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December 2010

Recipes Christmas Carols A Special Christmas Story

“Christmas Day in the Morning”

Shopping Guide

Decorating Ideas Business Features


December 2010

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December 2010

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t’s hard to believe that it is that time of year. The twinkle lights are being hung, Christmas trees are being dressed, and Christmas carols are filling our radio stations. Although it seems that Christmas starts a little bit earlier and earlier each year, you can’t help but notice that warm feeling inside knowing that soon you will be spending time with your family and friends. Each year during the holiday season, we take great pleasure in setting aside our regular work and sending a heartfelt message to all our friends, readers and customers. How joyful we are that this time has come again to extend to you our sincere gratitude because it is good friends, readers and advertisers like you that make our business possible. May your holiday be filled with joy and the coming year be overflowing with all good things in life. Please enjoy the 2010 Christmas Guide. Every year we publish a special magazine the highlight the Christmas spirit of our community. I would like to thank all of the advertisers that participated in this year’s publication. Most of all I would like to thank Elizabeth Kalfsbeek who has been a great deal of help in making this publication a success. Merry Christmas,

Lloyd Green Jr.

Owner - Williams Pioneer Review Publication A Datamind XP Production


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December 2010

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Thanksgiving Coffee Co. “Not just a cup, but a just cup.”

The Thanksgiving Coffee Company Staff pictured in front of the production plant and administration office in Noyo Harbor, Fort Bragg, California, when it caufht fire in July of 2010.

By ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK Writer & Contributor

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t a time when no one had heard of, or cared about, artisan coffee, Paul and Joan Katzeff moved to the Mendocino coast in 1972 to open Thanksgiving Coffee Co. out of the Mendocino Hotel – their only client. “During this time the California wine industry was becoming famous

and California cuisine was all about Alice Waters and Chez Panise,” Paul stated. “Thanksgiving Coffee grew up surrounded by this culture and a roast master was born.” He also recognizes “good karma and a decent dose of serendipity” played a part in his calling as a roaster. After two years of roasting coffee, the company had five products organized by roast color. These were the first specialty coffees to be marketed by roast color and the first packages to

have a pull date. By 1975 the Katzeff’s relocated to Noyo Harbor, which Paul describes as being similar to Cannery Row. According to Paul, it was surrounded by a very active fishery, artisan shop builders, boat captains, engine repair merchants, crazies, old salts, feisty fisherman poets and cranky deck hands. “We fit in because we were roasting coffee — who ever heard of that!” he stated. “It was Steinbeck’s ‘Cannery Row’ in the flesh. We roasted coffee in the middle of all this for 15 years. We traded coffee for fish to eat! Where craftsmanship was an everyday affair, we took our first steps toward our own form of craftsmanship-coffee roasting.” From initially having to trade coffee for fish to eat to currently producing 750,000 pounds of coffee with annual sales of more than $4 million, the artisan roasting company has come a long way in 38 years. At the very least, it has had its share of milestones of which to be proud; from becoming the first specialty coffee roaster to sell to a major grocery chain in 1978 (Safeway), to becoming the first founding charter member of


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Williams Pioneer Review

December 2010

the Specialty Coffee Association of focused on the people. The company America in 1983, and being honored has since gained a reputation not only with the prestigious for flavor, but Dr. Jean Mayer also for organic Global Citizenship and fair trade Award from The practices. Tufts Institute for “Specialty coffee Global Leadership has become the in 2008, the business coffee that cares, lives by its motto, not just about the “not just a cup, but a product but also just cup.” about the people Most recently, who produce it it dealt with a and those who devastating fire, consume it.” allegedly arson, For the the day after 4th last decade, of July last year, Thanksgiving leaving a ruined Coffee has also production area worked to be and administrative more sustainable offices. Fortunately, by reducing the unroasted bean waste through inventory and Pictured. Paul Katzeff, Co-founder, in 1972 recycling, onantique roaster were site worm preserved, causing composting, little interruption to customers. running delivery trucks on a “While it feels strange to work in percentage of biodiesel and using the shadow of our burned out former recycled paper for printed materials, home, there is much to be thankful such as coffee labels. for,” Paul blogged. “We’ve been around for nearly 40 years. The road has been long and winding and not always smooth. This was certainly a sobering experience but it showed us how much we are loved and what a strong place we hold in both our local community as well the specialty coffee community.” T h a n k s g i v i n g Pictured Thanksgiving Coffee Company prior to the fire. Coffee Co. set a goal in 1990 to become 100% organic, around the time when, In 2008 the company donated a plot of according to Paul, the business land to a local community garden, for transitioned from a company focused example. To address the larger impact specifically on the product to one more of shipping coffee around the world

and all the energy that goes into brewing and serving its coffee, Thanksgiving planted over 70,000 trees in Ethiopia to offset carbon emissions — making it the first carbon-neutral coffee company in 2002. The Katzeff’s continue to buy beans from worldwide growers in Ethiopia, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Rwanda and Uganda, recognizing that beans’ flavor represents the terroir or regional climate, soil and varieties planted in each country. Moreover, a large percentage of Thanksgiving’s product development has been influenced by environmental goals, as evidenced by the company’s private-label products for nonprofit organizations. By purchasing “Song Bird Coffees,” for example, consumers are also supporting the American Birding Association. “Gorilla Fund Coffee” helps the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International; “Cerulean Warbler Conservation Coffee” represents the American Bird Conservancy; “Bat Magic Coffees” support Wildlife Trust and Bat Conservation International, and “Java Forest Coffees” support Defenders of Wildlife. By patronizing Thanksgiving Coffee, people are championing not only the local community, by the global community at large. During this season of giving and sharing, Paul’s blog message resonates: “As the ashes settle and the dust clears, we remain Thanksgiving Coffee Company: ‘Not Just a Cup, But a Just Cup.’”

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For more information, or to place an order, visit www.thanksgivingcoffee.com.


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}

You will find additional

recipes like this throughout the magazine.

December 2010

Christmas Time Almond Toffee Submitted by: Trish Hendrickson

Ingredients • • • • • •

2 cups butter (Do NOT use Margarine) 2 ½ cups white sugar ½ teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons corn syrup 2 cups milk chocolate chips 1½ cups finely chopped alomonds

Directions

Cover a large baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large heavy bottomed saucepan, combine

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the butter, sugar, salt and corn syrup. Cook over medium heat, stirring until the butter is melted. Allow to come to a boil, and cook until the mixture becomes a dark amber color and the tempture has reached 295 degrees F. Stir constantly. As soon as the toffee reaches the proper temperature stir in 1½ cups almonds and remove from heat. pour toffee onto the prepared baking sheet. Sprinkle the chocolate over the top, and let it set for 5 minutes to soften. Spread the chocolate into a thin even layer once it is melted. Sprinkle the nuts over the chocolate, and press in slightly. Putting a plastic bag over your hand will minimize the mess. Allow to cool until chocolate sets. Break into pieces and store in an airtight container.


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Heart of the Home Gingerbread Fun

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he holiday season is here again! Our family has many holiday activities to keep us busy. The children love helping me in preparing for the holidays. They love decorating, cookie baking, opening their advent calendars, wrapping presents and listening to our favorite Christmas music every day. Of all the music we listen to throughout the year Jingle Bell Rock has earned the spot as the most played song on our ipod! One of our favorite traditions is baking and decorating gingerbread houses and gingerbread men. This is a fun activity for both young and old, and the results are cute and tasty to boot! Gingerbread kits are available in stores and a good option if you are pressed for time. We enjoy making our own gingerbread and taking a special trip to the store to find colorful candies, sprinkles and gumdrops. I have included a good

recipe in this issue for gingerbread from Martha Stewart. A template for your house is available on MarthaStewart.com. or you can easily make your own at home. This recipe will yield several small houses and gingerbread men. You can also find many more recipes for gingerbread available at online recipe sites. Using royal icing to hold the sides and roof of your house together works best because it dries hard and acts like glue. I use butter cream frosting when frosting cookies for the children to eat. Wishing you happy holidays and happy baking!

Kim Giffin

{

recipe

featured in this article is on page 8


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Budget Friendly Christmas Decorating Tips

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Go branch hunting outside. Spray-paint the branches in a silver or gold, pop them in a vase and voilà ... elegant holiday decor. Take it a step further and dangle some ornaments on them or tie a few bows. Glue leftover cards or those from previous years on matboard using Spray Mount, double sided tape or rubber cement and hang as holiday artwork, says Mary Ellen Turner, vice president of seasonal merchandise for Party City. The boards could be trimmed down to the size of a single card or left as a whole board with numerous cards attached to it lined up against a wall or on top of a coffee table. Use natural elements, such as evergreen branches, pinecones or berries with candles. “But always make sure to place candles in separate holders, such as hurricane glasses, for safety,” says Kimberly Kennedy, author of The Art and Craft of Entertaining and life-

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Gingerbread Cookies

butter and brown sugar until fluffy. Mix in spices and salt. Beat in eggs and molasses.

Ingredients

Add flour mixture; mix on low speed until thoroughly combined. Divide dough into thirds and wrap in plastic. Chill for at least 1 hour.

Submitted by: Kim Giffin

• 1 teaspoon baking soda • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter • 1 cup dark-brown sugar • 4 teaspoons ground ginger • 4 teaspoons ground cinnamon • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cloves • 1 teaspoon finely ground black pepper • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt • 2 large eggs • 1 1/2 cups unsulfured molasses • 6 cups all-purpose flour

Directions

Heat oven to 350 degrees. On a well-floured surface, roll out dough to 1/8 inch thick. Cut into desired shapes, or using template instructions, if desired. Place dough shapes on ungreased baking sheets; chill until firm, about 15 minutes. Bake 15 minutes, or until gingerbread is firm in the center, but not dark around the edges.

In a large bowl, sift together flour, baking soda, and baking powder; set aside. In an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream

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style consultant for the National Candle Association. Or, pile artificial snow on a silver platter, a tabletop, or mantel with vintage glass ornaments and votives in crystal holders to create a dramatic effect. Take your throw pillows and tie them with holiday colored ribbons either once around the middle or like a Christmas gift. Add a rhinestone pin for an extra kick! Don’t have Christmas stockings? Santa won’t care. Take soup, peanut, or coffee cans and we’ll create a new place for gift stuffing! About one inch down from the top of the can, drill a hole. Now paint the can whatever color you like and either add a label with the person’s name on it or paint it right on the can. Glue things on, paint, etc. Go for it. There are no rules! Paper snowflakes work great. Then string a ribbon through the hole and hang it on the mantel, on the wall or tree!

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December 2010

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Fill large tubular vases with red cranberries to add a beautiful splash of Christmas red to any room. If you don’t have any vases, take 3 or more clear glass wine bottles or other household bottles and fill them with cranberries. You can even take it a step further and add flowers, twigs, or greenery with water. Another easy tip is to fill candle trays with cranberries or even pour them into the center of your dining table with candles here and there and voilà! Take some hanging picture frames and simply frame some pretty holiday paper as artwork. Sometimes you can even find a nice greeting card worthy of being framed and hung. Take household bottles (wine or juice, even beer bottles) and simply spray-paint them holiday colors. Green, red and blue work well. Even just taking a dozen bottles, spraying them with silver paint and popping candles, flowers, or twigs in them is the simple and perfect accent for a dining table, fireplace mantel, or a long console table. It will look stunning and no one will even guess how you did it so simply!

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Take clear vases or bottles, fill them with water, add holiday-colored food coloring -- a few drops will do -- and float candles in them or just line several up in a row to add a simple, cool holiday accent! Take holiday-colored ribbon and pin or glue it around the bottom of your lamp shade. So simple and so stylish! Make your own holiday wreaths. Go outside and cut almost any type of greenery that you see, bend it into a circle and tie with anything you have, whether it is fishing string, ribbon or rope. Hang it simple and fresh and add a few ribbons or ornaments. You can also use these on a table and lay them flat, then place a candle in the center. If you let it dry out, you can make it last a bit longer and even spray it a holiday color if you

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choose.

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a red ribbon around a tall, slim drinking glass. Fill the glass with candy canes and display on a shelf or side table. For quick ornaments, hang Christmas cookie cutters with ribbon. Hang them on your tree or in a window so other people can enjoy your christmas decorations. Wrap an assortment of medium to large sized boxes with Christmas wrap. Attach ribbons and/ or bows. Pile the boxes in a corner from floor to ceiling. Add a few drops of food coloring to white glue. Put the glue into a squeeze bottle or icing piping bag. Draw simple Christmas star outlines on waxed paper. Pipe glue onto the paper, following your drawn outlines. Dry. Peel glue ornaments off of the waxed paper and hang in windows with thread or ribbon. Display a large collection of photos from Christmases past. This makes a sensational conversation piece. Use a collection of odd frames or create frames using colored cardboard or craft foam. Instead of displaying each picture individually, you can create a collage. Use a large piece of red craft foam. Cut photos into interesting shapes (just cut around what’s important in the photos). Glue the photos to the foam, overlapping them and leaving a 1” - 2” border of red foam showing. Cut holly leaves from green craft foam. Glue three leaves to each corner of the red foam frame. Cut small circles from left-over red foam (these are the holly berries). Glue them next to the holly leaves. Paint fruit such as apples and pears with egg white and roll in gold sparkles. Air dry on a rack and display in a basket along with nuts.

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December 2010

A Datamind XP Productions Publication

In the news back then... Williams Farmer • 12/21/1956

YOUNGSTERS AND ADULTS READY FOR VISIT FROM OLD ST. NICK

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hile St. Nicholas is hitching his reindeer some place in the polar ice cap in readiness for Monday nights visit, Williams’ folks are awaiting his arrival with mixed emotions. The kids, for instance, with boundless optimism, know that Santa will be here Monday night as well as his preview visit on Monday afternoon after the free show at the grammar school. The Williams Fire Dept. has lined up an unusually good feature for the annual Christmas Show, which starts at 2 p.m. in the grammar school auditorium, and will include a light-hearted feature “So Dear to My Heart” and a Walt Disney cartoon parade. Immediately following the show Santa will roar up to the Community Christmas Tree aboard a fire engine to distribute treats to the youngsters. (Kids, Santa uses the fire truck for transportation in the daytime to allow Rudolph and his eight sidekicks to get a good first rest before Monday’s world flight.) Over at the post office, tired clerks are “plowing” through one of the largest deluges of Christmas mail. Outgoing and incoming mountains of mail have kept regular staff members and two seasonal employees busy all week. Nearly all clubs and organizations have held their annual Yule parties; churches and schools have presented programs and in addition a number of

private parties have brightened the social calendar. Baskets are being ready for the needy and gifts have been distributed to hospitals. One of the big social events of the holiday season, the Annual Firemen’s Ball will be held tomorrow night at the Colusa County Fairgrounds in the Main Exhibit Building. A large and gay crowd is anticipated for this 34th seasonal highlight. Music for dancing will be provided by Gordon Marvin and his nine piece dance band from Sacramento. Many of the homes reflect the happy holiday spirit with brightly colored lights, Eager Rudolphs, Smiling Santas, manger scenes, and the traditional wreaths. Perhaps on of the most beautiful Christmas views in town is the Community Tree when the fog covers it like a gigantic mantle of angel’s hair.


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December 2010

Williams Pioneer Review

Cooking Christmas Dinner...

S

SPECIAL TO THE WPR

o you tried to make reservations but they wouldn’t take you, you tried to contact your favorite restaurant but they stopped taking orders. Or, maybe this is your first year in your own home, and well, the time has come. Turkey time, that is! With a little know how, you can make a fabulous menu this Christmas that will wow your guests without overwhelming you. First things first, what to prepare? Picture your favorite Christmas dinner. No, it won’t be that great (memories are always better), but it is a place to start. Unless you are vegetarian, lets start with the basics: turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and gravy, cranberries, yams, and pumpkin pie. Ham is on some lists, but that is up to you. If you have never prepared a turkey before, you have two choices. Make a go at it, or order one from a restaurant. The choice is yours. I say go for it, but before the actual dinner. Make one a few weeks before; call your mom, grandma, or the neighborhood grandma to teach you how. Get the hang of it, and you will be prepared for November. Should you run into a problem come turkey day, the folks at Butterball are waiting to take your call! Check them out at: butterball.com. They have a menu planner and lots of tips to help you get the perfect turkey every time. Before I continue, let me say this: if you are making a turkey, you might as well prepare all of your other dishes too, ensuring you have it down before Christmas. This single step will save your sanity. By keeping it simple, you will do just fine. Stuffing is a tricky thing; in different parts of the country, you will find different types of stuffing. In fact, stuffing is dressing in some places. For the sake of this article, I will stick with stuffing, as not to confuse. As a southerner, I am a big believer in the use of cornbread rather than bread cubes, but whatever your family goes for will do. Or, seeing as how this is your Christmas, try something new this year, start your own traditions! Mashed potatoes are a fairly easy dish to prepare, but can be ruined by too much mashing and seasoning. Potatoes can take a great deal of salt and pepper, but taste as you go (and don’t double dip!) and leave a few lumps. The potatoes are usually one of the last dishes prepared, but you can store them for up to two hours in a Crockpot set on low. As for the gravy, you will either have to learn how to make it from Mom, or buy it in the jar at the grocery store. They make pretty good ones, but please, do put it in a gravy boat (ask grandma for hers) to save face. Cranberry sauce. It is a tricky topic in the culinary world. Some would never eat cranberries that did not look like cranberries, while others believe that God created the cranberry sauce can shape during the sixth day. I am of the canned variety choice, but it is fairly easy to create a sauce from scratch. Then of course, there are the yams, which are not really yams, but sweet potatoes. You know if you come from a family who adds the marshmallows. If you are not, well, you

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don’t know what you are missing! Anyway, the yams are really easy to prepare, don’t stress yourself, and frankly, if you add enough marshmallows, no one will notice anyway! As far as pie goes, if you are a novice, I would suggest a good bakery. There are the frozen variety too, some of which are quite good. If you do decide to bake them yourself, and they come out fabulous on your test run, make extra on Christmas to send home with your guests. They will love you for it! Some would say there is so much more to Christmas, the various casseroles and local specialties. Green bean casseroles, roasted veggies, and the like can be easily added to your menu at your choosing. For your holiday menu, you will of course need recipes. Here are a few websites that will help get you ready for the big day: Foodnetwork.com Some great recipes, some super fancy, some really good and simple. Check out Paula Deen’s Southern Cornbread Stuffing, or Sandra Lee’s Candied Yam Souffle. Verybestbaking.com A great site for desserts. Try Libby’s Pumpkin Cranberry Bread. They label the recipe’s difficulty level too. Kraftfoods.com Good recipes made with ingredients in your pantry and fridge. Try their Cranberry and Toasted Walnut Stuffing. They label the nutritional content per serving, and offer light cooking recipes. Campbellskitchen.com Where to find the classic Green Bean Casserole and other great recipes. No matter what your menu, by keeping it simple, trying out your recipes beforehand, and knowing your limits, you will be the host with the most this Christmas.

Yam’s & Apples Submitted by: David W.

Ingredients

• 3 medium yams • ¾ to 1 cup thinly sliced apples • ¼ cup brown sugar • Dash of cinnamon • 1/8 cup butter or margarine • 1/4 cup apple water, saved

2-quart cassrole or baking dish with butter or margarine. Place alternating layers of yams (broken and pressed) and apples (apples on top of yams). Then, sprinkle in brown sugar, dashes of cinnaon, and pats of butter or margarine over each layer of apples. cover entire mizture with 1/4 cup of apple water and bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees.

Directions

Separately, cover apples and yams with water and boil until almost done. Save apple water. Peel yams. Grease

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December 2010

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Remembering Loved Ones.. By ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK Writer & Contributor

cNary-Moore Funeral Service invites the community to share in its 9th annual Holiday Memorial Candle Lighting Ceremony beginning at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 8 at 107 5th St. in Colusa. “The upcoming days hold many expectations, emotions and experiences for those of us on a journey through grief,” stated Verdo Werre, McNary-Moore Funeral Service manager since 2000. “Stepping away from the busy activity of these winter holidays to honor a loved one may bring peace and comfort.” Family and friends who have lost a loved one are invited to attend the ceremony, lasting approximately one hour, in which local clergy will address the attendees before families come forward in the chapel with a decorated candle to indicate and honor the person they have lost. “The holidays are some of the most difficult times for grief, I believe,” Werre said, who has more than 30 years’ experience in the industry. “This event helps people remember the memories of their loved ones.” While anyone is welcome to attend, McNary-Moore especially sends out invitations to families who have lost loved ones in the last two years. “We want people to know our (professional) services don’t end when the funeral ceremony is finished,” Werre said. “Our services are perpetual.” The firm inaugurated the Holiday Memorial Candle Lighting Ceremony nine years ago in conjunction with their grief counseling services as a way to help families grieve their loss. Through the company’s Web site, families dealing with loss are able to tap into interactive videos on

coping with grief, live grief counseling, sign up for daily e-mail affirmations and join in group grief support. “Grief is a private thing,” Werre said. “A lot of times people do like to communicate about what they are feeling, and this way they may do so from the privacy of their own homes.” McNary-Moore facilitates around 150 families per year. When Werre first started in the business, services were much more cookie-cutter and “generic.” “Now, we’re seeing a transition into people wanting to personalize ceremonies,” explained Werre. “Today’s service is more of a celebration of a person’s life. Ceremonies are changing a lot, which is helping with closure. We’re being progressive as to what people want and what is beneficial.” McNary-Moore is the first in the area to provide tribute videos to their clients as a standard service. The Life Tributes software suite provides four ways to honor the life of a loved one. In addition to tribute videos, funeral directors can create a matching memorial Web site, themebased print keepsakes, and, in the near future, even broadcast the funeral or memorial service over the Internet to family members and friends living far away. “Many people haven’t given much advanced thought to how they would like to remember their loved one during a funeral or memorial service,” said Werre. “Now they can be as involved in the creative process as much as they wish to be – or they can simply provide us with the family photos and images they wish to include, and we can take it from there.” For more information, call 458-2111 or visit www. mcnarymoorefuneralservice.com.


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Pretzel Salad Submitted by: Jennie G.

Ingredients

• 2 cups crushed pretzels • 3/4 cup margarine, melted • 2 teaspoons white sugar • 1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese • 3/4 cup white sugar • 4 1/2 ounces frozen whipped topping, thawed • 1 (6 ounce) package strawberry flavored gelatin • 2 cups boiling water • 2 (10 ounce) packages frozen strawberries

Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). In a medium bowl, mix crushed pretzels,

December 2010

margarine and sugar. Press crushed pretzel mixture into the bottom of a 9x13 inch baking dish, and bake in the preheated oven 8 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Blend together the cream cheese and sugar. Fold in whipped topping and spread evenly over cooled pretzel mixture. In a medium bowl, dissolve the strawberry flavored gelatin in boiling water. Mix in strawberries and set aside to cool for 15 minutes. Pour gelatin mixture over cream cheese mixture and refrigerate until set, about 4 hours.

Jello Salad Ingredients

• 1 lg. box lime Jello • 8 oz. pkg. cream cheese • 1 can crushed pineapple, drain • & save juice

Directions

Huzarensalade Submitted by: Jack M.

Ingredients

• 3 Cups groud beef, cooked • 1 apple, chopped • 2 tablespoons dill pickle relish • Salt & Pepper • Nutmeg to taste

Submitted by: James G.

Ingredients

• 1 can tuna - drained • 2 small can evaporated milk • 1 can chicken rice soup • 1 can mushroom soup • 1 large can chinese noodles • ½ cup grated cheddar cheese

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Mix Jello, cream cheese and 2 cups boiling water. Take pineapple juice and add enough cold water to equal 2 cups. Add this with pineapple and nuts. Stir and put all together in mold. Refrigerate until firm.

• Cloves to taste • 2 hard-cooked eggs, chopped • 1 cup beets, chopped • 2 cups mashed potatoes • mayonase (or oil and vinegar

Directions Combine all and chill. Its

ingredients that easy.

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Ambrosia Salad Five-Can Casserole

Williams Pioneer Review

Submitted by: Mary B.

Directions

Combine all ingredients and mix well. Pour into buttered casserole dish. Sprinkle with grated Cheddar cheese. Bake uncovered for about 45 minutes at 350 degrees.

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Ingredients

• 1 small can chunk pineappel • 1 small can cherries • 1 small can sliced peaches • 1 small can mandarin oranges • 1 small package flaked or shredded coconut. • 1 small package slivered almonds • 1/2 pint whipping cream, sweetend with 2 tablespoons of sugar.

• 1 small package minute rice

Directions

Drain all fruits reserving syrup. Cook rice in syrup mixture until rice is tender. drainr ice and add to ruits which have been mixed. Stir in cocnut, whipped cream, and sweetened sugar. fold whipped cream into fruit mixture. Top with slivered almonds. www.WilliamsPioneerReview.com


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December 2010

A Datamind XP Productions Publication

Christmas Day in the Morning

e woke suddenly and completely. It was four o'clock, the hour at which his father had always called him to get up and help with the milking. Strange how the habits of his youth clung to him still! Fifty years ago, and his father had been dead for thirty years, and yet he waked at four o'clock in the morning. He had trained himself to turn over and go to sleep, but this morning it was Christmas, he did not try to sleep. Why did he feel so awake tonight? He slipped back in time, as he did so easily nowadays. He was fifteen years old and still on his father's farm. He loved his father. He had not known it until one day a few days before Christmas, when he had overheard what his father was saying to his mother. "Mary, I hate to call Rob in the mornings. He's growing so fast and he needs his sleep. If you could see how he sleeps when I go in to wake him up! I wish I could manage alone." "Well, you can't, Adam." His mother's voice was brisk. "Besides, he isn't a child anymore. It's time he took his turn." "Yes," his father said slowly. "But I sure do hate to wake him." When he heard these words, something in him spoke: his father loved him! He had never thought of that before, taking for granted the tie of their blood. Neither his father nor his mother talked about loving their children--they had no time for such things. There was always so much to do on the farm. Now that he knew his father loved him, there would be no loitering in the mornings and having to be called again. He got up after that, stumbling blindly in his sleep, and pulled on his clothes, his eyes shut, but he got up.

H

And then on the night before Christmas, that year when he was fifteen, he lay for a few minutes thinking about the next day. They were poor, and most of the excitement was in the turkey they had raised themselves and mince pies his mother made. His sister’s sewed presents and

A short story by: Pearl S. Buck

his mother and father always bought him something he needed, not only a warm jacket, maybe, but something more, such as a book. And he saved and bought them each something, too. He wished that Christmas when he was fifteen, he had a better present for his father. As usual he had gone to the ten-cent store and bought a tie. It had seemed nice enough until he lay thinking the night before Christmas. He looked out of his attic window, the stars were bright. "Dad," he had once asked when he was a little boy, "What is a stable?" "It's just a barn," his father had replied, "like ours." Then Jesus had been born in a barn, and to a barn the shepherds had come... The thought struck him like a silver dagger. Why should he not give his father a special gift too, out there in the barn? He could get up early, earlier than four o'clock, and he could creep into the barn and get all the milking done. He'd do it alone, milk and clean up, and then when his father went in to start the milking he'd see it all done. And he would know who had done it. He laughed to himself as he gazed at the stars. It was what he would do, and he mustn’t sleep too sound. He must have waked twenty times, scratching a match to look each time to look at his old watch -- midnight, and half past one, and then two o'clock. At a quarter to three he got up and put on his clothes. He crept downstairs, careful of the creaky boards, and let himself out. The cows looked at him, sleepy and surprised. It was early for them, too. He had never milked all alone before, but it seemed almost easy. He kept thinking about his father's surprise. His father would come in and get him, saying that he would get things started while Rob was getting dressed. He'd go to the barn, open the door, and then he'd go get the two big empty milk cans. But they wouldn't be


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December 2010

waiting or empty, they'd be standing in the milk-house, filled. "What the--," he could hear his father exclaiming. He smiled and milked steadily, two strong streams rushing into the pail, frothing and fragrant. The task went more easily than he had ever known it to go before. Milking for once was not a chore. It was something else, a gift to his father who loved him. He finished, the two milk cans were full, and he covered them and closed the milk-house door carefully, making sure of the latch. Back in his room he had only a minute to pull off his clothes in the darkness and jump into bed, for he heard his father up. He put the covers over his head to silence his quick breathing. The door opened. "Rob!" His father called. "We have to get up, son, even if it is Christmas." "Aw-right," he said sleepily. The door closed and he lay still, laughing to himself. In just a few minutes his father would know. His dancing heart was ready to jump from his body. The minutes were endless -- ten, fifteen, he did not know how many -- and he heard his father's footsteps again. The door opened and he lay still. "Rob!" "Yes, Dad--" His father was laughing, a queer sobbing sort of laugh. "Thought you'd fool me, did you?" His father was standing by his bed, feeling for him, pulling away the cover. "It's for Christmas, Dad!" He found his father and clutched him in a great hug. He felt his father's arms go around him. It was dark and they could not see each other's faces. "Son, I thank you. Nobody ever did a nicer thing--" "Oh, Dad, I want you to know -- I do want to be god!" The words broke from him of their own will. He did not know what to say. His heart was bursting with love. He got up and pulled on his clothes again and they went down to the Christmas tree. Oh what a Christmas, and how his heart had nearly burst again with shyness and pride as his father told his mother and made the younger children listen about how he, Rob, had got up all by himself. "The best Christmas gift I ever had, and I'll remember it, son every year on Christmas morning, so long as I live." They had both remembered it, and now that his father was dead, he remembered it alone: that blessed

Williams Pioneer Review

Christmas dawn when, alone with the cows in the barn; he had made his first gift of true love. This Christmas he wanted to write a card to his wife and tell her how much he loved her, it had been a long time since he had really told her, although he loved her in a very special way, much more than he ever had when they were young. He had been fortunate that she had loved him. Ah, that was the true joy of life, the ability to love. Love was still alive in him, it still was. It occurred to him suddenly that it was alive because long ago it had been born in him when he knew his father loved him. That was it: Love alone could awaken love. And he could give the gift again and again. This morning, this blessed Christmas morning, he would give it to his beloved wife. He could write it down in a letter for her to read and keep forever. He went to his desk and began his love letter to his wife: My dearest love... Such a happy, happy Christmas!

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The End


Williams Pioneer Review

December 2010

Here we come a-wassailing

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Christmas Day is here and so are we Time for children and presents And Christmas trees. Happiness, loveliness, Christmas bells ringing out goodwill to men and peace on earth.

A Datamind XP Productions Publication

Ev'ry thing they taught you When you were a child The things a Child once taught the world. If Christmas day is really in your heart You don't have to save up all your love To give once a year Learn to give, try to live Each day like Christmas Day.

Feliz Navidad Feliz Navidad Feliz Navidad Feliz Navidad Prospero Ano y Felicidad. Feliz Navidad Feliz Navidad Feliz Navidad Prospero Ano y Felicidad.

Mr. Grench Silent Night Silent night, holy night All is calm, all is bright Round yon Virgin Mother and Child Holy Infant so tender and mild Sleep in heavenly peace Sleep in heavenly peace Silent night, holy night! Shepherds quake at the sight Glories stream from heaven afar Heavenly hosts sing Alleluia! Christ, the Saviour is born Christ, the Saviour is born Silent night, holy night Son of God, love's pure light Radiant beams from Thy holy face With the dawn of redeeming grace Jesus, Lord, at Thy birth Jesus, Lord, at Thy birth "

You're a mean one, Mr. Grinch You really are a heel, You're as cuddly as a cactus, you're as charming as an eel, Mr. Grinch, You're a bad banana with a greasy black peel! You're a monster, Mr. Grinch, Your heart's an empty hole, Your brain is full of spiders, you have garlic in your soul, Mr. Grinch, I wouldn't touch you with a thirtynine-and-a-half foot pole! You're a foul one, Mr. Grinch, You have termites in your smile, You have all the tender sweetness of a seasick crocodile, Mr. Grinch, Given a choice between the two of you I'd take the seasick crocodile! You're a rotter, Mr. Grinch, You're the king of sinful sots,

I wanna wish you a Merry Christmas I wanna wish you a Merry Christmas I wanna wish you a Merry Christmas From the bottom of my heart. [repeats] Your heart's a dead tomato splotched with moldy purple spots, Mr. Grinch, You're a three decker sauerkraut and toadstool sandwich with arsenic sauce! You nauseate me, Mr. Grinch, With a nauseous super "naus"!, You're a crooked dirty jockey and you drive a crooked hoss, Mr. Grinch, Your soul is an appalling dump heap overflowing with the most disgraceful assortment of rubbish imaginable mangled up in tangled up knots! You're a foul one, Mr. Grinch, You're a nasty wasty skunk, Your heart is full of unwashed socks, your soul is full of gunk, Mr. Grinch, The three words that best describe you are as follows, and I quote, "Stink, stank, stunk"!


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December 2010

Williams Pioneer Review

17 Mary Did You Know Mary, did you know that your Baby Boy would one day walk on water? Mary, did you know that your Baby Boy would save our sons and daughters? Did you know that your Baby Boy has come to make you new? This Child that you delivered will soon deliver you. Mary, did you know

Christmas Island Let's get away from sleigh bells, let's get away from snow, Let's make a break some Christmas dear, I know the place to go. How'd ja like to spend Christmas on Christmas Island? How'd ja like to spend the Holiday away across the sea?

Here we come a-wassailing Here we come a-wassailing Among the leaves so green, Here we come a-wand'ring So fair to be seen. Love and joy come to you, And to you your wassail, too, And God bless you, and send you A Happy New Year, And God send you a Happy New Year. We are not daily beggers That beg from door to door, But we are neighbors' children Whom you have seen before Love and joy come to you, And to you your wassail, too, And God bless you, and send you

that your Baby Boy will give sight to a blind man? Mary, did you know that your Baby Boy will calm the storm with His hand? Did you know that your Baby Boy has walked where angels trod? When you kiss your little Baby you kissed the face of God? Mary did you know.. Ooo Ooo Ooo The blind will see. The deaf will hear. The dead will live again.

The lame will leap. The dumb will speak The praises of The Lamb. Mary, did you know that your Baby Boy is Lord of all creation? Mary, did you know that your Baby Boy would one day rule the nations? Did you know that your Baby Boy is heaven's perfect Lamb? The sleeping Child you're holding is the Great, I Am.

How'd ja like to spend Christmas on Christmas Island? How'd ja like to hang your stockin' on a great big coconut tree? How'd ja like to stay up late like the Islanders do, Wait for Santa to sail in with your presents in a canoe? If you ever spend Christmas on Christmas Island, You will never stray, for ev'ry day Your Christmas dreams come true.

How'd ja like to stay up late like the Islanders do, Wait for Santa to sail in with your presents in a canoe? If you ever spend Christmas on Christmas Island, You will never stray, for ev'ry day Your Christmas dreams come true. On Christmas Island, your Christmas dreams come true.

A Happy New Year, And God send you a Happy New Year. Good master and good mistress, As you sit beside the fire, Pray think of us poor children Who wander in the mire. Love and joy come to you, And to you your wassail, too, And God bless you, and send you A Happy New Year, And God send you a Happy New Year We have a little purse Made of ratching leather skin; We want some of your small change To line it well within. Love and joy come to you, And to you your wassail, too, And God bless you, and send you A Happy New Year,

And God send you a Happy New Year. Bring us out a table And spread it with a cloth; Bring us out a cheese, And of your Christmas loaf. Love and joy come to you, And to you your wassail, too, And God bless you, and send you A Happy New Year, And God send you a Happy New Year. God bless the master of this house, Likewise the mistress too; And all the little children That round the table go. Love and joy come to you, And to you your wassail, too, And God bless you, and send you A Happy New Year, And God send you a Happy New Year.


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December 2010

Christmas Shopping in Arbuckle Ace is Santa’s secret helpers...

By ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK Writer & Contributor

S

A Datamind XP Productions Publication

till hunting for that perfect Christmas present? Fishing and hunting licenses are now available by the click of a button at Ace Hardware in Arbuckle. “This is a very exciting new feature,” said Kylie Gonzales, an Ace manager. “No more waiting for your tags or filling out applications. We will provide hunting and fishing licenses and tags right there in the store, available electronically.” For duck and game bird stamp collectors, not to worry; you will still receive a stamp at the end of the year. After more than four years in business, Ace Hardware is also a onestop shop for locals looking for home essentials such as fireplace accessories, gutter guards and tools. Ace offers computerized paint color matching, propane exchanges, hand truck rentals, automotive key cutting, special order services on more than 65,000 items and more. In the near future, Ace will carry Stihl products and will have the ability to fill propane tanks. “We treat our customers like family,” said Gonzales. “If we don’t have something in stock, we are happy to go above and beyond to get them what they need.” According to Gonzales, it’s important to prepare homes and yards for the winter season.

“Make sure you’ve tested and changed batteries in the smoke detectors and that they are all working properly,” she suggested. “Prepare your family with an escape route in case of an emergency. Insulate windows and doors to seal off cold air flow, which will save energy and your pocketbook.” Ace carries a competitivelypriced selection of Christmas trees, ornaments, lights, picture frames and more. “The holiday season is a popular time to get together with loved ones,” Gonzales said. “If you’re entertaining this year, stop by Ace to get ideas on how to decorate your home for Christmas and check out the huge assortment of gifts and décor.” Gift cards are also available making a perfect present for anyone on your list. As a way to say “thank you” to customers, Ace has also implemented the Ace Rewards program. New enrollees will receive 1,000 bonus points on their first purchase. Ten points are earned for each $1 spent, and participants will receive $5 reward for every 2,500 points earned to spend in store or online. Additional Ace Rewards benefits include everyday double points on hot items, membersonly coupons and the ability to manage your account online. For more information, call 476-3003 or visit the store located at 600 5th St., Arbuckle.


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December 2010

Williams Pioneer Review

A few more recipies.. Soft Chocolate Chip Cookies Ingredients

• 2 cubes soft margarine • 3/4 cup brown sugar • 3/4 cup white sugar • 2 eggs • 1 tsp. vanilla • 1/4 cup cocoa • 1 tsp. baking soda • 1/2 tsp. salt • 1/2 cup milk • 3-1/2 cups flour • 1 12oz package chocolate chips

• 1 cup chopped nuts (optional)

Directions

Cream together shortening and sugars. Beat in eggs and vanilla. Sift dry ingredients toghether and add alternately with the milk to the shortening mizture. Beat well after each addition. add chips and nuts last. Drop by teaspoonful on wellgreased baking sheet. Bake at 375 degrees 10 to 12 minues. These cookies will stay soft if kept in a well-sealed container. www.WilliamsPioneerReview.com

Chicken Salad Ingredients

• 4 cups diced, cooked chicken • 1 can pineapple tidbits • 2 cups seedless grapes • 2/3 cup dry salted peanuts coarsly chopped • 1 cup chopped celery • 1/4 teaspoon crushed tarragon leaves • 1 cup mayonnaise • 2 tbs. lemon juice • 2 tbs. pineapple juice • salt as needed to taste

Bean Salad Submitted by: Sally M.

Ingredients

• 1 pound can cut green beans • 1 pound can red kidney beans • 1 pound can garbanzo beans • 8oz can pitted ripe olives • 1 red oinion, thinly sliced • ½ cup minced green pepper • ½ cup oil • 1/3 cup red wine vinegar

19 Directions

Combine chicken, pineapple, grapes, peanuts, and celer. Stir in the tarragon. Salt to taste. In another bowl, combine the mayonnaise, lemon juice, and pineapple juice. Fold this mixture into the chicken-fruit mixture. Makes 8 generous servings. www.WilliamsPioneerReview.com

• ½ cup burgundy or claret wine • ¼ teasp. basil • ¼ teasp. garlic powder

Directions

Drain beans and olives, and combine with onion and green pepper. Combine remaining ingredients and pour over bean mixture. Cover and refigerate several hours or overnight.


Williams Pioneer Review

December 2010

A Datamind XP Productions Publication

20 Shopping on a Budget SPECIAL TO THE WPR

D

ecember is the most expensive month of the year for everyone who celebrates Christmas. It seems that the pressure and the temptation to spend increases each year. This is especially true if you have children, as it is very easy to feel that you are letting them down if you do not give them at least some of the expensive toys that they want. However, once January comes around, and you receive your bank statements and credit card bills, it is very easy to regret your spending and vow to spend less next year, but that promise is all to easily broken when enticing displays of Christmas goods arrive in the stores. The good news is that it is possible to set and keep to a budget for your Christmas shopping. Here are some tips for doing so.

Christmas Presents

Write a list of the people to whom you wish to give Christmas presents. It is fine to restrict this list to very close friends and family. Do not feel under pressure to give gifts to

everyone you know. Next, write down the maximum amount that you plan to spend on each person’s gift and calculate the total amount. If you are shocked by this total, go back and reduce some or all of the amounts until you reach a total you are happy with. Once you begin your Christmas shopping, your aim should be to find gifts for each person on your list at the budget or below it. Start by visiting websites and stores where you can find good quality presents at low prices. eBay is a very good place to begin your search. In particular, you can find new children’s toys, games, clothes and other accessories at prices well below the normal retail prices. eBay sellers can afford to sell at these rates because they have fewer overheads than traditional retailers. Before ordering from an eBay seller, remember to read the feedback that has been left by other buyers to ensure that you are dealing with a reputable, efficient business. It is also a good idea to read the seller’s returns policy to ensure that you would be able to return the goods within a certain time frame if you were not satisfied with them.

Other places to shop for good value Christmas gifts include consignment stores and thrift stores. Many people would not even consider looking for Christmas presents in thrift stores but you will be amazed at what you can find once you start looking. Donations to these stores often include unwanted gifts and brand new clothing that still has the original label attached, all costing much less than the recommended retail prices. Outlet malls are also a great place to shop for gifts at lower than retail prices. However, the temptation here may be spend more than you intend, since there are so many goods at reduced prices. If you do visit an outlet mall, keep strictly to your spending limits for each present and resist the temptation to buy extra things, just because the prices are so low.

Christmas Wrapping Paper, Tags and Cards

All of these essential Christmasrelated articles can add up to a relatively large amount. The best way of saving money on wrapping paper, tags and cards is to buy them the previous year in the January


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December 2010

sales, when they are vastly reduced in price. If you do need to buy wrapping paper at the full price, it is more economical to buy a few large rolls of wrapping paper that will suit everyone than it is to buy individual sheets of wrapping paper for each recipient of your gifts. You could, for example, choose a simple, modern design that will be suitable for all of the adults. If you have many young children to buy presents for, try and find a roll of wrapping paper that will appeal to both boys and girls, such as paper with a Winnie the Pooh design. If older children are also on your Christmas present list, you will need to select another roll that will appeal to both boys and girls in the older age group. You could even make your own wrapping paper to reduce costs. Buy a large roll of inexpensive brown paper and either draw, paint or stamp Christmas designs all over it. This is an activity that your children will love participating in, so you should have the roll decorated fairly quickly. You can also save money on tags and cards by making your own. A good way of making tags is to use decorative edge scissors to cut out individual Christmas pictures from old Christmas cards. Just make a small hole in the top of the picture with a needle, pull through a small length of colored thread, tie it together with a small knot, and you have a homemade tag. New Christmas cards can also be easily made by using pictures cut out from old Christmas cards and adding stickers, ribbons and anything else you can think of. The only materials you have to buy are card blanks and envelopes but these are usually a lot less expensive than manufactured Christmas cards, especially if you buy in bulk or on eBay.

Christmas Food and Drink

Stocking up on food and drink for the festive season can be very expensive, especially if you are hosting several parties or if you have a large extended family who all visit at Christmas. The best way of keeping to a budget is to make a list of everything you will need before you start shopping. That way, you will be less likely to purchase too much. In fact, the best time to write a Christmas food and drink shopping list is the previous year. When the festivities are still fresh in your mind, you will remember if you had insufficient supplies of white wine and too much cranberry jelly, for example. If possible, it is also a good idea to begin your Christmas food and drink shopping well in advance. You can buy nonperishable items, such as canned foods and wine, months in advance and put them away in a special cupboard or store room. This enables you to spread the high cost of the

Williams Pioneer Review

shopping over several months or even over the whole year and your December expenses will not be so high. When doing the Christmas food and drink shopping, buy as many supermarket own label goods as possible. In most cases, you will be buying a similar product to a branded one but without the fancy label. This is a very good way of reducing Christmas expenditure without reducing the overall amount of food that you buy and, once the food has been prepared, no one will be able to tell the difference. Following these tips will not only ensure that you and your family and friends have a very merry Christmas but also that your January statements will show much healthier balances.

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Pumpkin Bars Ingredients

• 2 c ups sugar • 2 cups flour • 1 cup canned pumpkin • 4 eggs • 2 tsp. cinnamon • 2 tsp. baking powder • 1 tsp. vanilla • 1 tsp. baking soda • 1/2 tsp. cloves • 1/2 tsp. ginger

Directions

Turkey Dressing Submitted by: Jan R.

Ingredients

• 2 large loaves bread (day old) • 2 onions, diced • 6-8 stalks celery, diced • 2 tsp. salt • 4 tsp. sage • 1/2 tsp. pepper • 4 eggs, slightly beaten • 2-3 cups turkey or chicken stock (or broth) • 1 cube + 3 Tbsp. margarine

Directions

Sauté onion and celery in 1 cube margarine until tender (about 20 minutes). Break

Mix all ingredients together. Pour into greased 11 x 14 inch jelly roll pan. Bake at 350F for 25 to 28 minutes. Cool. Frost with cream cheese frosting (recipe below). Cream Cheese Frosting 1 pkg. (8 oz.) cream cheese. 2 cups powdered sugar. 6 Tbsp. butter or margarine. 2 tsp. milk 1 tsp. vanilla. Mix all ingredients and beat well.

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bread into small pieces in a large bowl. Add onion and celery to bread. Mix through. Add eggs. Blend together to moisten bread. Add salt, sage, and pepper. Mix well. Blend in enough chicken stock (or broth) until dressing is moist but not gooey. Rub broiler pan with 3 Tbsp. margarine. Press dressing into pan and bake 30 minutes at 375�. Stir well. Bake 30 minutes more. (A turkey may be prepared and cooked, leaving one hour or cooking time, and placed on top of the dressing while the dressing bakes.) www.WilliamsPioneerReview.com


Williams Pioneer Review

December 2010

A Datamind XP Productions Publication

22 Santa’s Loosing It! Sagehands Performs with Sandy’s First Christmas

Submitted Photo: Front row: Sammy Martinez, Ernie Lemus, Michelle Lemus. 2nd row: Christian Lemus, Zach (Teddy) Vaillancourt, Kristina Smrekan, Abbey Baird, Salvador Valencia Chavez, Hailey Werre. 3rd row: Terri Trent, Cindy Muniz, Jada Gibbs, Katie Dudman, Kendra Hester, Veronica Baird, Scot Dudman. Back row: Mike Bell, Mac Jeffries, Erlis Reeves.

By LLOYD GREEN JR. Publisher & Editor

O

n December 10th, 11th, 17th, and 18th, the Stagehands Theater will be performing an original playwright “Santa’s Loosing It” by Susan Gibbs and “Sandy’s First Christmas” by Shot Sistrunk. Doors will open at 7:30pm and the performance begins at 8:15pm. A special Matinee will be held on December 12th. Doors will open at 1:30pm, and the performance will begin at 2:15pm. The Stagehands Theater group has been around for over 40 years and has produced many plays over the years. “We continue to produce good plays and provide an opportunity for theater art”

said Susan Gibbs. Stagehand produces a minimum of two plays a year and has the mission to create more opportunities for theater education in order to help increase membership. “We are hoping to put on classes in lighting, sound, set design, wardrobe, props, and stage managers and directing” said Gibbs. “It takes a lot of people to put on a play.” said Gibbs “Not everyone is comfortable on stage, although once you have been bitten by the acting bug, you can’t wait to get onstage again.” With the funds from attendance, the Stagehands Group anticipates upgrades and maintenance on their current building. “We need lots of work on the building” said Gibbs, “We need paint, building

repairs, a new light board, and wiring.” Although some donations have been made, the group is looking into grant money and even donated labor or volunteer work. “It takes time and money to make all the repairs needed, and we don’t have it” said Gibbs. For the past year, the Stagehands have been writing and producing their own plays due to the cost of renting the rights to a play. “If a play is fairly new or very popular it costs money for us to perform it” said Gibbs. “We are in contact with the local English classes to have their students write some plays to be produced by the theater.” Susan “Sue” Gibbs has been a volunteer of the Stagehands for almost 40 years. “I was very shy when I first started with the Stagehands. I just came to watch with my husband, but the next thing I know I was on stage singing with the group. I never got off from that time on” said Gibbs. “I have been involved ever since.” The Stagehands can be compared to a big family explained Gibbs. “Once you have been in a play with someone, you can run into them years later and still have that connection.” Gibbs continued by saying, “Please Come Join our Family.” The upcoming plays will be performed at the Stagehands Theater located at the Colusa County Fairgrounds (9th Street Entrance). Tickets are $7.00 a person and available at the door or at the following businesses: Messicks Hardware in Colusa, The Pizza Factory in Arbuckle, and Shear Class in Williams.


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December 2010

Williams Pioneer Review

Spicing it up for the Holidays!

Duo takes America by storm, one table at a time..

By LLOYD GREEN JR. Publisher & Editor

O

You will find them out at the Annual Colusa County Craft Show, dressed in bright red aprons and sombreros. Business Partners Diana KempAzevedo and Polly Seaver-Codorniz are hair stylists by day at Shear Class in Williams become Jalapeno Jelly makers one time a year. “We dream to be on every Thanksgiving dinner table in America,” said Azevedo as she explained their venture to a tasting customer. The infamous D&P Jalapeno Jelly can be found on many Colusa County residents tables, refrigerators and recipes. “It adds to any dish from toast, crackers, and snacks.” Said Codorniz. Starting out with just 10 cases of Jalapeno Jelly the First year they have grown to 118 cases in 2010. “And people

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just want more!” commented Codorniz. “It has been a learning experience, we ran out of Jelly the first year and thank goodness we had our noodle knot blankets we were selling as backup.” Said Azevedo. The Jalapeno Jelly prepared by Azevedo and Codorniz is made from all locally grown products. “We get the ingredients from friends and family who grow the peppers.” S a i d Azevedo. “It has no artificial coloring like many other Jalapeno Jellies that can often be a deep red or green.” As their stock becomes ever-so popular, they duo have been experimenting with new Jalapeno flavors that may be introduced in upcoming years. For more information D&P Jalapeno Jelly can be contacted at (530) 473-2005.


Williams Pioneer Review

December 2010

A Datamind XP Productions Publication

24 Colusa’s Newest Restaurant is Now Open Downtown

Pictured: Ashley Indrieri and Tom Indrieri owners of Tommy’s Market Street Grill in Downtown Colusa. (Staff Photo)

By LLOYD GREEN JR. Publisher & Editor

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ommy’s Market Street Grill is located in the busy Market Street business district across from Davison Drugs at 627 Market Street. The new restaurant that opened for business early in October offers a menu that is a mix of specialty American BBQ cuisine. “My first week was crazy, steady breakfast and busy lunches” said Indrieri. “Everyone is loving my Philly cheese, grilled chicken and smoked tri-tip sandwiches.” Tom Indrieri and his wife Ashley Indrieri are partners in the new venture. “There is nothing like being self

employed, my passion is food, so no matter how crazy things get, I love it!” said Indrieri enthusiastically. Tom and Ashley are not strangers to the press or the community. Tom and Ashley are both longtime residents of the City of Colusa and Colusa County. Tom is a Colusa County Board Supervisor, and Ashley Indrieri is the Executive Officer for the Family Water Alliance in Maxwell. Indrieri has a longtime history with food, starting back in the 1980’s when he worked at the local McDonalds in Williams, California. “I learned a lot from their school. I began my journey to culinary school where I opened a drive-in for a few years.” said Indrieri. “My philosophy is simple. Serve your customers the very best food, with great service and an enjoyable atmosphere, and they will keep coming back” said Indrieri. Not only does Tommy’s cook breakfast and lunch, they also offer full service catering. “We do everything from Elegant Weddings to Backyard BBQ’s” said Indrieri. Tommy’s menu includes affordable choices of burgers, Sammy dogs, deli sandwiches, grilled sandwiches, soups of the day, stacks of pancakes, omelets, breakfast items a la carte, daily specials and a wide range of espresso drinks. Tommy’s Market Street Grill is open for Breakfast and Lunch seven days a week from 6am to 3pm on Mondays through Saturdays and 6am-2pm on Sundays. To place an order, inquire about catering, or for more information call (530) 458-6100.


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December 2010

Williams Pioneer Review

Traeger changes what we can cook on our grill... By ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK Writer & Contributor

T

here’s a new way to make chocolate chip cookies this holiday season: barbecue them. While barbecuing often evokes images of summer, steaks and skewers, Traeger handcrafted pellet grills allow home chefs a whole new realm of creativity. “Traeger grills work like a convection oven, plus it grills, barbecues and acts as a smoker,” said Everett Brainard, of Brainard’s Ice in Williams, who has been selling the barbecue’s for four years. “You can cook anything on it that you can cook in the oven at home.” Traeger grills are fed with all-natural wood pellets, a natural biomass, utilizing an indirect cooking system to surround the food with heat and wood smoke. Traeger’s easy three-position switch allows for grilling on “high,” slow cooking on “medium” and smoking on “smoke.” Flare ups and charring are eliminated because the grease drippings run off a slanted tray out of the cooking chamber into an external bucket. “People don’t normally barbecue for Thanksgiving or Christmas, but it’s something that can be done very easily, especially in this area with mild winters,” Brainard said. “Traeger’s won’t flare up and burn food, so chefs can more or less walk away from the grill while it works. You can cook your turkey outside while preparing side dishes inside.” Besides convenience, grilling on a Traeger is also a more healthy way to cook, both nutritionally and environmentally. Traeger wood pellets are created from 100-percent recycled hardwood sawdust that would otherwise be burned or thrown in landfills. No fossil fuels of any kind are used in the combustion process, leaving a lower carbon footprint. Because fat and grease drippings are channeled

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away from food, the cooking system reduces fat and decreases cancer causing “benzo-a-pyrene.” Moreover, the hardwood smoke created by Traeger wood pellets produces antioxidants similar to vitamin E. “Customers love the flavor of the food that’s cooked on the grills,” Brainard said. “Plus, there are no hazardous chemicals, like with charcoal or gas barbecues, because the fuel comes from wood products.” The all-natural barbecue wood pellets come in a variety of flavors including alder, apple, cherry, garlic, hickory, maple, mesquite, oak and pecan. Traeger also has its own line of spices, sauces and marinades which are gluten and MSG-free. The days of “slaving over the stove” are over. From cookies to pizza, turkeys or pork loins, ham and steak, even jerky, the Traeger has you covered. “It makes a chef out of anybody,” said Brainard. Locally, purchase a Traeger grill at Barinard’s Ice, 570 8th St. in Williams. For more information, call 473-2187 or visit www.traegergrills.com.


Williams Pioneer Review

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December 2010

A Datamind XP Productions Publication

Black Shire Almonds

By ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK Writer & Contributor

W

hen Dan Slauson is not busy working in the UC Davis Medical Center’s pediatric unit by day, he and his business partner Joseph Bratka, a buyer for the UCD Bookstore, are busy manning their 10-acre almond farm in Arbuckle, S&B Ranch. S&B Ranch’s recent fourth harvest yielded 10,771 pounds, a 62 percent increase from last year’s 6,666 pounds. The pair moved to Arbuckle in 2002 and hand-planted 457 trees in 2004, which will continue to increase in production and eventually level off around a 15,000-pound yield. But it is their roasted and flavored nuts, “Black Shire Almonds,” which have been gaining a reputation in recent years. The pair set aside 3,000 pounds of almonds this year for the retail product, purposely allocating a small amount of the yield to ensure the product sells out while the product is at peak freshness

and optimal flavor. “Some of the (corporate almond) processors keep their product in cold storage, which is not a bad thing, but you don’t know how old they are,” Slauson said. “Our almonds are extremely fresh; they are not stored or vacuum sealed and we don’t use preservatives.” Black Shire Almonds come in six savory varieties, five sweet flavors and all natural. Wasabi is the latest flavor, quickly becoming a favorite, and joins onion garlic, cheese jalapeno, tequila lime, natural hickory smoked and roasted salted. Sweet flavors include butter toffee, mocha, cinnamon honey, raspberry honey and orange honey. “People are often surprised about how good our almonds are, and comment on how they are different than from what they get in the store,” Slauson said. “We want to have people enjoy them while they are still fresh, remember the flavor, and return for more the next year.” Though Slauson and Bratka had no prior farming experience beyond a vegetable garden, the pair farms the orchard of Padre and Butte almond trees themselves. “We do all the work ourselves and I enjoy doing it,” Bratka said. “I take pride in what I do. We’ve had some great teachers; the neighbors have been wonderful in sharing their experience, showing us how to do things, how to get the best size nut. That’s a big reason for our success.” Slauson and Bratka outsource the roasting and flavoring to a third party, also in Arbuckle, but oversee the entire process. The cross pollination of


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December 2010

the Padre and Butte-variety tress is another reason for the great flavor. “(Butte and Padre) are some of the best varieties for snacking and eating,” Slauson said. “In fact, ‘natural’ is our most popular seller.” The name “Black Shire Almonds” came from Slauson and Bratka’s “silent” partners, draft horses Doc, who passed away in 2006, and Danvick. Danvick is an integral part of the growing process. “Her fertilizes the trees,” Slauson said. “He’s been very helpful, as you can tell from our production increase.” Besides Danvick’s sizable contribution, Slauson said the cool spring and mild summer weather also helped with the fruitful harvest. The 2010-2011 crop is now ready for market, just in time for the holidays. Locally, Black Shire Almonds are available at Oasis in Dunnigan, 30003 County Road 8. Weather permitting, the almonds are also sold at the Elk Grove Farmers Market, Laguna and Big Horn Boulevards. Each bag is $5. Orders are also accepted online at www. blackshirealmonds.com. Shipping is free on orders with seven or more bags. For more information, call 476-2081.

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Almonds are good for you (courtesy blackshirealmonds.com)

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• One serving of almonds (one ounce or about 2025) contains 12 percent of your daily allowance of protein. • One serving gives you 35 percent of your daily allowance of vitamin E, a valuable antioxidant known for many cancer-fighting qualities. In fact, almonds are the best whole food source for vitamin E. • Nearly all of the fat in almonds is monounsaturated, also known as the “good” fat with absolutely no cholesterol. • Almonds are loaded with minerals like magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, calcium and folic acid. • Almonds also provide lots of healthy fiber. • One serving of almonds contain as much calcium as 1/4 cup of milk, a valuable tool in preventing osteoporosis and building strong bones and teeth. • Almonds contain more magnesium than oatmeal or spinach.


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December 2010

A Datamind XP Productions Publication

Kiving Kids a Fighting Chance

By LAUREN MILLER Writer & Contributor

A

decade after the founding of “La Corona Boxing Club,” it is going strong and expected to get stronger. Founded and run by Merced Corona, the “La Corona” is run out of his residence’s shop. It is astounding to see the operation. Inside of what looks like an ordinary equipment shop, there are two boxing rings, a field of body bags, a full weight station, and a sitting area for parents. On a Thursday night, sparring practice night, the shop is overflowing with children from all over the county warming up, practicing on the bags, and strapping up for their matches. Merced Corona, a sheriff with Colusa County, volunteers his time for the kids and for the passion of boxing. Tonight, he is accompanied by a colleague and friend, Mr. Rich Bowen. Both Merced and Rich are certified coaches with USA Boxing. The other coaches, Mr. Alfredo Medina and Mr. Carlos Diaz volunteer on other practice nights. The club practices two nights a week, and Merced

points out the system: the children’s whose hands are wrapped in red tape are the registered competitors, and the children wrapped in blue tape are the non-registered competitors getting their practice in. As a USA Boxing sanctioned club, the registered competitors travel far and wide to destinations such as San Francisco, Reno, and Fresno. They compete in rings, see new places, and create a new social network. “ “Some of these kids have never seen a major bridge or a sky scraper,” Bowen says, as he explains the team trip to Pacifica. After a day of competition, Bowen and Corona took the kids to the beach to unwind. “Boxing takes full dedication,” says Corona. It seems that these kids have it. Corona holds a body bag for Manuel Alcaraz, age 13. While Manuel punches, Corona swings a towel, requiring expert focus and agility on Manuel’s part—he must simultaneously punch and duck the swinging towel. And he does. Manuel Alcaraz attends Johnson Junior High and plays no other sports. He likes boxing. His favorite boxing memory is not only his first win, but also his last win. He was knocked down, but he got up and ended up winning the match. The kids attending “La Corona” range from the age of eight up through high school. The sport of boxing is an interesting one at such a young age. There is an acceptance and determination in being hit and hitting back. Sparring matches last for two minutes, with one minute off. All the while, Coaches Corona and Bowen are constantly supervising in the ring. “It’s okay, come off the ropes with a hook,” advises Bowen, as a small boy struggles against his opponent. “It takes a lot of guts to get in the ring,” he later comments. While the actual matches are on an individual


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level, this is definitely a team. After each match, the competitors touch gloves and exit the ring together. There is comradeship. At the end of the night’s practice, Corona calls the team in, and they all huddle around. Announcements are made and a round of applause is given for the nights practice. “Who brought toilet paper?” Bowen asks the crowd. A little girl raises her hand, and another round of applause is given for her donation. Corona funds the running the of the Club, and does not charge a cent for the children to compete--most Clubs charge thirty or even seventy dollars a month, while Corona also provides the protective equipment and gloves free of charge.

Williams Pioneer Review

When asked why he does it, he responds, “It is a way to give back to the community, as corny as that sounds. This is not a business, this is a pleasure.” Bowen, who has spent his adult life volunteering his boxing time, heartily agrees. Anyone can come and box. There are no restrictions keeping anyone from coming and being a part. “If they come and show up every time, they are in the club,” says Bowen. Mrs. Diana Azevedo has her son Nick attending, and she is amazed by the club. Nick is learning and experiencing the skills of networking and confidence-- skills that will pay off for the rest of his life. Nick’s story can be applied to all of the children in the shop. As a observer, one can see parents making sure all the kids have water and mouth guards, and standing ringside with pride while their kids spar. This club is a community, so when someone brings small things like water and toilet paper, it makes a genuine difference, and helps everyone feel like they are contributing. Merced and Rich’s goals for the club are thus: “to give every kid a fighting chance,” as there slogan states, and to someday see one of their kids make it to the USA Boxing Amateur Trials, or even the Olympics. With Jackie Corona having won the World Ringside Championship for her division, and Juan Rodriguez with six wins and one loss, just to name a few star boxers, “La Corona Boxing Club” is well on its way to succeeding at both of these goals.

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A Datamind XP Productions Publication

30 Activities for kids or the young at heart... 

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

  

 

         

        

  

   

  

  

 

  



                     




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A Datamind XP Productions Publication


Christmas Guide 2010