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the young son clarinet,flute,violin,percussion,piano,cello ! ! ! !

2014

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William Pearson


Performance Notes – General

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- The piece is in three sections and each section is 5 pages long. -  Pages are double sided, and the back side of each page has a B after it. (1B, 2B, 3B are the back sides of pages 1,2 and 3.) -  The score is read in both directions: o Front pages are read ‘normally.’ You play page 1, and you move on to page 2.
 o Back pages are not read in sequence. Meaning that after page 1, you do not play page 1B, but move on to 2. o Back pages are read ‘backwards.’ The music still reads from L to R, but page turns go in the opposite direction. -  Page turns are written into the score most of the time. (When they are not, simply turn the page like you normally would.) -  Written-in page turns are indicated by a boxed P, a horizontal line and an arrow indicating the movement of the page. o The horizontal line indicates how long the page turn should take, just like any other notation.

- The piece does not begin on page 1, it begins on page 11.
 o Here is the order of the pages starting from the beginning: 11-15, 14B-6B, 6-10, 9B-1B, 1-5
 o I’ve italicized the pages which are turned backwards.
 o In other words: you are playing the last third of the piece, and then are (musically) rewinding the score back to the second third, playing it, and then rewinding back to the first third and playing it.

- There is no conductor. I would strongly prefer that you don’t use any kind of time keeper. The piece is measured in seconds, but the specifics of the timestamp are much less important to me than having a continuous, comfortable temporal flow. The important thing is to have a feel for about how long each system lasts without having to count in your head. -  You will all be playing off of scores. o Pages 11-15 are split into two groups of three players: [Clarinet, Flute, Violin] and [Percussion, Piano, Cello] So each group will be cueing and playing off of each other, but will also be unaware of what the other group is doing. It is very possible that the groups will finish their 5 pages at slightly different times. This is OK.

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- When moving from a forward section to a backwards section (page 15 into page 14B, for example), there is always a way for everyone to get on the same page. In the case of page 15-14B, there is a held percussion note that can be used to bridge any time-gap there might be between the two groups.

- Backwards pages are always in full score, so you will always be able to cue each other and know what each other are playing on those pages.

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- The timestamp applies to each page, and seconds do not ‘accumulate’ across pages. -  Backwards pages are always 10 seconds each, while forwards pages last varying amounts of time. -  The violinist and the Percussionist each have to move during performance. Their second location is shown in bold italics on the chart below, and their approximate pathway indicated with dotted lines. - Stands should be placed as flat as possible in front of the performer. so that page turn directions can be seen by the audience. Stage Setup (arrows indicate direction you should be facing)!

Clar. Perc

Piano

Perc

Flute

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Cello

Violin Violin

Audience


Notes for Clarinet

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Multiphonics -

These two diffused diads require great air volume and almost no pressure.

If you are unable to hold a multi phonic for the indicated duration, simply keep re- instigating it, breathing freely within that time.

X noteheads are fingered, but without tone, only air sound.

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Notation -

Square noteheads are only air sound.

The || clef indicates “pitch� of air sound.

Higher up on this staff indicates a bright, brilliant tone, while lower on this staff indicates a dark, dull tone.

Arrows from x-noteheads to regular noteheads indicate gradual change from air to tone, or the other way around.

Triangular, hollow wedges indicate an audible inhalation.

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Notes for Flute

X noteheads are fingered on the indicated pitch, but without tone, only air sound.

Square noteheads are only air sound.

The || clef indicates “pitch” of air sound. Higher up on this staff indicates a bright, brilliant tone, while lower on this staff indicates a dark, dull tone.

The dotted line above the staff indicates continuous, free, meandering whistle tones.

Arrows from x-noteheads to regular noteheads indicate gradual change from air to tone, or the other way around.

Triangular, hollow wedges indicate an audible inhalation.

Notes for Violin and Cello

Notation -

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X noteheads are fingered on the indicated pitch, but muted with the left hand, and should have no or very little pitch.

Triangular, hollow wedges indicate an audible inhalation.

The bridge clef indicates movement of the bow up and down (not across the strings) the strings, in relation to the bridge. Playing on the bridge is indicated on this clef as any line parallel to the drawing of the bridge, below the staff.

Perforated notation:

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Perforated notation always takes place on the bridge clef, and involves using a heavy scratch-like pressure to create a ‘perforated sound’. The sound may be inconsistent, but should be continuous.


Notation in parentheses should be played as soon as the page is turned, and then held, waiting for some other action to take place.

“After 3 pitches” or “After 2 pitches,” etc, indicates that the performer should wait until they hear that number of pitches come from the piano, and then move on to the next parenthetical notation. The number of pitches is not cumulative, but refers only to the space between one parenthesis and another.

The violinist must move during the performance. This is indicated on the score, and the pathway of movement is indicated on the stage setup chart above. The violinist moves to a position looking over the shoulder of the pianist, and uses the pianist’s score for the remainder of the piece. The violinist is responsible for all page turns from that point on. Movement should be slow, but not dramatically inflected.

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Notes for Piano

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Notation -

Triangular, hollow wedges indicate an audible inhalation.

Figures in boxes are repeated as indicated. If these figures are pitches, they should not exactly ‘mimed,’ but should be played without many pitches coming through. Key noise, or noise from the action of the piano is encouraged. Fractions accompanying these boxes (1/10, 1/20, etc) indicate how often you should attempt to strike a key which sounds - one out of every ten pitches, etc. These are not meant to be precise, but give you an indication of how silent these passages should be.

A piano with a loud action, loud pedals, etc is preferred over a piano with excellent tone.

Pedaling should always be audible and percussive.

X noteheads indicate pitches which should be depressed silently and held.

The Pedal should be depressed whenever it is not precisely indicated.

Vertical dashes over the top note of the piano indicate gripping the tip of this key and shaking it up and down - no pitch, just the sound of the action moving.

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Notes for Percussion Notation -

Top line - 2nd from top line - 3rd from top line -

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High nipple gong Mid nipple gong Low nipple gong

Pitches of the gong are not important, other than that they should not be triadic. Gongs should be played with hard mallets.

Bottom space -

Space under the staff -

The thunder sheet and bass drum should also be played with mallets, the exact type I’ll leave to your discretion.

The only exception to this is indicated by a dot in the circle of the bass drum notation:

The gongs and thunder sheet should be hung on a rack like this, with the bass drum beside it.

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Thunder sheet Bass drum

This dotted circle indicates that you should use the tips of an open wire brush to tap the surface of the bass drum. The effect should resemble rain falling on a surface.

Low

Mid

Thunder Sheet

High

Bass Drum


The position of this rack on stage is indicated on the stage setup chart with a line separating the percussionist, pianist and cellist from the Clarinetist and Flautist. The rack and the face of the bass drum should be parallel to this line and to each other.

The rack should be covered by a sheet. The sheet’s purpose is both to dull the sound of the percussion, but also to create a more solid wall between the pianist and the winds.

The percussionist must move during the performance. This is indicated on the score, and the pathway of movement is indicated on the stage setup chart above. At the point indicated on the score, the percussionist removes the sheet from the rack, walks to the far side of the piano, opens the lid, lays the sheet inside the piano, folds it up snuggly over the exposed strings near the keyboard, and closes the lid. The metaphor here is that you are “tucking in” the piano. It is not important how consistently you mute the strings with the sheet, though this muting is a desired effect of the “tucking in.” All actions should be slow and deliberate, but not especially dramatically inflected.

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…Yet no w a wonder would shoot up, all one color, and virtues would jostle each other to get a vie w of nothing—the cro wded house, two faces glued fast to the mir ror, cor ners and the bustling forest ever pre paring, ever menacing its o wn shape with a shado w of the evil defenses gotten up and in fact already exhausted in some void of darkness, some kingdom he kne w the earth could not even bother to avoid if the minutes ar ranged and divine letter men with smiling cries were to come in the evening of administration and night which no cure, no bird ever more compulsor y, no subject apparentl y intent on its heart’s o wn demon would forestall even if the tr uths she told of were no w being seriousl y lit, one by one,in the hushed and fast darkening room.

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John Ashbery - from T he Young Son


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1B


2


2B


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3B


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4B


5


5B


6


6


6 B


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7


7B


8


8


8B


9


9


9B


10


10


10B


11


11


11B


12


12


12B


13


13


13B


14


14


14B


15


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Ending Addendum for the young son (2017) This is a work for pianist and assistant. The pianist will have their eyes closed and their head down on the piano for the entire work. This piece works like a game of ‘Simon.’ The assistant will have a set of 8 chords and a set of 8 corresponding patterns: 120

120

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The assistant, standing to the right of the pianist, will begin by playing the first chord in any of the upper octaves, holding the keys down as the pianist finds the same chord with their right hand. (Remember, the pianist is working only by ear and by touch) As the pianist finds the chord, the assistant will trace, on the back of the pianist’s hand, the pattern assigned to 9that chord. The pianist will then play the chord with the pattern 120 applied. For example, the first chord will be played by the pianist like this:

After the pianist plays that chord with the pattern applied, the assistant will continue by playing the first and second chord, holding the second chord so that the pianist can find it, and then tracing the first and second patterns on the pianist’s hand. The pianist would then play 9 this:

This continues in the same manner (1, 1 + 2, 1-3, 1-4, 1-5… 1-8) until all 8 chords are played in sequence by the assistant, then all 8 patterns traced on the back of the pianist’s hand by the assistant, and then all 8 chords played again with patterns applied by the pianist. If the pianist makes a mistake, they will play a low cluster with their left hand. The pianist will then play a little extra music, and then ‘wake up’ suddenly, ending the piece.

the young son by William Pearson  

For Flute, Clarinet, Violin, Cello, Piano, and Percussion. (2014)

the young son by William Pearson  

For Flute, Clarinet, Violin, Cello, Piano, and Percussion. (2014)

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