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TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION

MAY 2014


Inner City Christian Federation’s (ICCF) involvement in the South East Community Association target area dates back to the late 1980’s. As has been the case for all of our housing and community development efforts since ICCF’s founding in 1974, our vision for the renewed health and vitality of this area now known as Tapestry Square is singly focused on the creation of healthy, balanced and attractive opportunities for all people to enjoy. In pursuit of that goal this report is the result of ICCF’s continuing efforts to present the exciting possibilities and incorporate the desires of all area stakeholders. Very few daunting challenges and their ambitious and sensitive responses can be planned at a single point in time and realized overnight. The revitalization of Tapestry Square is no different. The board and staff of ICCF are pleased to present this report, but please note that this is not a final package of plans and schedules. This as an interim report based on our progress so far. Having heard the input of a great variety of stakeholders we are excited about going forward with next steps. These will focus on further research into site planning, architecture and finance of all that will be built so that we can soon celebrate a neighborhood that once again brims with safety and opportunity for all. ICCF will not always be in full control of the multiple factors that will impact large scale community development efforts. Building codes, loan underwriting standards and investor requirements and many other parameters will influence the final fulfillment of our collective vision. ICCF is firmly committed to carefully integrating all stakeholder input into these external standards. However it is not likely that all stakeholders will realize all of their hopes for this area. I trust that ICCF can count on your continued feedback as we go forward with the next steps in this exciting effort. For our part we will regularly report on our progress.

This report produced with the generous support of the DTE Energy Foundation and the Urban Planning Consultants at Williams & Works.

Thanks so much for your interest and support. Jonathan Bradford, President and CEO Inner City Christian Federation

Williams engineers . planners . surveyors

& Works a tradition of service


TS

EN NT CO SECTION PAGE One: PROJECT OVERVIEW

3

Two: EXISTING CONDITIONS

9

Three: COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

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Four: RECOMMENDATIONS 25 Five: SITE LAYOUT 35 APPENDIX

Tapestry Square is located at 100 Wealthy Street in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan. Tapestry Square covers multiple blocks and is bounded by Cherry Street to the north, Lafayette Avenue to the east, Franklin Street to the south, and Division Avenue to the west. This report captures the community conversations that followed the question “How should Block A be designed and developed to achieve long term impact for all who live and work on the south east side of Grand Rapids”?


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ON

PROJECT OVERVIEW THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF TAPESTRY SQUARE HAS A LONG HISTORY BUT IN 2014, THE COMMUNITY GATHERED AGAIN TO DELIBERATE AND DECIDE HOW THESE FOUR BLOCKS CAN BE USED AND DESIGNED ITS FUTURE IS BEING WRITTEN NOW


PROJECT OVERVIEW

THIS IS A COMMUNITY BLOCK THAT IS POISED FOR REDEVELOPMENT...

AND THIS IS A TIMELY MOMENT TO SEEK SOLUTIONS. 4

TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)


PROJECT OVERVIEW

THIS AREA STUDY IS INTENDED TO HELP DETERMINE BEST AND PREFERRED LAND USES FOR A DEVELOPMENT SITE AT THE GATEWAY OF THREE DISTINCT GRAND RAPIDS NEIGHBORHOODS.

WHAT IS TAPESTRY SQUARE?

WEAVING THE STORY TOGETHER In 2014, the Inner City Christian Federation (ICCF), in collaboration with community stakeholders convened a series of community engagement activities to reignite a vision for the neighborhood known as Tapestry Square. The community conversation that ensued is captured in this report, which provides a framework for revitalization of this vacant space that anchors millions of dollars in public and private sector investment, and is one of the last remaining vacant parcels at the gateway of downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan. The vision is a result of both qualitative and quantitative data. It is a vision captured from the voices of residents, stakeholders, and leadership encouraging ICCF to help transition this corner into a dense and dynamic destination that responds to the investments that have been made, especially in bus rapid transit, to create an authentic urban place. It is also a vision based on demographic shifts in our population, as well as market studies conducted for residential and commercial development. Phase One of Tapestry Square, completed in 2012, has already brought much needed retail and housing opportunities to the Wealthy Street corridor. The question now is, what’s next?

Tapestry Square is a unique mixed use neighborhood adjacent to Downtown Grand Rapids at the crossroads of the Heartside Neighborhood, Heritage Hill Neighborhood Association, and the Southeast Community Association.

WHY IS THIS AREA IMPORTANT? The south east side of Grand Rapids is experiencing tremendous growth in residential and commercial development. Tapestry Square seeks to weave together commerce and community by adding quality and diverse housing, expanded retail opportunities , and business opportunities to the neighborhood.

WHO IS INVOLVED IN THE REDEVELOPMENT OF TAPESTRY SQUARE? The Inner City Christian Federation (ICCF) based in Grand Rapids, Michigan is a non-profit organization seeking to expand housing opportunities for people in the Greater Grand Rapids area. ICCF believes that decent housing is a basic human need and an important building block for families and communities. ICCF is a community development organization that provides high quality, affordable housing and essential services for those who would not otherwise have this opportunity. In doing so, ICCF works with others toward the realization of a healthy, vibrant community in which people of all walks of life are treated with respect and dignity and have the opportunity to grow and thrive.

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PROJECT OVERVIEW

THE HERE AND NOW The neighborhood where Tapestry Square is located has an interesting past that is typical of several mid-size cities across the United States. Wealthy Street and Division Avenue were turn of the century thoroughfares that integrated neighborhood residential areas with its retail business district somewhat seamlessly. The streets were a place where pedestrians, automobile drivers, and streetcar passengers could traverse in relative comfort and safety.

Area south of Wealthy purchased and platted by first area developer.

Census records indicate that 1910 persons lived with this area.

LATE 1800’s

TURN OF THE CENTURY

The neighborhood experienced vast redevelopment during the 1950s, and small blocks were broken up with highways, while social unrest and various government housing initiatives led to the demolition of core neighborhoods and historic housing. The once active blocks fell to disrepair following the collapse of stabilized neighborhoods, and what followed were decades of disinvestment and increasing crime rates.

St. Mary’s Hospital,Catholic Central, St. Andrews Catholic Elementary, and Vandenberg Elementary constituted institutional buildings in the area.

1920’s

1970’s

1980’s

1990’s

Neighborhood unrest strikes Grand Rapids. Several businesses burned on east side of Jefferson, just north of Franklin. Mary Free Bed Hospital relocates to Wealthy Street and Lafayette Avenue.

South East Community Association (SECA) and ICCF research neighborhood needs, prepare Neighborhood Partnership Plan, approved by Michigan State Housing Development Authority.

ICCF constructs Pleasant Prospect Homes I and II; SECA and City of GR completes major street, alley and lighting improvement effort.

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TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

MILLENNIUM ICCF and SECA conducts planning clinics to study revitalization possibilities from Division Avenue to Lafayette Avenue, and Cherry Street to Franklin Street.


PROJECT OVERVIEW

At the start of the millennium, ICCF recognized the opportunity for community revitalization in an effort to eliminate blight and crime while bringing stability and opportunities to the greatest number of people possible. ICCF partnered with neighborhood organizations to begin the process of determining what this community reinvestment and revitalization might look like.

There were 43 retail businesses operating within 2 blocks each direction from the corner of Wealthy Street and Jefferson Avenue.

In 2008, just as the Wealthy Street reconstruction was complete, the economic recession stalled further development. In 2012, ICCF was able to revisit the project, renaming it Tapestry Square. In 2012, ground broke on the first buildings, and in 2013, a new Grand Rapids public school was established in the neighborhood. Bus Rapid Transit will open in August 2014, with a stop at Tapestry Square.

Mayor’s Model Village program launched as part of federally funded urban renewal. All houses between Logan Street and Pleasant Street, Jefferson Avenue and Lafayette Avenue demolished.

The 131 expressway opened with an exit/entrance at Wealthy Street.

MID CENTURY

EARLY 2000’s Grand Rapids Catholic Diocese moves into new headquarters at corner of Wealthy and Division, a renovated former Chevrolet dealership.

2007-2009 Rebuilding of Wealthy from Division to Madison completed.

1970 - 1975

2010

2012

Census records indicate approximately 650 people living in the Tapestry Square area.

ICCF constructs first buildings at Tapestry Square, south side of Wealthy Street between Sheldon Avenue and LaGrave Avenue.

2013 Grand Rapids University Preparatory Academy opens at Division Avenue and Logan Street.

TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

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PROJECT OVERVIEW

TAPESTRY SQUARE FAST FACTS

8.25 ACRES

8

19M IN CURRENT INVESTMENT

MIXED USE

Future Land Use

TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

EXISTING ZONING

TRANSITIONAL CITY CENTER (TCC)

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TAPESTRY SQUARE RENTAL UNITS

7,000 SQUARE FEET OF OCCUPIED RETAIL


O

TW

EXISTING CONDITIONS TAPESTRY SQUARE IS FOUR SQUARE BLOCKS ON THE EDGE OF THREE DISTINCT NEIGHBORHOODS AT THE INTERSECTION OF TWO KEY THOROUGHFARES

WITH A VISION TO BE ONE OF THE MOST INFLUENTIAL AREAS OF THE CITY


EXISTING CONDITIONS

BLOCKS BLOCK A

BLOCK B

Block A is bordered by Wealthy Street to the north, Division Avenue to the west, Sheldon Avenue to the East, and Logan Street to the south. Block A features a prominent corner at Wealthy and Division, and benefits from The Rapid BRT Silver Line. Block A is “the open” slate of Tapestry Square, available for a range of mixed-uses.

Block B, bordered by Wealthy Street, LaGrave Avenue, Logan Street, and Sheldon Avenue sits in close proximity to the medical complex of St. Mary’s and Mary Free Bed and is bordered by the Heritage Hill neighborhood. Block B has seen significant development and is partially built out with mixed-use commercial, retail, and residential development.

BLOCK C

BLOCK D

Block C lies along the Division Avenue corridor, between Logan Street and Buckley Street, west of Sheldon Avenue. Block C is home to the new Grand Rapids Public School University Preparatory Academy (UPREP). Block C is entirely built out with the possibility for additions to the UPREP campus.

Block D is entirely residential and sits on the south side of Logan Street, between Sheldon Avenue and LaGrave Avenue, and north of Buckley Street. The homes within Block D are part of the South East Community Association Neighborhood. Block D would be ideal for added residential housing complimentary to existing neighborhood housing.

A

C

B

D

2012 Existing Conditions/Concept Sketch

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TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)


EXISTING CONDITIONS

TAPESTRY SQUARE NEIGHBORHOODS St. Mary’s Health Complex

Rapid Central Station Diocese of Grand Rapids

Heartside Park

Downtown Market

UPREP Academy

HEARTSIDE NEIGHBORHOOD

Mary Free Bed

BLOCK A

BLOCK B

BLOCK C

BLOCK D

SOUTH EAST COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION (SECA)

Child Discovery Center

The Heartside Neighborhood has more than 2,900 residents according to the 2010 US Census. Most of the housing in Heartside is dense mixed-use residential, with primarily renter-occupied (80%) multi-story housing units.The majority of residents in Heartside are white (63%), black or African American (24%), or Hispanic or Latino (7%). Recently, Heartside has benefited from the development of the Downtown Market, and is experiencing a growth spurt of housing and retail development along its primary corridor on Ionia Avenue. South East Community Association (SECA) is home to over 4,900 residents and includes the area of Tapestry Square. The majority of resident are black or African American (55%), Hispanic or Latino (25%), and white (11%). The area features high density, single-family homes, with a balance of renter- occupied (50%) and owner-occupied housing units (30%). SECA benefits from a strong industrial base and is heavily trafficked due to proximity and entrance ramps onto US-131.

HERITAGE HILL NEIGHBORHOOD

TAPESTRY SQUARE SITS AT THE JUNCTION OF THREE GRAND RAPIDS NEIGHBORHOODS.

Heritage Hill is a community of over 4,100 residents, with the primary demographic being white (90%).The majority of housing is dense, multi-family, renter-occupied (68%) homes. Heritage Hill is one of the largest urban Historic Districts in the country, with homes dating from 1843. This neighborhood is popular for families and college students alike, and is a connection to Eastown and East Grand Rapids.

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EXISTING CONDITIONS

AREA DEMOGRAPHICS The demographic data presented here is representative of a geographic area within a 3-minute driving radius from the intersection of Wealthy & Division and is based on 2010 U.S. Census Data.

POPULATION

29,927

6,087

People within 3 minute driving radius from Wealthy & Division

(202,395 Grand Rapids)

People Per Square Mile

(4,534 Grand Rapids)

AGE RACE

12

0-4

9.0%

5-9

7.8%

41% Caucasian

10-14

6.1%

35.7% Black or African American

15-19

7.6%

16.1% Other Race

20-24

10.0%

5.2% Two or More Races

25-29

11.9%

1%

30-39

16.2%

0.8% Asian

40-49

12.2%

0.2% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander Islander

50-59

9.4%

60-69

5.3%

70+

4.6%

American Indian or Alaskan Native

TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)


EXISTING CONDITIONS

AREA DEMOGRAPHICS

HOUSING

ECONOMY GRAND RAPIDS

TAPESTRY SQUARE Unemployment Rate

17.5%

25.5%

$16,476

Per Capita Income

$20,902

$32,198

Median Household Income

$47,496

2.45%

2,735

Area Businesses

2010 - 2015 Household Income Growth Rate

2.53%

55,813 Jobs

There are more than five (5) times as many jobs within a 3-minute drive of the subject site as there were employed residents, making the Wealthy Street & Division Avenue site a major employment area.

TAPESTRY SQUARE AREA

13,669 Total Housing Units 2,488 Houses per Sq./Mi.

GRAND RAPIDS

80,619 Housing Units 1,815 Houses per Sq./Mi.

TAPESTRY SQUARE AREA (3 mile radius)

70%

Renter - Occupied Housing Units

75%

Occupied Housing Units

2.47

Average Household Size

30%

Owner - Occupied Housing Units

15%

Vacant Housing Units

11,582 Total Occupied Households

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EXISTING CONDITIONS

INDICATOR SYNTHESIS There are several indicators that speak to the social, economic, and housing forecast of the Tapestry Square area. Below is a matrix that defines these indicators in terms of the change since 2000, the affect each indicator has as an economic capacity builder, and desired outcomes that will solidify Tapestry Square as an economically and socially viable area within Grand Rapids. The desired outcomes correlate directly to input received from the public at community open house events. Each indicator map can be found in the Appendix. INDICATOR

CHANGE (2000-2010)

IMPACT

-

DESIRED OUTCOME (2020)

NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS

DECREASED INCREASE the number of households in the Tapestry Square neighborhood

HOUSING DENSITY

DECREASED INCREASE density to achieve urban effectiveness

OWNER OCCUPIED HOUSING

DECREASED INCREASE opportunities for home ownership and stabilization

RENTER OCCUPIED HOUSING

DECREASED INCREASE versatile and viable housing options

NUMBER OF VIOLENT CRIMES

DECREASED MAINTAIN and continue to see a drop in violent crimes

RESIDENTS WITH NO HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA

DECREASED MAINTAIN and continue to see an increase in adult educational attainment

PERCENT OF NON-WHITE RESIDENTS

DECREASED MAINTAIN neighborhood inclusivity

PERCENT OF CIVILIANS EMPLOYED

DECREASED INCREASE employment opportunities in the area

*IMPACT

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- This has had a negative impact on the community

TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

+

+ /

-

+ This has had a positive impact on the community

/ This has not yet had a

significant impact on the community


EXISTING CONDITIONS

WALKABILITY

1 MILE

Tapestry Square has the benefit of being in close proximity to the core downtown area, transit options, recreation, neighborhoods, entertainment, retail, schools, and health services.

MICHIGAN STREET Medical Mile

1M I

1/2 MILE

1/2 M 4M

1 MILE

IL E

GRAND RIVER Recreation

1/2 MILE

1/2 MILE 10 min

1/4 MILE 5 min

1 MILE UPTOWN

Entertainment & Higher Education

1/2 MILE

Neighborhoods & Community Schools

Industry

1 MILE 20 min

FULTON STREET

Cultural Institutions & Commerce

HISTORIC DISTRICT

GRANDVILLE AVENUE

WALKABLE DISTANCES

E IL

1/

LE

DOWNTOWN

Arts, Higher Education & Entertainment

1/2 MILE

1 MILE

SOUTH DIVISION

Education & Recreation TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

E

RE

TAPESTRY SQUARE IS A COMMUNITY CENTERED AREA DEVELOPMENT PLAN

THE INPUT, FEEDBACK, AND IDEAS FROM COMMUNITY MEMBERS WILL HELP DETERMINE THE GUIDING PRINCIPLES THE GUIDING PRINCIPLES WILL ENSURE THAT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT REFLECTS COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

COMMUNITY VISIONING WORKSHOP AT UNIVERSITY PREPARATORY ACADEMY ICCF hosted two community input open houses to gather public perspectives on preferred uses for redevelopment of Tapestry Square at Wealthy Street and Division Avenue. These meetings helped to identify current challenges and potential opportunities and addressed needs and desires from residents, business owners, stakeholders, and other community groups.

TOP COMMUNITY PRIORITIES Participants were encouraged to select their top neighborhood priorities in the following categories. The statements below represent the priorities that generated the greatest number of responses.

EDUCATION Access to an above average elementary school

HOUSING

NEEDS ASSESSMENT The objective statements below were developed during the Wealthy Jefferson Development Initiative in 2002. Participants at the University Preparatory Academy (UPREP) Open House identified the level of progress made on those objectives since 2002.

THESE OBJECTIVES HAVE BEEN MET:

• Traffic speeds on Jefferson and Wealthy streets will be reduced • Vandenberg Elementary School hall be reopened, and preferably returned to use as a conventional neighborhood school • Deteriorated residential and commercial structures will be demolished or rehabilitated

THESE OBJECTIVES ARE IMPORTANT AND NEED TO BE REVISITED:

• High quality housing will be built on vacant lots • Neighborhood retail stores will return, including a full service grocery store

THESE OBJECTIVES ARE IN PROGRESS:

Mixed-use development (homes and retail combined)

SOCIAL Create a safe environment for all people at all times of day

PLACEMAKING Improve streetscaping with trees, lights, and common areas

HEALTH Ensure access to a full grocery store

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TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

• Illicit and illegal activities will be eliminated • All current homeowners will be able to continue to enjoy their homes, including some form of protection against tax increases that could threaten their home ownership in the future • The playground at Vandenberg will be expanded and converted to a park (now The Child Discovery Center) • The quantity of off-street surface parking will be greatly reduced • New owner-occupied housing will be targeted to a variety of buyers; affordable rental units will be interspersed among the new housing • Pedestrian safety


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

TAPESTRY SQUARE CORRIDOR CHARACTERISTICS Open house participants analyzed opportunities, assets and challenges. Using sticky notes and an aerial map, they placed notes that correspond to the numbers below. The map below and related lists indicate the various site conditions to consider for future planning and development, as identified by the stakeholders who attended the workshop.

COMMUNITY DESIRES 1 Grocery store 2 Small grocer 3 Middle income housing 4 Draft house 5 More parking 6 Middle income affordable

12

housing 7 Library

23 24

25

15 14 1

17

20 2

10 9

8 School gym

7

18

8 19

22

11

9 Market/store 10 Restaurant

3 4

13

16

6

28

5

26

22

11 Daycare 12 Splash pad

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13 Temporary garden 14 Improved gateway

21

15 Sidewalks and bike lanes

COMMUNITY CHALLENGES

COMMUNITY ASSETS 16 Condos

20 Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)

17 Access to food

21 Daycare

18 Rental business

22 Great school

19 Housing

23 Good transit

24 Safety 25 Better pedestrian crossing 26 Too many surface parking lots

27 No connectivity 28 Challenging crime area

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

OPEN HOUSE SYNTHESIS Based upon input from the community open house event, these themes emerged as central to the development of Tapestry Square, and will inform the guiding principles for land use planning. Tapestry Square sits at a crossroads of established neighborhoods and is a southern anchor of Downtown. It must serve diverse needs to meet current demands while also planning for a future influx of income diverse populations. Tapestry Square is a community that will benefit from a network of safe, walkable streets that provide access to varied retail and business opportunities and accommodate housing for a diverse mix of residents.

Participants at the community visioning open house at UPrep Academy, March 2014.

Tapestry Square is a vital connection between downtown Grand Rapids and neighborhoods to the south. Thus, the area must restore, revive, and strengthen existing neighborhoods while also building an authentic urban place that acts as a bridge to Downtown Grand Rapids. Tapestry Square will be home to people who represent diverse incomes, ethnicity, education levels, family types and sizes, and social interests. Housing types should be just as varied. Tapestry Square will be a destination, providing ample civic and social places that promote community connectedness.

Infographic used to educate and to synthesize the priorities activity from the open house.

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TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

STAKEHOLDER MEETING Following the community open house, ICCF hosted a stakeholder meeting at Blue35, a co-work space, with key leadership in the community, business professionals, and community development representatives who contribute to redevelopment efforts in Grand Rapids. Below and on the next pages are some of the Blue35 Big Ideas that were generated by stakeholders, with their take-away questions listed below.

STREETSMART

GATEWAY TAPESTRY SQUARE IS A GATEWAY TO THE CITY

SMART STREET DESIGN WILL LEAD TO SMART GROWTH The City has plans to improve pedestrian features at Division Avenue and McConnell Street, while also making traffic adjustments that will add a left turn lane on Division Avenue to westbound Wealthy Street.

Block A is at the intersection of 2 busy streets, one of them (Wealthy Street) being a gateway into the downtown. There is a possibility that Wealthy Street could one day be at-grade under US 131.

KEY

Q

The streets should first and foremost be scaled for the pedestrian.

If the long term goal is to attract a grocer, what are other neighborhood components that would support and enhance that vision and make it a viable option in the marketplace?

Sheldon Avenue can be designed as a pedestrian thoroughfare. Pedestrian safety is important. Typically, a pedestrian feels safe if there is 2 feet of space between the building and the sidewalk and another 2 feet of space between the pedestrian and the street.

KEY

Q

How do we accommodate new uses and parking in a way that accentuates the public realm, while enhancing safety and supporting commerce? TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

GOOD GROWTH GOOD GROWTH AT TAPESTRY SQUARE WILL COME FROM TRANSITIONAL USES AND A CLEAR FORECAST OF FUTURE NEEDS (Below are comments captured from stakeholders that relate to the Big Idea of Good Growth)

Focus on adding greater density. Grocery stores require a significant amount of non-retail space for loading and stocking. In addition, grocery store prospects have expressed an interest in streetfront entrances to manage theft.

Tapestry Square should consider the addition of stacked flats with horizontal layouts as a housing option.

There will be certain A Streets and B Streets that need to be defined in Tapestry Square. Wealthy Street and Division Avenue are A streets, meaning main retail frontages.

It is possible that rental units will fill up with college students and other young professional tenants. If the neighborhood is successful, they just might stay.

Tapestry Square is outside the DDA district; and therefore, it can capture brownfield tax increment financing.

Tapestry Square sits at the intersection of three distinct neighborhoods; Heritage Hill, SECA, and Heartside. Successful retailers will understand how to capture the buying power of all demographics in the area.

A well-defined public space to terminate the McConnell Street vista might be a true focal point and provide a visual connection to the Downtown Market.

This is a prime area for Community Revitalization Program funding from MEDC. There may be partnership opportunities with Pure Michigan partners to initiate the effort. Ground floor retail with office and residential space above seems like the most logical type of mixed use for the area.

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TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

How can the project incorporate flexible retail spaces to accommodate a small grocer that may grow over time?

KEY

Q

How do we program the space in a way that contributes to the public realm through the placement of storefronts along key streets while still hiding the parking behind active uses and/or within a building?


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

DESIGNING in CONTEXT CAREFUL URBAN DESIGN WILL CONTRIBUTE TO THOUGHTFUL GROWTH

(Below are comments captured from stakeholders that relate to the Big Idea of Design in Context)

Make a practice of placing similar building types facing one another on opposite sides of the streets, specifically on Sheldon Avenue. Best Practice Example: Rylee’s ACE Hardware on Michigan Street and Fulton Street: Windows at storefront, theft prevention, ample but not abundant parking. Baker Lofts are a best practice example of urban housing, as are the stacked flats at Douglas Street and Seward Avenue that Rockford Construction is building. It would be best to take an organic perspective of the space and build the space for immediate needs that can transition into future growth and development. The corner of Wealthy Street and Division Avenue needs to hold the corner. The building needs to be at the right-of-way to frame the intersection. Buildings can step back at 4-5 stories, and build up to 9-12 stories within the block.

KEY

Q

How do we ensure that new buildings will frame the street and create walkable urbanism?

Touch screen, cloud based ideation technology at Blue35.

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FO

RECOMMENDATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS ARE FLUID USES ARE TRANSITIONAL IMPLEMENTATION IS ESSENTIAL


RECOMMENDATIONS

KEY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF TAPESTRY SQUARE Good growth and a measure of success for Tapestry Square will depend on three key elements:

1

The commitment from community members and stakeholders to outline a clear preferred vision for Tapestry Square.

2

The ability of local officials, developers, and entrepreneurs to easily recognize and contribute to the preferred vision for Tapestry Square.

3

The establishment of a concise set of guiding principles that will assist ICCF and other local investors in assessing successes and areas of improvement in order to meet both short and long term goals.

Guiding Principles are integral to the planning process, and help ensure that the above mentioned elements are met. The guiding principles for Tapestry Square were developed after a review of past planning efforts, conversations with the community, and a review of best practices for urban development.

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TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

GUIDING PRINCIPLES MIXED USE / MIXED HOUSING The future land use plan for the City of Grand Rapids calls for Tapestry Square to be part of a mixed-use area that serves as an extension of the downtown and integrates with area neighborhoods. Space is designed to accommodate a range of uses, a mix of housing, and allow for transitional growth. TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT Space is designed to capitalize on recent transit development and accommodate existing multi-modal needs while preparing for future developments in transit design. WALKABLE URBANISM Space is designed to enhance and promote the human scale. Pedestrian access takes precedence over motor vehicle access. INTERIM USES / INCREMENTAL URBANISM Build an economic base from the inside out by creating a stimulating and equitable environment for entrepreneurs, storefront by storefront. MARKET ANALYSIS Building types and uses respond to market needs, anticipate market trends and are flexible to meet future demands. SITE PLANNING Urban design best practices result in a dynamic, people-centered public realm, scaled to humans while accommodating transit, bicycles, and vehicular modes of transport.


RECOMMENDATIONS

MIXED USE/ MIXED HOUSING A mix of uses coupled with a mix of housing will allow for responsive growth, helping to connect existing neighborhoods to the downtown by providing a range of diverse housing types. Mixed use development at Tapestry Square will be demonstrated through the inclusion of: A

B

Neighborhood mixed use building – Storefronts front Wealthy Street, continuing the established pattern, residential and/or office above. Buildings are at least 3 stories, gradually increasing number of stories west towards Division Avenue and south toward McConnell Street. Urban mixed use building – Anchor building, at least 5 stories in height, built to the corner provides a visual cue and sense of arrival. Storefronts line Wealthy Street and Division Avenue. Entries are placed on both frontages.

C

Live/work building – Storefronts along Division Avenue, allowing for transitional uses of residential and retail. Upper stories include townhomes, stacked flats or office space (rental or fee-simple). Building is at least 3 stories in height, with ground floor entries.

D

Courtyard apartments – Multi-story courtyard housing, opening to shared common space within the block, and connecting east across Sheldon Avenue. Units front Logan Street and Sheldon Avenue.

E

Parking structure – Structured parking is wrapped with active uses; vehicle/ bike storage, loading and all ancillary services are internal to the block, with secondary access from the parking deck. Below grade parking is also an option.

B

A E

A A C

D

CONTEXT APPROPRIATE Above is suggested placement for elements of mixed use development.

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RECOMMENDATIONS

TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT Transit Oriented Development (TOD) is a mixed-use development pattern meant to maximize access to public transportation and often incorporates features to encourage the use of public transit in place of automobiles. TOD neighborhoods typically have a center with a transit station or stop (train station, metro station, tram stop, or bus stop). This center is surrounded by relatively high-density development (at least 30 units per acre) with progressively lower-density development spreading outward from the center. TODs generally are located within a radius of one-quarter to one-half mile (5 to 10 minute walk) from a transit stop, as this is considered to be an appropriate scale for pedestrians, and encourages walkable living.

Successful Transit Oriented Development at Tapestry Square will be demonstrated by: •

High density in the north and west portions of Block A, nearest to the Silver Line BRT station on Division Avenue.

Dedicated bike lanes on all transit routes with combined transit and biking infrastructure such as shelters and bike racks/ bike parking.

Dedicated walkways, sidewalks, crosswalks, and ample lighting to encourage pedestrian accessibility and connections to transit.

Reduced off-street parking through the utilization of on-street parking and placing structured or underground parking internal to the block. Wealthy Street and Division Avenue will have storefronts with active ground-floor uses.

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Neighborhoods connected to affordable transportation, a mix of services that meet all income-level needs, and housing for mixed incomes to stabilize the housing market in the immediate area. Mixed income and mixed unit types within the same building are preferred. TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

TAPESTRY SQUARE

Tapestry Square is linked to the Silver Line, Bus Rapid Transit, connecting it to downtown, the Medical Mile, south Division and the cities of Kentwood and Wyoming.


RECOMMENDATIONS

DIVISION AVENUE & McCONNELL STREET The BRT stop at Division Avenue and McConnell Street will feature 48’ shelters on each side of Division Avenue. The platform will be barrier free and accessible, with a sloped ramp and handrails and will feature step-less boarding on BRT buses. The stop will feature bicycle parking and the route will be accentuated with pedestrian friendly features such as improved street lamps, enhanced landscaping, wayfinding signage, and space for public art.

According to the American Public Transportation Association, the following metrics have been realized with Bus Rapid Transit:

LIVE

PROPOSED BRT PLATFORM STATIONS AND BUSES

In 2012, neighborhoods near public transit performed 41% better financially than properties without easy transit access.

WORK Living in neighborhoods with access to public transit provides up to 5X as many jobs per square mile as compared to other regions in a given area.

SHOP When located near a public transit stop, retail property experiences a 167% average increase in value, the highest of all property types. TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

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RECOMMENDATIONS

WALKABLE URBANISM The principle goal of streetscape improvement is to enhance the pedestrian atmosphere and experience at Tapestry Square. Pedestrian friendly streets are designed to be more accommodating to pedestrian traffic than conventionally designed streets, which are designed for the automobile. The concept of “complete streets” is being systematically embraced and implemented at the local, county, and state levels, and provides for all means of transportation including walking, biking, vehicles, and transit. Pedestrian friendly streets promote smart growth, context sensitive development, and walkable neighborhoods featuring innovative design approaches. Streets that are accommodating to pedestrians also enhance overall street liveliness and help in creating a sense of place.

Storefronts and streetscape welcome transit riders into mixed use, mixed residential development node

Dedicated, marked crosswalks provide safe pedestrian and bicycle crossing

Walkable Urbanism at Tapestry Square will be demonstrated by: •

A seamless transition from the downtown area north of Wealthy Street to Tapestry Square

Safe, walkable routes from the BRT station to Tapestry Square and easily accessed transit stops

POSSIBLE COMPLETE STREET SCENARIOS Residential Scenario Complete Street

Commercial Scenario Complete Street Right of Way

• Protected and aesthetically interesting pathways and sidewalks connecting retail, housing, and open spaces and parks

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Commercial Zone

Pedestrian Zone

Buffer Green Zone

Wheels Zone Parking Zone

Transit Zone

Motor Vehicle Zone

Motor Vehicle Zone

Wheels Zone Transit Zone

Each street will have defined zones for building, pedestrians, greenspace, bike traffic, transit, and automobiles

Buffer Green Zone

TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

Pedestrian Zone

Dedicated crosswalks with pedestrian prioritized street crossing lights

Residential Zone


RECOMMENDATIONS

TAPESTRY SQUARE INTERIM USES Derived from the community meeting on March 11, 2014, this graph depicts possible interim uses and activities at Tapestry Square identified by participants.

ACTIVE USES

OUTDOOR EXERCISE CLASSES

COMMUNITY GARDEN Temporary or does not require dedicated space

OUTDOOR ART SHOWS WITH MUSIC

TEMPORARY EVENT SPACE FOR AN OUTDOOR FESTIVAL, OPEN MIC NIGHT, OR CULINARY ARTS FESTIVAL

OUTDOOR GYM PLAYGROUND FOR ADULTS, BOOT CAMP, REALLY FREE MARKET, WALKING MEDITATION LABYRINTH PIAZZA

BEER FESTIVAL

ICE SKATING RINK SKATE PARK DOG PARK SUMMER PROGRAMS

ART PRIZE VENUE Permanent and requires dedicated space

FOOD TRUCK COURT, URBAN HOP FARM

MEDITATION OR PRAYER GARDEN

PASSIVE USES $

COTTAGE INDUSTRY VENDING SPACE

POP-UP DRIVE-IN MOVIE THEATER

TIME/MONEY

UPREP GYM

BOCCE BALL, SCULPTURE GARDEN WITH TREE EDGES, DOG PARK WITH TREES, HOPS TRELLISES.

VELODROME FOR TRACK CYCLING (WEST MICHIGAN VELODROME PROJECT)

TREE GROVE, SPACE THAT’S FLEXIBLE FOR MULTIPLE KINDS OF ACTIVITIES

$

$

$

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RECOMMENDATIONS

MARKET ANALYSIS Two market studies have been prepared for Tapestry Square. A Target Market Analysis, by Zimmerman Volk in 2013 identifies the potential housing mix and absorption potential of the site given current market conditions. The grocery study by Pelaton Associates identified market potential for a grocer. TARGET MARKET ANALYSIS over the next four years

GROCER market potential

New Multi-Family Rentals:

6-10 units absorbed per month

Single-Family Attached For-Sale:

2-3 units absorbed per month

The household population within a 3-minute drive of Tapestry Square site is 28,562 – providing the site with one of the highest population densities found in the City of Grand Rapids. The aggregate income of the Tapestry Square market area (3-minute drive) was found to be the second highest in the markets investigated during this study, with a combined household income totaling $493 million.

HOUSING TYPES

1

2

The density of the population in the subject market area is higher than most areas in the city, in large part due to smaller household sizes (2.47 per unit), and the presence of more renters and college-aged residents. It should be noted that these households spend a higher percentage of their incomes on consumer goods relative to higher-income households.

3

1. Courtyard housing example 2. Stacked flats 3. Live/work/townhomes Note that ownership type and income types can be vertically and horizontally mixed throughout

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TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

Tapestry Square

1-mile radius of existing grocers serving Tapestry Square. Pelaton Research Partners, 2011


RECOMMENDATIONS

SITE PLANNING Site planning refers to the organization of the public and private realm through the placement of buildings. Consideration is given to the layout and width of rights-of-way to accommodate all modes of transport, as well as the form of buildings and their placement. Form includes the building frontage (storefront, stoop, lightwell) and how the building engages the street and sidewalk. Placement includes setbacks or build-to zones which help to define the public realm and provide a sense of enclosure to the pedestrian. A sense of enclosure results in a greater sense of security and can help shorten the perceived distance between buildings and blocks. Development at Tapestry Square will follow the A, B, C, Ds of site planning:

ACTIVATE - Both Wealthy Street and Division Avenue will be treated as

“A� streets, prime for active uses facilitating commerce. Storefronts will be placed at grade, and built to the right-of-way. Some on-street parking will be available on Division Avenue, coexisting with BRT infrastructure and the pattern of on-street parking on Wealthy Street will continue west fronting Block A.

BUILD-TO - Buildings will frame the street and be built to the corner of Wealthy Street and Division Avenue. By building to the corner, traffic may slow, especially when turning, enabling a more pedestrian-friendly intersection.

The ABCDs of site planning, Williams & Works, 2014.

CONNECT

- Green and grey infrastructure, including parkways, public spaces, bikeways, and sidewalks connect to each other and surrounding buildings.

DEFINE - Buildings are scaled in proportion to the width of the right-ofway, ideally at a 1:1 or 1:2 ratio.

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VE

FI

SITE LAYOUT LAND USE CONCEPT PLAN FOR FUTURE DEVELOPMENT


SITE LAYOUT

LAND USE PLAN The following vignettes provide a concept plan for Tapestry Square that incorporates the guiding principles. 1. Base concept plan showing existing built structures, proposed new structures, and lands devoted to parking

2. Base concept plan showing designating parking type as either surface or wrapped/underground

LA GRAVE AVENUE

LOGAN STREET

LOGAN STREET

BUCKLEY STREET

BUCKLEY STREET

New

Parking

Viewshed

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DIVISION AVENUE

DIVISION AVENUE

Existing

WEALTHY STREET LA GRAVE AVENUE

WEALTHY STREET

TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

Wrapped or Underground Parking

Surface Parking


SITE LAYOUT

3. Base concept plan showing potential building types/use of the southern portion of Block A at Logan Street and Division Avenue.

4. Base concept plan showing potential building types/use of the northern portion of Block A at Wealthy Street and Division Avenue.

WEALTHY STREET

LA GRAVE AVENUE

DIVISION AVENUE

DIVISION AVENUE

LA GRAVE AVENUE

WEALTHY STREET

LOGAN STREET

LOGAN STREET

BUCKLEY STREET

BUCKLEY STREET

Courtyard/Apartment

Live/Work/Townhome

Urban Mixed Use

Neighborhood Mixed Use

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SITE LAYOUT 6. Complete concept plan.

5. Base concept plan showing public spaces, such as courtyards, plazas and public art.

DIVISION AVENUE

LA GRAVE AVENUE

DIVISION AVENUE

LOGAN STREET

LOGAN STREET

BUCKLEY STREET

BUCKLEY STREET

Public Space/Plaza

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LA GRAVE AVENUE

WEALTHY STREET

WEALTHY STREET

Focal Point/Public Art

TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

Public Space/Plaza

Courtyard/Apartment

Existing

Live/Work/Townhome

New

Urban Mixed Use

Surface Parking

Neighborhood Mixed Use

Wrapped or Underground Parking

Focal Point/Public Art Viewshed


CONCLUSION

SUMMARY FROM PLANNING TO ACTION This study has laid out a community revitalization and reinvestment plan meant to bolster economic development, increase residency, and encourage quality community development in the Tapestry Square development area. Now is the time for Tapestry Square. Area investments indicate that this corner is prime for redevelopment. ICCF, having control of the property, has helped ensure that it will be developed in a manner that is contextual and reflects community needs and aspirations.

TIME-SENSITIVE STRATEGY WITH A COMMUNITY-FOCUSED APPROACH Tapestry Square benefits from proximity to three Grand Rapids anchor neighborhoods, a vibrant downtown area, and continued investment in bus rapid transit (BRT), thus making it an important gateway connecting residential areas to commerce, education, employment, recreation, transportation and service. Tapestry Square will have the opportunity to serve diverse housing needs, serve diverse retail and business opportunities, and will provide a place where current residents can afford to stay.

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CONCLUSION

PLANNING PROCESS This plan has established a vision and strategy to guide growth in Tapestry Square, with a focus on Block A. ICCF reached out to a consultant team, stakeholders, community members, and existing residents to help in the planning process. The planning process included: •

A thorough review of recent investment, existing plans, and proposed projects and initiatives to set the context for this planning study

A parcel-by-parcel field survey to record up-to-date information on land use and vacancy, building conditions, and public amenities such as institutions, parks, and gardens

A demographic analysis, housing market study, and retail study to assess real estate trends and market potential

Illustrative mapping of all compiled parcel data as well as hot spots for crime, commercial activity, tree coverage, traffic patterns, and access to public transportation

Extensive public outreach, which included two open house visioning workshops, one stakeholder meeting with community leaders, residents, developers, business owners, religious leaders, service providers, and City agency representatives, and a feedback session to share results and gather additional recommendations

And the creation of a set of guiding principles, building types, and site concept plans which will help to knit Tapestry Square into the surrounding urban fabric of downtown Grand Rapids.

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TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)


CONCLUSION

GUIDING PRINCIPLES WILL GUIDE GOOD GROWTH From the planning process, a set of guiding principles was developed. The following guiding principles have been based on both community input and the ability for these guiding principles to be implemented over time in a way that will be recognized by achieved measurables. Tapestry Square is a unique project balancing several unique existing and emerging needs. Meeting these needs will require the continued engagement of current and future residents, and helping people realize their stake in the Tapestry Square development community. Tapestry Square will grow from the local support of active institutions and capital input from business investors, but will prosper from continued community participation and action.

MIXED USE / MIXED HOUSING The future land use plan for the City of Grand Rapids calls for Tapestry Square to be part of a mixed-use area that serves as an extension of the downtown and integrates with area neighborhoods. Space is designed to accommodate a range of uses, a mix of housing, and allow for transitional growth. TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT Space is designed to capitalize on recent transit development and accommodate existing multi-modal needs while preparing for future developments in transit design. WALKABLE URBANISM Space is designed to enhance and promote the human scale. Pedestrian access takes precedence over motor vehicle access. INTERIM USES / INCREMENTAL URBANISM Build an economic base from the inside out by creating a stimulating and equitable environment for entrepreneurs, storefront by storefront. MARKET ANALYSIS Building types and uses respond to market needs, anticipate market trends and are flexible to meet future demands. SITE PLANNING Urban design best practices result in a dynamic, people-centered public realm, scaled to humans while accommodating transit, bicycles, and vehicular modes of transport.

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APPENDIX

APPENDIX

TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

A-1


APPENDIX PUBLIC INPUT Community Engagement Participant List

Suzanne DeHaan Bernadine Shields Mary Neal Kim DeStigter Kathleen Grover Melinda Neal Jean Schaub Taylor Greenfield Jayvon Wallace Satorie Spicer Kim Dabbs James LaGrand Matt Fulk Daunique Harrold Lexus Harrold Heather Ibrahim Ariana Baluis Bri McKee Amy Duggan Sister Laurena Alfeu Bill Pearl Steve Volkers Ben Poosawtsee Dominique Burt Miles Taylor Kaylee Roan Suez Jan Earl Kay Courtney

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Rachel Lee Emmanuella Joseph Sue Devries Michelle Bassett Jarrett Dewyse Larry Beckwith Brian Hofstra Ana Kenyatta Hill Ashley Dietch Melody Coville Ben Johnson Michelle Hoexum Becky Butela Zakiya Jackson Eileen Kooreman Don Brooks Kate Diedrich Todd Theisen Patrick Tischler Najeem Muhammad Charlotte Booker Mark Holzbach Sara Perez David Hathaway Eric Doyle Virginia LaGrand Jay Hoekstra

TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

Jonathan Bradford, ICCF Andrea Hipps, ICCF Ryan Schmidt, ICCF Kristen Moore, ICCF Lynee Wells, Williams & Works Kendall Gilbert, Williams & Works Suzanne Schultz, City of Grand Rapids Nick Monoyios, The Rapid Conrad Venema, The Rapid Mike VanGessel, Rockford Construction Jim Talen, Kent County Commissioner Ryan Kilpatrick, Michigan Economic Dev. Corp. David de Velder, Kent County Land Bank Jim Reminga, Rockford Construction Emma Lamore, Mary Free Bed Katie Holloran, Mary Free Bed


APPENDIX PUBLIC INPUT March 11, 2014 Community Meeting Attendees We asked people to respond to the question “What do you consider your stake in the community to be?” These answers are in their words.

• To continue to help make the community a desired place to live • Good safe neighborhood • Neighbor • Considerable owner/occupant in 2 family home on Lafayette • This neighborhood is vital connection between downtown and neighborhoods to the south • Student • I go to school next door • Our students • I live here • Owner,Business owner, Resident • Student • Student • Local Non-profit • I’m a student and I live in this area • Work & visit neighborhood daily considering relocating to this area in next 5 years • Live in surrounding area, shopper/visitor • To make it a true community; neighbors know neighbors, sharing needs and gifts • Real Estate - Neighborhood Viability • Work nearby, would love to see social and economic growth also potential future resident • I am a student here next door • Student • A healthy environment • I'm a lifer - it is my home/ community • I live in Hert. Hill

• Gateway entrance to east side • Resident, potential home owner • I live a couple miles away & drive through. I want it to be nice, also a finder • Business/property owner and community neighbor • I am apart of this community • Real Estate related & personally would love to see a new thriving neighborhood • Live in it • I live nearby and am interested in affordable mixed-use income housing • Homeowner • I work downtown and would consider moving here • Homeowner, church goer, block club coordinator • Keep it healthy • It’s been our home for 35yrs • Property owner, business owner, neighbor & volunteer • Property owner, business owner, neighbor • Crime free, more jobs • Crime free, more jobs • Trying to help form a GR downtown residents council • Work • Interested neighbor-1/4 mile away • Frequent user of neighborhood services • Very high - it's close to HH and we attend Grace CRC

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APPENDIX PUBLIC INPUT March 11, 2014 Community Meeting Attendee Comments • Make the graphics online, please. Great information • Thanks • Thanks • We really would like a gym b/c students do need our physical education • I think we should use some of our space that we have to build a gym and a library • I feel that UPrep should get a gym • Connect this area to surrounding areas (Downtown Market & everything North) make it easy to cross Division & Wealthy and easy to walk & bike to homes & businesses • Thanks for your input opportunity • Keep up the Great Work! The long term benefits will be realized soon. The momentum has shifted. • What a great way to help understand the development. Has me thinking • The staff at Art Prize would love to help and learn from ICCF and this project in any way possible. Keep us posted • I believe this event should really consider a gym • I am very supportive of ICCF and all that you all do. Keep on doing. Thank you • A Trader Joe’s or Whole foods would be great for Grand Rapids and downtown in particular. A yard (private yard) space would be great for the town homes. • Thanks for doing this • Keep at it - Get public involved • Would love to keep informed • I think it should become a parking lot for the business around the area • Why Tapestry Square needs Trader Joe’s - we need a good grocery store close to Heritage Hill, downtown and the Tapestry Square redevelopment. Trader • Joe’s is an attractive destination for shopping and it will make living in Tapestry Square more desirable for city lovers. Trader Joes will not need to rely only on Tapestry Square customers-important since many of the units are not yet built. Why Trader Joe’s need Tapestry Square- it is close to Heritage Hill customers many of whom already love the chain, it is close to new apartments downtown, it is close to the new downtown market, making it a natural part of a city shopping trip for suburban customers, it is on the new silver bus line- carrying in potential customers from Kentwood, other urban Trader Joe’s stores operate in relatively small footprint buildings.

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TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)


APPENDIX EXISTING CONDITIONS Community Indicators Since 2000, the number of households has decreased in the Tapestry Square area as abandoned and occupied residential properties are converted towards newer uses. As a result in the loss of households, the housing density has also decreased since 2000. Number of Households, 2000

Number of Households, 2010

Housing Density (Houses per Square Mile), 2000

Housing Density (Houses per Square Mile), 2010

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APPENDIX EXISTING CONDITIONS Community Indicators Since 2000, the number of owner-occupied houses has decreased while the number of renter-occupied housing units has increased steadily. The overall number of housing units has fallen as the development area transitions from residential to mixed-use.

A-6

Percent of Owner-Occupied Households with Two or More Persons, 2000

Percent of Owner-Occupied Households with Two or More Persons, 2010

Percent of Housing Units that are Renter-Occupied, 2000

Percent of Housing Units that are Renter-Occupied, 2010

TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)


APPENDIX EXISTING CONDITIONS Community Indicators Between 2006 and 2009, the number of violent crimes in the Tapestry Square area significantly decreased. Since 2000, more residents in the Tapestry Square community are completing high school and earning a high school diploma. However, most areas surrounding Tapestry Square still have a relatively low educational attainment with over 25% of residents not obtaining a high school diploma, compared to the City average of 18%. Number of Violent Crimes, 2004-2006

Number of Violent Crimes, 2009

Percent of Residents with No High School Diploma, 2000

Percent of Residents with No High School Diploma, 2010

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APPENDIX EXISTING CONDITIONS Community Indicators The majority of residential areas surrounding Tapestry Square have communities with 30% or more non-white residents. Since 2000, many communities south of Tapestry Square have over 40% of non-white residents, while in the immediate area of Tapestry Square the percent has decreased. The employment rate of the Tapestry Square community has decreased since 2000. Percent of Non-White Residents, 2000

Percent of Civilians Employed, 2000

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TAPESTRY SQUARE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION INNER CITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (ICCF)

Percent of Non-White Residents, 2010

Percent of Civilians Employed, 2010


Tapestry Square Community Conversation May 2014  
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