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FEBRUARY 19 THROUGH

MARCH 5

VOLUME 3 • ISSUE 6

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WOODLAND ARBUCKLE FFA FIELD DAY DRAWS RECORD CROWDS n what was the largest turn COMMUNITY out ever for the Arbuckle FFA Field Day, kids from all over COLLEGE the north state and beyond after the groundbreaking

By ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK

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ow that construction has commenced for Colusa County’s first permanent college facility, Colusa County Supervisors reflect that the road has been long. “It’s been a very interesting and long road,” said District 3 board member Mark Marshall. “It was a challenge to find not only the money, but also the willingness of the college to come back to Colusa County.” Negotiations for a college facility in the county were in the works years ago, but the college backed out. “It’s been a challenge, but we’ve been very determined to do what’s best for the students of Colusa County,” Added Marshall. Originally scheduled for October, the official groundbreaking ceremony for the Woodland Community College Colusa County Educational Outreach Facility took place Jan. 26 in Williams on E Street, close to where Interstate 5 meets Highway 20, behind the California Highway Patrol facility. “We knew when we started this little journey that we needed some higher education in the county,” said Kim Dalbow Vann, Colusa County District 1 Supervisor. “We were able to form a very good relationship with Woodland Community College and Dr. Fairchilds and we just started a series of meetings with them and literally went down the path of ‘how do we get this done? How do we make this a reality?’ and not a 10- to 20-year reality, a ‘now’ reality?”

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came to participate in a day filled with competitions and camaraderie. There were 16 different categories of skills testing including: Ag Mechanics, Best Informed Greenhand, Co-op Quiz, Creed, Dairy Products, Farm Business Management, Farm Power, Farm Records, Floriculture, Forestry, Job Interviews, Lt. Horse Judging, Nursery and Landscape Management, Nov. Vegetable Crops, Small Engines and Specialty Animals. More than 700 contestants bustled between buildings, minds jumping from one specialty to the next. In all, between the students and supervisors, over 900 people buzzed around the Pierce High School campus. This year’s Field Day toppled the 2009 record of 670 entrants, and 2010 marked the first time that a participating FFA team came from outside of California. A team even came from as far as San Luis Obispo to take part in the unique experience.

FFA Member demonstrates his cutting skills at the Arbuckle FFA Field Day. To See more photos go to page 8. Photo By: Chaz Franklin

FRIENDS OF NRA HOST 3RD ANNUAL DINNER FEB. 26

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he Colusa County Chapter of the Friends of the National Rifle Association is set to host their third fundraising dinner Friday, Feb. 26, at the Colusa County Fairgrounds. Dinner will be catered by Louis Cairos and Colusa County Supervisor Tommy Indrieri. “We support education, public safety, youth programs and the shooting sports,” said Karen Ellison, Colusa County Chapter of the Friends of the National Rifle Association Chairperson. “We are the only organization around that does this. Fifty percent of the money we bring in through fundraising stays in Northern California.”

(Courtesy Photo) Brennan Stalker and Rich Ellison at the last FNRA dinner.

Continued on Page 2 Stalker won a youth 20 gauge shotgun.

Coming Events f

Weather f

FNRA DINNER February 26, 2010

WILLIAMS VBS DINNER March 6, 2010

WILLIAMS HIGH SCHOOL CARNITAS DINNER February 27, 2010

COLUSA WESTERN DAYS April 9-11, 2010

COLUSA COUNTY FARM BUREAU DINNER March 4, 2010

Continued on Page 3

Friends of the Williams Pioneer Review

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FEBRUARY 19, 2010 - MARCH 5, 2010

COMMUNITY COLLEGE Continued

Plans have been in the works for the Colusa County Facility since the passage of Measure J in November 2006 allocated $3.4 million to the project. According to Woodland Community College President Angela Fairchilds, Ph.D., evidence of aging facilities and community growth – both residential and in population – were factors in mapping out a master plan for Yuba Community College District over the last six years. Designs to upgrade facilities and expand within the district led authorities to seek Measure J funds in the first place. Evidence of rapidly advancing technologies, and a growing demand for education in general, were also factors in utilizing Measure J funds. “It turned into a team with the land owners, Colusa County Board of Education, Colusa County Supervisors, Yuba Community College and Woodland Community College,” Vann said. “We just decided we would get it done. Whatever it took.” YCCD is responsible for all of three counties and parts of five others. Woodland Community College’s service area includes Colusa County. Outreach courses in Colusa have previously taken place in leased or rented facilities. The new structure will be Colusa County’s first permanent college structure, now owned by the district. Colusa County Supervisors committed Tobacco Settlement Funds for infrastructure costs, and authorized the auditor-controller to issue a $600,000 payment to the Yuba Community College District. “It’s the best investment in education we’ve ever made,” Vann said. The Colusa County Facility will be a 9,000 square foot building built on four acres. Within the complex will be administrative and studentservices offices, as well as three classrooms to facilitate up to 120 students at any given time. The decision to plant the facility in Williams was based on criteria that the land be readily accessible by foot, car and public transit; be within close proximity to public services, such as fire and police; environmentally sound and centrally located to best serve the population within the county. Moreover, the Colusa County Office of Education will be building adjacent to the outreach facility. Both the CCOE and WCC are looking forward to combining resources and anchoring relations by being so close. “The college will not only benefit students who want to get a degree after high school, or adults pursuing a degree, but also for people who want to expand their horizons,” Marshall said. “It’s for everyone who wants to enjoy learning.”

Officials at WCC are depending on the input of Colusa County residents to help prioritize the courses, certificates and degrees offered at the new location. In April 2007, an initial survey, in English and Spanish, was sent out to county residents, asking preferences for times to offer classes, types of courses, reasons for attending college and barriers preventing people from attending. “We want the community to get involved in helping us create the curriculum offered so it suits the needs of the people in Colusa County,” Marshall said. “There will be a nice balance of academics and vocational training.” Classes are set to begin in spring 2011.

WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

NATURAL GAS WATCH

Lower February natural gas bills than one year ago. Pacific Gas and Electric Company’s (PG&E) customers can expect average natural gas bills to be about four percent lower this month than in February of last year. Small increases in charges for transmission, distribution and mandated social programs are expected to be offset by lower forecast usage and a decline in gas prices. The price of the natural gas has been favorable due to high storage levels and lower demand. Natural gas costs can change quickly during the winter months depending on weather and market conditions. PG&E takes steps to protect our customers from severe price spikes, including smart purchasing decisions, financial hedging against potential price

OOH-LA-LA OPENS SALON AT WELLNESS CENTER Celebrating one of Colusa County’s Newest Businesses

By ZACH MEHR

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urprisingly in this economic climate, a number of new and successful businesses have opened in the Colusa area in the past few years. Many new and exciting opportunities have been presented. One of the newest to open recently is the hair salon called Ooh-La-La, located inside the Colusa Indian Community Wellness Center. The center is now a place where people can get a healthy workout while enjoying the pleasures a salon offers. Ooh-La-La provides a wide range of services, including hair, tanning, massage, make-up, and different types of salon products. The official ribbon- cutting took place February 10, done by Wayne R. Mitchum, Sr., tribal chairman. The ribbon was held by the two Colusa County Pageant winners. Snacks and refreshments were provided to the public in attendance. Laurie Costa, director at the salon and spa, said, “We’ve had the idea of adding this to the wellness

center for some time now, and so far I think it’s really going great. The girls who are working here are always extremely busy, so that’s a good sign. In the end we just wanted to be here for our members, and that’s what’s important to us.” Kim Womble, the manager of the Salon, has been in the hair-design business for 20 years, working mainly in Yuba City. The transition to her new business has been an exciting one. “I love it out here, I really do. It’s a very positive place to come to work, and I really enjoy coming here every day.” Ooh-La-La has already made a difference in the community by participating in the Locks for Love program, which is for people to donate their hair to people under 21 who have lost it due to a medical condition. The salon is at 3720 Highway 45 at the Colusa Wellness Center. Hours are Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

spikes, and using our extensive pipeline and storage infrastructure to help us moderate gas purchase costs. PG&E passes the wholesale price of gas through to customers without mark-up. Customers can also take steps to help reduce their gas bills, as well. Simply turning down your thermostat by just one or two degrees and installing weather stripping in your home, are two easy ways to save on your winter heating bills. Customers in need of assistance with bill payment should call 800-PGE-5000. Low Income Energy Efficiency, California Alternate Rates for Energy) as authorized by the California Public Utilities Commission.


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FNRA DINNER Additionally, the Colusa County Chapter of the Friends of the National Rifle Association has a grant process which the public safety, range improvements and shooting sports for all ages of men, women and children. The Friends of NRA began in the fall of 1992. There is no membership for the Friends of NRA and people do not need to be a member of the NRA to support the Friends of NRA. The FNRA is part of the NRA Foundation, a nonprofit, non-political 501C3 organization. It’s anticipated to be an evening full of entertaining games, raffles and auctions, the reason for the dinner is at the forefront of everyone’s mind: gun rights. Children are welcome to attend. Please inform the Association of the children's age and sex prior to the dinner as all children under the age of 16 in attendance will receive something for attending. The event will be held February 26, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. in the Festival Hall located at the Colusa County Fairgrounds. Tickets must be purchased in advance. For tickets and other information please call 530-682-2595 or contact karen95987@yahoo.com.To learn more about the FNRA, visit www. friendsofnra.org/ca

FEBRUARY 19, 2010 - MARCH 5, 2010

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YCCD MAKES SWITCH TO VoIP Thanks to Measure J Dollars

Marysville, CA – Faced with an antiquated technology infrastructure which included a phone system that was more than 20 years old, the Yuba Community College District (YCCD) included improving the District’s technology infrastructure in its priorities when developing its Facilities Master Plan in 2005 in preparation for the Measure J facilities bond in 2006. Five years later, this priority is continuing to materialize as the District upgrades its network to provide the infrastructure needed to support the implementation of advanced Internet Provider (IP) based unified communications applications such as Voice Over IP (VoIP), unified messaging, and security alerts. VoIP refers to technology that enables routing of voice conversations over a computer network. The new network will substantially increase performance and ensure first-class service delivery to staff and students. New switches will enhance network resilience, reduce power consumption and enhance virtualization projects maximizing the District’s investment in a new virtual server environment. In conjunction with the network upgrade, the District has refreshed its server environment, reducing

28 of its servers down to 4 virtual servers. In addressing the District’s phone system the technology department wanted to improve service, boost staff productivity and decrease costs, and felt like VoIP was the right solution. YCCD also wanted a unified communications infrastructure for all users. Working with Altura and Netvad, the District created an open communications infrastructure that resulted in business benefits including improved communications between sites, better service to current and prospective students, and cost savings. For instance, the District couldn’t use four-digit dialing between its two college campuses or remote sites before the switch. Not only was this costly, but it also made communications more cumbersome and hindered service to students. As part of its roll-out a VoIP platform and over 600 VoIP handsets have been distributed District wide. All in all, the District’s move to VoIP will save the District $100,000 a year while giving it far superior technology than it had with the central office-based Centrex telephone service. Karen Trimble,YCCD’s Director of Information Technologies, said “We had hit a crunch point with network capacity, wanted to move to a more efficient server environment, and had outgrown our telecommunications system. Our 20 year old Centrex system was no longer meeting the needs, nor was it cost effective. Moving to VoIP, in addition to cost savings, gives us the opportunity to move to unified communications technology and the ability to provide emergency

notifications. The new equipment gives us a 10-fold performance increase and allows us to run all these new services.” Also important, the switch to VoIP will enhance the District’s security and emergency preparedness. Under the old Centrex system, the District lacked the ability to alert emergency workers quickly via calls to 911. The District will also now have the ability to send alert messages to designated zones. “Being able to have a quick and more effective way to communicate in a time of emergency is of the utmost importance for the safety of our students and staff,” said Dr. Nicki Harrington, YCCD Chancellor. “This new technology enables us to have rapid response in emergency situations, strengthens communications for students and staff, and further enhances our distance learning options for students.” The infrastructure upgrades and the switch to VoIP are just some of many technology upgrades that have been made possible thanks to Measure J Bond Dollars. For instance, in 2007 YCCD was able to begin offering wireless internet access to students and staff. The Yuba Community College District spans eight counties and nearly 4,200 square miles of territory in rural, north-central California. It has colleges in Marysville and Woodland, an educational center in Clearlake, and will be adding outreach facilities in Sutter and Colusa Counties as part of the Measure J facilities bond. For more information about YCCD please visit our website at www.yccd.edu.


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WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

FEBRUARY 19, 2010 - MARCH 5, 2010

a OPINION & LETTERS b

EDC INSIGHT

CHICKEN LITTLE

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ith the winter Olympics chickens, his responsibility. I had no well underway, most love lost for the feathered creatures. of us have watched at So, to the feed store we went, and, least a few minutes here and there. once he discovered how cheap the One thing has really bothered me; chicks were, he decided 30 would be the networks replaying the footage a good start. Now, when you have 30 of Georgian luge athlete Nodar adult layers, that’s how many eggs Kumaritashvili losing control of his you can get in a day. It got to the sled and flying off the track into a point where we couldn’t give the eggs steel post, ending his life. We feel for away, the hens were laying so much. The reality finally hit his family, friends and Aaron when he realized fellow athletes, viewing how much we were the tragedy repeatedly. spending to feed all those It also bothers me that chickens, our free eggs newscasters give you all being quite the opposite. of five seconds warning So, for now, I will keep for the scene about to my mouth shut for the be played that it may most part and watch in be disturbing and not amusement, making side suitable for children. bets with friends as to That leaves a lot of parents diving for the ANDREA MOORE how long the chickens Publisher will remain. I forgot to remote to turn off the mention, he bought one television or scrambling for each of us, and we all to sidetrack their children’s attention. Our thoughts have named them; Meredith named and prayers go out to his family. hers Chickadee, Isaac changed his chick’s name from John to Eggy Their’s is a horrible loss. then Ducky and is now finally called Hunter (don’t ask me!). Aaron’s has This issue marks the third anniversary been dubbed Hambon,e and mine is of the Williams Pioneer Review. Country Fried. When we started this journal, our Now, in Aaron’s defense, I know goal was to provide something it will be a good experience for none of the other local publications the kids, learning about raising an provided, a positive, community- animal and appreciating the origins oriented, informational news source of their food. I can’t tell you how for the whole family. While our excited the kids were when Aaron hopes for succeeding have been much told them he had placed an order satisfied, the amount of support from for the chicks at Griff ’s. Everyday, readers and advertisers has been and I mean everyday, they would ask humbling and encouraging. We’ve how many more days until chicken verified, even while the print-news day would arrive. Finally that day industry appears to be going down came, and they are now completely the drain, good news prevails. With fascinated by the little critters. The that, thanks, everyone, again for your cat is pretty fascinated by them too, support. Here’s to a bright future, full sitting on top of the cage, staring at them upside down. If for nothing of good news! else, it has provided amusement for our family. What can I say? We are Recently my husband decided it easily entertained. As most will guess, would be a good idea to purchase this story will be continued… four baby chickens for the kids to raise for eggs. Growing up we had some chickens and all I can say is they were more work than they were worth! Now, this isn’t the first round of chickens Aaron had to have. About eight years ago, when we were expecting the birth of Meredith, Aaron got it in his head to raise some chickens. I gave him a few warnings and let him know they would be his

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e are at the anniversary of environment, less taxation, less the American Recovery regulation, less litigation, and and Reinvestment Act more common sense. We need (ARRA) of 2009, signed into law to encourage our young people to by President Obama on February explore their interests and expand 17, 2009. That’s right, folks, it has on their talents. I recently learned been a year of “Recovery that in 2009 there were and Reinvestment.” I 162 fictitious business wanted to see what had names filed within been accomplished with Colusa County. this massive amount Naturally, some of of money we borrowed these were the required from China, so I went renewal of the name to the government’s after being in business website, recovery. for five years. However, gov, however, when I even if only 30 percent “Googled” it I received (I don’t have any idea as the following message: to the actual number) BEN FELT CCCC President “Oops, this link appears were new filings, it to be broken.” would be fantastic for Well, that about our community. It is a sums it up. Broken! known fact that per-capita a higher That’s how I felt about ARRA percentage of first-time businesses from the beginning. If we had are started in rural communities used the money to fix our nation’s than in the much larger urban areas infrastructure by repairing roads or cities. Granted, the number and bridges, building water storage, of employees hired by these new a nuclear power plant or two, businesses is less in the rural areas some desalination plants along the than in the larger cities, but it is still coastlines, and sewer and water economic development. In most systems throughout rural America, cases the small new businesses in we might have had a chance at a rural community make a larger recovery, and we certainly would impact on their local economy have reinvested in America. But, than their urban counterparts make instead, we all saw where our next in their larger communities with generation’s hard earned money higher populations. went. And regarding job growth, So, if you are passionate about an it just dawned on me that the idea interest, a hobby, an idea, or the work is for all those jobs to be in the you did at a previous job, consider government sector, not the private making it your new career. There sector as I had assumed. Why else are people and resources available would the government have gotten to help you accomplish your goal. into the auto, banking, and insurance Today is a great time to start! For industries, and adamant about additional information please call healthcare reform, even though 75 the Chamber of Commerce at 530percent of the populous are opposed 458-5525. to the concept? I don’t mean to be negative, CONTACT INFORMATION but our economy is in real trouble, Williams Pioneer Review and bigger government is not the 317 Fifth Street solution. The solution is in a free Colusa, CA 95932 market system, a business-friendly

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FEBRUARY 19, 2010 - MARCH 5, 2010

a THE NEWS BACK THEN b

Williams Farmer, March 5, 1937; BASEBALL BENEFIT DANCE AT ARMORY SAT., MARCH 20 With spring comes the urge for baseball, and that urge is now being felt in Maxwell. L. L. Barrett, who for several seasons has successfully managed a championship baseball team here, announces he will again have a team in the ďŹ eld this season. For the beneďŹ t of expenses necessary in such an organization, a dance will be given at the Armory in Williams on Saturday night, March 20th. A good orchestra, to be announced later, will be engaged to furnish music. Effort will be made to make this dance a big success. Cooperation and patronage of everyone interested in the popular sport and in Maxwell’s champion team is now being solicited. BROWN AND GOLD BUZZ Shop classes have cleaned the “lemonâ€? for the purpose of selling candy here instead of in the basement, where it has been conducted all winter. The coming of warm weather has made the change necessary and will be a beneďŹ t to all students who patronize the organization. March 12, 1937; TRIP TO CITY NO EASY TASK 62 YEARS AGO In talking with N. A. Britton the ďŹ rst of the week we learned something of the difďŹ culty of travel days we learned something of the difďŹ culty of travel in the early days. In telling of a trip to Santa Rosa sixty two years ago with his parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. Martin A. Britton, he stated that the journey from the Britton Homestead in Spring Valley to Colusa was made over roads which were not graded or graveled and which were muddy in winter and knee deep in dust in the summer. Colusa and the journey by steamer went as far as Knights Landing, where a train was taken by the party to as far as Vallejo, where a steamer was boarded, and the boat crossed the bay to a point near Petaluma, where a stage completed the remainder of the trip to Santa Rosa, a thriving city of 2,500 at the time. In going to San Francisco the boat made directly from Vallejo. In speaking of the early days we learned that Martin A. Britton, who ďŹ rst came to California with the 49ers, returned with a wagon train in ’52 and located a homestead in the valley west of Williams, which he named Spring Valley, a name which still stands today. Norman Britton, who was born at this ranch which grew to 2500 acres, can well recall trips made from Spring Valley to Colusa with loads of grain. The trip in the schooner wagons took two days. The Stovall Place, the W. H. Williams place, located approximately where the brick house now stands today, and a place on the slough and Colusa were the only places encountered between Spring Valley and Colusa at the time. The watching the development of Colusa County, the advancement in the methods of transportation and the building of communities has been a privilege of N. A. Britton. Williams Farmer, Februar y 11, 1938; RUMIANO BROS. INSTALLING CHEESE FACTORY. FIRST OF ITS KIND IN CALIFORNIA-MILK GOES DIRECT FROM COW TO VAT

The newest and most novel innovation dairy industry of California is now being projected by Rumiano Bros. of Maxwell and Willows. They are installing a cheese plant at Vina, California, different from anything found in the state. By means of milking machinery and equipment, the milk will be transported from the cows directly to the vat in the factory. This method of “milkingâ€? will eliminate danger and risk of foreign bacteria. The milk rooms with concrete oors will be absolutely sanitary and sterile in every detail, with the cows being fed only concentrated foods in that room. The outside corrals will be oored with asbestos, thereby eliminating dirt, mud, or ďŹ lth of any kind, a very important factor to contributing to the sanitation of the plant. It is also planned to bottle class A milk with the excess quantity from that used in the manufacture of cheese. The Rumiano Brothers will start with their present herd of 300 cows of high grade Guernsey and Holstein breed, adding gradually until the herd reaches 500. These men have, for many years, been important in the dairy industry of the Sacramento Valley, having cheese factories at Maxwell, Willows and Granada. They were most instrumental in the establishment of the Western Condensing Company located in Maxwell. Much interest is being directed at their new project at Vina, which is undoubtedly proven a stupendous advancement in the dairy industry of California.

good news to the public and especially Williams. Williams Farmer, Februar y 23, 1940; BARRETT’S STORESMAXWELL AND WILLIAMS COFFEE -#at-#at-#a POTATOES -#4t-#4a FRESH ASPARAGUS 2LB 23¢

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Men playing on the championship squad were Coach Warren Taylor, Matt Jauregui, Kenny Egbert, Frank Kintana, Wally Gray, Elmo Nordyke, Jim Manor, and Ellis Rogers. These fellows deserve much credit for the excellent job done in winning the County League Championship. Williams Farmer, March 10, 1944; THREE PLANES OF BRITISH NAVAL AIR FORCE LAND AT C.A.A. AIRPORT

Three Avenger planes of the British Navy landed at the Airway Airport BACON Wednesday morning about eleven 1LB 18¢ o’clock due to one of the planes being forced down with engine trouble and Williams Farmer, March 4, 1949; the other two planes of the formation CLUB HEARS HISTORY setting down to wait for the troubled OF LOCAL BLOCK plane. However the ďŹ eld, which is un-surfaced The Kiwanis Club observed its ďŹ fteenth and unimproved, was too soft to permit birthday this week with a recognition the planes to take off, and Gil Britton was of the charter members now actively called to tow the planes to high ground, associated with organization. resulted when the planes attempted to B. L. Fouch, as chairman of the program get rolling. committee for the month of March, Thursday the planes were still grounded gave a historical sketch of the block on and the ofďŹ cers and men were hoping to UITUSFFUCFUXFFO&BOE'TUSFFUT)F have a steel matting transported to the stated that he remembers the building ďŹ eld so that the planes could get into the now occupied by Central Garage as a air and on their way. It was thought that livery stable operated by Rathbun and it would be difďŹ cult to get the planes into Abel. It was next used as headquarters the air without the matting or taking the for the ďŹ rst motor stages to run out planes to a hard county road. of Williams and Wilbur and Bartlett The Avenger is a single engine plane, Springs. Three Stages were operated but is heavy, and the tail wheel is smaller by Quigley and Becker. than on the Flying Fortress. A fortress The lots belonging to Otto Klopp were and three ďŹ ghters were forced down on vacant until a service station was built the local ďŹ eld at Christmas time but due Williams Farmer, Februar y 23, by O.F. Klopp. This station was recently to the larger tail wheels they were able 1940; BARTLETT removed. The lots on to take off, although the ďŹ eld was softer SPRINGS TO BE which the Williams that it is now. DEVELOPED BY Theatre now stands were Lt. Commander Haigh was in charge of NEW COMPANY occupied by Murphy’s the planes that landed on Wednesday. Boarding House. North Again we say “Those responsible for It will be good news to of Murphy’s property, the unimproved condition of the Colusa the people of the vicinity a roadway, over which County ďŹ eld are impeding the war effort; and others throughout the trucking of grain to endangering the lives of those ying in California and the West, the scales which served the valley and who have reason to land to learn that the famous the brick warehouse at our ďŹ eld, and will be responsible for Bartlett Springs, one of stood. The lots between accidents that may result because of the the world’s ďŹ nest mineral the roadway and the unimproved or rather, the absence of springs, has recently lots upon which the surfaced runways. changed hands and is Odd Fellows hall now now in the process of stands were vacant. Dr. PAT ASH rebuilding. Kimball’s ofďŹ ce occupied Some years ago the Contributor the corner lot and faced hotel and facilities were Sacramento Valley Museum north until the Odd destroyed by ďŹ re and only Fellows purchased the a few cabins have been available at the corner lots and Dr. Kimball moved his once popular springs. The properties building and faced it west. have been purchased by a group of It was suggested that some of the California and Nevada people headed members with memories of what it used by Earl Burns of Stockton. to be give reports from time to time It is planned to rebuild slowly. upon its history of certain blocks and Landscaping and preparation for a streets in the city. building program, which will start late The report given by Chairman Fouch this year or early in 1941, are the chief was interesting, and not only by those activities at this time. The bottling and unfamiliar with the history of the sale of the Bartlett Springs Water will be community, but by “old timersâ€? as well. continued on a large scale. The new owners of this famous old TOWN TEAM WINS COLUSA property believe it possesses a high COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP intrinsic value, and are planning to place it again at the disposal of guests who Williams town team number 1 defeated formerly patronized its ďŹ ne hotels and the American Legion team of Colusa partook of its unique springs, as well last Monday night by a score of 56-41, as attract new devotees from amongst earning the title of the Colusa County the ranks of Americans who, prior to League Champions. This contest, the World War were accustomed to the second of the playoff games, gave patronizing European Spas which are Williams an 11-1 record in league play. now virtually closed to all business. They lost their only game to Maxwell Much business from Bartlett Springs 52-51. has been transacted in Williams in the Last Friday night, the locals beat past years. The trucking of the water the Arbuckle Hotel team 53-52 in an and the warehouse for the springs was elimination tilt, to earn ďŹ rst place in maintained during the active years. league standings. The contest with Its resumption of operation will be Colusa clinched the championship.


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WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

FEBRUARY 19, 2010 - MARCH 5, 2010

a COMMUNITY BRIEFS b

CATHOLIC CHURCH OF THE ANNUNCIATION 627 8th Street Williams “Meet & Greet Coffee Club� Every Third Sunday of the Month after 9:30 a.m. Mass Join us for refreshments and conversation

PACIFIC FLYWAY QUILTERS The county’s quilt guild. monthly meetings will be held the 3rd Wednesday of every month. Meeting starts at 7:00pm located at the Colusa Masonic Hall 311- 5th street.

WILLIAMS COMMUNITY CENTER ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES MONDAY NIGHT BINGO: CHANGES Everyone Welcome! Early Bird Games Starting Time at 6:00 P.M. Regular Games Begin at 6:30 P.M. WE WILL NOT BE PLAYING ON 5TH MONDAYS THIS YEAR Refreshments Available at Reasonable Prices, Home Made Desserts Game Day: Third Wednesday of the month, February 17, 2010 at 1:00 P.M. Movie Day: Fourth Wednesday of the month, February 24, 2010 at 1:00 P.M. Price: FREE Refreshments: Soda & Candy are available at a low price. (Bring a Pillow-the seats are hard)

Williams Community Blood Drive March 18, 2010, 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Parkside United Methodist Church Located at 9th & G Streets Donor card or Photo ID required Must be 17 or older to donate (16 with parental consent) Minimum 110 pounds & generally healthy Please eat and drink plenty of fluids.

CELEBRATE RECOVERY Meets every Friday night at 6:30 P.M. at the First Presbyterian Church (north annex building) at 4th & Jay Streets in Colusa. CELEBRATE RECOVERY is a free program that addresses issues of alcoholism, codependency, drug addiction, and other hurts, habits and hang ups. CELEBRATE RECOVERY is open to anyone who is experiencing pain, brokenness, or just wants support and encouragement. We are an anonymous program. For further information, please call 458-2802.

TRAVEL STUDY PROGRAM IN OAXACA, MEXICO

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HAVE A COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT? EMAIL THEM TO submissions@ williamspioneerreview.com

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MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN YOUR COMMUNITY the citizens for a better Williams hold meetings the 4th Thursday of every month beginning at 6:00pm. meetings are held at the Sacramento Valley Museum. everyone is welcome!!

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Sacramento State is offering a two-week travel study program in Oaxaca, Mexico, from July 9-24, 2010. Program participants will strengthen their Spanish language skills while earning three units of undergraduate or graduate academic credit. Participants will attend seminars focusing on public health issues in Mexico and factors that impact states such as Oaxaca. Guided weekend tours to nearby villages and markets will be optional. Dr. Peter Baird, associate professor of bilingual and multicultural education at Sacramento State, leads the travel study program. He is also the co-author of “Beyond the Border: Mexico and the U.S. Today.� Registration for the travel study program is $2,100 and includes tuition, family homestay,

Sacramento State academic credits, cultural classes and seminars. Airfare not included. During the two-week homestay, participants will experience life as an Oaxaca native by staying with a local family. Save the Date! Plan to attend one of the upcoming information sessions in Napa Hall. Presentations will be offered from 6-8 p.m. on Feb. 23, April 20 and June 8. The information sessions are free to the public and will be located at the College of Continuing Education, Napa Hall, Sacramento State, 3000 State University Drive East. For more information about the program, please contact: Professor Peter Baird (916) 2784916 • pbaird@csus.edu

V Williams VBS Fundraiser Dinner Williams Vacation Bible School will hold a Roasted Pulled Pork Dinner on Sat. March 6th. Doors open at 5:30pm, with dinner being served at 6pm. In addition to a delicious dinner the night will include a Silent Auction, ticket-in-a-bag raffle, and a door prize! Join us for a fun night raising money for Williams Vacation Bible School at Williams Community Church on 9th and C street. Adults dinner tickets $12 and children 4y10yrs $6, Under 4 FREE! For more information please contact Alicia Draves at 473-3139.

V WHS CARNITAS DINNER

The Williams High School Senior Class is having a Carnitas Dinner on Saturday, February 27, 2010. The $10 dinner will include plenty of rice, beans, tortillas, and the famous carnitas meat prepared by Sal Covarrubias. The doors of the school’s multipurpose room open at 5:00 p.m. and the

serving will continue until 8:00 p.m. Take-outs are available. Tickets may be purchased in advance from any Senior Class Member. The students are Disneyland bound in late May so please help them get there!

what’s the scoop? Keep the community informed of your organizations activities, events, and fund raisers. Fill out the form below and mail or drop off at our office before February 25, 2010. ______________________ Event Name ______________________ Event Date ______________________ Event Time ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ Details & Contact igm5# ."5.,.5R5)&/-

a CLASSIFIEDS b REAL ESTATE EXCLUSIVE 27.33ÍłACRE HOME SITE WEST OF CORNING WITH MORE THAN 1,275 FEET OF THOMES CREEK FRONTAGE. AMPLE ACREAGE FOR A HOME, BARN, STABLE AND MORE. ACCESS TO THREE COUNTY ROADS. MAGNIFICENT VIEWS OF MT. SHASTA, MT. LASSEN AND PACIFIC CASCADE COASTAL RANGE. PRICED TO SELL AT $120,000. CONTACT OWNER AT Έ530Ή 848Íł2315

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VERY LARGE ROOM FOR RENT PRIVATE BATH, PRIVATE ENTRANCE, USE OF KITCHEN, TV, COMPUTER, WASHER/DRYER, DECK, ALL UTILITIES, A/C, INC. MALE OR FEMALE. PET OK. CALL 476Íł3767.

FOR SALE FIREWOOD FOR SALE: MIXED HARDWOODS, VERY DRY $100 1/2 CORD, $180 FULL CORD CALL 476Íł2948 FOR MORE INFORMATION. WALNUT DRY, CUT FIREWOOD FOR SALE. $25./ PICKUP LOAD. ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE COLUSA CO.

YULETIDE DINNER. CALL JULIANN AT 458Íł7446 NEW & ASSEMBLED EXTERIOR WATER HEATER ENCLOSURE CABINET. $150 OBO. FOR INFO CALL 530.473.2439. HEAVY DUTY EXPANDED METAL SIDERACKS FOR FORD LONGBED PICKÍł UP. INCLUDES HEADACHE RACK. DESIGNED TO HAUL FIREWOOD OR BULK PRODUCTS. $350/COMPLETE SET. 530Íł476Íł2948

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WILLIAMS ALUMNI: INTERACTIVE WEBSITE PRIVATE & FREE MAKE NEW CONTACT WITH OLD CLASSMATES AND BROWSE THE SITE FOR CLASS PICTURES AND CANDID PICTURES FROM 1912 TO ABOUT 1970. NEW REUNION AND CANDID PICTURES POSTED CONTINUOUSLY. SPONSORED BY A WILLIAMS GAL! EMAIL: SUNDEEÎ? SBCGLOBAL.NET NEED TO

EMPLOYMENT TOW TRUCK DRIVER: WILL TRAIN. GOOD DMV. MUST BE OVER 21 YEARS OLD. MUST LIVE IN COLUSA.

COMMISSION BASED PAY. 530.458.2126. VEHICLE DETAILER: FULL TIME. GOOD DMV. EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. 530.458.2126. POST YOUR CLASSIFIEDS AD TODAY! CALL 530.844.0396

WORK WANTED M.C.’S HAMMER: “HIREÍł AÍłHUSBANDâ€? NO JOB TOO SMALL...ELECTRICAL WIRING, FAN INSTALLATION, CARPENTRY, PICTURE HANGING, DRY WALL, LIGHT BULB CHANGING, ETC.; “HONEY DOâ€? LISTS DONE

IN A FLASH! REASONABLE RATES THAT ARE SENSITIVE TO TODAY’S ECONOMIC WOES. CALL MICHAEL CODER AT Έ530Ή230Íł8479 FOR ALL YOUR HANDYMAN NEEDS! POSTING YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IS EASY! WITH THE WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW. STOP BY OUR OFFICE OR DOWNLOAD OUR SUBMISSION FORM ONLINE! IT’S YARD SALE SEASON! POST YOUR YARD SALES WITH THE WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW THIS SPRING & SUMMER!


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FEBRUARY 19, 2010 - MARCH 5, 2010

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Trees are what you make of them… Notice the extent of the care taken to build a splint for a cracked limb. I’m sure this tree is like an old friend to the landowners. It’s obvious that they are willing to do whatever it takes to preserve its strength and beauty.

An angelic halo created by wrapping fruitless mulberry limbs together. This trio of trees turns the art of topiary into an expression of a new artistic pruning technique. This tree would definitely win a contest for a very unusual topiary.

Camellias are as tough as nails for some people to grow. Others have tried to grow them for years without success. The difference lies within the combination of proper light, drainage, soil type and Ph (or acidity) of the soil. Camellias and azaleas like lots of compost and good drainage, with shade. A northern exposure is best protected from the afternoon sun. Many areas of Colusa have extremely high levels of salt (alkaline content) which make growing these difficult at best.

Look up! Widow-makers, aka. broken limbs, are over a sidewalk in Colusa. Everyone should learn to recognize a hazardous tree when they see it. Don’t park under dangerous trees either.

Ash trees are common here in Colusa County. These are not leafing out early, look closely. Mistletoe is taking over these trees. This parasite must be kept under control or the tree will eventually die. The sad part is that birds love to spread the seeds from tree to tree while eating them. The best removal program is to cut off the limb below each cluster. I have had some luck spraying Round-Up directly on the clump of mistletoe. This is one of the biggest tree problems in Colusa County.

This olive tree is definitely my favorite topiary in Colusa. Many years of dedication have been spent pruning and shaping this tree. This is truly a work of art.

This poor cedar tree has obviously fallen victim to a hack job. There is really nothing much one can do for it anymore. Once you have cut the top out of a cedar or cypress, and large side cuts, it’s only a matter of time before it dies. This is what not to do to your tree.

Obadiah Montgomery Gobel was born to happy parents Allen and Alycen Gobel of Williams. He came into the world weighing in at 10 lbs 2 oz and 21 ½ inches in Woodland Community Hospital. Obi joins sisters Khloey and Korey. Grandparents include Mark and Nancy Marshall, Tom Wayman, Fred and Charleen Gobel.

Let us help celebrate life’s special moments! Send us your birth, anniversary, and engagement announcements and we can share them with the rest of our county! Email to: submissions@williamspioneerreview.com.


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WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

FEBRUARY 19, 2010 - MARCH 5, 2010

P H OTO S 由 2010

Photos Taken By: Chaz Franklin


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FEBRUARY 19, 2010 - MARCH 5, 2010

Recently the Williams Fire Department conducted a live burn for training purposes. They burned a portion of the Old Motor Inn located on Highway 99 in Williams. They will burn the remaining portion of the building later in the spring for further training.

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FEBRUARY 19, 2010 - MARCH 5, 2010

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COLUSA COUNTY FARM SHOW

WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

DUTCH OVEN COOK-OFF

Sacramento River Cast Iron Cookers Winter Camp The Sacramento River Cast Iron Cookers 8th Annual Winter Camp Dutch Oven Cook-Off, was held January 16 at the Colusa County Fairgrounds. (Photos Courtesy of Richard Lau, laus-photography.smugmug.com)

Young farmers, Issac & Meredith Moore test drive a John Deere Tractor at the Colusa County Farm Show on February 3rd. (Staff Photo)

Hundreds of spectators were expected at the Colusa County Farm Show on February 2-4, 2010. (Staff Photo)

2541 7th Street • Williams,CA 95987 1108 MARKET STREET - COLUSA, CA

(530) 458-3803

(530) 473-3883


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MY LITTLE MAYBERRY Essays of Colusa

By DENISE DENTON-RINZLER

Signs of Spring Sure signs of spring: ants on the kitchen counter, flies on the screen, and skeeters on the puddles. You can tell the seasons here by the critters that show up. Right now I’m enjoying the birds. Please don’t remind me that scientists say birds evolved from lizards. I don’t really care for reptiles, although some (insert the word strange) people seem to find them charming. If squirting blood from eyes, sprouting a parietal third eye, squeezing, swallowing whole or poisoning prey to death thrills you, reptiles are your babies. From my perspective, if birds did come from lizards, I give them credit for having enough sense to shed those belly-dragging ways and sprouting wings and song. In my little Mayberry, bird species are multitudinous, with seasons, like the insects. For years, I’ve attempted rather fruitlessly to learn their calls and songs. Luckily, the heart doesn’t care about what the head knows and enjoys the music anyway. Someday, there will be computer apps translating bird words into human ones. Like the first phone connection in Edison’s time, we’ll hear a scratchy, “Will you listen to that loony human trying to imitate us! What a lousy accent. She oughta get Rosetta Stone.”

FEBRUARY 19, 2010 - MARCH 5, 2010

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GOVERNOR SWARZENEGGER ANNOUNCES MORE THAN $100 MILLION RECOVERY ACT INVESTMENT In Advancing Use Of Health Information Exchange and Technology, Training Workers For Health Care Jobs Of The Future Nearly $70 Million To Expand Health Information Technology And More Than $31 Million For Health Jobs Of The Future Governor Schwarzenegger today announced that California will receive more than $100 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act) awards. These funds will assist health care providers to expand the secure use and exchange of health information technology (IT) and train workers for thousands of health care jobs across the state. "Training Californians for health care jobs and the efficient and secure exchange of private medical information are fundamental to the future of health care delivery in our state," said Governor Schwarzenegger. "The health IT grants will help California build a world class system to promote and expand the way information is shared, protecting medical privacy, promoting efficiency and will ultimately help reduce health care costs." The grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and U.S. Department of Labor (Labor) will allow California to build a foundation to exchange health information across the State that provides safe, secure patient and provider access to health information, while providing job training to thousands of Californians statewide. "Securing these valuable funds

for Californians took collaboration at the federal, state and local levels, including government and health care organizations," said Senior Advisor to the Governor and Director of the California Recovery Task Force Herb K. Schultz. "The Task Force is working around the clock to make certain that these funds are put to work quickly and efficiently to jumpstart our economy and create jobs in the health care sector." Health IT: A robust system to exchange health information will improve patient care in several areas including: more informed decisions by making certain patient medical history is available at the point of diagnosis and care; enabling early diagnosis with the potential to improve outcomes and reduce costs; and, increasing efficiencies related to administrative tasks. More information about the State's grant application and the selection process for the Health Information Exchange Governance Entity is available at http://www. ehealth.ca.gov/ Regional Extension Centers: Regional extension centers will help eligible providers and hospitals make meaningful use of electronic health records by providing handson technical assistance and support as they buy, install and begin to use such records. Job Training for Health Care: Eight organizations within California also received more than

$30 million in grants to train workers for jobs in health care and other related industries. The competitive grants from the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration will address current and forecasted workforce shortages. They will also provide future workers with the training necessary to pursue career paths, enhancing opportunities in high growth or emerging industries. "We are very excited about this important funding for the green tech, biotech, nursing and allied health professions," said Victoria Bradshaw,Secretary of the California Labor and Workforce Development Agency. "These are the industries in highest demand in California and leveraging current efforts by the Governor's Green Collar Jobs Council, and the Nurse Education and Allied Health Initiatives, will quickly lead to important jobs for California." Previously, as part of his commitment to creating jobs in California, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger established a $32 million Allied Health Initiative which is a three year, public-private partnership aimed at reducing California's critical health care worker shortage by adding thousands of additional professionals to California's hospitals and health care facilities over the next three years. The Governor's Nurse Education Initiative established in 2005, started with a $90 million, five-year public-private partnership, which has so far seen an increase of more than 54 percent in the number of Registered Nurse (RN) graduates. In 2009, Governor Schwarzenegger committed an additional $60 million five-year funding for the publicprivate partnership to maintain the important expansions realized in California's nursing education programs.

C&L HOME SERVICE DOES MORE THAN PEST CONTROL

SWIMMING POOL MAINTENANCE WEEKLY SERVICE TO REMOVE LEAVES, VACUUM, CHEMICAL REGULATION, AND CLEAN FILTERS YEAR ROUND SERVICE FREE ESTIMATE

WE ALSO CLEAN HOUSE GUTTERS A COLUSA COUNTY BUSINESS

CALL 473-5566 or 908.5566


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WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

FEBRUARY 19, 2010 - MARCH 5, 2010

COLUSA NATIVE RETURNS TO HELP TEENS

Pictured: Florence A. Soares-Dabalos. (Photo by: Elizabeth Kalfsbeek)

Healthcare West in one of their counseling centers to hone her clinical skills, where she became known as the resident teen expert. Soares-Dabalos will continue to operate her Chico private practice serving adults and teens. She will look at the needs of the community before deciding if she will work more than one day in the new Colusa office. “Having grown up in Colusa, I wanted to give back in some way,” she said. “I thought there might be a need for teens to have a neutral, objective person to talk to. I also offer an understanding of this area and what it’s like to grow up here.” Contact Florence Soares-Dabalos by calling 899-0220 or 781-3844. She can also be reached through her Web site www.florencemft.com

as bullying, building self-esteem and peer relationships. Some of hen most people describe the students on her caseload were their “favorite” type of client, dealing with poverty, moms it’s safe to bet that few would say, “the who were prostituting angry, moody 15 year old girl with themselves out for drugs and issues of child abuse of attitude.” But Florence A. Soares-Dabalos, all forms. The following year she MS, LMFT, thrives on working with adolescents. The psychotherapist interned at the Educational recently opened a private practice Opportunity Program in in Colusa one day per week, and Sacramento working with operates out of her Chico office the college students dealing with relationship struggles, rest of the week. “I love working with teens,” depression and anxiety. Before testing for her Soares-Dabalos said. “I’ve focused on teens for 13 years now, ever since licensing exams Soaresmy first job out of grad school as a Dabalos earned 3,000 Residential Family Therapist for a client-contact hours at a group home for severely group home for teen girls.” The psychotherapist graduated emotionally disturbed teen from Colusa High School in 1984 girls. She then became a and took four years off before supervisor for a child abuse pursuing further education. She prevention program where graduated from CSU Sacramento in she taught bonding and 1994 with a degree in psychology and attachment to parents of a minor in philosophy, completed her newborns. Finally, the therapist Master’s degree three years later in began working at Catholic Marriage Family Child Counseling. “I hope to offer Colusa County residents, middle school and high school kids primarily, a place to get counseling services without having to travel to Yuba City and/or Chico,” Soares-Dabalos said. “I’ve spoken to LICENSED ESTHETICIAN some of the health care professionals in the area and they tell me how pleased they are to have another therapist close by to refer their BY APPOINTMENT ONLY patients.” Besides working with adolescents, 430 Market Street • Suite E Soares-Dabalos’ also focuses on Colusa, CA 95932 • 530-682-7262 empowering women to assert jonellebernard@yahoo.com themselves, as well as fathers of teen girls who want to better understand their daughters. “I’ve always been quite fascinated by people’s stories,” she said. “I’m very curious by nature. From day one, I fell in love with the counseling profession. There is such joy when a client tells me s/he learned something they can use for the rest of their lives because of their time in session with me.” Soares-Dabalos began her profession while still in graduate school, interning for Dyer-Kelly Elementary School in Sacramento. She worked with kids on issues such

By ELIZABETH KALFSBEEK

W

Skin Care by Jonelle Jonelle Johnson Bernard

All Waxing & Body Treatments

TROUGHTON TAKES THIRD TITLE WINS AGAIN!

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im Troughton of Maxwell was best in show for the third straight year at the third Colusa Farm Show Commodity Cook-Off. She was happy to accept the $500 award this year for her cream-of-mushroom and wild-rice soup. She intends now to retire from the competition to lend her expertise as a judge of the event next year. Although the dishes had to include California-grown rice and/or nuts, Troughton opted to stay really close to home for best-of-show ingredients. Her recipe featured locally grown, organic long-grain rice from David Carvalho and milled by Polit Farms in Maxwell. To secure her place as Best of Show, Troughton placed first in the maincourse division with Spanish-ricestuffed taco mini-sliders, first in the wild-rice division with the mushroom soup and first in the side-dish division with a pineapple rice pilaf named "Kim's Fried Rice," after Kim Davis, who gave her the recipe. Michelle Jewitt won first place and $100 for her fennel salad with orange vinaigrette, served with mandarin oranges, slivered almonds and mint. Bernice Dommer placed second in the side-dish division with a pistachio rice pilaf, and Cheri White placed second in the wild-rice division with wildrice-stuffed Cornish game hens. Colusa Casino Resort food and beverage manager Greg Hankins, Colusa Casino Resort chef supervisor Bill Camp, Kathleen Rocha of Chef Colus, and Miss Colusa County Anastasia Cristler judged the competition. Prize money for this year’s cookoff was provided by J. Nair Media & Photography and the Colusa Casino Resort. Umpqua Bank sponsored aprons and potholders for each contestant, Lundberg Family Farms sponsored wild rice for contestants, and Picket Fence Antiques offered prize money for the Dutch- oven division, but there were no Dutchoven entries. Troughton said she was surprised that there weren’t Dutch-oven cookers participating. “I thought there would be a line of Dutch ovens going when I arrived here this morning,” she said. “We need to rethink the timing of this event a little,” said Carolan Meek, chief executive officer of the Colusa County Fair. Meek said having the cook-off in the middle of the week on a work day may be limiting the participation. There were only four contestants this year. “We will consider moving this event to the Colusa County Fair,” she said. “Maybe we would get more participation as a Sunday afternoon event.” Overall attendance at this year’s Farm Show was a little down; about 30,000 attended over the threeday run. Vendor participation was up, however, and, according to Meek, the nearly 270 vendors were pleased.


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GIVE A DAY OF VOLUNTEER SERVICE IN 2010, GET A DAY OF DISNEY THEME PARK FUN – FREE Disney Parks Hopes to Inspire 1 Million Volunteers Disney Parks announced a new program that celebrates the spirit of volunteer service with a simple proposition: “Give a Day, Get a Disney Day.” Disney hopes to inspire families to volunteer in their communities during 2010 through this first of its kind program. One million people who perform volunteer service for a participating organization will receive a free one-day admission ticket to a Walt Disney World Resort or Disneyland Resort theme park. While the “Give a Day, Get a Disney Day” program kicked off Jan. 1, guests can learn more about the program and how to get their free one-day admission to a Walt Disney World or Disneyland theme park by visiting www.DisneyParks.com (for the United States and Puerto Rico) or www.DisneyParks.ca (for Canada). In the past year, guests have been celebrating all sorts of special moments in their lives at Disney parks – from birthdays and anniversaries to reunions and graduations – as part of the “What Will You Celebrate?”

campaign. “In 2010, we want to recognize and add one more reason for celebration: the contributions people make to their communities every day,” said Jay Rasulo, chairman of Walt Disney Parks and Resorts. “We want to inspire 1 million volunteers – people who will invest time and energy to make their own communities and neighborhoods a better place.” To enable people to sign up for an eligible volunteer project, Disney is working with HandsOn Network, the nation’s largest volunteer network. Part of Points of Light Institute, HandsOn Network has 250 on-theground volunteer action centers across the country and connects volunteers to more than 70,000 nonprofit agencies that need their help. “Wherever we live, our communities need our hands-on help to thrive,” said Michelle Nunn, CEO of Points of Light Institute. “We are thrilled at this unprecedented effort by Disney Parks to help mobilize 1 million volunteers into action. ‘Give a Day, Get a Disney Day’ has the potential to

reach so many families and instill the volunteer spirit in a new generation.” Bob Iger, president and CEO of The Walt Disney Company, said, “ ‘Give a Day, Get a Disney Day’ fits perfectly with our long history of supporting and participating in volunteer efforts. It’s a great way to honor guests who are making a positive contribution to their communities.” Guests can go to www.DisneyParks. com for the United States and Puerto Rico or www.DisneyParks. ca for Canada to search for volunteer opportunities available in those areas through HandsOn Network and sign up for a day of volunteer service. Many of the opportunities will be for projects that entire families can participate in together. To raise awareness for grass-roots community volunteerism and the “Give a Day, Get a Disney Day” program, Disney VoluntEARS joined local volunteers in cities across the United States and Canada today. Work projects involving 1,000 volunteers were coordinated by HandsOn Network in Atlanta,

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Chicago, Los Angeles and Miami, and across Canada – in Toronto, Montreal, Halifax and Vancouver. Southwest Airlines has partnered with Disney in an effort to raise awareness and inspire people to volunteer. “Southwest Airlines strives to make a positive difference in the communities we serve, from protecting the environment to supporting a local cause,” said Linda Rutherford, vice president of Communications and Strategic Outreach, Southwest Airlines. “Southwest employees give back both locally and nationally through volunteerism, with individual and personal efforts, serving together as teams or through companywide efforts. The opportunity with Disney unites two companies that are devoted to the spirit of volunteerism.” Impact Colusa County is one local organization who is participating in the program.They have many volunteer opportunities to choose from. To learn more about the program and the different ways to volunteer visit www.GiveADayGetADisneyDay. com.

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WILLIAMS PIONEER REVIEW

FEBRUARY 19, 2010 - MARCH 5, 2010

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DEPARTAMENTO DEL SHERIFF DEL CONDADO DE COLUSA El departamento del Sherff ’s del condado de Colusa recientemente premio en $ 23,000 en equipo para cinco diferentes departamento de botes y de caminos de agua. En conjunto de esta gran cantidad de equipo, el departamento del Sheriff ’s, también ha proporcionado con una cantidad a el oficial del departamento de tiempo parcial de seguridad de botes. Actualmente existe únicamente un solo oficial de seguridad de monitoreo en bote en el condado de Colusa. Este oficial de tiempo parcial trabaja de Abril a Septiembre, para ayudar durante la temporada ocupada del río de Sacramento. El equipo de buzos servirá al condado de Colusa con énfasis en cuerpos lentos de agua como en la reserva del Este del Parque, Letts Lake, y los más grandes canales dentro del valle y en algunas partes del rio de Sacramento y el Butte Creek, los dos últimos considerados “ aguas muy cambiantes”. Los últimos pocos años hemos tenido que depender de otras agencias de fuera, el Lt. Shane Maxey nos dijo, ellos se han prestado muy bien, pero

si no tenemos nuestro propio equipo, tenemos que acomodarnos al horario de las otras agencias. El equipo de buceo responderá, a los rescates, ala recuperación de cuerpos, a la búsqueda de evidencia y recuperación de propiedad, así como vehículos robados, y todo lo que se relaciones con el desarrollo en el agua. (El equipo de buceo) nos dará un adicional recurso en la comunidad y estoy desenado con esto que disminuya el tiempo de respuesta, en las emergencias nos comento), Maxey, “Si alguna tragedia ocurre afortunadamente este será un rescate y no una recuperación de cuerpo”). Los miembros de buceo todavía no están determinados, pero la opción está abierta a todos los Sheriffs, del condado de Colusa. El entrenamiento comenzara en Yuba City , con el propósito en la instrucción en el nado en alberca y después en la certificación de buceo en el océano. No todos los cinco buzos serán entrenados al mismo tiempo, debido a recursos del personal. Tomara adicional e intensivo entrenamiento para enfocarse en los ríos, si es que escogemos ir a esta ruta

pues esta agua es considerada muy cambiante. El condado de Colusa usualmente tenía un equipo de buceo en el 1990. En este tiempo, los miembros de buceo traían su propio equipo. De acuerdo con Maxey, los oficiales se retiraron y nunca se volvió a llenar esta posición. Mientras muchas personas han mostrado interés en estar en el equipo de buceo, ningún personal desea hacer este gasto de comprarse el equipo ellos mismos, el cual es costoso. El delegado Mike Bradwell, de la seguridad de botes del condado de Colusa, aplico por este dinero del departamento de los caminos de agua y de bote. Los fondos todavía serán recibidos, para comprar lo necesario de equipo para los buzos. El equipo de buceo y el oficial de tiempo parcial ayudaran al Sheriff ’ de Colusa y a su departamento a ser mas, activos y no a tener que esperar a reaccionar en los casos de accidentes en el agua. La más grande ayuda es que el público sea y se conduzca seguro, poniéndose los equipos de seguridad, manteniendo sus ojos en los niños y usando el sentido común.

COMISIONADO ADJUNTO CHP RAMONA PRIETO TIENE IMPRESIONANTES LIDERAZGO REGISTRO Que es lo que inspiro Ramona, “Mona” Prieto, la Asistente del Comisionado del la Policía de Autopistas, el ingresar a esta organización desde hace mas de tres décadas atrás? La respuesta es corta, las motocicletas. “Yo admiraba al departamento de Policía de Autopista, al renombrado programa de Motocicletas, y fervientemente quería ser un oficial en motocicleta, nos menciono Prieto. “ Yo escogí esta carrera por la independencia, la responsabilidad y la contabilidad.” A principios de sus comienzos en esta profesión, Prieto se enfoco en el cumplimiento del cumplimiento en el trafico, convirtiéndose en la primer oficial mujer de motocicleta en la historia de la Policía de Autopistas (CHP)—rompiendo con 51 años de tradición del sexo masculino al ser los únicos oficiales en motocicleta en las autopistas.. Ella manejo para el CHP en el centro de la ciudad de Los Ángeles por más de cinco anos. Ahora con más de 30 años de experiencia, Prieto es señalada como la primer asistente mujer del Comisionado en la historia del CHP, dos años atrás. Durante el desempeño de su profesión, ella dirigió siete comandos en siete deferentes ramas y opero tres diferentes grupos de personal, haciendo su camino hacia el avance de su rango de cadete, hacia el Asistente del Comisionado. En su actual rol, el Comisionado

provee, el ejecutivo nivel de vigilancia al oficial de la academia, la oficina de entrenamiento y desarrollo de la organización, la oficina de la comunidad y el alcance del reclutamiento, y la oficina de la relación con la prensa todo esto está bajo la dirección del comisionado y el asistente del comisionado. Desde esta posición el asistente del jefe revisa las operaciones de estas cuatro importantes organizaciones. “El trabajo de la policía es bien recompensado y muy desafiante profesión”, nos dijo Prieto, “No importa lo que escojas para hacer en la vida, mantente enfocado en tus metas y nunca te des por vencido. Siempre pregúntate a ti mismo, cuál será el impacto que lograre? Qué cosas positivas contribuiré con mi misión?” Prieto a conseguido varios campeonatos incluyendo el del más seguro oficial, el trabajar en un lugar de violencia para la prevención de esta, el envolvimiento con la comunidad, y el de tener varias resoluciones en problemas de seguridad. Ella también se ha envuelto en el planeamiento y en los esfuerzo del manejo de diferentes programas especializados a lo largo del estado”. Acompañando todo esto atreves de su carrera le acompañan numerosos premios de la división de comando del CHP, premios de la comunidad, también por la colaboración del (Las mujeres que se dedican a promover la paz de

la asociación de oficiales, así como el logro de sus logros profesionales, y el del LAPD de especiales operaciones de liderazgo. Adicionalmente a esto Prieto pertenece a varias asociaciones de la Policía.) Prieto a conseguido varios logros y nos dice que el más grande de sus retos es trabajar a lo largo del estado con pocos recursos. El comisionado nació en San Francisco y ha trabajado en San Francisco, Los Ángeles y Sacramento. Después de sus estudios secundarios, Prieto trabajo cinco trabajos parciales, para poder ponerse en colegio de San Francisco y graduarse con el título en Asociado en Artes y Administración de Justicia. Después de integrarse al las fuerzas del CHP, ella continuo su educación y recibió su licenciatura en Artes y Administración Publica del UC San Francisco, y el doctorado en liderazgo del Colegio de Saint Mary’s en Moraga. La Comisionado Prieto es también graduada de la Universidad del Northwestern de Police Staff and Command, y ha recibido certificación en compensación al trabajador del UC Davis. De acuerdo con prieto su más notable logro es ser la mama de 5 ninas y abuela de ocho nietos, y la esposa del Sheriff del condado de Yolo, Ed Prieto. Pero como es que balancea su vida personal con lo profesional? Tener un compañero comprensivo y que me apoya en todo ayuda muchísimo. Prieto dijo que de su esposo el Sheriff, Hay mucho en común entre nosotros, hemos trabajado juntos tanto tiempo y tenemos la misma pasión al público y el deseo de servir a la comunidad. Nuestras carreras comenzaron al mismo tiempo. Hemos tenido la oportunidad de compartir una increíble jornada.

DEL NORTE CLÍNICAS, INC. ESTÁ PATROCINANDO LA COMUNIDAD DE COLUSA REUNIÓN CON EL CONSULADO MÓVIL DE MÉXICO Del Norte Clínicas, Inc. está patrocinando la Comunidad de Colusa Reunión con el Consulado Móvil de México el 20 de febrero de 2010, Colusa High School ubicado en 901 Avenida Colus en Colusa. El Consulado de México estará ofreciendo su matrícula y los servicios de Pasaporte a la comunidad. Este es un servicio sumamente importante porque evita que la gente de tener que perder días de trabajo para obtener este importante servicio. The Clinics Del Norte, Inc. Clínica Móvil estará ofreciendo exámenes médicos gratuitos durante el evento y representantes de numerosas agencias de servicios sociales estarán presentes para proporcionar información valiosa sobre los servicios que se ofrecen a la comunidad. Además, habrá comida típica mexicana a precios razonables y sorteos de premios que se ganó. El Consulado sólo servirá para las personas con nombramientos. Por favor llame a 1-877-639-4835 para programar una cita para pasaportes o matrículas.


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