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01 BANGERS UNFUN EMPTY LUNGS PIGSASPEOPLE BEE MICK SEE

BELFAST/GLASGOW ARTS & CULTURE

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Bad Break Magazine

Contents

Vol: 01

CONTENTS INTERVIEWS 03:

Bangers

- Cornwall Punk

11:

Unfun

- Canadian Punk

17:

Empty Lungs

- Belfast Punk

25:

PigsAsPeople - Belfast Hardcore

ARTICLES 31:

Duke Special Tuesday Lunch Club

35:

Empty Lungs E.P.

37:

The End of Skate Punk?

41:

The Day Before Bloomsday

PHOTOGRAPHY 47:

Bee Mick See E.P. Launch

Oli Edwards

Editorial

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EDITORIAL

lasgow can be a great city. The city’s musical happenings, which will hopefully become the focus of my future editorials, are rightly celebrated at home and abroad. Glaswegian stalwarts Holy Mountain are garnering ever more (inter)national attention with their pounding Sabbath worship while local favourite Dinosaur Jr-by-way-of-Tain punk rockers Paws are in the middle of their first tour of the USA, including a five day stop at SXSW. In the city itself Clocked Out have released a new 7” (to be reviewed next issue), giving a free one to everyone who went to the release gig at the 13th Note last Friday. The music scene is certainly not immune to change however, and sadly the past year has seen the much admired Citizens call it quits after five years while the Captain’s Rest, a fantastic (if slightly pretentious) wee pub which specialised in cheap rum and ear splitting basement gigs, has closed down with the owner relocating to Sauchiehall Street and opening the latest uninspiring yuppie fest Broadcast. Similarly the Halt Bar on Woodlands Road, in the past home to the open stage sessions where Glaswegian indie giants Belle and Sebastian began, faced perpetual near-closure since being shackled by a noise abatement order and losing business to cheaper pubs nearby. The Halt has now been bought out and reopened as a gentrified hole complete with goddamn hanging baskets. As I say Glasgow can be a great city and there’s always plenty going on musically, but that’s not what I’m going to write about today. Out of deference to international women’s day as well as, being a Glasgow University graduate, a less than selfless desire to make clear the distinction between the Glasgow University Union and Glasgow University as a whole I’m going to write about the recent national controversy surrounding the culture of outright misogyny which exists within the GUU, not-so-hidden behind a veneer of laddism, banter and anti-intellectualism. By now you might have seen a picture of Chris Sibbald. For the past few days he’s been leering out of national newspapers, a cigar clutched between grinning teeth looking for all the world like a 70’s comedian hired to amuse the Bullingdon club. An ex-president of the GUU board it is unsurprising that he is a vile sexist with political ambitions, along with former entertainment convenor Paddy Baxter and trainee solicitor David Tait, in a controversy following the finals of the Ancients debating championship, which took place at the GUU on the 2nd of March. According to witnesses the three were leaders in the delivery of misogynistic heckling during debates from Marlena Valles from Edinburgh University and Rebecca Meredith of Kings College, Cambridge. The sexist displays continued after the debate in the bar with Sibbald exclaiming to his chums, in 1. As an aside this is something I find really fascinating. Not being part of the GUU I can’t be entirely certain about the details surrounding this channel subscription, but my impression is that it was paid for by union funds for use in the board meeting room and as such is a tragically apt microcosm of the hierarchical dominance which structures the GUU..

reference to Valles, ‘get that woman out of my union.’ For anyone familiar with the GUU it is no surprise that this kind of behaviour was immediately brushed off by apologists, in typical GUU golfers parlance, as ‘par for the course’ and, shamefully, that is a fairly accurate summation of the events in the debate chamber. The GUU is institutionally sexist and everyone who has studied at Glasgow knows this. It should not have taken the abuse of a visiting speaker for the university to take action, but, make no mistake, the GUU old boys who make up the senior management, Muscatelli included, would not pursue this if they could make it disappear. Thankfully however Glasgow is a very politically engaged campus, especially following 2011’s seven month occupation of the Hetherington Research Club – the longest running student occupation in UK history. On the 8th of March, neatly coinciding with international women’s day, the GUU pre-emptively closed in anticipation of a 300 strong march against sexism on campus. Pressure has been put on the GUU to expel Sibbald and co. who may also face disciplinary hearings from the university itself. Perhaps even more damaging to them is the coverage this story has received which, with a bit of luck, will have crushed any chances at a political career for these three. Cameron, Boris and Osbourne were members of the infamous Bullingdon club while at university and any chance we have to ensure that a new generation of Tories with the same old ideas are unelectable needs to be taken. Out of fairness to the Queen Margaret Union it is important at this point to make clear the situation with regards to Glasgow University and its unions. Glasgow University has two unions, the Queen Margaret Union and the Glasgow University Union. The QMU began as a women only union to represent female students, becoming unisex in 1978 and today, while not exactly perfect, it is a generally liberal, non-reactionary union where it is safe and even – shock! – uncontroversial for someone to be female, homosexual or otherwise not a straight white male. The GUU on the other hand was the last student union in the UK to allow female membership, doing so in 1980. It has begrudgingly tolerated this pretence of equality ever since. It is a preserve for It is institutionally sexist. Until 2011 the 139 club ran annual dinners in celebration of the 139 societal tumours who voted against allowing women to join the union. Since then LAMB (Last All Male Board) dinners have taken their place. It is a union which used funds for a subscription to a porn channel for the board.1 During my freshers week in 2007 it was a union where some GUU ‘fresher’s helpers’ circled a couple on the dance floor of the now defunct nightclub The Hive and began hurling abuse because the couple dared to be gay. At a university. In 2007. It is an elitist, Tory cesspit. A wretched hive of scum and villainy whose continued existence is a blight on the university and on Glasgow itself. Burn it to the fucking ground. Oli Edwards - Bad Break Editor

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Bad Break Magazine

Vol: 01

Music

SOUTH

PUNK

Interview: Bangers

BA NG ERS

Interview and Photography by William Woods

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The chaps in Bangers are three of the nicest people I’ve had the pleasure of meeting and partying with; and after seeing them in two other countries it was nice to finally see them make it over to Ireland. Thanks to Roo for doing the interview in the Warzone before the gig and thanks to the fellas for letting me take a few snaps of them.

Well first of all thanks for coming to Ireland. Yeah. So, so happy to be here.

Excellent, can you introduce yourself for anyone who might be reading? I’m Roo Pescod I play guitar and sing in Bangers, from the Deep South-Wild-West of England.

Can you tell us what the main motivation behind starting Bangers was?

Roo from Exeter’s leading Punk Rock exponant, ‘Bangers’ takes a few minutes out before their debut Belfast appearence to answer some questions.

Yeah, all three of us used to play in bands together already and we had a fast skate punk, sort of twidely slightly melodic hardcore band first, and then we had a beach themed hardcore band. Then I guess as you grow up a little bit your tastes kind of change a little bit and this is what we ended up with. so it’s really just wanting to keep playing in bands but wanting to do something a bit different. Like we played in a band called ‘Hit the beach’ who just wore speedos and sung songs about the beach, but it didn’t really have any legs y’know?

Was that inspired by living where you do near the coast at all? Andrew came round to my house one day and we were sitting out in my summer house and he was just like “I’ve got this great idea, because a hardcore band needs to have a 3 syllable name. What if we do ‘Hit The Beach’ and like we can say ‘hit the beach’ in like all the songs and yeah, that’s where it came from. We’d sat down and wrote down sort of pun names for songs and just kind of went at it from there.

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Wizard Wise is a great song and since hearing it has probably become one of my favourite songs, could you maybe give us an insight into what the song means to you?

You’re pretty much completely D.I.Y with running your own label, Specialist Subject records, screening your own shirts and everything else, what’s it like trying to organise everything on top of writing, touring and everything else that goes into being in a band? To be honest in 2012 we’ve had a very non-band year. We’ve all moved to Exeter and we’ve all been moving houses and getting jobs and things and like you know trying to pay off debts from previous years. So this year it’s been really easy because we’ve been currently writing a new album and we’ve just been practising and not doing that much. Like 2011 when the album came out we toured a lot and were just playing as much as possible and were really trying to be on tour as much as possible because we just had a new album and just wanted to be playing and we didn’t really practice that whole year. That was really hard and it’s weird to get to the end of touring and then go, “Right. Now we’ve got like start from scratch to write something else” because you haven’t sort of been keeping the wheel turning. But Andrew’s good at organising so he gets things done. And just recently, I don’t want to sound like we’ve bailed on D.I.Y but there’s another guy called Benny in europe who’s booking us a tour, I don’t know if that makes us totally non legit now. He’s a cool guy.

Yeah, me and my girlfriend were living in Falmouth and everybody else that we knew had kind of left; and we had got to a point were we were just kind of stale and needed to leave. In a lot of ways that’s the sort of situation the whole of the album came out of. Living in Falmouth and just actually getting to a point were we were kind of getting grown up beyond were we wanted to be. Wizard Wise is particularly like about coming to the realisation that we had to leave and also about not knowing where to go and what to do with that. One of the lines is my dad would always say to me when I was going into exams and things “remember the six P’s. Perfect planning prevents piss poor presentation” I was thinking about that. In terms of going into and exam well yeah that makes sense but in life, I always find it really difficult to be prepared for anything because I didn’t know what was gonna happen next. And thats what I mean by the end of the song where it says “We’re the oldest now that we ever have been” and you don’t know what’s coming next. And put very ineloquently is what that song’s about.

Well we’ve got lots of people like that like Jan at yo-yo records bringing people over. You need people that to keep the wheels turning and keep things going. Any advice for anyone wanting to start a band themselves? Just do it! And try and be as good as you can. Because it’s way cooler to see bands who are trying to put effort into being good. When you see bands who are new and young I think you can tell the difference between the people who are really trying to be good and the people who are just like ‘my friends are in a band, I’ll be in a band’ and I think firstly just do it because being in a band is really good fun and don’t just do it because you want to be in a band do it because you want to write music.

Interview: Bangers

Interview and Photography by William Woods

Hamish’s tour diaries have become famous or infamous for their stories and story telling, and I remember running into you guys in the hotel room next to us at The Fest, do you have any interesting stories from Fest last year? Or can you tell people who might not have experienced it yet what The Fest is all about? O.k, so The Fest is, for anyone who doesn’t know what it is, it’s in Gainesville Florida. Two hundred bands spread over I think it was more this year, but last year I think eleven venues across the town. The University of Florida football team is out of town, so it empties out and loads of punk kids from everywhere come in and get really drunk and watch lots of punk bands. It’s amazing, it’s like going to a little island where everyone’s into punk rock and everyone just wants to be friends and hang out. I don’t know if I have good stories about this. I remember last year when we played on the Sunday, when you play as well as getting like a hundred dollars for playing you get free beer in the venue you play on the day that you play. We weren’t quite opening up this stage but we were second on I think. It was really early and there were other bands on around that we wanted to see so I remember just we got there and I was like “Right, lets get involved with this free booze in the place we are” so I had a couple of beers and psyched myself up for it because when you fly over to Florida and play a show there is a certain amount of pressure you’re putting yourself under, [you think to yourself] this had really better be good. Otherwise it’s a whole year before we get to rectify this. So I got a little bit boozy there and I was pumped because it went really well, drank a little bit more and consequently I think missed all sorts of bands and like I just, I woke up in a van at about two o’clock in the morning and it wasn’t my van and there was a guy shouting at me for being asleep in his van and I couldn’t really remember how I got there and I didn’t know who he was. In the end it was actually one of the guys from Unfun and I pieced this together afterwards. I was hanging around with a friend of mine who was on tour with them and went back there and I think I suddenly decided “I must go to sleep” but yeah waking up at two in the morning with some guy I didn’t know shouting at me ‘cause I was asleep in his van and running about two miles back to my hotel and then getting up and doing it again the next day. That’s my Fest story for last year.

I know you guys aren’t over here for very long, but have you ever been to Ireland before? How have you found your time here? None of the three of us have been to Ireland before. Which seems insane because we’ve been talking about it for years. I was just saying to Kev, we were talking to the Arteries about coming over, we talked to Crazy Arm about coming over, and we’ve talked to Above Them about coming over and it really has been going on for years. Saying like, “We should really go to Ireland because it’s so close it would be so easy.” But the ferry has been restrictively expensive, bringing a van over I think costs maybe three-hundred, four-hundred pounds? Or is it more than that? I think it can a bit more depending on how many people are traveling. Yeah, so that’s always stopped us. So we met the guys from The Winter Passing in Kingston when they were over and the issue came up again when Rob said “You know you should really come over to Ireland it’ d be really good and fun” and for some reason this time it just it stuck and we went for it and Andrew found flights so we got over for slightly cheaper and just haven’t brought anything and they’ve just lent us all their stuff, like guitars, amps everything! Which is just like a really awesome thing to be able to fly into Ireland with nothing and play a show the next day with everything you need. Yeah it’s been amazing and we’ve been treated so well as well. Rob came and picked us up from the airport and we went back to Rob’s parent’s house and they’d cooked us some dinner when we got back and we just sort of hung out all that day, it seems to be a very nice place to hang out.

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“[It’s] just like a really awesome thing to be able to fly into Ireland with nothing and play a show the next day with everything you need.”

Roo plays guitar and sings in the band. He’s the fellow speaking to you just now.

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Hamish plays drums. He writes a zine about his days touring with Bangers called “Lucida Console’s Dog Days”. It comes highly recomended by a lot of people myself included.

Andrew plays bass and sings as well as keeping everytihng running smoothly in the band’s own label “Specialist Subject Records”

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I remember Kenny in Glasgow telling me you were named after Nicky Banger, the footballer. [laughs] I know you’ve told me since that’s not true. It was Kenny up to his old tricks. Have there been any other rumors popped up about your name anywhere else? I don’t know if there’s rumors about it. I always find it really funny that bands get asked about what they’ve called themselves so much because, you always, always see people being asked unless it’s something really obvious; I think naming a band is just one of those things where someone has an idea like Andrew coming in and saying “Hit the Beach, we’re gonna call this band Hit the Beach” and you’re like “yeah that’s cool we’ll go with that” with this it was like we wrote some songs and then we were like “What are we gonna call this?” and we’d all sort of joke about names we were gonna call it and then Bangers kind of stuck. And I think that must be the same with so many bands. I think naming a band is just one of those things where at first everyone laughs at and then it becomes less funny and they’re like “Yeah I can live with this, this is fine”

“Muncie Girls, I’ve been listening to that Muncie Girls record loads. I think it’s awesome.”

Sorry to bring that up again I remember asking you about that in Edinburgh and straight away you saying “Did Kenny tell you that?” I still find it funny that it spread so quickly. Hahaha no not all! Someone else asked me about this! Yeah I remember someone quite literally saying “So you’re named after Nicky Banger? Why is that?” and I was just like “Who? What?” I don’t know anything about football. I bet he said it with a real straight face as well.

Interview and Photography by William Woods

Interview: Bangers

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Haha yeah he did indeed. Are there any other bands in the U.K. Or elsewhere you think people should be checking out at the minute? Oh god yeah! This is this that I’m awful at, there’s so many bands who I love to bits. I could spout a big list, but Sam Russo has just released his album, in-fact Andrew is doing the pre-orders at the moment. He’s cool. We went to Europe with him earlier in the year and I just love the guy to bits and he’s just finally recorded his album, and it’s awesome; So he I will recommend. Who else have we been listening too? Oh we’ve been listening to the newish ONSIND record a load recently with four famous female protagonists/antagonists I’m not so sure what it’s called I think it might be the name of them and I’m not going to say it because I know I’ll get it wrong. But yeah, Sam Russo, ONSIND that’s not bad to be getting on with. Oh and Muncie Girls, I’ve been listening to that Muncie Girls record loads. I think it’s awesome.

“Now we all live in the same city for the first time since we’ve been a band it’s so much easier to actually practice”

[The OSIND record is titled ‘Mildred, Margie, Annie, Clarice’]

The new E.P is fantastic, it’s been a constant feature in my ears anyway since June. I just wanted to asked what’s next for Bangers? You said you were writing an album? Yeah we’re currently writing a new album which I would say optimistically, we might record in around March or April. I think we’ve got 7 or 8 songs that are more-or-less done apart from some lyrics and bits and pieces. Now we all live in the same city for the first time since we’ve been a band it’s so much easier to actually practice and things. So we’re having a really good time just practicing every week and writing stuff. That’s definitely musical plans for the future, we’re just going to finish writing this, record it with Oli Wood in a barn in Cornwall and hopefully take a bit more time make it a little bit stranger I think. More effects and things, I don’t know.

Well I’m sure everyone’s looking forward to hearing it. Thanks for taking the time to talk. Not at all Thank you!

You can download all of Bangers material from: bangersbangers.bandcamp.com or buy phyical copies (and Hamish’s zine) from: specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk All photos shot with a Bronica SQ-B and edited digitally

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UNFUN After wrapping up a huge European tour in Belfast with Anarcho-Punk legends Subhumans, Lenny from Unfun was a really nice dude and answered some questions for Bad Break.

Interview and Photography by William Woods

Interview: Unfun

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The gig was pretty crazy so setting up a photoshoot was pretty much impossible and we arranged the interview afterwards via email. I had alot of fun hanging out and partying with Unfun I can’t thank Lenny enough for taking the time to do the interview after touring and sleeping on floors for a month and a half and then flying back to Canada.

First of all, it was great to see you guys make it over to Ireland! Thanks for coming. Can you introduce yourselves for anyone reading? I’m Lenny and I sing and play guitar. We just got home from tour and we’re all scattered. Tyler is in Calgary & Declan’s in Toronto

I know you wern’t here for very long but did you notice any immediate differences in touring Ireland or Europe compared to Canada or The United States? Ireland and the UK were pretty close to shows in Canada and the US. I mean, even though there’s hardly and squatted venues in North America, there’s tons of houses and collective spaces here to play. We play at those venues most of the time and sometimes bars.

You have a really distinctive sound. I think due in no small part to your characteristic gritty sounding vocals combined with the melodic guitars. Can you give us an insight into how you achieve that sound? Well, I have no idea... We all come from a distorted background. Hardcore, metal and punk. I think we just wanted to be more aggressive than other bands that do the ‘pop thing’ and present something a little more fucked up. We tend to turn up louder than most bands were paired with and all that. Our approach to a typical show would be to get pretty fucked up and turn up to 11 and go.

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Can you give us any collective or individual influences or bands that have inspired you? Seaweed, Swervedriver, Green Day, Vile, Pegboy, The Nuns, Babes in Toyland, weed, babes, this world and grime.

Can you give any advice to anyone wanting to start a band themselves? Just do it. Don’t care what anyone thinks. It’s art, man.

“ I think being jaded on alot of the bands that play in the same circuit has made a huge affect on our new record. Trying to steer away from anything that is normal or classified under a certain genre.” Your new 10” “Northwest Solitude” is due out soon on Dead Broke Rekerds. How does it compare or differ from Sick Outside View or Caroline? I think the Caroline EP was the turning point for the band. It changed our sound to a little more grungey than SOV [Sick Outside View]. Northwest Solitude will be more slow with more personal lyrics about death and everything that hurts. We’re getting away from the Weaselesque guitar leads and doing some more shoegazey leads which I think sounds really good and will set us apart from bands that we share this genre with. We always wanted to be a loud, emotional grimey pop punk band. I think being jaded on alot of the bands that play in the same circuit has made a huge affect on our new record. Trying to steer away from anything that is normal or classified under a certain genre.

Interview: Unfun

Interview and Photography by William Woods

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We had Bangers over here last month. I was asking Roo if he had any good stories from The Fest in 2011. He told me about getting a little too drunk and waking up in your van. Can you tell us what that was like from your point of view? Well, I wasn’t around the van when that happend but I remember Declan telling me he got up and looked really scared or something... I could be confusing that with this other kid that slept in Siren Songs van at Awesome Fest though... But yeah, more crazier things happend there than someone waking up in our van hahaha We were wild. So many drugs ingested in such little time.

“The day before at the ADD prefest Declan and I punched each other out in front of Dave’s house in front of like 201 people” Any interesting Fest stories you want to share with us yourself? Bob dropping acid for the first time on the Saturday of Fest in 2011 at about 6pm. He had smoked some crack and then ate acid and just walked through the backstage area of the venue. He told the security he was ‘with Paddy.’ And while I was standing near the front waiting for D4 [Dillinger Four] to play, he just walked in the middle of the stage and looked into the crowd so intensely. I was like, “wtf is Bob doing on this main stage right before D4 are about to play?” It was pretty funny. I called him over and asked him to get me a beer from backstage. Declan threatened to kill himself in front of a bunch of cops when he passed out on the roof of a building and was awoken by cops. In 2010 after we played I was all fucked up, like at 2pm. My friend who I hadn’t seen in a while gave me the key to his room and I went there and drank all the beer and a bottle of whiskey and had a little get together in their room. When they got back I was just trashed hanging out and let a traveling friend of mine, who plays in that band Eviction Party, call his family long distance. Yeah... I dunno, there’s probably more but I can’t think of ’em... Oh, that same night we had to load out at 2am and we were just throwing our cymbals all over the parking lot and the equipment and shit. The day before at the ADD prefest Declan and I punched each other out in front of Dave’s house in front of like two hundred people.

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Sick Outside View was how I discovered you, a friend told me about it and I got the tape from a British Distro. Why did you chose to put out a tape as opposed to a CD or record? It seems to be becoming more and more common. SOV was actually first relased on vinyl. Fast Crowd Records out of San Diego put it out before the tape came out. That tape was a part of our UK tour, with those available and our UK 7” single, ‘Shallow Graves.’ We have however bootlegged our own record and made cassettes for tours if we don’t have the vinyl. The vinyl I think is all sold out... There was two pressing and I think you can find it hid in some people’s distros. But it’s pretty much done.

Any other bands we should be looking out for at the minute? Sabertooth, Murmurs, Wide Angles, Siren Songs, Dead Dog, Wild Child, Frozen Teens...

What's next for UNFUN? Chillin the fuck out and going to lay down the drums for Northwest Solitude today at my bestfriend Luke's basement studio here in my hometown of Port Dover, Ontario. Peace.

You can download all of Unfun’s material from: unfun.bandcamp.com or buy phyical copies from: deadbrokerecords.com/store or differentkitchen.bigcartel.com (UK Distro) All photos shot with a Canon 550d

Interview: Unfun

Chilling and partying with the Warzone volunteers post-gig in Belfast, the last show of their European tour.

Interview and Photography by William Woods

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Interview and Photography by William Woods

Interview: Empty Lungs

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When it comes to hard working, dedicated musicians in Belfast few come close to the level of Kev Jones from Empty Lungs. The Lung’s boys neoteric, anthemic sound is a welcome injection of the sort of melodic punk rock that Belfast seems to lack, and it was great to hear that Kev was happy to take some time to talk. The lads were nice enough to let me hassle them with a camera too.

LU NGS

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First of all can you introduce yourself for anyone reading? I’m Kev the singer and guitarist from Empty Lungs a Rock / Punk four piece based in Belfast.

So you’ve just come back from a short Irish tour, how was it playing in Ireland outside Belfast and Dublin? The Irish tour was fun, it was our first time doing a run of Irish dates back to back instead of doing weekends here and there. It was also our first tour as a four piece with Sam our new guitarist and Mykie our new drummer! The shows were cool and (as is the way on tour) we met loads of cool new people and made some new friends. We love getting down to the west and south west of the country its beautiful and the shows are loads of fun.

Any interesting stories or happenings you want to share? In Ballina we stayed with our mate Momme from Alps and Only Fumes and Corpses. Its a beautiful secluded countryside spot were we ended up drinking until 6am. That’s fairly standard but before the show he cooked us diner and as we finished he asked if we could get a production line going to bottle his homebrew. That was the first time we’ve set up a band bottling line. Also whilst asleep in Limerick on a friends floor there was a massive party with students upstairs making more noise than I’ve ever heard at a party, we think they were smashing bottles of buckfast indoors against a wall it was insane. After getting to sleep myself and Sam (our other guitarist) awoke to someone walking into the living room, for whatever sleepy, tipsy reason without discussing it we both assumed it was some confused asshole from the upstairs party. So  naturally we started  aggressively shouting at him to get the fuck out. I think Sam was one minute away from getting up and hitting him. Turns out it was a guy that lived there. Whoops. He was pretty confused haha. We apologised loads then went back to sleep. We can be a grumpy bunch when you wake us up.

Interview and Photography by William Woods

Interview: Empty Lungs

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So when you’re not touring and sleeping on living room floors what do you all do by day? I spend a of time doing band stuff. Sitting with my laptop booking tours, hassling people and of course writing music. I also do some back-line tech work for other bands and local stage crew work. I’ve been known to do odd jobs as well, painting, wooden floors and a string of other random shit jobs, whatever I can get to pay the rent! Sam is a sound engineer and tour manages some other great bands. Ryan works as a desk jockey but seems to spend most of his time on twitter threatening to shit on his boss’s desk. Mykie works at that joint that sells the fancy phones, laptops and portable music devices. The name escapes me though. Thinks there’s a piece of fruit in the logo? I dunno it’ll never take off.

“The music scene in general is real healthy. I don’t just restrict myself to the punk scene because ive always had an appetite for more than one genre!”

How do you see the state of the punk scene in Belfast at the minute? The music scene in general is real healthy. I don’t just restrict myself to the punk scene because ive always had an appetite for more than one genre! The punk scene is doing well however especially with the awesome work of The Warzone Collective.  I guess there’s a lack of variety in the type of punk played here, its always been mainly a street punk, ‘77 style and ska heavy scene. Don’t get me wrong some of the bands doing it are amazing but there are a load of bands playing the same old thing to the same old faces and it lacks progression.  I always thought the beauty of punk rock was that it was ever-changing, progressing with the times, musically, politically and artistically but I guess Jello Biafra was right, a lot of the time it becomes a stale cartoon.

There aren’t too many bands of the same erk of Punk as yourselves in belfast, why do you think that is? I really have no idea. There are people that dig our music (I think haha) and people that listen to the same stuff as us so I dunno why there aren’t more bands like us. Start some bands you fuckers!!

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Kev Plays Gutar and sings in Empty Lungs as well as Belfast Punk / Hip Hop Band Bomb City 7. He;s the dude doing the talking here. He also likes to blink when photos are being taken.

Sam plays guitar and adds to the dual vocals that help make the songs so damn catchy. Like most of the band, he smiles a lot and listening to tell stories will have you pishing yourself.

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Ryan plays bass in the band as well as joining Sam with vocal duties. He’s one of the most possi dudes I know and it’s always a treat to see him having a good time on stage.

Mykie is the latest additon coming in to play drums in the band. Mykie had a real passion for the scene and again like the rest of the lads has a great habit of making me laugh anytime I’m hangin’ with him.

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Are there any good bands in Belfast we should be listening to right now? Loads!! Off the top of my head : Axis Of, Lantern For A Gale, Hornets, And So I Watch You From Afar, Beemicksee, Lafaro, Pigaspeople, More Than Conquerors, Gascan Ruckus, Desert Hearts, Robyn G Shiels, Runnin’ Riot, Fighting with wire.

“Lyrical inspiration comes from many different places. Protest music has been a massive influence on me my whole life”

Operation Condor off your free E.P. is a fantastic song, obviously delivering a strong political message, you can tell you have passion for what your singing about. Where do you get your lyrical inspiration from? Is it important that all your songs are politically or socially aware? Lyrical inspiration comes from many different places. Protest music has been a massive influence on me my whole life, I grew up listening to my Da play folk protest songs and then I discovered punk with its many subgenres. I think mostly though my day to day life and the people I encounter influence my writing heavily. The positivity of being around musicians and other amazingly fun and creative people 24 / 7. Working shite jobs and watching people all around me struggle to pay their bills and make their way in life.  I don’t think its important that everything I write is political or socially aware. I write about life, relationships and everyday experiences. Unfortunately life gets very political sometimes whether you realise it or not.

Are their any bands you would want to see over here to gig with? A long, long list!! Here’s my top choices: Hot Water Music, Against Me!, The Menzingers, The Hold Steady, Above Them

What can we expect next? What’s on the cards for Empty Lungs? We’re releasing our new E.P. ‘Stand Up’ digitally on 16th February and physically on 23rd February with a launch show that night in Belfast. Irish and UK tours in March, European tour in June. There’s a track from the ep streaming at: www.emptylungs.bandcamp.com We’ll be releasing a music video for another track off the ep at the beginning of February.

Interview: Empty Lungs

Interview and Photography by William Woods

You can listen to a track from the upcoming E.P at: www.emptylungs.bandcamp.com or buy phyical copies from the band themselves, hit the E.P. launch on 23rd February. You won’t be dissapointed. All photos shot with a Bronica SQ-B and edited digitally

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Keep up to Date with the lads at: facebook.com/emptylungsni twitter.com/emptylungsni www.emptylungs.com

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PIGS ASPE OPLE

Interview: PigsAsPeople

Belfast’s New Post-Hardcore three piece are moving from strength to strength. Chris takes some time to try and give us an insight into their speedy development from their inception four months ago.

Interview and Photography by William Woods

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Thanks for taking the time to talk, first of all can you introduce yourself for anyone reading? That’s no problem! Thanks for taking the time to talk to us! Well I’m Chris and I play bass and sing and the other two lads are Stevie who plays guitar and does the odd bit of singing and Wilson who plays drums and shouts his lungs out!

You guys have only been going for a few months yet you have released an E.P, played several gigs in Belfast and been on tour already. Can you give us an insight into how you’re moving so fast? When we started the band we always wanted to be a touring band and put out records in quick succession so people don’t forget about us. We just love to play and love working on the band and it shines through to other people! We’ve always been influenced by bands like Minor Threat and Black Flag who were all about the DIY so we try to bring that in as much as we can into our ethos. No-one gonna do this for you so you gotta do it yourself, so that’s what we do!

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Interview: PigsAsPeople

Interview and Photography by William Woods

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How’ve the last four months treated you otherwise? Has it been hard fitting all the band work in with other commitments? Once you get it all sussed it’s easy! We’re all in full time education and we’re all music students so our tutors are cool with us going off on tour cause we learn more out there then we do in a classroom! We’re all very flexible when it comes to the band, just have to make it work! It’s like a relationship!

Your debut E.P. “The first four months” is great. I actually can’t choose a favourite track on it, the four fit together spectacularly well with “The Quiet Earth” providing a great instrumental break in the middle of all the high energy melodic guitars and shouted vocals, was their any thought that went into achieving your sound? Or did you just get together and this is what happened? We wrote Glass Fiends and Cities in the first 2 practises, Cities came from Stevie fucking about on guitar and it just came from there, Glass Fiends came from me just saying to Stevie “play 4 chords” and the main riff came out! Everything just came together so naturally and then we just decided to jam out for a bit and we naturally jam slow and Quiet Earth came out. We’re all massive Russian Circles fans and we wanted to have a big riffy song that didn’t sound like the others! We were a bit scared to be seen as a run of the mill riff band from Belfast, so we decided to break the mould with a long instrumental song!

You’ve all been involved to some degree with the Warzone and the D.I.Y scene in Belfast. How important do you think a D.I.Y mindset is in music? It’s the most important part of being in a band! If you think you can be in a band and get handed stuff just for being in a band you’re completely wrong. There are so many bands that I’ve seen come and go that just make a Facebook page and expect likes and views to make the band, more bands need to realize that the music industry doesn’t owe you anything, you make yourself, get your head down, write songs and gig like your life depends on it. We have our own distro that we take on tour with us and it’s just some of friends EPs and singles and we sell them to people that think would like it, more bands need to start to do that! The Warzone is one of the best places to go to in Belfast for a night out! It’s just got that brilliant atmosphere that all venues need!

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Are their any bands in Belfast or Ireland that we should be looking out for? Stop All The Clocks are going to be huge! They’re friends of our we made when first playing in Dublin, they blew us away! They’re the most talented band we have ever seen and their music is just amazing. Safe Ships from Belfast are great, really young Every Time I Die style hardcore that’s ballsy as hell! Bellos are gonna be great when they’re shown in the right light, fantastic Failure style grunge, lovely! We’re lovely Empty Lungs at the minute!

I’ve been asking everyone this one, do you have any advice to anyone starting a band? Yeah, the most crucial thing that I realised when starting a band was that you all don’t have to like the exact same music, we all listen to completely different music with the odd band we can all agree on, we just know what we wanna make, it’s all about the goal! Gig anywhere you can, I get odd looks when I tell people I’m playing somewhere like Portrush, when playing Portrush is lethal! Anywhere is a great place to play! Put on your own gigs! Some of the best gigs we’ve done are the ones we’ve put the money and effort into!

“Yeah, the most crucial thing that I realised when starting a band was that you all don’t have to like the exact same music, we all listen to completely different music”

Interview: PigsAsPeople

Interview and Photography by William Woods

Well it seems you guys are moving from strength to strength. What’s Next for PigsAsPeople? Well we’re currently mixing our second EP so that’s gonna be out in a couple months time! We’ve got a couple sneaky gigs that are gonna be awesome! We’re planning a UK tour for soon and a couple festival appearances (hopefully!). We’re also gonna have another release due for the middle of summer! We’ll be hitting Dublin a lot more in the next few months and then Belfast is gonna get some awesome little treats too!

And lastly, the question on everyone’s lips. Does Wilson ever stop smiling? Absolutely not. What a silly question.

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Duke Special’s Tuesday lunchtime gigs have been an unusual, but welcome addition to live music in Belfast. Having made it to three of the six shows I’ve decided to try to write up my impression of the performances. Duke [Peter Wilson] was a really nice dude when I was taking to him and very willing to help anyone out and talk to anyone who wants to have a few words with him. He also let me take a few photos which was great.

THE DUKE

LUNCH WITH

Review: Duke Special - Tuesday Lunch Club Words and Photography by William Woods

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Fuke Special is known for his unique take on the idea of live music. Recently he was doing a show every night during a week long residency within the newly opened Metropolitan Art Centre, each one hugely distinct from the last. With guests that included The Futureheads, The Blockheads, Foy Vance, Joe Black & Nanu Nanu, as well as members of the Bonzo Dog Band the week was a resounding success. I was at the final show of the week, a fantastic round-up which featured a lot of the artists who had performed during the week. Duke’s latest endeavour is yet another original take on live music, something not often seen in Belfast for sure. Starting on October 23rd for six weeks, Duke invited us to his “Tuesday Lunch Club” at Love and Death on Anne Street in Belfast. Beginning at 12:01pm with the idea that folks could come on their lunch break and listen to Duke play, both solo and with friends, while enjoying food from the bar. Duke didn’t fail to impress in the intimate setting playing the songs his fans know and love along with some newer tracks and varying cover tracks. I managed to make it to three of the six shows, the first being week one which, possibly due to lack of promotion consisted of me, a university friend, a friend of mine who was helping Duke taking care or the door tax, and about three other people. In spite of the poor show of heads Duke’s performance was as genuine and engaging as it could have been, taking the time to explain the meaning behind the songs so as to allow you to take as much as you can from them. As well as him taking the time to engage with most members of the audience when he had the opportunity to do so.

“ Duke is always good at bringing you into the world of his music... as if in the company of Alfred Stieglitz in the late 1801’s listening to him lament about people riding bikes with newly invented kodak cameras round their necks” I was not present for the following gig but from what I’ve been told it almost didn’t happen thanks to the small numbers of the first week; but thankfully Duke decided to go ahead with it and the numbers had risen tenfold, with even more the following week. I didn’t make it back until the fifth week and there where absolutely no seats left by the time I arrived. a very different picture from the inaugural gig. I stood at the bar and ordered some food this time. Love and Death were offering £5 lunch deals (the same price as the

Music

door tax) I opted for the steak sandwich. I don’t know much about food or anything but I thought it was pretty good if not a little small. Duke was up to his usual high standard, with Amanda St. John providing some fantastic vocal accompaniments throughout. Duke took lots of requests and after informing people that he was going to play for a while longer for anyone that had to leave for work he continued far beyond the intended time. Unfortunately I had to leave before he finished, but from what I did see Duke was absolutely on fire. The combonation of his trademark vocals, pronounced and well enunciated with a distinctive Northern Irish intonation with his skilled pino work was holding everyone’s absolute attention. There was a real atmosphere and connection; everything was just working perfectly and it felt pretty special. I was sorry i had to leave. The final week rolled around and the situation was much like the week before with me propped up against the bar due to a packed house. I bought my lunch again and this time opted for the fish sandwich in the £5 deal again, pretty nice but far too small. The only real vice I had about the venue was the lack of catering for vegetarian and vegan patrons in the £5 deal. Duke put on another fantastic show with the usual high level of engagement, with more great guest spots from Amanda again. Although Duke’s music might not be in keeping with most of the other music featured in this publication I think there are many parallels that can be drawn. Whilst talking to him when I was taking photos for this piece it became apparent he is very much passionate about D.I.Y culture in music which is of course something we all strive to encourage. That didn’t come as much of a surprise from what I’d seen and heard, but it was good to hear it from him. He also told me he has recorded with Steve Albini in the past which, let’s be honest, is pretty fucking cool. All in all I think Duke’s Tuesday Lunch club was a massive success and a great thing to have available once a week to break up the day with some good music. Upstairs in Love and Death provided the perfect intimate space for the performances in spite of the unnerving stained glass images of winged individuals that would remind you of the sort of person you’d see on some horrid prime time reality T.V. programme, a remnant of whatever the space was before. If there was more catering to the vegetarian and vegan clientèle there wouldn’t be much to fault the bar at all. I mean, the whole place strikes me as being a bit pretentious, but where isn’t these days? Duke himself was on top form week after week as was Amanda St. John who brought a wonderful addition of vocal harmonies and accompaniment to parts of the performances. Duke is always good at bringing you into the world of his music, but I think in this smaller, more relaxed venue and atmosphere, with Duke solo on the keyboard I actually felt as if I were in the company of Alfred Stieglitz in the late 1800’s listening to him lament about people riding bikes with newly invented kodak cameras round their necks, or like I was being encouraged to purchase some Applejack Liquor from a pushy salesman in New Jersey around the same time in history. The only downside was possibly the lack of a real acoustic piano, but that in itself seems to be a rarity in bars these days. Duke is always very appreciative of his fans and played pretty much whatever song was asked of him, even if he struggled and add libbed with the lyrics form time to time, which all added to the charm, flow and intimacy of these unique and special performances. It was sad to see them end. Hopefully we will see more of the like from Belfast and I look forward to seeing what Duke has planned next.

Review: Duke Special - Tuesday Lunch Club

Words and Photography by William Woods

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Amanda St. John accompanied Duke on vocals for many of the gigs. Taking time to relax and unwind outside Love and Death after the end of the final gig.

You can find Duke’s work at: dukespecial.com All photos shot with a Bronica SQ-B

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EMPTY LUNGS STAND UP E.P Quarantine Collective

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Review: Empty Lungs - Stand Up E.P.

Words and Photography by William Woods

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espite what some people might tell you we don’t have a bad music scene here in Belfast, but one thing I feel the city does lack is the wholehearted, optimistic and unremittingly earnest style of punk rock we see on labels like No Idea Records. The sound whose path was paved by the likes of Descendents, Hot Water Music and Alkaline Trio. Thankfully however, there is at least one band in Belfast bringing something of that ilk to the table; Empty Lungs. After hearing their 2011 single Identity Lost I had high hopes for what the band would come up with next and the new E.P. Stand Up, self-released in association with Quarantine Collective in February, has delivered exactly what I was hoping for. Think Latterman meets Above Them with folk influences and a bit of Belfast character thrown in and you’ll have something close to what these guys are achieving. I don’t know about you but I couldn’t really ask for much more from a local band. That’s not to say the band don’t have a very distinct sound all of their own because they most certainly do. Helped in no little part by Kev’s characteristic gruff lead vocals, as well as the strong dual backing vocals provided by Ryan and Sam, Empty Lungs create wonderfully melodic and pasionate punk rock. They don’t overuse their distortion pedals, which is something that’s always refreshing to hear.

The tracks on the record flow together wonderfully, with the first two, Running in Circles and Until the Day we Die, drawing you in and grabbing you with fast paced, Latterman-esque guitar hooks before the third track, Nothing Left to Lose really shows off what the band is all about. The interaction between the vocals, backing vocals and guitar melodies makes this a perfect example of the band’s distinctive, and impressive, sound. Track four, Long Road Home, gives a sense of the bands folk influences with its slower pace, arpeggiated chords and more of a story-telling vibe than the previous tracks. This track builds to an impressive climax creating the emotional peak of the E.P, before Release the Lifeboats brings a return to the faster pace and energy of the opening tracks while still retaining a little bit of that folky flavour. This comes immediately before the straight up angry optimism of Stand Up brings the E.P. full circle. Urging you to stand up and be heard when you’re skint and angry, and not to let it get you down Stand Up echoes the consciousness of Running in Circles but with the emotion and passion required to put across its message effectively. It really wraps up the record perfectly and you can see why it was chosen as the title track, while Empty Lungs’ fantastic socially and politically engaged lyrics really make Stand Up a record not to be missed. You can tell these dudes have real devotion to what they do, that they’re working hard to do it and I can tell you that they do it well.

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IS THIS THE END OF

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SKA PU

Article: The End of Skate Punk?

Words and Illustration by William Woods

ATE UNK?

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With paradigms drastically shifting in the world of skateboarding and changing attitudes of young, new skaters could we be seeing and end to the long standing connection between the skateboarding and punk subcultures? Words & Illustration by Willie Woods

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month or two ago something happened to me that got me thinking about skateboarding and how the culture has changed over the decade I’ve been skating. I’d had a really shitty day and decided to get up early the next morning and go for a skate at Bridges before my morning class at uni. I was down there at about 8.00 – 8.30 am so the park was absolutely dead. I was skating about by myself, blowing off the steam from the day before with a smile on my face when three kids turned up. I heard one of them say to his friend “Is there anybody there?” to which his friend replied “There’s some guy skating the bowl but he looks like he’s homeless.” Now, as hilarious as a bunch of twelve year old rats thinking I’m homeless is, it illustrates a point, and got me thinking as to how skateboarding has changed in the ten odd years since I picked up my first board. To better explain where I’m coming from, I first really noticed something odd last summer about the kids coming into skateboarding just now. One day, for example; I was sitting on a bench in the titanic quarter of Belfast on a blazing hot day with a few friends. Three or four kids went past on boards wearing Hollister t-shirts and cream coloured chinos which seem to be the latest uniform for folks who like be told what they should be wearing. This is something that seems pretty common with the younger generation in the scene, they’re all as far as fashion goes pretty much part of the mainstream. Now anyone with a little sense knows not to judge someone by what they wear, but it seems so common that the kids all dress the same; and maybe I’m getting a little too jaded for a guy in his early twenties but when I started skating I’d have got torn apart if I spent that much time on my image instead of spending the time trying to land the next trick on my list. On top of that, they started skating in the area we were sitting and we overheard a lot of their conversation which consisted more about their ‘setup’ and what stuff they wanted to get next instead of what trick they wanted to pull off or where they wanted to skate. They spent more time talking about decks than they did actually skating.

This got me thinking about how those kids got into skateboarding and about how I did myself, and I’m sure it must’ve been in a pretty similar fashion, watched a couple of videos, seen a few photos in a magazine, played a video game and decided they wanted to get a board and give it a go. So how have these things changed? How come such a difference seems apparent from when I started skating? When I started the only thing anyone gave a shit about was landing new tricks, meeting your friends and listening to music. Now there seems to be so much of a gravitas on how you look as well, how has it gone from being friendly and enjoyable to cliquey and image based for these kids in a decade? Now obviously there are exceptions to this rule, there where edjits back when I started and I’ve come across plenty of kids getting into it for the right reasons these days. But in a decade skating seems to have shifted from creativity, autonomy, friendliness and having fun to who’s the coolest, who can do the best trick etc. and general competitiveness and one-upmanship. It’s interesting when you look at this attitude with younger skaters and look at how corporations have become more and more apparent in the past ten years and how a lot of skate brands (vans being a prime example) have made their way into the mainstream. Back in the early nineties there were lots of skaters, Mike Vallely for one, who were worried about the level of corporate involvement in skateboarding and made a concerted effort to avoid and escape it. It seems in the past ten years we’ve seen a huge increase in the amount of corporate involvement in skating. Adidas and Nike for example have become a standard in the community these days, and the guys at the top of these corporations, and others like VF corp which owns Vans these days, have put people who have never stood on a board in their life in a very, very powerful position within the skateboarding community. They don’t care about you or the culture, or ‘sport’ as they’d prefer to call it. You might wonder why I think this would be such a big deal; surely more interest and money going into skateboarding is a good thing right? Absolutely not when these people start treating skateboarding and the people they employ with the same money making business ideals they apply to everything. This could explain the shift in attitude in the ‘generations’ of skaters that I was talking about. All the skaters I know that are a similar age to myself,

Article: The End of Skate Punk?

Words and Illustration by William Woods

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“We need to keep skateboarding creative and as D.I.Y as possible. Don’t buy from big corporate names who don’t give a shit about you, support local companies if they exist, buy from companies that care about your scene.”

all skate for fun, because they love doing it and can’t imagine not doing it. The do it to laugh and be with friends and think about the world creatively. Some of those friends have done well enough to be sponsored by some companies. Companies that let them do what they want to do and stay creative and let them have fun. When bigger corporations stick their hand in the mix and trying to use skateboarding for their one and only goal problems begin to arise. These corporations will try and are trying to run skateboarding with the same principals that drive their corporations, which is totally incomparable with the street skating that I know and love. Street skating is too unpredictable and inefficient as a business venture. If these corporations are allowed to dominate the culture you will see park and competitive skating dominating where it’s easily contained and profited from. Meaning street skaters will get kicked to the curb because it’s not worth the time and money to send them to the great spots we see in skate videos. Meaning a hypothetical death to professional street skating; and I can’t think of anything worse than a skateboarding world dominated by the Ryan Sheckler’s and Rob Dyrdek’s out there. Now, this doesn’t seem to be a problem in European pro skating just yet. But this is already happening on some level in the states with things like the Maloof Money Cup. The Maloof’s own The Palms in Las vegas which was built from a buying and reselling of the Fiesta Hotel, they have their hands in the numerous sports and entertainment business ventures. The Maloof Money Cup skateboard contest is just another way for them to make profit. I mean, it has the word ‘money’ in its name for fuck’s sake. The point is the Maloof’s are worth over a billion dollars and I doubt any one of them has stood on a board long enough to be in such a position of authority over skating. The real problem is that while, hopefully, skaters from my generation and older wont be drawn in by this horrid bullshit. But kids picking up boards these days seem to be more influenced by this style of competitive skateboarding as opposed to the street skating me and my friends were raised on; leading to this attitude of looking the best being able to do the best trick as opposed to just chilling out, having fun and being creative at the same time. Skateboarding over here is definitely being influenced by these big American competitions as they are more prominent than they used to be. The connection between skating and the punk community has always come from the mutual axioms of having fun

and enjoying life and not giving a shit what anyone thinks. With no-one on top and no desire to be on top. As already stated corporate influence in skateboarding seems to be turning the attitude of the collective scene in the ‘generation’ below and changing it from something that shares the ideals of the punk community to something competitive, macho and image and status driven. To get good at skating to look down on or impress others as opposed to doing it for yourself and saying fuck you and laughing at anyone who tries to make you feel inadequate. We need to try and stop the paradigm shifting in this way. Big corporations have no place in skateboarding. If it keeps up before long you’ll see a few corporations and skaters making all the money while everyone else gets shit on. No more wonderfully creative video parts from Louis Barletta and Luis Puig. Just bullshit competitiveness and corporate sponsorship and advertising which is completely paradoxical to the world of skateboarding I came up in. Skateboarding will cease to be a way of life and a culture and start to become another sport solely with the intention of being profitable like football, and maybe even worse like American football where the teams are nothing but huge franchises. We can’t let that happen. We need to keep skateboarding creative and as D.I.Y as possible and keep the connections between the skate and punk communities alive. Don’t buy from big corporate names who don’t give a shit about you, support local companies if they exist, buy from companies that care about your scene. If you’re in Belfast look at Wireless skateboards, if you’re in Glasgow think about Blueprint, or buying Focus skate shops own brand decks. We need to stop skateboarders becoming standardised sportsmen competing to be the ‘best’ and keep the deviations from the norm that make skateboarding such a wonderful thing. Take some influence from Vallely escaping the corporate world back in the early 90’s. He saw it happening then, and now, x number of Tony Hawk games later, we need to see it and stop European skating going the way of American skating. Then again, I might just be getting bitter and cynical about getting older and being called homeless by a load of kids. Corporate invasion of the community or a cynical twenty-something arsehole. You decide!

Bad Break Magazine

THE DAY BEFORE

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BLOOM

Diary: The Day Before Bloomsday

Words and Illustration by William Woods

MSDAY

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I h ave a h a b i t o f l i v i n g my l i fe fantastically unorganised, unplanned w i t h a c o m p l e te l a c k o f r o u t i n e a n d c o n s i s t a n c y. To b e h o n e s t I c a n b a r e l y l o o k a f te r my s e l f. T h i s h a s s o m e s e r r i o u s l y a d ve r s e e f fe c t s o n my a l r e a d y p r e t t y s ke tc hy b o d y f r o m t i m e to t i m e . T h i s i s a s h o r t i n s i g h t i n to o n e s u c h o c c a s i o n . Wo r d s a n d I l l u s t r at i o n by W i l l i a m Wo o d s .

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thought I’d talk a little about my own life experiences in each issue of Bad Break. Having a long standing chronic problem with my bowels often means that my digestive habits can be unpredictable to say the least, and this can lead me to some pretty tense situations. I’d like to share with you some of the more exciting, and entertaining of those moments in my recent history. At least some would say entertaining, others might not agree but regardless I need somewhere to vent this shit, as you’ll soon find out. The first story I’d like to share happened in June 2012 when my friend Oli was visiting from Glasgow for a week or so. It was a few days before the 16th of June, which I remember because Oli and myself were going to head down to Dublin for Bloomsday. Anyway, as a gift Oli had brought me a bottle of ‘Wood’s Navy Rum’ that he had spotted in a corner shop in Glasgow. My surname is Woods and the bottle was about £12 from what Oli told me so it seemed like the perfect gift. What Oli didn’t realise was this Bottle of dark navy rum that shared my name was in fact 57% abv, which is a little more than we’re used to on a regular basis. He also didn’t realise that I had been totally clean and sober for

a matter of months prior to this because of my habitual drinking to work before that. We had both shared a bottle of Canadian Whisky the night before at the Tragedy gig in the Warzone and, despite our hangovers, we decided to throw a party the next night and that’s when we broke it out. As the night began we discovered that ‘Wood’s dark navy rum’ was very easy to drink considering it’s strength and we got through it far too quickly before opening some homebrewed cider I’d made with my dad a few months before. The rest of the night was, unsurprisingly, a total blur. I remember flashes of pushing my old fridge down an alleyway and dancing and stripping to Prince’s self titled album. I woke up the next morning on the living room floor. Now it might have seemed up until this point that the booze making me do silly things was the peak of this story and it is, in a way, but it didn’t happen while I was drunk. I woke up around the same time as everyone else the next day. I must’ve still been slightly drunk considering I felt fine and had drunk more booze in the past week than I had in a long time. Anyway generally the morning after acts of drunken debauchery my friends and myself make a point of leaving the house as soon as possible before we end up sitting about all day feeling hungover and sorry for ourselves. We decided to check out the Da Vinci exhibition that was currently on display at the Ulster Museum. We walked down there in the terrible wet weather punching each other in the back of the head and making each other laugh in that giddy kind of still drunk / slightly hungover twilight you find yourself in when you’ve drunk to real excess. We made it to the museum and headed up to the exhibition. It was pretty spectacular seeing half millennium old drawings from one of the greatest minds in history on display fifteen minutes from my home, but I could feel my hangover kicking in as we walked around.

Diary: The Day Before Bloomsday

Words and Illustration by William Woods

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“Two sets from the bottom I was physically holding my asscheeks together with my hands to desperately prevent what was coming.”

Before long I started to feel pretty wretched. I was expecting that. It was no surprise. What came next was to ruin my day for certain. I feel I should add another side note here, like I said I had been drinking most of the week, and very heavily the past two nights. With my condition drinking is generally supposed to be limited to a couple of glasses of wine with dinner every now and again, and my guts were starting to let me know they weren’t happy. I could feel a rumbling in my tummy, something I get often but it became very apparent very quickly I needed to find a toilet immediately. No big deal I’ve had to do that before and the museum had just gone under a multi million pound refurbishment, their was bound to be a toilet near by. I left everyone else in the room and asked an attendant where the nearest toilet was. I was informed the one on the ground floor was the only one. I was on the fifth floor. The top floor of the building. My hangover blues were soon interrupted by an immediate sense of intense panic that manifested itself in my sprinting out of the gallery, through the ceramics collection, past the lifts and running down every flight of stairs as fast as I fucking could. Two sets from the bottom I was physically holding my asscheeks together with my hands to desperately prevent what was coming. I ran straight past the front door to the amazement of two of my friends who had popped out for a smoke. I was running, running and internally screaming at my body to hold on when, ten feet away from the doors of the gents the horrid acts of last night came gushing out of me like new Covent garden winter broth. I had vomited out my arsehole. The people sitting at the café must have heard it too. The sense of panic drained out of me with the liquid keek, being replaced by regret, fear and all of the worst traits that hangovers can give. All that was left for me to do was to slowly climb the steps to the toilet, drag my body into a cubicle, pull my trousers off and deal with the sordid manifestation of my week long thoughtless, hedonistic binge. I removed a brand new

pair of designer kaks that contained the foul business. They found their way into the bin beside the sinks. But not before I used an entire industrial roll of arse paper and four flushes to sort the rest of myself out. I was just lucky in this instance that I managed to contain the grim affair in my kaks, so I was able to pull my trousers back on and take my sodden, sorry, shaken and beaten self to the seats in the foyer. I met some of my friends to whom I announced as I sat down “I just shit myself ”. Oli and Butler where elsewhere in the museum so I sent Oli a text containing the same words: “I just shit myself ” the came down in a few minutes and after about five minutes of one friend laughing and no-one else really knowing what to do I decided I needed to go home to bed while everyone else was going on into town. If it had been a nicer day I may have been able to motor on, but it was cold and wet and I could feel the cold cutting me to my very being, my crotch sadly without the protection of underwear. That hangover lasted 5 days through Bloomsday and most of the next week, strong opioids couldn’t even stave off the regret, pain and fear, which lasted the majority of the month. It will be a cold day in hell before I drink Wood’s dark navy rum again. The two month detox before hand before a week of heavy continuous drinking was probably only going to end badly. But honestly, people talk about comedowns off ecstasy, they haven’t got a fucking clue. Still, I regret nothing. We had a lot of fun.

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3 self portraits taken with the camera on continous shutter about thirty minutes after the incident.

The unseasonably cold weather coupled with the wind and rain would normally be a mild irritant on the walk from the Busรกras to the hostel; but in my present state at the time it all cut me to my very core, turning the pile of dirt occupying the space normally reserved for my major organs into cold mud laced with regret.

...Then it all stopped, became sunny and warm and I stopped feeling quite so melodramatic.

Diary: The Day Before Bloomsday

Words and Illustration by William Woods

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A post apocalyptic aristocrat living statue, and Oli beside a bronze non living statue of James Joyce.

After Bloomsday events we made it to St. Stephen’s Green where by body finally gave up and I spent a surprisingly and dangerously long time sleeping on a big flat rock.

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Music & Culture

Live Show Photo Essay

BEE MICK SEE

BIRDS OVER NUPES

E.P. LAUNCH Photography by William Woods

Bee Mick See is by far one of the most original and enjoyable artists in Belfast and his live performances are just as entertaining. His latest gig in Auntie Annies to release his new E.P. ‘Birds Over Nupes’ didn’t fail to live up to expectations. I went down with a Canon 600d I had checked out from university to take some photos and put together a short photo essay for you here.

Photo Essays: Bee Mick See E.P. Launch

Photography by William Woods

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ee Mick See is by far one of the most original and enjoyable artists in Belfast and his live performances are just as entertaining. His latest gig in Auntie Annies to release his new E.P. ‘Birds Over Nupes’ didn’t fail to live up to expectations. I went down with a Canon 600d I had checked out from university to take some photos and put together a short photo essay for you here. Bee Mick See’s unique breed of hip hop gives something entirely wonderful to the scene in Belfast. He has that magic ability to write songs poking fun at himself and songs about having fun as well as more sober songs about important issues. This ability to not take yourself or the world seriously and still bring attention to things wrong with the world is a quality, I think, that breeds fantastic music and people. The new E.P. ‘Birds Over Nupes’ is fantastic and a steal at £2 digital and £3 physical on his bandcamp. Bee Mick See always manges to keep his material sounding fresh and comes up with something new for each release, and subsequently his live shows. Bee Mick See’s live gigs are a very special experience indeed, and as such there was no way I was missing the launch of his new E.P. in Auntie Annies. Bee Mick See and his long time accomplice in crime Paul Denver didn’t fail to deliver a fantastically original and entertaining performance with Niall Lawler providing hosting duties. You could see the work put into giving us something we can all enjoy. Including highlights of soya milk shots being handed out to audience members and the raffle with wonderful prizes including a crate of WKD blue, a bottle of Lambrini, a bottle of Tesco cider and a lunch date with the man himself. I brought a camera down to try and catch the pure absurd joy of it all and with any luck the photos I have posted here will give you a sense of the fun we all had there that night. If you’ve never seen Bee Mick See live I’d advise you put it on your list of things to do in 2013 right now.

Photo Essays: Bee Mick See E.P. Launch

Photography by William Woods

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Thanks

THANKS Bad Break has been an ambition of ours for a few years now, originally concieved as a zine concerning the Glasgow punk scene. It never really got off the ground while I was living in Glasgow, and so was put permanently on hold as I got ready to move back to Belfast to study. Then, in my second year as a graphic design student I got tasked to design a brief of my own and took the opportunity to write design and produce this issue of Bad Break, with Oli helping writing the Editorial and acting as an editor for the pieces I had written. It is our hope that in subsequent issues we will be able to showcase more of the arts and culture of both Belfast and Glasgow and get more people involved to make a really great magazine. The photographs in this issue were taken mostly with a Nikon N90 with a 50mm f 1.8 Prime lens and a 18 -80 mm lens or a Bronica SQ - B with a 80mm f 2.8 prime lens. Both with Illford XP - 2 400 film, or Porta 400 film. Some photos were taken with a Yashica FX-D with Fuji 200 or Kodak 100 iso film. Others were shot witha Canon 550 d digital camera with a 18-55mm lens. Please feel free to contact us with any thoughts, suggestions or if you would like to contribute to future issues. Badbreakmagazine@gmail.com

Cheers, Willie & Oli

Photo Credit: Linzi Oliver


Bad Break #01