skiers per winter. Ice skating was first offered in 1970 and saw an annual use of 283 visitors. Fast forward to 2010-11, the introduction of the Ice Skating Trail through until 2020 net a remarkable 40 to 50,000 more people that put this experience on their bucket list annually. Winter camping was also available in the park in the 1970s. Roads 4 and 5 in East River Campground were kept open to provide 50 campsites with electricity complimented by a then-winterized Comfort Station located between them. This was phased out by the end of the decade. Fortunately, winter camping has returned as of 2020 to the 7 pullthrough sites (#370 to 376). Arrowhead continues to evolve serving and inspiring its patrons by making old activities new again. It is also changing with the times embracing technology and adding amenities and services. What started out as a recommendation by the Ontario Parks Integration Board 55 years ago has bloomed into a leading cross-country skiing and ice skating destination. John Leadston, Assistant Park Superintendent

Cross Country Skiing at Arrowhead Long before the first snowflake falls in the Park, our maintenance team goes to work brushing, pruning, clearing fallen trees, placing signage, and preparing equipment. As the flurries start to fly they switch hats, fire up the Piston Bully and Ginzugroomers, and start building a base layer, initially defining the trail with rollers, then laying some track, and finally putting in some skate ski lanes. We begin our daily reporting of conditions at this time to be found on the ONTARIO PARKS SKI REPORT and selecting “ARROWHEAD FULL REPORT”. Skiers enjoy a wide assortment of trails ranging from our beginner Bunny trail to our hardest Homesteader skate ski trail, with many intermediate trail options too. A few of our ski trails incorporate campground roads such as the Roe(easy), East River(easy), Arrowhead Lake(intermediate), and Lumby trails(intermediate). Our beautiful Beaver Meadow(intermediate) trail branches off from the Arrowhead Lake trail, and our Lookout(intermediate) trail features undulating hills and meanders through a mixed forest, rewarding the skier with a magnificent view. Finally, we have our 800m Sprint trail that the Huntsville High School Nordic Team loves to practice their hill climbs on! It has been our privilege to have been the host venue for many significant x-c ski events throughout the years. We have played host to the Ontario Parasport Winter Games(2006, 2012), the OUAA Nordic Ski Championships(2007, 2013), the Ontario Winter Youth Games(2010), the Cross Country Ski Ontario Cup(2010), the OFSSA Nordic Ski Championship(2012), the Canadian National Masters(2013), the FIS World Snow Day(2015), the Ontario Senior’s Games(2013, 2019), at least four Ontario Special Olympics qualifiers since they began holding events in the park in the year 2000, the latest being held in 2018, the Muskoka Loppett(continuing a Muskoka tradition started in 1968 from 2002 on), the Jackrabbit Program(since 1997), and two Elementary School races each year. The energy level at these events can only be described as “electric” as parents, grandparents, teammates, and coaches cheer on their friends, loved ones, and athletes as they sprint toward the finish line!

Park Clerks Role There are a couple of staff members you probably won’t run into while visiting the park as they diligently work behind the scene on administration tasks required in the operation of Arrowhead. They are our two park clerks. The clerk position has certainly evolved over the last few years as Arrowhead’s business has grown requiring us to move from one clerk to two clerks. There are times however when we are called on to lend a hand at the gate selling permits and providing information. During these times we will be sure to say “hello” and wish everyone a great experience while visiting Arrowhead.

The Arrowhead Nordic Ski Club has a long tradition in the Park(since 1995) coordinating many of the above listed events and we have a good working relationship with their executive committee. Some of these events require a Herculean effort to execute and wouldn’t be possible if it weren’t for a large, dedicated group of volunteers, coordinators, and of course, our amazing trail grooming team. Whether it’s your first time strapping some boards to your feet or your thousandth, we’re here for you to enjoy an Arrowhead Park ski experience like no other! Our friendly rental team is standing by to outfit you should you require any equipment. See you on the trails! Kevin

Janet

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Ontario Parks I Arrowhead


What does it take to make the Ice Trail? Arrowhead provincial park is home to one of the finest ice trails in all of Ontario. Its 1.3km trail weaves in and out of the Muskoka landscape and is a winter destination hotspot for travelers and adventure seekers alike. A lot goes into making the ice. It’s not just your average backyard rink you have at home! First, there needs to be a lot of snow on the ground, then it gets packed down by driving on it in circles until its completely flat. Then we need at least –20 weather to be able to put water down with our retrofitted water truck. After a few days of that, there should be enough buildup of ice to put the “water bag” across the spreader bar and lay water nice and smooth. After a few more days of that, it’s time for the secret weapon, an actual hockey arena Olympia ice resurfacer! Once a few days of laying water and resurfacing the ice is completed, it’s time to open!! Now it’s just a matter of maintaining the ice. The 4-5am morning starts now beginning with the frosty temperatures of the cold Muskoka mornings. An everchanging routine of ice resurfacing, laying water and plowing off the nights snow keeps the “ice guru” a very busy person.

From the Groomer’s Seat Arrowhead is well known for its winter program, offering ice skating, snowshoeing, and outstanding cross-country ski trails. A lot of work and experience goes into making and maintaining the kilometers of ski trails. Arrowhead has a PistenBully 100 groomer, which is a very complicated and amazing piece of equipment. The PistenBully uses the tracks of the machine to cut the snow before the tiller chews up the snow before flattening the snow into the pristine corduroy that skiers love to see. As amazing as the PistenBully is, a lot of operator experience is required in determining the right combination of settings on the machine, as well as understanding the snow conditions. Understanding the snow is a major part in producing that pristine corduroy. Snow type is important; is the snow light and fluffy or heavy and packable? How much new snow has accumulated? Is the snow base icy, hard packed, granular, or powder? Understanding these three snow factors and how they interact with each other helps the PistenBully operator determine the right combination of settings on the machine and how best to groom the trails. Paul Blakelock

Patrick

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ATTENTION VISITORS If you are showing any of these COVID-19 symptoms delay your visit.

Cough or Shortness of Breath

Loss of Taste or Smell

Fever or Chills

Headache

Sore Throat or Difficulty Swallowing

Fa�gue

Runny Nose or Conges�on

Nausea/Vomi�ng or Diarrhea

Go home, self-isolate and use Ontario’s COVID-19 self-assessment tool: www.ontario.ca/coronavirus.

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Ontario Parks I Arrowhead


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