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OCTOBER172, 2009 - OCTOBER 16, 2009

VOLUME 2 - ISSUE 19

COLUSASTOCK BENEFIT CONCERT OCTOBER 3RD

COMING EVENTS OCTOBER IS BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH OCTOBER 3 COLUSASTOCK OCTOBER 4 OMEGA NU RUMMAGE SALE

(Photo Courtesy of Gene McKasson) The Colusa High School Jazz Band performed for the crowd at the last Colusastock concert.

OCTOBER 6 CITIZENS POLICE ACADEMY BEGINS OCTOBER 10 COLUSA COUNTY BREAST CANCER WALK

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n Saturday, October 3rd, the band LEGEND and Colusa Friends of Music will sponsor a benefit concert, with all proceeds going to the

Colusa and Pierce School’s Music Department. The event will take place at the Colusa Fairgrounds Pavilion from noon until 10:00 pm. In addition to LEGEND

STAFF REPORT

OCTOBER 17 COLUSA FIRE FIGHTERS ASSOCIATION DERBY OCTOBER 25 ARC CAR SHOW & BBQ OCTOBER 19 CRMC SENIOR HEALTH FAIR

What’s Inside This Issue PAGE

Weather ............................... 2 Opinion ............................... 4 News Back Then ............... 6 Home & Garden ............... 7 Community Calendar .. 12 Classifieds .........................13 Espanol................................14

WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW 317 Fifth Street Colusa, CA 95932 Direct: 530.383.4861 Fax: 1.530.458.2675 SUBMIT STORIES TO submissions@ williamspioneerreview.com ADVERTISING graphics@ williamspioneerreview.com EDITOR & PUBLISHER publisher@ williamspioneerreview.com

STAFF REPORT

performing, the HIWAY 20 and old, chips, nachos, snow band will also be on hand to cones and cotton candy. For more information, entertain the crowd. Keys to the Kingdom, an adult rock contact Brian Basset, Friends band from Arbuckle, will also of Music president, at 519play a set for the crowd. The 2766, or Michael Phenicie, Colusa High School band and Colusa School’s music director Show Choir will perform, as at 458-7631 during the day or well as the Colusa Jazz Band. 458-7814, in the evening. Tickets are $8.00 for adults, There will be a kid’s $5.00 for carnival with students, and many free Mark Your Calendars free for age activities to COLUSASTOCK 5 and under. provide hours Tickets will of fun. OCTOBER 3, 2009 COLUSA FAIR GROUNDS be available NOON TO 10:00 PM in advance Hamburgers at Egling and hot M i d d l e dogs will be available for the lunch time School in the band room, or at crowd, and tri-tip sandwiches the gate. Come on out to the Colusa will be offered for dinner. Other food items will be Fairgrounds and help support available throughout the day, your local music department! including drinks for young

MARTINI WINS AT CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR THREE YEARS IN A ROW

OCTOBER 16-18 COLUSA CASINO CHILI COOK-OFF

SECTION

FREE/GRATIS

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or the third year in a row Williams native Ashleigh Martini brought home another win from the California State Fair’s Best of Show-Horse Show, after competing in the Senior Trail Class. “It feels really good to hold onto a title like that,” shared Martini. Martini first began taking riding lessons when she was eight years old, after her mother asked her if she was interested in horses. They had purchased her first horse by Martini’s ninth birthday. Over the years she has accomplished many things, some bigger than others, one of which is winning the Senior Trail Class three years in a row. A Williams 4-H Club member for 10 years, Martini has focused on several projects including horse, miniature horse, photography and scrapbooking. Martini is currently attending Yuba Community College to prep for either an engineering or mathematics major, but plans to continue showing as often as she can. “I would also like to become a certified judge, so I can judge horseshows in the future,” she said. She likes to encourage kids who may be interested in horses to take a few riding lessons and join a local 4-H

THE LEGENDS IN MUSIC CONCERT SERIES COMES TO COLUSA STAFF REPORT

(Photo Courtesy Dale Martini) Ashleigh Martini recently won the Senior Trail Class for the third year in a row at the California State Fair. Martini is pictured here with her partner in crime, Sheal Due the Town.

group, but she also warns that it’s not all about the ridinghorses are a lot of work. “There is so much to learn,” she explained “It’s important to learn all you can before making a decision on whether or not you are serious about getting into horses. If you are dedicated, it can be very rewarding.” What has it been like for Ashleigh? “Horses have brought a lot of good into my life,” Ashleigh said “…happiness, love, fun, knowledge, patience.” She

also went on to describe how she had to learn to deal with responsibility, commitment and how to lose with dignity. “Every day is a learning experience, every time my horse and I can improve on even the easiest maneuver, I look at it as another accomplishment,” she explained. Martini continues to compete and will be participating in the Sacramento Horseman’s Association Schooling Show on October 4.

In today’s economy the phrase budget cuts, can send a shiver down the spine of many educators. When it comes to schools and their programs, it seems that music is one of the first programs that are cut. In spite of that fact a new musical experience is sweeping area schools and their music departments. Students and teachers are treated to an experience of a lifetime, an opportunity to see firsthand the process of putting on a major performance. The Legends of Music Concert Series is a three day program that provides a unique opportunity for music, theater and production students to get a glimpse into all the aspects of the music industry; From developing a program, marketing, writing full orchestration, preparation of the concert, performing and all the behind the scene action that it takes to make the concert happen. It’s a multi-faceted program the blends an educational experience for both students and teachers, fundraising opportunity for local music programs, and an entertainment experience that puts a full, 32 piece orchestra together with some of the most talented musicians of our time. ....................Continued on Page 2


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WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

OCTOBER 2, 2009 - OCTOBER 16, 2009

LEGENDS COMES TO COLUSA Continued The program and series was developed by Dr. Keller Coker of Western Oregon University and Don Kennedy, formerly the Director of Marketing for Chinook Winds Casino Resort in Lincoln City, Oregon. Kennedy is currently the Director of Marketing for the Colusa Casino Resort. “My hope is that it spreads with true musical legends giving back to their communities, that colleges, high schools and middle schools all work together to make music a successful program and that we provide our kids with lots of options growing up to be well rounded people,” said Kennedy. The three day program kicks off with a Wednesday visit to area schools by members of the production to talk to students and teachers about their various roles in the LMCS. Thursday the students and teachers would be on site for a late afternoon production preview including room and seating preparation, sound, lighting, a full rehearsal, question and answer session and a meet and greet with the Orchestra Conductor and the guest artist and finally they will end the day as audience members for the performance. Both Thursday and Friday’s concert performances will be on sale to the public and the music departments will be selling blocks of tickets with half of the proceeds going to their respective programs. The featured orchestra is the American Metropole Orchestra, which is based on the famous European Metropole Orchestra of the Netherlands. Dr. Coker, an accomplished performer and composer, will be the conductor. Some very lucky, specially selected area music students will shadow orchestra

members, production staff and singers of the series. They will even have the opportunity to be selected to work on and perform in future concerts. The guest artists are legendary in the music world. Sonny Turner is the lead singer of The Platters who have old time favorites such as: Only You, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, The Great Pretender, Red Sails in the Sunset and dozens more. The Grand Lady of Country Music, Lynn Anderson whose timeless hit I Never Promised You a Rose Garden is just one of dozens of gold records. Paul Williams, songwriter, who has won an Oscar, Golden Globes, Grammy’s and numerous other awards. Some of his songs include: Evergreen, We’ve Only Just Begun, Rainy Days and Mondays, the theme to the TV show the Love Boat and the muppet’s Rainbow Connection. The program is the second of its kind. The first was on the central Oregon Coast in a region similar in size to Colusa County, where 300 students and teachers participated in the series. For this series, half of the orchestra will be from Yuba, Sutter and Colusa Counties including Mike Phenicie as well as one student musician from Colusa High School. As each concert approaches, more local students will join the orchestra and singers. In addition, a local middle school audio-visual class is working on a project to provide a six to seven minute video montage of Lynn Anderson for her concert. The concerts will be October 22 and 23 at 8 p.m. Ticket prices are $35 preferred seating and $25 reserved. For more information about the series you may visit www. colusacasino.com.

1108 MARKET STREET - COLUSA, CA

(530) 458-3803

ART SHOW AND SHARE A SUCCESS STAFF REPORT Creative Looks in Maxwell played host to the Colusa Regional Medical Center Art Show and Share September 19, with over 120 pieces of art, it was a resounding success. Kyla Lees, 16, of Williams was the youngest artist whose work was displayed. Her photography showed life through her eyes with experience beyond her years. The Art Show and Share was her first foray into the art world. “It’s more than I thought it would be,” shared Lees of her experience. Lees and her family are recent transplants to Colusa County by way of San Antonio, Texas. At the tender age of nine, while on a family trip to Niagara Falls, Lees took some of her very first photos. “Seeing the beauty you could capture with something so small-the highlights and lowlights always fascinate me,” she explained. Also at the event was a Yuba City musical group the Saxsations. With a mixture of 500 pieces to their repertoire, they

(Staff Photo) Kyla Lees showed off her photography at the recent Art Show & Share that was held in Maxwell.

have songs for every occasion. The tranquil setting of the Creative Looks’ gardens, the music and artwork, it made for a pleasant event for all who attended. The event is not a fundraiser but rather a way to bring art into the community both at the show and later when it is displayed at Colusa Regional Medical Center, many are also available for purchase. Being displayed at CRMC is a great way for budding artists to gain exposure for their works. Those artists include: Susan

Alvarez, Alandra Arambula, Jean Boyes, Deanna Day, Annie Dirks-LaGrande, Rodrigo Duran, Josh Edwards, David Fermin, Margery Fuson, Sue Graue, Cheryl Hennessy, Alice Kaeslin, Patricia Kalfsbeek, Kyla Lees, Bonnie Lee Martin, Mary Ann Nation, Melissa Oden, Tracy Pitts, Kevin Roddy, Jenna Smead, Sue Sutton, Augusta Bell Tremayne, Cheryle A. Young.

COLUSA COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND THE COLUSA COUNTY BUSINESS AND VISITORS’ CENTER TO MERGE WITH COLUSA COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE under the Chamber umbrella. This decision will streamline the organization, utilize the knowledge and talents of all of its members and Since 2003 the Economic Development reflect the organization’s response to the current Corporation, The Colusa County Business economic climate. The Board is comprised of volunteers and will expand and Visitor’s Center and the from 9 to 11 members. This Colusa County Chamber of Visit on the web October, the Board will seek Commerce, have operated nominations for six open as three separate entities www.ColusaCountyChamber.com board seats for the term at 2963 Davison Court in 2010-2011. Board meetings Colusa. After much planning are held the 3rd Thursday of and discussion, the three organizations voted every month at 6:30 p.m. at the Business and unanimously September 17th to merge together as the Colusa County Chamber of Visitors’ Center. Everyone is welcome and Commerce, Inc. With the merger the EDC encouraged to attend. and BVC will function as separate committees SPECIAL TO THE WPR


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BOOK FAIR IS COMING TO BURCHFIELD PRIMARY SCHOOL!

OCTOBER 2, 2009 - OCTOBER 16, 2009

ARBUCKLE COMMUNITY CHURCH CELEBRATES 130 YEARS SPECIAL TO THE WPR

SPECIAL TO THE WPR

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urchfield Primary School with be presenting “Destination Book Fair” Running October 31stNovember 6th. We will offer “Early Bird” shopping again on Saturday, October 31st, from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Anyone wearing their costume in to purchase a book on Saturday, will receive their purchase in a trick-or-treat bag with a treat! Shop the fair on Sat., before the book fair “officially” opens to avoid the crowds! On Monday, March 2nd, the book fair will be open after school from 2:30-4:30. At 6:00 p.m. on Monday Donnie Crandell with perform his Magic Show in the cafeteria, free of charge for all. Following the performance, the book fair will be open until 8:00 p.m. The book fair will be open the following hours for the remainder of the week: Tuesday, Nov. 2nd-Friday, Nov. 6th, 8:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Support Burchfield’s library and visit the book fair! Call 4585853 for more information. for information.

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elicious cake and people of all ages mingling amid the hum of friendly conversation combined on Sunday, September 20th, as the Arbuckle Community Church marked its 130th anniversary. A beautiful Bible-shaped cake inscribed with the words “Great is Thy Faithfulness” reflected the celebratory mood of the congregation. The event marked the exact date in 1879 when five faithful pioneers organized the first charter. Since then, the church’s colorful history has been marked by continuous renovations and remodeling, small group Bible studies, a prayer chain and annual events such as the Almond Blossom Tea, the Quilter’s Raffle, rummage sales, church picnic/campout and Men’s Breakfast. Various community service and outreach activities have been conducted through the decades, including food baskets, canned food drives, vouchers for gas and groceries, and the support of numerous missionaries around the world. In 1925, voluntary tithing replaced the subscription method of financing, a practice in faith that continues today. A commitment of setting 10 percent of the annual

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ROADMAP PROGRESSES

The county and cities learned in the process that to be successful in establishing an The County of Colusa, the enterprise zone, an economic budget aside for missions also City of Williams and the City development plan, or roadmap, continues. of Colusa have announced was necessary. In late 2008, During the social hour the next step in creating the county and cities began to celebration, highlights of the an economic development create a plan to be a roadmap church’s history were shared. roadmap for the entire county, containing not just where we One entry noted that in 1932, soliciting input from county want to go, but also identifying Pastor A.D. Bruce and a Mr. residents on what economic the steps needed to reach those Chandler were concerned development they would like goals. The first meetings held in about the rowdy young people to see in Colusa County. “We May were hosted by the City want to hear from everyone,” in Arbuckle, so they started of Colusa. Key members of said Supervisor Kim Vann. baseball games at night to provide clean recreation for “This is about our county’s the business community were the town youth. Christian future.” October 8 has been interviewed for their thoughts education, especially for set for the next meeting in on economic development for the region. Another key children, is evident in the many Williams. “The future of the City and County of Colusa component was a visit by decades of Sunday School, is too important to leave to a professional site locator children’s messages during the chance. We need to take charge who specializes in assisting worship service, summertime of our economic future,” said companies wishing to relocate Vacation Bible School and a Colusa City Manager Jan or expand. variety of youth programs. McClintock. The Williams meeting “The cake may be gone and The Economic Development is scheduled for Thursday, the social hall quiet,” said Roadmap project started in October 8, at 6:30 p.m. at one church member, calmly 2007 to create an enterprise Granzella’s meeting room. scraping icing off the social zone in Colusa County. An Area residents are encouraged hall carpet, “but the ongoing enterprise zone would create to attend to help create a fellowship of believers and tax incentives for businesses to future of economic stability their personal relationship locate or expand in the county. and prosperity. with God will go on until the next anniversary!” The current pastor, Matt Woodward, serves a congregation that upholds the whole Bible as the inspired Word of Woodland,” Morgan says. The God. The congregation BY: ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK museum welcomes groups recognizes the 130th Writer & Contributor from schools, churches, youth anniversary as a testimony to groups and more, and it is also God’s faithfulness to them olusa County residents open to the public every Friday, as a body of believers and interested in a tour of the Saturday and Monday from to the work of sharing the Holy Land need only travel as 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. gospel with the community far as Woodland. Individuals The museum’s and groups alike are able to humble beginnings began in of Arbuckle and beyond. stop by the Woodland Museum the foyer of Woodland United of Biblical Archaeology at Fellowship in 2007. Morgan Woodland United Fellowship, created a display case with a 240 N. West Street, to visit few juglets and lamps from a collection of artifacts archaeological digs in which from biblical times. Since he had participated, and the its inception a year ago, the collection continued to grow. Woodland Museum of Biblical “When you can actually look at Archaeology has hosted more (and sometimes hold) objects than 800 visitors. that come from the period of “Most people Abraham, Moses, David or are very surprised that a Jesus, those stories about them display concerning biblical become more alive,” Morgan archaeology of this quality is says. “It tends to remove the local,” says WUF pastor Carl approach to Scripture that Morgan. “It’s not something these characters were bigger they expect to see in a church. I than life and somewhat believe we are the only church mythological. They were as real in the country with a museum as you and I.” like this.” Of the 800 guests On the west wall of the in the last year, says Morgan, museum artifacts from mainly many return with friends to the Middle Bronze Age share their enthusiasm about (2,200 B.C. to 1,550 B.C.) are the collection of genuine displayed. Visitors will find artifacts from biblical times. sling stones, which were used The museum also hosted a as weapons and swung with a weeklong summer children’s leather strap. They will also see camp, “Truth Quest.” swords from 2,000 B.C. and a Almost every piece sacrificial knife from the time in the museum has a Bible of Abraham. There is pottery story to accompany it, leaving dated before 3,000 B.C. and a both children and adults with battle-axe on display that dates a greater appreciation for the to at least 500 years before the Bible and biblical history. “They time of Abraham. call it the ‘Secret Treasure’ of ................Continued on Page 5 SPECIAL TO THE WPR

BIBLICAL MUSEUM IN WOODLAND

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OCTOBER 2, 2009 - OCTOBER 16, 2009

OPINION

WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

THINK PINK

TIME FOR REAL SOLUTIONS TO REAL PROBLEMS

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ometimes it’s really lives, or should be, let’s make hard not to get caught the best of them. up in the rat race called October is Breast Cancer life. Rushing here and there, Awareness month and I think school, meetings, karate, it’s awesome how our county dance. It’s enough to make my comes together for the cause. head spin on my shoulders. I Whether you are able to always have to remind my- make a monetary donation to self to stop, take a local charity or a deep breath show up for the and focus on the Breast Cancer important things Walk in Colusa in life, my famOctober 10th, ily. So, I take a it’s crucial we step back and all participate in remember the some way. Even reason I started if you can enthe WPR was to courage a friend be able to conor a loved one to tinue what I engo get a mamANDREA MOORE joy, writing and Publisher mogram, you are meeting people, doing something while being there pro-active for my family. With that I refocus and feel a weight lifted off my shoulders. I see things Andrea Moore may be in a new light even though I reached via email at: publisham still as busy as always. er@williamspioneerreview. As a society we tend to get com caught up in the drama of the moment, it’s easy to do. But, once we take a step back it’s easier to see what our original goals were and get back on track. We are in charge of our

espite numerous latenight meetings and many public hearings, we have missed the deadline to come up with a comprehensive water solution this year, but a special legislative session has not been ruled out. The perfect storm of belowaverage rainfall and water cutbacks due to environmental regulations has left California farmers and ranchers with an uncertain future.

the Central Valley has made national media headlines, fueling the frustration of Central Valley farmers. A quick drive down Interstate 5 and anyone can see the numerous signs that reiterate the frustration, “Congress Created a Dustbowl.” Many can debate the numbers of acres of farmland being fallowed because of lack of water, but whether 150,000 acres or Ashley Indrieri 300,000, neither Family Water Alliance Five water bills is acceptable introduced for one of the this summer fell short of largest agricultural-producing addressing the real issues regions in the nation. facing the Delta. The bills It is paramount for farmers attempted to deal with the in the Central Valley to tell governance structure of water their story. Our state’s water deliveries, but would have crisis is simply not pitting only added more red tape interest groups against each to an already bureaucratic other, such as farmers versus process. fish, it is about our state’s In recent weeks the lack of livelihood. The environment farm water being delivered in does not have a higher moral

calling than the farmers who grow the food that feeds our families and our nation. Simply saying we don’t have the money will only cause the Central Valley of California, which is known as the bread basket of the world, to have communities that cannot even feed themselves. Californians should be ashamed of political inaction and erroneous environmental policy that has brought our $36 billion agricultural industry to a breaking point. Pushing a package of bills that does not address infrastructure as a solution to California water crisis is a naive attempt that will be as successful as the ”kink your hose” mentality to solve the real problem that faces our state. Ashley Indrieri may reached via email

be at:

view us online!

www.WilliamsPioneerReview.com

WHAT DOESN’T KILL US MAKES US STRONGER

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ife has a way of bringing you up, then tries to pull you back down. A few weeks ago my decision to resign the presidency of the Colusa County Chamber of Commerce was made because I wanted to fulfill my dreams to become the person I wanted to be. While recovering from having my wisdom teeth extracted, I had some time to reflect on my life over the past few years and realized that I really have accomplished a lot for a person my age, yet, I wanted more. Not material successes, but relationships of friends and family. With the growth of my business, my new home and life in general, it was time to move on and pass the torch. Although my decision was publicly scrutinized with the obvious aim to tear down my reputation of reliability and devotion to community service, I remain standing on my feet. There were times I thought of giving up to run away from it all, but I knew better. I have nothing to hide, but I could not have guessed the number of people who believe in me and voiced their

support, who recognized the lose four people who thought critical ink as nothing more there was no more love and than an attempt, under the their luck had run out. If you guise of an “investigative feel down on your luck or are report,” to manufacture a just having a bad day, week, controversy where there was month, or year, be assured none. it will get better. There are A friend of mine says, “You people who love you, even if it never know what the other may not seem so. So the next person is going through to time you are having a bad make decisions or to act the day, take a moment to talk to way they do.” Often times someone; maybe a friend, or a we take things at face value. loved one or even a complete Sometimes we grumble at stranger. You might learn the espresso bar employee something new about that who is taking longer than person, good or bad, but don’t usual to make our favorite judge. The next time you see coffee, with little someone and you Lloyd Green Jr. c o n s i d e r a t i o n Writer & Contributor greet with “Hi, that the server how are you?” may have been stop for a second up all night with a sick child, and listen for the answer. or completing final course I often think, “Why papers, one step closer to complain, it isn’t as if anyone is becoming the doctor or other going to listen.” It is true. We professional they aspire to be. don’t like to hear complaints. It may seem like a cliché, but We all have complaints of no matter how bad you might our own that always seem feel or what is going on in bigger than the complainer’s, your life, just smile at every no matter the situation. We person you see. That smile may act as if we care, but do can brighten someone’s day, we? Voicing you opinion or and you just might inspire a discussing the situation may life. take that big complaint down Our community has to a little situation when you been unfortunate recently to finally realize, “That wasn’t so

bad now, was it?.” We are all human, and I think we get so caught up in our computers, iPhones and our personal schedules that we often forget the human element. We all make mistakes, and we all have those bad days, but is it really worth “sticking” it to a person forever? If you have ever held a grudge against anyone or make it your purpose to get back at someone, try sitting down and writing a list of the factual things the person did to you. Then write a list of things you have done in return. I’ll bet the list won’t balance. So, pick up that phone, or grab that iPhone and email that person to say you are sorry, and make up over a nice cup of coffee or lunch. Over the past few weeks I have learned that love is stronger than hate. My mother has always preached it, but I never listened. However, when you get to a moment in life when it feels as if everyone is out to get you, and you realize people are there to support you, the meaning of the lesson

becomes a reality. Now that I have moved on and am writing a new chapter in my life, I will never let one of my dreams fade, because dreams don’t work without action, and no one can stop me but me. As I continue my community service as a director of the Colusa County Chamber of Commerce, I am happy to support the merging of the Chamber with the Colusa County Economic Development Council and the Colusa County Business and Visitors Center as progress for the community and to the benefit of all who live and work here.

“Those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible.” T.E. Lawrence

Lloyd Green Jr. may be reached via email at: lloyd@ lloydsprintandcopy.com


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OCTOBER 2, 2009 - OCTOBER 16, 2009

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BIBLICAL MUSEUM Continued Pottery includes terra-cotta dipping juglets and other household items from around the time of Job. The north wall of the museum displays items from the Iron Age (1,250 B.C. to 587 B.C.), or the time of Israel’s monarchy and King David, to the Babylonian captivity in 587 B.C. Guests will see on display un-translated cuneiform tablets, made of mud and then fired to make them hard, which were an early method of contracts and covenants,. Also of note are clay containers used for various things such as holding oil, and several have been found with traces of opium inside. A priest of that time would use opium in a ceremony, or a woman in labor might take opium for the pain. Other relics include alabaster jars from Egypt, cooking pots, juglets, everyday ware, tableware, pitchers, bowls, tablets, storage jars, wooden

Egyptian mummy mask, scarab beetles used to make the seal impressions of different pharaohs, mantle deities, a pilgrim’s flask from Judea used to carry wine pulp to mix with water, an incantation bowl from Lydia used by priests to read the future, and more. “Archaeology helps us understand the culture and lifestyle of people from biblical periods,” Morgan says. “Most of the information you read from biblical commentaries about everyday life and culture in biblical times is available because of the works of archaeologists.” The museum’s east wall has some items from the late Iron Age, like a fruit bowl, but also artifacts from Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine eras. Even in biblical times there were makeup applicators, perfume bottles, mending needles, fish needles and surgical tools. There are also oil containers from Petra, blown

glass from Phoenicia, Roman nails and spear points, and a solemn child’s burial urn from Carthage, where infanticide was rampant. For those who don’t have their Bible history down pat, do not worry. There are 2-feet by 10-feet parchment timelines along each wall to show visitors the chronology of Bible history. The timeline dates key biblical periods and relates biblical characters and events with those periods. The timeline also reveals the books of the Bible that emerged from those periods. Underneath the timeline are contemporary objects along with a description of each and a Bible verse to give it context. “Most of us appreciate visual enforcements for what we are taught or read about,” Morgan says. “By seeing these objects in their context, the Bible stories come alive and are more easily understood.” In the south corner of the museum is the Tall el-Hamman corner, where Morgan has participated in an archaeological dig for the past four years. The site in Jordan is believed to be the city of

Sodom as written in Genesis. The corner will be a 3-D area depicting the actual square Morgan is excavating in Jordan. It will display tools used in archaeology and will show the meter of ash found at the site, which is crucial evidence since the Bible declared Sodom was destroyed by brimstone and fire. Morgan plans to return for a fifth year of excavation in January. “This season we will be focusing on the well-preserved Early Bronze city which was the Sodom of Genesis 10 listed in the Table of Nations after the Great Flood,” Morgan says of the upcoming dig in Jordan. Seven Woodlanders are set to go on the dig in January, and all are welcome to participate. Woodland United Fellowship’s Upcoming Community Events: Archaeology Kids’ Club: Meets every other Friday from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. to learn how archaeology and the Bible work together. Games are played as well as excavation of a mock square. Ongoing Greek and Hebrew classes: Open to the public

for a small fee. Basic New Testament Greek meets from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays. Lecture Series: The museum offers at least two lecture series each year concerning archaeology and biblical history. They are free and open to the public. Dr. John Moore will lecture beginning at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 10 about the Intertestamental Period (the 400 years between the writing of the Old and New Testaments) and continuing in the afternoon at 1:00 p.m. Dig at Tell el-Hammam: Sunday, November 15 at 6:00 p.m. Dr. Steven Collins, the director of the archaeological dig in Jordan, will be sharing the most recent information about the ongoing dig he believes to be the biblical Sodom. All are welcome to attend the lecture and participate in the dig. For more information, visit www.wufonline.org.

Photo cut line: Pastor Carl Morgan with relics from the Holy Land in the Woodland Museum of Biblical Archaeology.

CSU CHICO STUDENTS TO HELP LOCAL NONPROFITS WITH MARKETING

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pproximately 300 CSU, Chico students will provide marketing assistance to local nonprofit organizations through a joint project with North Valley Community Foundation. Forty-five nonprofit organizations currently working with the Community Foundation are participating in this project. An orientation meeting was held on campus Monday evening, September 21, to match students with representatives from the organizations they have chosen for this project. The September 21 gathering included a training session, “Telling Your Story”, by Laura Cootsona, Director of the Nonprofit Leadership Institute, a program of North Valley Community Foundation. Cootsona presented information to help the students and nonprofit representatives present to maximize the impact of this project. The goal is for these nonprofit organizations to significantly increase their visibility, thus increasing donations, volunteers and public understanding of their services. Cootsona stated,“Nonprofit leaders typically assume that because the work done by their organizations is important, the public understands what

they do and that the public cares. We cannot operate with these assumptions and be successful.” Students involved in this project are all enrolled in Management 300, a Business Communications class that is primarily for students seeking a degree in Business. Professor Bob Sprague is coordinating this effort to provide students with relevant “hands on” experience and nonprofits with expert advice. “Everyone benefits when students and community

resources and needs. The students walk away having truly contributed to our community, and the nonprofits have access to a whole new resource,” Alexa explained. “This project is especially important right now, as nonprofits are facing unprecedented funding difficulties. More than ever, nonprofits need the public to understand the services they provide, and ways in which they as community members can help out” she stated. Small groups of students will be meeting with representatives from the 45 nonprofits involved during Visit on the web the semester, and developing marketing projects and goals www.NVCF.org tailored to meet the needs of each organization. organizations collaborate,” North Valley Community stated Sprague. “The College Foundation serves Butte, of Business students receive a Glenn, Tehama and Colusa real experience of developing with a variety of services. These communication products for services include helping donors an organization. The non- find the best way to carry out profit organizations receive their philanthropic goals, quality products and the helping nonprofits maximize innovative energy unique to their impact, and educating university students. Both the community about the groups grow deeper in what importance of supporting their it takes to develop a local favorite charities. Counties community.” For further details on Also present this project or other services was Alexa Valavanis, CEO offered by the Foundation, of North Valley Community contact NVCF at 891-1150 or Foundation. “This is a unique at www.nvcf.org. opportunity to connect


6

OCTOBER 2, 2009 - OCTOBER 16, 2009

THE NEWS BACK THEN SPONSORED BY SACRAMENTO VALLEY MUSEUM Patricia Ash, Contributor

the news back then

Mrs. McMahon stated that the springs will possibly be developed be a company. An option has been taken and it is probable that these springs which were at one time, the most popular in the northern ------------------------------------------------------ part of the state will again be attracting patrons from great WILLIAMS FARMER distances. Whether a hotel will be rebuilt or individual cabins will 9/24/1937 YELLOWJACKETS TO USHER be constructed is not known. The rebuilding of the springs would AT ST. MARY’S-CAL GAME be a big asset to Williams as all A rare opportunity will be afforded shipping and most patrons of the thirty five members of the Williams spring pass through Williams. -----------------------------------------------------High School when they leave on the school bus at 6 a.m. Saturday WILLIAMS FARMER morning to attend the annual Gael9/28/1951 Bear gridiron classic. HANK RHOADES WRITES The group will work as ushers for FROM KOREA one complete aisle, with Coach Mathiesen acting as aisle captain. (Contributor’s note-The Smith’s referred to At 11 a.m. the boys will report at in the letter were Dick and Harry Smith, the north end of the California editors and owners of the Williams Farmer Memorial Stadium where their at this time.) aisle assignment will be given to Dear Folks- This letter is meant them. Upon arriving in Berkeley for all the Smiths responsible for the group will be divided into my receiving the Williams Farmer. several smaller groups and will Some of them get lost and others be shown some of the interesting arrive on the mountain top quite highlights at the campus by Mr. V. beaten to be readable. Magazines Binsacca, Mr. Austin George, and and newspapers are passed one Coach Marty Mathiesen. The only man to another and by the time cost to the boys will be a small fee the platoon reads it, a good many charge for the passage over and pages have been used for lighting back on the Carquinez Bridge. fires and under blankets to keep ------------------------------------------------------ the dampness out. The Williams WILLIAMS FARMER Farmer pages are strewn on many ridges and mountain tops here in 10/7/1938 Korea. Some of the hills we own BARLETT SPRINGS MAY BE and a few the Chinese still have. REBUILT SOON My job is that of a rifle platoon leader in Easy company of the 21st Mrs. C.C. McMahon passed Infantry Regiment. I have the 2nd through Williams Monday en platoon and according to the book, route to San Francisco from it should consist of three nine-man Bartlett Springs. She stopped for rifle squads with an automatic rifle a brief visit with F. E. Kidd, former team in each and a fourth squad local representative of the springs. consisting of a light machine gun

WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

and a 3.5 bazooka team. The two to point out their target by firing medics and four litter bearers white phosphorus at or near the make a total of 42 men. Platoon bunkers. We are thankful they are headquarters consists of me, a here and only wish they could win platoon sergeant and a runner. This the war without us. It’s hard to makes a total of 47. The platoon believe that after seven battalions since I have had it has ranged of artillery have shelled a hill, from 52 to 19 men. The present the air corps has dropped napalm moment finds us back to full and the tanks have put in their licks that you would strength and attached have over a hundred to a tank company Chinese to gain its as armored infantry. top. The Chinese We have been on one are small but with a mission with them. rifle, he is a tough And despite some 200 customer. It gives you mortar rounds the a strange feeling to Chinese threw, we are find you have fought still able to tell about up a mountain all day it-thanks to the tank your own against and company commander. enemy armed with We are a miserable PAT ASH your own equipment lot in the infantry, for Contributor such as machine guns, all we own, we carry Sacramento Valley Museum M1 rifles, carbines, on our backs. Each automatic rifles and night we dig in on ridge lines and pull foxhole guard, mortars. which means one man on guard in My grandfather fought for the each hole all night. The least noise South, my dad in WWI and have down the slope usually has one of been in WWII. I have been told my men tossing a grenade. If there this may be the war may be the happens to be a squeal, everything turning point in civilization. Dad opens up. Morning finds us told me he fought the war to end thankful for the light and for a all wars. I’m a bit confused about ridge line that is still ours. I don’t the principals for whom we fought know when in my life I have been all these wars, but I am not one bit subjected to such physical strain confused about what will happen as the mountains and weather if I should fail to keep the high in Korea have placed on me. ground for this country. I have This, plus sleepless nights, early met a number of people in the morning attacks and patrols which last war and it isn’t uncommon to go on day in and day out, make me hear the remark “It’s another war, wonder if it isn’t hell on earth. The but still the same people”. The war in Europe saw the C-rations army says six months of combat along the roads. This war finds the duty and I will be rotated. I’ll have C-rations along the ridgelines. The that in another month and a half, I tanks are far below and the artillery wonder-? Thanks so much for the two mountain ridges behind. The paper, but best of all thanks for the air corps is usually flying around spirit behind it. overhead, waiting for an AT6 plane As Ever-Hank

PHOTOS FROM THE PAST

old comstock store Opened Appx. 1902 The Comstock Store located where the parking lot of Fouch’s Drug Store now is. Originally Crutcher and Manor, it became Comstock’s around 1902. The building burned in a fire Dec. 5, 1919. The original back wall is still standing. Photo courtesy of Sacramento Valley Museum.


WWW.WILLIAMSPIONEERREVIEW.COM

OCTOBER 2, 2009 - OCTOBER 16, 2009

7

HOME GARDEN

&

Pomegranates…

BY CURTIS PYLE

Why?

Recent discoveries in the health benefits (anti-oxidants) have caused much publicity. The juice has been found to be extremely good for you. Its antiaging properties appeal to the masses. It’s easy to grow here, and easy to eat. The fruit stores easily, and the longer it sits, the better it gets. Most of us have only heard of one variety called “Wonderful”. Actually, there are dozens of varieties out there somewhere, and just now are being collected for propagation and further testing. I have

The most requested tree in Colusa County.

managed to find the following varieties that show promise here in the valley. • Wonderful – Most common, medium red, tart fruit. Excellent for juice, jams and fresh fruit • Mellow Yellow – (shown in photo) Jumbo in size, up to 10 inches, yellow with red blush outside, pink inside, soft edible seeds, excellent in fruit salads • Sweet – Just as they sound, make excellent juice without adding sugar • Ambrosia – Gigantic fruit, up to 12 inches in diameter, long living in any soil, will take more moisture

Mellow Yellow

than other varieties, semi-sweet mild flavor Kashmir – Pinkish-red fruit with ruby red seeds and intense flavor, slight spreading growth pattern Angel Red – Large red 6-8 inches, nearly seedless fruit, develops a month earlier than Wonderful, excellent for flavor Red Silk – Bright red fruit, very high in sugar content with an unusual berry flavor, medium to large fruit, semi-dwarf spreading growth pattern Ornamental Dwarf – Super heat tolerant, free flowering most of the

Ornamental Dwarf

season, beautiful orange flowers followed by small tart fruit, grows 6 to 8 feet tall Miniature – Several new types exist with fruit as small as a quarter, little leaves and lots of flowers, excellent potted plant that takes heat, various heights from 2 to 4 feet, very slow grower

More health benefits are being discovered with pomegranates all the time!

Gardening Tips:

Collect iron filings from under grinders in any metal working shop. Sprinkle them on the ground under your roses, redwoods, camellias, gardenias and especially hydrangeas. (It will often turn hydrangeas blue.) As it rusts, it produces chelated iron, which helps prevent iron deficiency in your plants. Ashes from the barbeque will rid your plants of aphids and provide potash to the soil. Just dust this organic treatment on the plants. A little dish soap, vegetable oil and water in a squirt bottle will take care of many insect problems. Just spray on the plants before they get out of control. Make sure to spray in the early morning or late in the day to avoid burning the leaves. Do not use on ferns. Ferns don’t get many bugs; what look like bugs on the underside of the leaves are often spores, the very special way ferns reproduce.


8

WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

OCTOBER 2, 2009 - OCTOBER 16, 2009

ARBUCKLE CAKE ARTIST EXCELLS farmed rice and tomatoes, and she was one of 48 people in her graduating class. But she is no stranger to the global community. Struckmeyer is a seasoned traveller and has found inspiration from Rome to the Caribbean. “It’s interesting travelling to different places and sampling their customary food and seeing how they use regional produce, nuts, dairy, etc,” Struckmeyer says. “It’s also interesting to see the different decorating techniques from people all over the world.” Her love affair with cake decorating and sculpting was birthed from a day in the kitchen with her best friend’s mom at age 15. Struckmeyer had fun learning to decorate cake and a seed was soon planted. “I was Katrina Struckmeyer displays one of her cake creations. (Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Kalfsbeek) always artistic when I was younger,” Struckmeyer says. “I never really recognized it until I got older and started doing BY: ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK cakes and could mix my artistic ability Writer & Contributor with my profession.” Besides the sheer enjoyment of making What do Greek columns and pottery from people happy with cake, Struckmeyer antiquity, a sombrero, a Native American also finds cake decorating therapeutic. in traditional headdress and a frog have in “It’s total therapy for me,” she says. “It’s common? They are all examples of hand- fun and challenging at the same time. sculpted cakes designed by cake artisan I believe when one is given the gift of Katrina Struckmeyer. Struckmeyer creativity, it’s essential to express yourself began her career as a journeyman baker as often as possible. This is an outlet for at Raley’s and Bel Air in Sacramento in me with my art.” 1985. After some twists and turns, she After baking for 15 years at Raley’s landed in rural Arbuckle in 2004 and and Bel Air, Struckmeyer pulled a 180 opened The Sidewalk Café in 2007. The and decided to do something completely café serves lunch specials and traditional different. She worked as a psychiatric espresso fare and acts as a front for nurse for the following six years, during Struckmeyer’s blossoming cake empire, which time she met her almond farmer Sophisticakes. husband, Mark, on a blind date. “I joke “Cakes can taste as good as they look, that I went crazy and got married and and you don’t have to live in a major had a child late in life,” Struckmeyer says. metropolis to have access to artistry,” “I stopped working as a nurse and wanted Struckmeyer says. “It’s in your backyard.” to do something more flexible after I had Clients often bring an idea or a photo my son. Owning my own business was a to Struckmeyer and ask her to replicate pretty obvious choice.” it as a cake. The artisan first visualizes After taking some time off to be a the project, then stacks cake and finally mother to her son, Colt, Struckmeyer sculpts. Fondant is easier to work with, opened The Sidewalk Café in 2007 but she also sculpts with whipped and rediscovered her passion for cake topping as well. “It is so satisfying when decorating and designing. the customer sees the cake for the first “It’s very gratifying working in a small time and it exceeds their expectations,” town because you can build wonderful Struckmeyer says. “What a rush!” Struckmeyer creates cakes for all occasions, including weddings, anniversaries, birthdays, dog birthdays, bachelorette parties and baby showers.There is no design or theme that is out of the question – just ask. From a barbecue grill with hamburgers and hot dogs on top to a gun in a holster, the artisan’s skill is limitless. “I enjoy the challenge of trying to replicate something and make it look as true to form as possible,” Struckmeyer says. “There’s always somebody wanting a design I’ve never done before. I also take a lot of pride in my work because I’m a perfectionist.” Have a favorite photo you’d love to see on a specialty cake? No problem. Struckmeyer has a special photo printer, which makes capturing an image in frosting, well, a piece of cake. Struckmeyer grew up in the small community of East Nicolaus in south Sutter County, not unlike Arbuckle. Her family

relationships within the community,” Struckmeyer says. “Everyone has been so supportive. I really enjoy the social interactions the coffee shop has to offer.” Still, there are drawbacks. “You can only do so many wedding cakes if you only have 1,500 people in the whole town,” Struckmeyer says. “Expanding the business regionally would bring more cake business, which is what I ultimately

want to focus on. Bring it on!” To contact Struckmeyer, call (530) 4763663 or e-mail ohbabykat@yahoo.com. The Sidewalk Café is located at 311 5th St., Arbuckle and is open Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Saturdays from 7:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.


WWW.WILLIAMSPIONEERREVIEW.COM

OCTOBER 2, 2009 - OCTOBER 16, 2009

9

DISCOVER & TRAVEL

DISCOVER BY ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK Writer/Contributor

WinchesterA Definite house Mystery

Carpenters were hired to work ‘round the clock on desired. construction. The house, alas, was never finished, when The front doors to the mansion are also of interest. Mrs. Winchester died in her sleep 38 She paid $3,000 for the exquisite he Winchester Mystery House is exactly years later September 5, 1922, at the stained glass doors from Tiffany’s that, a The Winchester Mystery House age of 82. in New York, yet they were never is exactly that, a mystery. While there Of the 160 rooms in the house, used. It is said only three people are theories, no one really knows why of particular interest is the séance ever walked through the doors; the widowed Sarah Pardee Winchester, heiress to the room, which served two purposes carpenters who installed them and Winchester rifle empire, bought a farmhouse on the for Mrs. Winchester. The first was to Mrs. Winchester. Mrs. Winchester outskirts of San Jose and demanded construction take communicate with the spirits, whom never had any guests to use the front place 24 hours per day for 38 years, at the cost of $5.5 she believed responsible for the death doors. Even President Theodore million. Some believe Sarah Winchester bought the of her family. The other was to spy Roosevelt was denied an audience. farmhouse on the advice of a Boston psychic who on servants through windows. Sarah Many of the stairs told her if construction ever stopped on the property, Winchester was the only person were replaced with easy riser spirits killed by the Winchester rifle would haunt with a key to the room, which has steps, due to Mrs. Winchester’s her. Sarah sought to appease these spirits, whom she one entrance but three exits. She arthritis. Elevators were eventually believed responsible for the deaths of her husband visited nightly to commune with the installed when she was confined and only child. spirits killed by the Winchester rifle, to a wheelchair. The hallways are Money was no object, and Mrs. Winchester had who guided her construction plans. (Photo By: Elizabeth Kalfsbeek) mostly narrow and seem a bit the means to design V i s i t o r s Door to nowhere. claustrophobic. a house in whatever w i l l It’s worth the drive style suited her fancy. also see the damage to to see the bizarre nooks and crannies of “the mansion She inherited a the mansion from the designed by spirits.” Don’t miss the door opening to $20 million fortune 1906 earthquake. Sarah a blank wall, the largest cabinet in the mansion that following the death Winchester believed the goes straight through to the back thirty rooms of the of her husband and earthquake was a sign mansion, the smallest cabinet that is one-half-inchmother-in-law, as of anger from the spirits thick, the number 13 that recurs throughout the house well as 2,777 shares for spending so much and other strange phenomena. One tour mate nailed in Winchester stock. money on the front 30 it on the head; “This house makes you feel anxious,” Her income was rooms of the house. She she said. “It’s like you’re living in her crazy head.” around $1,000 per subsequently boarded up When to go: The museum is open daily from day, which was taxthe 30 front rooms, which 9:00 a.m. Call for the schedule of flashlight tours free until 1913. weren’t opened again until offered in October. Located at 525 S. Winchster her death. Boulevard, San Jose 95128. Call (408) 247-2101 for Now visitors are able more information or visit www. (Photo By: Elizabeth Kalfsbeek) Spider Web Windows to tour the eccentric T h e winchestermysteryhouse.com. mansion designed by four th Where to Eat: Santana Row is a the even more eccentric four-foot-ten-inch tall Sarah floor balcony, the highest point in new urban district with more than Winchester. The guided mansion tour lasts an hour the home since the 1906 quake, 70 shops, 20 restaurants and 9 salons and is a little over a mile long, covering 2,400 square gives a great view to the bell tower. and spas and is just blocks from the feet, including doors leading to nowhere and stairs The bell rang daily at noon and Winchester Mystery House. Try leading to the ceiling. Participants will see many of 5:00 p.m. to alert servants of meal Sino, 377 Santana Row, serving the home’s 10,000 windows (including one built into times. Legend has it the bell also contemporary Chinese cuisine the floor), 2,000 doors, 47 fireplaces, 40 bedrooms, rang daily at midnight and 2:00 in a chic atmosphere. Sample the 40 staircases, 13 bathrooms, 6 kitchens, 3 elevators, 2 a.m., alerting the spirits to enter extensive Dim Sum menu. www. basements … and 1 shower. and leave the séance room. sinorestaurant.com Born in 1839, Sarah Pardee married William At any given time, Where to Stay: At Hotel Valencia, Wirt Winchester in 1869, the second president of Mrs. Winchester employed 18 355 Santana Row, enjoy the view the Winchester rifle company. Four years later their house servants, 13 carpenters, 10 from the rooftop wine terrace. only child, Annie, was born, but only lived for six gardeners and 2 chauffeurs. She www.hotelvalencia.com. weeks. In 1881 Mr. Winchester died of tuberculosis. paid servants $3 per day in cash, Mrs. Winchester subsequently left New Haven, twice the going rate. She paid Connecticut, in 1884 and moved to San Jose, where the servants in cash so she could (Photo By: Elizabeth Kalfsbeek) she purchased an unfinished eight-room farmhouse. fire anyone on the spot if she so Stairs to nowhere.

T


OCTOBER 2, 2009 - OCTOBER 16, 2009

WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

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OCTOBER 2, 2009 - OCTOBER 16, 2009

11

GRIMES LADIE’S AID ATTENTION, ALL PARENTS AND DINNER AND BAZAAR COMMUNITY LEADERS: SPECIAL TO THE WPR

T

he Ladies Aid of Grimes will celebrate the 50th anniversary of its Dinner and Bazaar November 7. An allyou-can-eat turkey and ham feast will be served up by the ladies beginning at 5:00 p.m. at the Grand Island Elementary School. The event will feature bazaar booths offering linens and crafts. The Country Store will offer home-canned items, local produce, homemade candies, jellies and baked goods. A beautiful quilt made by Beverly Thayer will be raffled, and the Grimes Civic Association will sponsor

a number of donated raffle items. Proceeds from this raffle will benefit the maintenance of the Grimes Scout Cabin. The Grimes Ladies Aid was founded in 1901 to maintain Grimes Community Church, which had been built in 1875. Today it also supports children’s activities. This year’s co-chairs are Emily Bradburn, Ardith Miller and Jean Malcolm. Tickets will be available at the door. Adults are $10, children 6-13 are $5 and children 5 years and younger are free. For more information contact Evelyn Jansen at 4372493.

SPECIAL TO THE WPR

C

ommunity Advocates for Parents and Children (CAPC) will be hosting training for school personnel on Thursday, October 22, 2009 on “Creating Bully Resistant Schools” with Hilda Graham. The training will address issues of bullying pertaining to each school district, define bullying to create a universal understanding for Colusa County and specific to Colusa County’s needs, and begin plans to work as a community to eliminate bullying. Hilda will assist each school and support staff in identifying

programs, rules and events that strengthen students and address any areas that may be precursors to bullying. This training is FREE and includes breakfast and lunch. The training begins promptly at 8:00 a.m. and ends at 3:30 p.m. (breakfast begins at 7:30 a.m.). The training will be held at the Colusa Indian Tribal Council Conference Room, 3720 Highway 45, Colusa. Additionally, Pierce Unified School District will host a parent training with Hilda Graham on Wednesday, October 21, 2009 at 6:00 p.m. in the Arbuckle Elementary Cafeteria. Hilda will discuss with parents the same information

planned for the training with school professionals and support personnel. Parents, this is also free and a wonderful opportunity to learn how to support your children and their schools. This is also a chance to be an active participant with the schools. Please call Caroline Roady with any questions or to register for the Thursday, October 22, training, 4587678. CAPC is proud to bring this training to Colusa County with a grant from the Local Child Care Planning Council of Colusa County, a program within CCOE Children’s Services.

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SEASONAL ALLERGIES? BY: ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK Writer & Contributor

F

all is here, and with the changing of seasons come allergies and colds for many. With people losing their jobs, and in turn their healthcare,a natural approach to preventive medicine may be right on the money. “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” says Michael O’Connor, who has owned and operated Woodland Nutrition for more than 20 years. “Rather than waiting until you get sick, support your body nutritionally.” This can be as simple as stocking your kitchen with wholesome foods for a healthy diet and taking a “good ol’ fashioned multivitamin.” People who prepare their bodies nutritionally and still get sick will heal quicker, and the illness will tend to be more short-lived, than a person who is not nutritionally prepared. Sneezes, itchy eyes, runny noses, sore throat, sinus infections, congestion … sound familiar? There are a multitude of theories for cold and flu season,

including close proximity of kids back in school, visiting relatives during the holidays, dampness creating mold allergies, and so on. “Once a person gets a diagnosis from a doctor, then the choice of treatment is up to the patient, whether it be a more natural approach or a synthetic approach,” O’Connor says. A Western approach to medicine follows a synthetic approach, treating and relieving symptoms right here, right now. A holistic approach treats the cause of the ailment, strengthening the whole body and building resistance. Herbal or natural remedies are sometimes described as “alternative,” but just 100 years ago treatments were all natural. Homeopathic remedies, which may take more time and patience than instant relievers, re-train the body. “It’s very unfortunate we don’t have formal education on a natural approach,” O’Connor says. “Some countries incorporate both a natural approach, as well as a symptomatic approach, to healing, with synthetic medicine and natural remedies side by

side on shelves.” Without this formal knowledge on natural remedies, it is up to people to try out different homeopathic treatments to see what works for them, rather than receiving guidance from a doctor. O’Connor stresses the approach to nutritional support is individual and is different for each person. He encourages people to stop by the shop to chat with him. “Very rarely do you use a natural approach to treat a symptom,” O’Connor says. “(People) have fantastic systems to keep them in balance, and there are wonderful natural tools for individual needs.” Rather than waiting to run to the pharmacy to treat symptoms this season, a holistic approach to maintaining and treating the whole body may mean less illness … and money … altogether. “Whatever you can do to strengthen your body’s systems ahead of time requires fewer treatments down the road,” says O’Connor. Woodland Nutrition is located at 424 First St. For more information, call 6664393.


12

OCTOBER 2, 2009 - OCTOBER 16, 2009

COMMUNITY BRIEFS

COLUSA COUNTY BREAST CANCER FUND THE COLUSA COUNTY BREAST CANCER FUND WILL BE HOLDING MEETINGS THE SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH AT MCNARY-MOORE FROM 4PM - 5PM. FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT SHERRY BURNS AT (530) 458-2111. CATHOLIC CHURCH OF THE ANNUNCIATION 627 8TH STREET WILLIAMS “MEET & GREET COFFEE CLUB” EVERY THIRD SUNDAY OF THE MONTH AFTER 9:30 A.M. MASS JOIN US FOR REFRESHMENTS AND CONVERSATION COLUSA COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY GARDEN. PLOTS 4’ X 16’, COME AND BE APART OF THIS GREAT COMMUNITY ACTIVITY. GROW YOUR OWN PRODUCE! TAKE IT OME OR SELL IT AT THE COLUSA FARMER’S MARKET. CONTACT LYNDA REYNOLDS AT 530.458.3028 FOR ANY QUESTIONS EMAIL LYNDAREYNOLDS@COLUSAEDC.COM. WILLIAMS COMMUNITY CENTER ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES VETERAN’S HALL - 9TH & ‘C’ STREET, WILLIAMS, CA. MONDAY NIGHT BINGO: EVERYONE WELCOME! EARLY BIRD GAMES BEGIN AT 6:30 P.M. REGULAR GAMES BEGIN AT 7:00 P.M. REFRESHMENTS AVAILABLE AT REASONABLE PRICES, HOME MADE DESSERTS GAME DAY: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2009 AT 1:00 P.M. MOVIE DAY: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 AT 1:00 P.M. THIS MONTH WE ARE SHOWING: NICOLAS CAGE IN “NATIONAL TREASURE” SHOW TIME: 1:00 P.M. PRICE: FREE THIS MONTH “FREE POPCORN” REFRESHMENTS: SODA & CANDY ARE AVAILABLE AT A LOW PRICE. (BRING A PILLOW-THE SEATS ARE HARD) CELEBRATE RECOVERY MEETS EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT AT 6:30 P.M. AT THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (NORTH ANNEX BUILDING) AT 4TH & JAY STREETS IN COLUSA. CELEBRATE RECOVERY IS A FREE PROGRAM THAT ADDRESSES ISSUES OF ALCOHOLISM, CODEPENDENCY, DRUG ADDICTION, AND OTHER HURTS, HABITS AND HANG UPS. CELEBRATE RECOVERY IS OPEN TO ANYONE WHO IS EXPERIENCING PAIN, BROKENNESS, OR JUST WANTS SUPPORT AND ENCOURAGEMENT. WE ARE AN ANONYMOUS PROGRAM. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL 458-2802.

SAVE THE DATE THE SECOND ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS CELEBRATION WILL BE HELD DECEMBER 12TH IN WILLIAMS.. MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN YOUR COMMUNITY THE CITIZENS FOR A BETTER WILLIAMS HOLD MEETINGS THE 4TH THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH BEGINNING AT 6:00PM. MEETINGS ARE HELD AT THE SACRAMENTO VALLEY MUSEUM. EVERYONE IS WELCOME!! THIRD ANNUAL COLUSA COUNTY BREAST CANCER FUND WALK WILL BE HELD ON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2009. SIGNUPS WILL BE HELD AT MEMORIAL PARK (10TH & MARKET STREET, COLUSA) REGISTRATION 9-10AM. WALK BEGINS PROMPTLY AT 10AM. JOIN US FOR ENTERTAINMENT AND FUN AFTER THE WALK. THE WALK IS FREE BUT DONATIONS ARE GLADLY ACCEPTED! FOR INFORMATION, ENTRY FORMS, AND DONOR/ SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES CONTACT SHERRI BURNS AT (530) 458-2111. PACIFIC FLYWAY QUILTERS THE COUNTY’S QUILT GUILD. MONTHLY MEETINGS WILL BE HELD THE 3RD WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH. MEETING STARTS AT 7:00PM LOCATED AT THE COLUSA MASONIC HALL 311- 5TH STREET. COLUSA COUNTY GENERAL PLAN UPDATE; COMMUNITY MEETINGS: WILLIAMS –

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 – 7 TO 9 PM. Williams Library 901 – E STREET, WILLIAMS. ARBUCKLE – TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2009 – 7 TO 9 PM Arbuckle Fire Department 506 Lucas Street, Arbuckle COLUSA – THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 – 7 TO 9 PM - Colusa Industrial Properties Conference Room 100 Sunrise Blvd, Colusa County MAXWELL – WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2009 – 7 TO 9 PM - Maxwell Veteran’s Hall. 250 Oak Street, Maxwell CHURCH OF THE ANNUNCIATION IN WILLIAMS ANNUAL RUMMAGE SALE. NEW LOCATION THIS YEAR: WILLIAMS VETERAN S HALL, 9TH & ‘C’ ST., DATES SALE STARTS: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1ST, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2ND TIME: 8:30 A.M. TO 6 P.M. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3RD TIME: 8:30 A.M. TO 12 NOON PLEASE SUPPORT THIS FUNDRAISER FOR THE CHURCH! COLUSA COWBOY’S HOME GAME SCHEDULE. GAMES TO BE PLAYED AT COLUSA HIGH SCHOOL. OCTOBER 10, VS. WHEATLAND. OCTOBER 17 VS. YUBA CITY. MIGHTY MITES PLAY AT 8:45. JR. PEEWEE PLAY AT 10, PEEWEE PLAY AT NOON, JR. MIDGET PLAY AT 2 AND MIDGETS PLAY AT 4.

IN CHICO, AT THE TRAINING PLACE ON THE CHICO CAMPUS OF BUTTE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 2320 FOREST AVENUE. THE COST OF THIS TRAINING IS $60 PER PERSON. FOR FURTHER DETAILS AND REGISTRATION, CONTACT NVCF AT 8911150 OR REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.NVCF. ORG. RESERVATIONS SHOULD BE MADE IN ADVANCE, AS REGISTRATION IS LIMITED. ARBUCKLE ELEMENTARY BOOK FAIR 10/26-10/3: MON 1:30PM - 5PM, TUES-FRI 8AM - 5PM, SAT 9AM - 11AM. FAMILY NIGHT WEDS OCT 28TH @ 6:30PM MULTIPURPOSE ROOM AES THEME - BINGO FOR BOOKS (NO COST) *FAMILY NIGHT IS AN EVENING THAT THE KIDS CAN BRING THEIR FAMILY TO THE BOOK FAIR TO SHOP AND PLAY BINGO FOR A CHANCE TO WIN A FEW BOOKS!! OUR WEB SITE IS HTTP://BOOKFAIRS.SCHOLASTIC. COM/HOMEPAGE/ARBUCKLEELEMENTARY A HOLIDAY CRAFTER’S SHOWPLACE: SATURDAY OCT 10TH - 9 A.M. - 2 P.M. LOCATED AT 9TH & PENDLETON (ARBUCKLE METHODIST CHURCH). JOIN US AT THE ARBUCKLE CRAFT SHOW! THIS IS OUR 7TH ANNUAL SHOW. EACH YEAR WE HAVE NEW CRAFTERS WHO, ALONG WITH OUR SEASONED PARTICIPANTS, BRING TO OUR SHOW INTERESTING HANDCRAFTED ITEMS. STOP IN TO SUPPORT OUR LOCAL CRAFTERS, TO SHOP OR JUST TO HAVE LUNCH AND VISIT WITH FRIENDS!

WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

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OCTOBER 17 COLUSA FIREFIGHTERS ASSOCIATION 2ND ANNUAL DEMOLITION DERBY. COLUSA COUNTY FAIR GROUNDS. GATES OPEN AT 6PM. DERBY STARTS AT 7PM. TICKETS $15. CONTACT A COLUSA CITY FIREFIGHTER FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TICKET AVAILABILITY.

OCTOBER 21 AUNTIE DEB’S CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE. 4PM.

OCTOBER 22 COLUSA COUNTY GENERAL PLAN UPDATE. COLUSA COMMUNITY MEETING. 7 TO 9 PM. COLUSA INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES CONFERENCE ROOM. 100 SUNRISE BLVD. THE COLUSA COUNTY BUSINESS AND VISITORS CENTER, THE FRIENDS OF THE COLUSA COUNTY LIBRARY WILL PRESENT AN EVENING WITH AURTHOR, TODD BORG.

OCTOBER 24 CITY OF COLUSA NOW OFFERING YOGA AND MEDITATION CLASSES. EVERY SATURDAY MORNING FROM 10:30AM TO 11:50AM. CITY HALL AUDITORIUM. 4 WEEKS. STARTING OCTOBER 17TH. $50. BEGINNERS WELCOME. DEADLINE TO SIGNUP IS OCTOBER 9. CONTACT SANDY AT 530.458.5622 X109. CITY OF COLUSA NOW OFFERING ADULT CO-ED VOLLEYBALL. MONDAY NIGHTS 7PM TO 9PM. EGLING MIDDLE SCHOOL. OCTOBER 5TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 9TH. $3 PER NIGHT. DROP-INS WELCOME. CONTACT SANDY AT 530.458.5622 X109. APRD LITTLE BEARS BASKETBALL SIGN UPS ARE SEPT 30TH WEDNESDAY 6-7PM APRD OFFICE 309 5TH ST ARBUCKLE OR OCTOBER 3RD SATURDAY 10-11AM BALFOUR PARK 10TH & HALL ST FEES: $40 FOR FIRST CHILD, $35 FOR SECOND CHILD AND $30 FOR EACH ADDITIONAL CHILD AGES PRE K TO 6TH GRADE GAMES TO BE PLAYED NOVEMBER 14TH TO FEBRUARY 6TH. PLAYERS MUST BE 4 YEARS OLD BEFORE 12/2/09. FIRST TIME PLAYERS MUST PROVIDE A COPY OF BIRTH CERTIFICATE. FORMS AVAILABLE AT WWW. ARBUCKLEPARKSANDRECREATION.ORG. FOR QUESTIONS PLEASE CALL APRD #4763007 HALLOWEEN PARADE: OCTOBER 252009. DOWNTOWN ARBUCKLE - ACE HARDWARE PARKING LOT. SIGN IN BOOTH OPENS AT 10:30AM. PARADE TO START AT 11AM. AWARDS WILL BE GIVEN FOR THE SCARIEST, CUTEST, MOST CREATIVE AND BEST THEME/GROUP COSTUMES IN EACH AGE GROUP. AGE GROUPS ARE PRESCHOOL AND UNDER, KINDERGARTEN TO 2ND GRADE, 3RD TO 5TH GRADE AND 6TH GRADE AND UP. BOUNCE HOUSE TO BE OPEN 12-2PM TRAINING TO STRENGTHEN LOCAL NONPROFITS BOARDS LOCAL NONPROFIT LEADERS HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO PARTICIPATE IN A TRAINING ON OCTOBER 5 PROVIDED BY THE NONPROFIT LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE, A PROGRAM OF NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY FOUNDATION. THE TOPIC WILL BE “THE RENEWABLE BOARD – EFFECTIVE BOARD INVOLVEMENT””. THE INSTRUCTOR WILL BE LAURA COOTSONA. THE TRAINING WILL TAKE PLACE FROM 8:30AM-12:30PM,

PACIFIC FLYWAY QUILTERS WILL HOST NATIONALLY KNOWN QUILT DESIGNER PATRICIA KNOEGHEL AT THEIR OCTOBER 21 MEETING. PATRICIA IS BEST KNOWN AS THE TALENTED LITTLE SISTER OF ELEANOR BURNS, CREATOR OF QUILT IN A DAY FAME. THEIR 2009 COLLECTION OF QUILTS WILL BE SHOWN. THE LATEST PATTERN BOOKS AND TOOLS WILL BE AVAILABLE AT A DISCOUNT. PLAN TO JOIN THE GUILD MEMBERS FOR A FUN EVENING OF QUILTS. MEETING LOCATION: COLUSA MASONIC HALL – 311 5TH STREET. DOORS OPEN AT 6:30PM.

OCTOBER 4 HUGE COLUSA RUMMAGE SALE. 8:30-2PM COLUSA SAC RIVER FIRE DEPT, MARKET STREET. ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT OMEGA NU SCHOLARSHIP FUND.

OCTOBER 6 COLUSA COUNTY GENERAL PLAN UPDATE. ARBUCKLE COMMUNITY MEETING. 7 TO 9 PM. ARBUCKLE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 506 LUCAS STREET, ARBUCKLE. RED CROSS FALL TRAINING: CLIENT CASEWORK. 1PM TO 5PM AND 5PM TO 9PM. COLUSA SENIOR CENTER. CONTACT JEANIE KESSINGER, 530.458.5471

OCTOBER 10 COLUSA COUNTY BREAST CANCER FUND WALK. FUN FAMILY FRIENDLY FREE WALK. COME SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR BREAST CANCER PATIENTS AND SURVIVORS ALIKE! REGISTRATION STARTS AT 9AM. WALK BEGINS AT 10AM. 10TH STREET PARK, COLUSA. FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT SHERRI BURNS AT (530) 458-2111 RED CROSS FALL TRAINING: EMERGENCY VEHICLE TRAINING. 9:00AM. COLUSA SENIOR CENTER. CONTACT JEANIE KESSINGER, 530.458.5471

OCTOBER 16-18

ARBUCKLE LITTLE LEAGUE PRESENTS 3RD ANNUAL CASINO NIGHT DINNER AND DANCE FUNDRAISER. COCTAILS 6PM. DINNER AT 7PM. DINNER BY BUCKHORN, WINTERS CA. RAFFLE PRIZES, SILENT AUCTION, DESSERT RAFFLE, BLACK JACK TABLES, POKER TABLE, CRAPS TABLE AND TOULETTE. LOCATION: 459 COUNTY ROAD 99W. SHADINGER STRAW & HAY BUILDING.

OCTOBER 25 ARBUCKLE REVITALIZATION COMMITTEE 7TH ANNUAL CAR SHOW & DEPOT BBQ THE SACRED HEART BAZAAR WILL BE SERVING A TRADITIONAL TURKEY DINNER WITH ALL THE TRIMMINGS AT THE MAXWELL LEGION HALL. TAKE OUT DINNERS AVAILABLE. 4PM TO 7PM. A FUN NIGHT FOR EVERYONE! WE HOPE YOU ALL COME!

OCTOBER 27 ARBUCKLE REVITALIZATION COMMITTEE CAR SHOW.

OCTOBER 29 COLUSA REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER SENIOR HEALTH FAIR. LOCATED AT THE COLUSA COUNTY FAIR GROUNDS. 10AM TO 2PM.

NOVEMBER 4 COLUSA COUNTY GENERAL PLAN UPDATE. MAXWELL COMMUNITY MEETING. 7 TO 9 PM. MAXWELL VETERAN’S HALL. 250 OAK STREET, MAXWELL

NOVEMBER 20 CRMC AUXILLARY HOLIDAY BOUTIQUE AND BAKE SALE. CRMC LOBBY - COLUSA 8AM.


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FOR SALE FIREWOOD FOR SALE: MIXED HARDWOODS, VERY DRY $100 1/2 CORD, $180 FULL CORD CALL 476ͳ2948 FOR MORE INFORMATION. EXCLUSIVE 27.33ͳACRE HOME SITE WEST OF CORNING WITH MORE THAN 1,275 FEET OF THOMES CREEK FRONTAGE. AMPLE ACREAGE FOR A HOME, BARN, STABLE AND MORE. ACCESS TO THREE COUNTY ROADS. MAGNIFICENT VIEWS OF MT. SHASTA, MT. LASSEN AND PACIFIC CASCADE COASTAL RANGE. PRICED TO SELL AT $120,000. CONTACT OWNER AT Έ530Ή 848ͳ2315 2002 KOMFORT TRAVEL TRAILER, 23 FOOT. EXCELLENT CONDITION. ASKING $7,000. Έ530Ή 473ͳ2366. CLEAN OAT HAY. GREAT FOR CATTLE/HORSES. 16 TONS AVAILABLE NEAR WILLIAMS. $80 A TON CALL: 530ͳ908ͳ3146 ALFALFA HAY. BY THE BALE OR BY THE TON. LOADING & HAULING AVAILABLE. LOCATED IN WILLIAMS. PLEASE CONTACT DENNIS AT 701ͳ4158

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WANTED HUNTING LEASE/ACCESS ON 600+ ACRES FOR 1 TO 3 HUNTERS. WILLING TO PAY TOP DPLLAR FOR GOOD PROPERTY. HOGS, DEER, TURKEYS, ANY OR ALL. RESPECTFUL, 30+ YEARS EXPIERENCE. REPLY TO Έ925Ή 381ͳ 1753 OR ENDO1ΝSBCGLOBAL. NET

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For $12, we will run your three line ad for one issue. Each issue has a shelf life of 2 weeks. Get more for your money! Add Bold for $2.00 or a box for $5.00. All Classified ads must be prepaid. We accept, Cash, Check, Visa, Master, and Discover Card.

SELLING A CAR?

List your Car, Truck, SUV, Van, Semi, Boat, or Agricultural Equipment for $25; Includes a B&W Photo., and 3 lines of text. Additional lines $2.00. Call (530) 458-2675 for details.

NOW ONLINE CREATIVE LOOKS: WHY DRIVE FAR AWAY WHEN WE HAVE IT ALL? GOURMET COOKWARE, GOURMET FOODS, HOME DECOR, WOMEN’S CLOTHING, JEWELRY, SALON & MUCH MORE! VISIT US ONLINE AT: CREATIVELOOKSMAXWELL.COM CALL OR COME BY TO INQUIRE ABOUT OUR WEDDING REGISTRY WILLIAMS ALUMNI: INTERACTIVE WEBSITE PRIVATE & FREE MAKE NEW CONTACT WITH OLD CLASSMATES AND BROWSE THE SITE FOR CLASS PICTURES AND CANDID PICTURES FROM 1912 TO ABOUT 1970. NEW REUNION AND CANDID PICTURES POSTED CONTINUOUSLY. SPONSORED BY A WILLIAMS GAL! EMAIL: SUNDEEΝSBCGLOBAL.NET NEED TO SELL YOUR CAR OR TRUCK? LIST YOUR VEHICLE IN THE WILLIAMS PIONEER CLASSIFIEDS . CALL Έ530Ή 458ͳ2675

YARD SALE

POST YOUR YARD SALES TODAY! LOST AND FOUND LOST AND FOUND CLASSIFIED ADS ARE ALWAYS FREE CONTACT US TODAY! 530ͳ383ͳ4861

WORK WANTED M.C.’S HAMMER: “HIREͳAͳ HUSBAND” NO JOB TOO SMALL... ELECTRICAL WIRING, FAN INSTALLATION, CARPENTRY, PICTURE HANGING, DRY WALL, LIGHT BULB CHANGING, ETC.; “HONEY DO” LISTS DONE IN A FLASH! REASONABLE RATES

Internships available with the Williams Pioneer Review, must be a student at a Colusa County High School and like to write. For more information email: publisher@williamspioneerreview.com.

THAT ARE SENSITIVE TO TODAY’S ECONOMIC WOES. CALL MICHAEL CODER AT Έ530Ή230ͳ8479 FOR ALL YOUR HANDYMAN NEEDS!

SERVICES LLOYD’S PRINT & COPY CENTER: CUSTOM ΈFULL COLORΉ BUSINESS CARDS, FULL SERVICE COPIES AT SELF SERVE PRICES, SPECIALIZING IN BULK MAILING, INVITATIONS, PHOTO CARDS, FLYERS, BROCHURES, AND MUCH MORE. CALL 458ͳ2674 OR STOP BY OUR OFFICE LOCATED AT: 317 FIFTH STREET IN COLUSA, FOR MORE INFORMATION. LLOYDSPRINTANDCOPY.COM LARGE FORMAT PRINTING NOW AVAILABLE AT LLOYD’S PRINT AND COPY CENTER. PHOTOGRAPHY ENTHUSIASTS CAN NOW CAN HAVE YOUR PHOTOS ENLARGED TO 36” X 90”! PAPER BANNERS, PRINTED VINYL BANNERS, BLUEPRINTS AND MORE. POSSIBLITIES ARE LIMITLESS. ARBORIST & PRUNING PROFESSIONAL AND EXPIERENCED. I CAN PRUNE ANYTHING. STILL TIME TO PRUNE ROSES, SHRUBS, FRUIT TREES, SHADE TREES & TOP ARIES. CONTACT CURTIS PYLE ARBORIST Έ530Ή 476ͳ2948

EDUCATION GRADE SCHOOLͳADULT TUTORING BASIC MATH SKILLS.

ADD, SUBTRACT, MULTIPLY, DIVIDE. WHOLE NUMBERS, FRACTIONS, DECIMALS & MORE. $5 PER HALF HOUR, WEEKLY. CALL FOR CLASS DATES. 530.476.3599, LEAVE MESSAGE.

LIVESTOCK QUARTER HORSE. 20 YEAR OLD BAY GELDING. GREAT HORSE, GREAT WITH KIDS, PTES, ETC. $1500 CALL Έ530Ή 476ͳ0890.

HELP WANTED SEEKING LOCAL RESIDENTS WITH THE SKILL S OF BLACKSMITHING, TANNERS, GLASS BLOWERS, WOOD CARVERS, SEAMSTRESSES, SOINERS AND WEAVERS. Call Cheri at 458-4222 SPANISH TRANSLATORS WANTED. PLEASE SEND RESUMES TO 317 FIFTH STREET. COLUSA, CA 95932.

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MUSEO BIBLICO EN WOODLAND BY: ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK Writer & Contributor

Los residentes del condado de Colusa que estén interesados, en un viaje a tierra santa, únicamente necesitan ir no más lejos de la ciudad de Woodland. Individualmente o en grupos, todos pueden llegar al museo Bíblico Arqueológico de Woodland, en el domicilio de Woodland United Fellowship, en el 240 N. West St, y así verán una gran cantidad de artefactos de los tiempos bíblicos. Desde que se inicio un año atrás, el museo bíblico arqueológico de Woodland a tenido más de 800 visitantes. “La mayoría de las personas se sorprenden de el sorprendente despliegue de productos y la calidad de este museo”. Nos dijo el WUF pastor Carl Morgan. “Es algo que no se espera ver en la iglesia, yo creo que somos la única iglesia en el país, con un museo como este.”De los 800 visitantes que tuvimos el ano pasado varios han regresado, con amigos para compartir su entusiasmo, acerca de la gran colección de artefactos originales, de los tiempos bíblicos. El museo también tuvo por toda una semana en el verano la visita de un campamento de niños.”Lo cual sí que es una gran prueba. Casi todas las piezas en el museo tienen una historia Bíblica que la acompaña, dejando en los adultos y en los niños una gran apreciación por las historias Bíblicas.” Ellos llaman a esto el “Tesoro Secreto”, de Woodland, nos dijo Morgan. El museo recibe a grupos de escuelas, iglesias,, grupos de jóvenes y mas, y también está abierto al público cada Viernes, Sábado y Lunes de 1:00 a 5:00p.m. El museo dio sus comienzos en el salón de entrada del Woodland United Fellowship en 2007. Morgan creó un pequeño aparador con unos cantaros y lámparas de excavaciones arqueológicas, en las cual él había participado, y la colección continuo creciendo. “Lo que actualmente se mira son

objetos que provienen del tiempo de Abraham, Moisés, Y David o Jesús, estas historias hacerca de ellos atreves de estos objetos se convierten mas a la vida.” Tiende en remover un poco el ha cercamiento únicamente atreves de las santas escrituras, ya que estos objetos fueron muy grandes en esa vida y algunos son muy mitológicos. Algunos son tan reales como tú o yo”. La pared lado oeste del museo tiene artefactos algunos de la edad Media de Bronce (2,200 B.C. al 1,550 B.C.). Los visitantes encuentran piedras las cuales fueron usadas como armas, y las cuales eran arrojadas con tiras de piel. También verán e sapadas del año 2,000 B.C. y cuchillos usados en sacrificios del tiempo de Abraham. Hay alfarería fechada antes del año 3,000 B.C. y un hacha de pelea que proviene aproximadamente de 500 años antes de los tiempos de Abraham. La alfarería incluye terracota cucharones, y otros utensilios domesticas que provienen del tiempo de Job. La pared Norte de museo ensena artefactos provenientes de la edad de Hierro (1,250 B.C. a 587 B.C.), de los tiempos de la monarquía de Isrrael y el rey David, hasta el cautiverio de Babilonia en 587 B.C. Los visitantes verán unas tablas inscritas sin traducir, hechas de lodo y cosidas al fuego para que se hagan duras, lo cual era un método de contratos y convenios. También notaran los recipientes usados para varias cosas como detener aceite, y muchas fueron encontradas con restos de opio. Los sacerdotes de esos tiempos usaban el opio en las ceremonias, las mujeres en la concesión tomaba opio para el dolor. Otras reliquias incluyen jarras de Egipto, ollas para copinar, alfarería, trastos para el uso diario, sartenes, mesas, ollas para guardar, piezas de madera con forma de personas Egipcias, mascaras de momias, y varias cosas más, como ollas de invocación de Lydia usadas por los sacerdotes para adivinar el futuro.

“La arquologia nos ayuda a entender la cultura y el diferente modo de vivir de diferentes culturas, del tiempo bíblico”. La mayoría de la información, que leemos de comentarios bíblicos acerca de la vida cotidiana y la cultura bíblica está disponible gracias al trabajo de los arqueólogos.” La pared del este del museo tiene algunos artefactos de los últimos tiempos de la edad de Hierro, como sartenes para fruta, pero también artefactos provenientes de Helenística, Romanos, y era Bizantina, hasta en esas eras existía el maquillaje, botellas de perfume, agujas, agujas para redes de pesca y herramientas para cirugías, también hay contenedores de aceite, de la era de petra, ollas de vidrio de la era Phoenicia, unas Romanas y solemnes urnas de sepelios de niños de Carthage, donde el infanticidio era desenfrenado. Para aquellos que no conocen la historia bíblica, no se preocupen. Hay tenemos un pergamino de 2 x 10 pies sin tiempo que en conjunto con cada pared ensañara a los visitantes una cronologías de la historia bíblica. Esto nos proveerá de información de los periodos de la era de la biblia, los eventos y lo que caracterizo a estos periodos, también se revelan libros de la biblia que provienen de esos periodos, en la parte de abajo se encontraran objetos que describen algún verso de la biblia. Lo cual la mayoría de nosotros nos interesaremos a leer debido a lo visual de los objetos, mirando estos objetos junto con este pergamino las historias de la biblia cobran vida y son más fáciles de entender. En el lado Sur del museo está el Tell-Hamman, donde Morgan a participado en la excavación de algunos de los objetos en los pasados 4 años. Se cree según el Jordán que es la ciudad de Sodoma así como está escrito en el Genesis. Esta esquina será de 3 dimensión, pues actualmente Morgan esta escavando en Jordania y ahí es donde se colocaran los objetos

que el obtenga, así como también se mostrara el metro de cenizas que existe lo cual es fiel evidencia de la historia en la biblia donde Sodoma fue destruida, por piedras y fuego. Morgan planea regresar el quinto año para el de excavaciones que seria para el mes de Enero del año próximo. Este ano estará enfocado en la edad temprana de Bronce, la cual fue la de Sodoma como está inscrito en el Genesis en la Tabla de naciones antes de la gran inundación, Morgan nos comento ha cerca del proyecto proveniente que es la excavación en Jordán. Woodland United Fellowship’s tendrá los siguientes eventos: El club de los niños arqueólogos: Se reunirá cada otro viernes de las 3:30 a 5:00 p.m. para aprender como la arqueología y la biblia trabajan juntos. Se jugaran juegos como excavaciones de un pedazo específico. Clases en griego y hebreo: Abierto al público con el pago de una pequeña cuota. Lo básico del Nuevo Testamento griego es de 6:00 a 8:00 p.m. Los jueves. Series de Lectura: El museo ofrece al menos 2 series de lectura cada ano, concerniente a la arqueología y la historia bíblica. Estas son gratis y abiertas al público. El Dr. John Moore comenzara la lectura a las 9:30 a.m. El Sábado 10 de octubre acerca del Interstamental Periodo (de 400 anos en medio del periodo que se escribió el nuevo testamento), y continuara en la tarde a las 1:00p.m. Escava en el Tell-Hamman: El domingo 15 de noviembre a las 6:00p.m. El Dr. Steven Collins, que es el director de la excavación arqueológica en el Jordán, estará compartiendo su más reciente información acerca de la excavación que él cree será el historial del bíblico Sodoma, todos están bienvenidos a la lectura y la participación en la excavación. Para más información por favor entra al www.wufonline.org.

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COMMUNITY PREPAREDNESS EVENT A LESSON IN PUBLIC SAFETY EVENT HELD SEPTEMBER 29 AT THE

BY: ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK Writer & Contributor

El otoño esta a la vuelta de la esquina, y con el cambio de la estación, también las alergias y los resfriados, llegan a algunas personas. Con las personas perdiendo sus trabajos, declinándoles los cuidados de salud; la prevención con medicina alternativa pude ser una buena alternativa para el ahorro de de dinero en esta crisis económica. “ Una onza de prevención, vale una libra de curación”, nos dijo Michael O’ Connor, quien es dueño y a la misma vez opera el centro de nutrición en Woodland por más de 20 anos. “No debemos de esperar a estar enfermos sino que debemos de ayudar a nuestro cuerpo alimentándolo adecuadamente.” Esto puede ser tan sencillo como tener en la cocina comidas saludables, “así como tomar un buen suplemento de vitaminas”. La gente que prepara sus cuerpos nutricionalmente, y de todos modos se enferman, se sanaran más rápidamente y la enfermedad vivirá menos tiempo en la persona que está preparada nutricionalmente hablando. Los estornudos, la picazón en los ojos, la nariz mojándose continuamente, el dolor de garganta, las infecciones de sinusitis, la congestión…. Se te hacen síntomas familiares? Hay una cantidad de teorías, para la temporada de resfriados y la gripe, incluyendo la proximidad de a cercarse a los niños al regreso de la escuela, visitar amigos o parientes durante las fiestas, lo mojado que crea lama o mojo que trae las alergias, y así sucesivamente. “Una vez que el paciente recibe el diagnostico del doctor, la decisión del tratamiento a seguir es decisión del paciente, si él quiere tomar los tratamientos naturales o escoger los tratamientos sintéticos”, nos comento O’Connor. El oeste se acerca a la medicina sintética, tratando y calmando algunos de los síntomas. Un acercamiento holístico trata esto atreves de la alimentación, reforzando las defensas del cuerpo y en consecuente la resistencia de este ante las enfermedades. Los remedios herbarios o naturales, son nombrados como alternativos, pero apenas 100 anos atrás, los tratamientos eran naturales. Los remedios homeopáticos, reentrenan al cuerpo, lo cual toma más tiempo y paciencia que los calmantes instantáneos. “Es muy desafortunado que no tengamos una formal educación y

ha cercamiento a lo natural”. Algunos COLUSA COUNT Y FAIRGROUNDS países, incorporan los dos lo natural y lo sintético a sus tratamientos medicinales.” Sin una formal educación en los remedios naturales, queda en cada persona el tratar diferentes tratamientos homeopáticos, y mirar que es lo que le resulta mejor a su organismo. O’Connor hace hincapié en el acercamiento a que lo nutricional es individual de cada persona y es diferente en cada organismo. El invita a las personas a visitar su taller y platicar con él. “Muy raramente son usados los tratamientos naturales para tratar síntomas”. Las personas tienen un gran sistema que los mantiene en un buen balance de sanación, pero hay (Staff Photo) Officer Keith Swift of the Williams Police Department gave demonstrations with maravillosas herramientas naturales his K9 partner, Sarek, showing how the dog can sniff out narcotics and other objects. para las necesidades individuales de cada persona.” Podríamos cambiar la visita hacia la farmacia esta temporada y en vez, hacer un acercamiento a lo holístico, para mantener y tratar todo el cuerpo, lo cual puede significar menos enfermedades, y el gasto en dinero también se reduciría, todo en conjunto.” “Todo lo que puedas hacer para mejorar y reforzar la salud de tu cuerpo para un futuro requiere de algunos tratamientos atravez del camino” nos termino diciendo O’

ESPAÑOL ~ ESPAÑOL ~ ESPAÑOL ~ ESPAÑOL ~ ESPAÑOL

(Staff Photo) Colusa County Search and Rescue volunteers Richard Bryant, Jr., Richard Bryant, Sr. and Jeff Long were on hand to tell people about the program and how they could join. Those who would like more information about Search and Rescue are invited to attend one of their meetings which are held on the second Tuesday of every month at the Williams Veteran’s Hall, 7 p.m. People may also contact S&R Coordinator, Lt. Shane Maxey at the Colusa County Sheriff ’s Office, 458.0200.

(Staff Photo) Local kids Giovanni Valencia, Aaron Tercero and Gisselle Valencia, were able to learn from the safety demonstrations put on by Colusa City Fire.

The following organizations took part in the event: • • • • • • • •

Be Prepared Colusa Boy Scout Troop 5 Colusa County Public Health Colusa Lions Club Colusa County Sheriff Office of Emergency Services Colusa County Volunteer Citizen Service Unit Colusa County Animal Control Colusa County Sheriff 's Search and

• • • • • • • • •

Rescue Colusa City Fire Dept Williams Police Dept Colusa Latter Day Saints Caring Choices Community Advocates for Parents and Children Medical Reserve Corps of Far Northern California Red Cross Three Rivers Chapter Colusa Branch California Highway Patrol National Guard


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OCTOBER 2, 2009 - OCTOBER 16,, 2009 9

COPS AND RODDER’S HOST FIRST CAR SHOW

WILLIAMS PION PIONEER REVIEW

& Rodder’s COPS

STAFF REPORT

T

he Colusa County Deputy puty Sheriff ’s Association (DSA), SA), along with the Mag Winders Car Club, hosted the first Cops and Rodder’s Car Show Saturday, September 26th. Over 90 classic cars and trucks lined the streets between the Colusa City Police Department and the Colusa County Courthouse for the event and people came from all around to check out some very cool classics. “We had good numbers, food, prizes and a good location, we feel it was a success,” shared Janice Bell, one of the event planners. People came from all over to participate in the event, one couple, Luckey and Caralyn Carter, came all the way from Waldport, Oregon. Part of the show included judging in several categories, and the winners are: • Just Plain Cool: Colette Young, ’53 Corvette • Best Carbon Footprint: Bruce Smith, 1922 Ford Model T Speedster • Best of Show 1948 and prior: Bob Criss, 1940 Chevy Coupe • Best of Show 1949 and later: Darci Richeson, ’69 Z28 Camaro Winners in the above categories were awarded trophies or sweatshirts. All entrants received t-shirts, dash plaques and Summit Racing ceramic mugs for participating. Planners hope this is just the first in what promises to be a new tradition for Colusa County. For future events or information people can contact the DSA at (530) 458-0200 or at the Sheriff ’s Office, 929 Bridge Street, Colusa or watch the website at www.colusacountydsa. com

Best Carbon Footprint: Bruce Smith, 1922 Ford

(Submitted Photo)

Best of Show 1948 and Prior:

Best Engine:

Bob Criss, 1940 Chevy Coupe

Bill Mack, 1918 Dodge Roadster

(Submitted Photo)

(Submitted Photo)

Best of Show 1949 and Prior:

Just Plain Cool!

Darci Richeson, 1969 Z28 Camero

Colette Young, 1953 Corvette

(Submitted Photo)

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www.WilliamsPioneerReview.com

(Submitted Photo)


WPR 10022009