Jewell Magazine Fall 2019

Page 1

the MAGAZINE of WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

PAGE 18

ALUMNI VOICES on EQUIT Y & JUS TICE C h r i s to p h e r Ca r r, Kim b e rl y F l o w e rs , C h r i s Ro s s o n , Lil ia To s o n

10 Al u m n i Fe a t u re ROY ABDO

14 Fa c u l t y P ro f il e THE JOY AND WONDER OF PAT SCHOENRADE

16 P ro g ra m Hig h l ig h t THE HONORS INSTITUTE IN CRITICAL THINKING

Fall 2019


the MAGAZINE of WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

Editorial CARA DAHLOR ANDREW NASH Design S P R I N G B OA R D C R E AT I V E Contributors J A E LY N N E L L I S O N R I VAS P H OTO G R A P H Y DON I POCK PHOTOGR APHY Editorial Board B L A N E B A K E R , ’8 6 , Professor of Physics

S H A N N O N E R N S T , ’1 8 , Office of Admission

A N D R E A M E L O A N , ’9 9 ,

Director of Alumni Relations

C L A R K M O R R I S , ’9 1 , Vice President for

Institutional Advancement

B ERT STOU FFER , ’ 91 ,

Alumni Board of Governors President

SUSAN TIDEMAN,

Associate Vice President for Institutional Advancement

Co v e r: C h r i s R o s s o n , ’0 6

24 The Haug

Jewell Magazine is published by the William Jewell College Office of Marketing and Public Relations, 500 College Hill, Liberty MO 64068. Send address changes and alumni updates to alumni@william.jewell.edu or 816.415.7831.

family legacy: John, Grace and Olivia


IN THIS ISSUE

Fall 2019

IN THIS ISSUE 10   A L U M N I F E AT U R E o n  R O Y A B D O , ’ 0 8

18

p.10

ALUMNI VOICES with   C H R I S T O P H E R C A R R , ’ 0 8 K I M B E R LY F L O W E R S , ’9 9 C H R I S R O S S O N , ’0 6 L I L I A T O S O N , ’0 7

26  55 SEASONS of the   H A R R I M A N - J E W E L L SERIES

p.26

Mark Morris Dance Group

4

P R E S I D E N T ’ S

2 4 L E G A C Y FA M I LY

6

A R O U N D T H E H I L L

2 8 COOL CLASS

NOTE BOARD OF TRUSTEES CAMPUS NEWS

9 Q U OTA B L E 1 2 FAC U LT Y AWA R D F I N A L I S T S 1 4 FAC U LT Y P R O F I L E

P AT R I C I A S C H O E N R A D E

1 6 PROGRAM SPOTLIGHT

THE HONORS INSTITUTE

2 3 JOURNEY BACK

HAUG SIBLINGS

CRITICAL CARE NURSING

3 0 C A R D I N A L AT H L E T I C S D O U G L A S E L LY , te n n i s

E D D I E H O R N , m e n’s s o c ce r C H U C K L L I T E R A S , fo o t b a l l

C H R I S M c C A B E , men’s basketball

3 2 G R A D U AT E H I G H L I G H T S CLASS OF 2019

3 4 CL ASS N OTES/I N M EM O RIAM

F I R S T-Y E A R T R A D I T I O N S

FALL 2019

3


PRESIDENT’S NOTE

B o a r d o f Tr u s t e e s

A Tr ib u te to O u r Tr u s te e s

O ne of my favorite topics to discuss with alumni and friends D r. E l i z a b e t h MacLeo d Wall s, President

is Jewell’s superb Board of Trustees. Comprised of notable alumni and Kansas City civic leaders, the Jewell Board represents the best of engaged and thoughtful governance. During my tenure as President, I have had the privilege of recruiting a number of Trustees on behalf of the Board. Our Committee on Trustees uses criteria related to skillset, diversity, philanthropic commitment and belief in our Mission to identify dynamic leaders capable of guiding Jewell toward

Jewell’s Board of Trustees brings a broad range of experiences and perspectives to bear on the challenges and opportunities for the College. Their genuine, shared commitment to Jewell’s continued excellence and relevance in Kansas City makes me ver y excited for Jewell’s future.

a bright future. Through the leadership of our Board over the past three years, we have established new Mission, Values, and Philosophy Statements; a new Strategic Plan; and donor-funded campus improvements designed to enhance the student experience. Board-led Task Forces on Athletics, Enrollment and Marketing, and Programmatic Development also have affirmed our commitment to the student-athlete experience and improving competitiveness; the strategic linking of marketing with enrollment to maximize our reach; and the establishment of new programs designed to diversify our offerings and audiences. This coming year, the Board is launching a new Task Force on another crucial topic, the residential experience and student housing, led by Trustee Pat McCown. The Board’s leadership is galvanizing our Jewell community— and placing before us opportunities to embrace innovation with an eye to long-term growth. I am honored to work alongside these inspiring leaders who have become such valuable members of our Jewell family.

SUSAN CHAMBERS, ‘90, BOARD CHAIR

4

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


BOARD OF TRUSTEES

W. Keith Pence,

Gary V. Ainsworth, ’82,

Professional, Leawood, Kansas

M a n a g i n g P a r t n e r, H a v a s G e m i n i , N e w Yo r k , N e w Yo r k

Gary D. Barnes, ’75,

Independent Civic and Social Organization

Sarah Fidler Rowland, C h a i r, L e a d B a n k , K a n s a s C i t y , M i s s o u r i

P a r t n e r, H u s c h B l a c k w e l l , K a n s a s C i t y , M i s s o u r i

Margo A. Shepard,

Brian G. Carney, ’96,

Ad v i s o rs, Mi s s io n Wo o d s, Kan s a s

F o u n d e r a n d C h i e f I n v e s t m e n t O f f i c e r, Bridgecreek Investment Management, Tu l s a , O k l a h o m a

M. Susan Chambers, ’90, Board Chair; Retired Executive Vice P r e s i d e n t a n d C h i e f H u m a n R e s o u r c e s O f f i c e r, Wa l m a r t In c., B e n to n v il l e, Ark an s a s

W. Russ Cline, Jr., ’71, P r e s i d e n t a n d F o u n d e r, R C A G r o u p , Lee’s Sum mit, Miss o ur i

William C. Gautreaux, ’85, P a r t n e r, M L P H o l d i n g s , K a n s a s C i t y , M i s s o u r i

Robert B. Gengelbach, ’69, Retired President, OXEA Corporation, D a l l a s , Te x a s

Jason L. Houseworth, ’96,

S e n i o r V i c e P r e s i d e n t- I n v e s t m e n t s , We l l s Fa r g o

Angela Andresen Smart, Vice P resident, Hall Family Foundation, Ka n s a s Ci t y, Mi s s o u r i

Bradley N. Sprong, ’86, Office Managing Partner and National Industry Ta x L e a d e r f o r P r i v a t e M a r k e t s G r o u p , K P M G , Ka n s a s Ci t y, Mi s s o u r i

Dawn Akers Stout, ’93, Senior Vice President, Chief Compliance Officer a n d S e c r e t a r y , F l u o r, D a l l a s , Te x a s

Qiana F. Thomason, Vice President of Community Health, Blue Cross a n d B l u e S h ie l d , Ka n s a s Ci t y, Mi s s o u r i

Todd E. White, ’85, S u p e r i n t e n d e n t , B l u e Va l l e y S c h o o l s , O verland Park, Kansas

P re s i d e n t a n d C E O, Fa nT h re e S i x t y,

Richard M. Wright, Jr., ’78,

Ka n s a s Ci t y, Mi s s o u r i

President and CEO, Gilmore Bell,

Steven M. Karbank,

Ka n s a s Ci t y, Mi s s o u r i

C h a i r, K a r b a n k R e a l E s t a t e C o m p a n y ,

Craig C. Zahnd, ’89,

Mi s s io n Wo o d s, Kan s a s

Managing Director and General Counsel –

Jason O. Klumb, ’90,

Am e r i c a s R e g io n , S w i s s R e i n s u ra n c e Co m p a n y, Ka n s a s Ci t y, Mi s s o u r i

At to r n e y, Ka n s a s Ci t y, Mi s s o u r i

Aimée G. Larrabee, President, Inland Sea Productions, O verland Park, Kansas

ADVISORY TRUSTEES

Jonathan M. Kemper, B o a r d , Co m m e r c e B a n c s h a r e s I n c ., K a n s a s C i t y, M i s s o u r i

Patrick J. McCown,

Helmar E. Nielsen, ‘58,

R e t i r e d P r e s i d e n t , C E O a n d C o f o u n d e r,

R e t i r e d E x e c u t i v e a n d E n t r e p r e n e u r, S t . P e t e r s b u r g , F l o r i d a

M c Co w n G o r d o n Co n s t r u c t i o n , K a n s a s C i t y, M i s s o u r i

David F. Oliver, A t t o r n e y , B e r k o w i t z O l i v e r, K a n s a s C i t y , M i s s o u r i

William D. Snyder, ‘62, Retired, Kan sa s State Universit y Fo o tball Coach, Manhattan, Kansas

FALL 2019

5


AROUND THE HILL

Campus News

Ca m p u s Ne ws

PUBLISHED RESEARCH

A Jewell Department of Biology research paper published in the Journal of Neurochemistry has wide implications in neurogenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and ALS. Tana Pottorf, ’18, served as lead author of “Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Adenylyltransferase 2 maintains neuronal structural integrity through the maintenance of golgi structure.” Co-authors were Alexis Mann, Shaneann Fross, Clayton Mansel and Dr. Bhupinder Vohra, Monte Harmon Chair of Biology. Pottorf plans to pursue an M.D. or Ph.D. and currently works in the University of Kansas Kidney Institute researching ciliary defects and how they relate to polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and obesity.

ERIC BLAIR JOINS CABINET

Following a national search, Jewell named Eric Blair, ’01, as its founding vice president of enrollment and marketing. Blair had served at Park University since 2002 in a variety of leadership roles, including Eric B l a i r, ‘ 0 1

residence life coordinator, assistant dean of student life, executive director of enrollment and most recently as associate vice president for enrollment management. He holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Jewell and a master’s degree in public affairs from Park.

ENGINEERING LAB

A new geotechnical and civil engineering materials laboratory on the lower level of Mathes Hall allows students to test and characterize the properties of aggregate, soils, concrete and metals. This new space, in addition to an environmental hydraulics laboratory and a computer laboratory in White Science Center, builds on the program’s emphasis in four areas, including environmental, geotechnical, water resources and structural engineering. Jewell’s first civil engineering class will graduate in May 2020.

6

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

Opened in January 2019


WELCOME NEW TRUSTEES » G ary Ainsworth, ’82, is managing

partner of Havas Gemini, a health care marketing company in New York City. He has held executive management positions in medical advertising, consulting,

Caeley Pittman

data companies and pharmaceuticals. Ainsworth serves as chair of Jewell’s Football Advisory Committee. » B ill Gautreaux, ’85, rejoins the board.

A partner with MLP Holdings, he serves a number of civic causes, including as chair of the Civic Council of Greater Kansas City and a trustee at Pembroke Hill School, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art and Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art. » A imée Larrabee of Kansas City is an

G O L D WAT E R S C H O L A R

Caeley Pittman, senior physics and Oxbridge Literature and Theory major, was named a 2019 Goldwater Scholar.

Emmy Award-winning journalist and

The preeminent undergraduate scholarship

president of Inland Sea Productions.

is awarded to students planning research

Her career includes print, film and inter-

careers in natural sciences, mathematics

pretive exhibit work for America’s lead-

and engineering. Pittman, who wants to

ing institutions such as the Smithsonian,

pursue a Ph.D. in astrophysics, studied

National Archives, PBS National Program

at Oxford University her junior year and

Service and USA Today.

conducted astronomy research with

» H elmar Nielsen, ’58, is a retired executive,

data from Galaxy Zoo. This summer,

entrepreneur and multi-patent owner. He

she received a prestigious Research

holds a law degree from Boston University

Experience for Undergraduates in

and is a longtime trustee of Eckerd College

Switzerland at CERN, the European

in St. Petersburg, Florida, where the Helmar

Organization for Nuclear Research.

and Enole Nielsen Center for Visual Arts

She spent last summer at Maria Mitchell

opened in 2018.

Observatory in Massachusetts, focusing

» B ill Snyder, ’62, is a new advisory trustee.

on an optical process to discover interme-

The retired football coach led Kansas

diate-mass black holes. Pittman presented

State University to 19 of the school’s 21

her research at the American Astronomical

bowl appearances, is a three-time national

Society meeting in Seattle and won

coach of the year and is a member of the

a Chambliss Astronomy Achievement

College Football Hall of Fame.

Student Award.

FALL 2019

7


Campus News

AROUND THE HILL

CENTER FOR

The Sunderland Foundation provided a $5 million lead gift for construction of a new Center for

FITNESS

athletics, student recreation and college and community events.

SPORTS AND

Sports and Fitness. The $20 million facility will serve as a multiuse space for NCAA Division II The Center for Sports and Fitness will be built near the campus entrance, adjacent to the existing Greene Stadium. A new press box and stadium bleachers are in store for the football and soccer stadium, while the two-story facility will include competition and practice courts for basketball and volleyball, a performance gymnasium, locker rooms, a fitness center, offices, an event terrace, classrooms and concessions. The Mabee Center will continue to serve Cardinal athletics and the community for swimming, athletic training, practices and recreational use.

photo by Chad Jolly, ' 94

C O N C E R T C H O I R N AT I O N A L R E C O G N I T I O N

H I L L S I D E B E A U T I F I C AT I O N

The Concert Choir was awarded second place

Jewell and the City of Liberty cut the ribbon

for the American Prize in Choral Performance in

in May on a reimagined hillside. The project

the College/University Division. Jewell joined

enhanced the usability and appearance of the

finalists representing some of the top choral

west side of campus while strengthening the

programs in the country, including the world-

physical connection between Jewell and Historic

renowned choirs from Westminster Choir College and Indiana University. Founded in 2009, the American Prize is a series

8

Downtown Liberty. The renovation included a new grand staircase from Jewell Hall to Jewell Street, a new brick façade at the base and a paved walking path—complete with restored limestone col-

of nonprofit, national competitions to recognize

umns—connecting the west side of campus with

and reward the best-performing arts in the

the east behind Marston Hall. The project, which

country. Jewell’s Concert Choir, directed by

may include future phases, was made possible

Dr. Anthony Maglione, also received second

through the vision of Jonathan Kemper and an

place in the 2015-2016 competition.

investment by the William T. Kemper Foundation.

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


Q U OTA B L E

QUOTABLE “ L i b e r t y a n d W i l l i a m J e w e l l C o l l e g e h a v e g r o w n u p t o g e t h e r.

“ Fo r t h e r e i n l i e s t h e m e a n -

We h a v e l e a n e d o n o n e a n o t h e r f o r a l m o s t t w o c e n t u r i e s . O u r

i n g o f L o u i s A r m s t r o n g’ s

h i s t o r y, o u r f u t u r e a n d o u r l e g a c i e s a r e i n t e r t w i n e d . A n d l i k e

existence, and of my o wn

t h e s t r a n d s o f a r o p e , w h e n b r a i d e d t o g e t h e r, t h e r e i s s t r e n g t h

as well: He in his great way

a n d c a p a b i l i t y b e y o n d w h a t e a c h s t r a n d p o s s e s s e s .”

and I in my small one have tried to make e ver ything

LY N D E L L B R E N T O N , ’ 7 7 Libert y Mayor; Je well hillside dedication

m o r e b e a u t i f u l . Yo u k n o w w h a t ? I r e a l l y c a n’ t t h i n k of a better way to spend

“ Yo u c a n o n l y b e i n d i s p e n s a b l e i f y o u a d a p t a n d c h a n g e a n d

yo u r life. And th a t’s wh a t

g r o w w i t h t h e t i m e s . We c a n’ t g r o w, p r o s p e r a n d l i v e t o g e t h e r

I owe to Satchmo, to my

w i t h o u t t h a t k i n d o f t h i n k i n g .”

m o t h e r, t o m y t e a c h e r s a n d

KAREN DANIEL

owe to them all—to you all—

to William Je well College: I

F o r m e r C h a i r, G r e a t e r K a n s a s C i t y C h a m b e r B o a r d ; C F O , B l a c k a n d Ve a t c h (r e t i r e d )

m y w o n d e r f u l , b l e s s e d l i f e .” TERRY TEACHOUT, ’79

“No matter where you go, t h e r e y o u a r e . Yo u a r e t h e

“ We a r e r e m i s s i f w e a r e not intentional in using

Wa l l S t r e e t Jo u r n a l d ra m a c r i t i c, play wright, author; Achie vement Day Dinner address

accumulation of your acts

the po wer of architecture

in life, and where you are

and landscape in shaping

in the present is not by

the life of the college. This

accident because you put

is perhaps best ref lected

yo u rs el f th ere. In life, it’s

engin ee r ing rel a te d; it’s

b y Ch u rchill ’s s ta te m en t

really eas y to f ind a linear

no t ab o u t yo u; it’s ab o u t

“In our business, so many things are science related,

of the primal importance

solution. But what makes

o f a r c h i t e c t u r e : ‘ We s h a p e

people really successf ul…

our buildings, thereaf ter

is the abilit y to think

t h e y s h a p e u s .’ ”

c r i t i c a l l y, h a v e a g r e a t

of Kansas Health System; Vice

J O N AT H A N K E M P E R

Chancellor for Clinical Affairs,

R e p r e s e n t i n g t h e W i l l i a m T.

c h a l l e n g e t h e s t a t u s q u o .”

University of Kansas Medical

Kemper Foundation, sharing

Center; Achie vement Day

his vision of the Jewell hillside

CEO, McCownGordon

Convocation address

beautification project

Construction

w h a t y o u d o .” DR. STEVEN STITES, ’82 Executive Vice President and C h i e f M e d i c a l O f f i c e r, U n i v e r s i t y

sense of curiosity and

R A M I N C H E R A FAT

FALL 2019

9


A LU M N I F E AT U R E

Roy Abdo

LIVING THE

American Dream IN JULY 2006, LEBANON-

war with Israel that destroyed

LANDED IN AMERICA WITH

Beirut. Through a few contacts,

BORN ROY ABDO, ’08,

A CELL PHONE, A SUITCASE OF CLOTHES AND $30 IN

President David Sallee, who

ABDO OWNS A DIGITAL

scholarship and a plane ticket

MARKETING AGENCY IN

WASHINGTON, D.C., AND

IS AN AMERICAN CITIZEN.

“[Attending Jewell] was one of the best things I’ve done in my life. I’m so glad the professors

10

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

he connected with Jewell

HIS POCKET. MORE THAN A DOZEN YEARS LATER,

Abdo became an American citizen on Dec. 15, 2018.

the international airport in

offered him a one-semester to Kansas City. When Abdo arrived in July, a group of students welcomed him at the airport and gave him a ride to his new host family.

and staff are there to empower

“That was the foundation for

people like me to pursue the

what I knew about America and

dreams I had,” Abdo said.

what I love about America,”

In 2006, Abdo was a man

Abdo said. “Hollywood talks

without a way to get home.

about New York, Vegas, Miami

He had left Lebanon for Greece

and Los Angeles. But [the

on a three-week study abroad

Midwest] is what America

program when his home

really is. It’s how much someone

country erupted into a brief

cares about someone else they


don’t know from a country they

East Broadcasting. He led

don’t know.”

the company’s digital

After a semester at Jewell, Abdo

marketing presence.

attended Georgetown Univer-

A master’s degree would speed

sity with a paid internship and

up his application for a green

scholarship. He wanted to finish

card, and Abdo got accepted to

his degree, so he started a blog

Johns Hopkins University’s

recounting his experience and

MBA program. To fund the

linked it to a PayPal account.

program, he turned case studies

Within six weeks and help from the Jewell community, he raised more than $35,000 to help him finish his business administration degree at Jewell. While at Jewell, he took advantage of every opportunity. He was a member of organizations such as Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity and Students in Free Enterprise, and he worked in the library and interned with the Harriman-Jewell Series. “A liberal arts degree teaches you to seek questions rather than answers. You’re building character and the critical thinking mindset. That helps you question things, helps you build arguments and build compelling ideas,” Abdo said.

from coursework into consulting projects for businesses and nonprofits. That opened doors for him after graduate school, and he became a consultant for Gallup. Then he launched his own digital marketing agency, Digital Revamp, with a client list that includes Lyft, the U.S. Department of State, World Bank and more.

I was a stranger, broken and hungr y, but thirsty for an opportunity. An opportunity for a better future, an opportunity to build the life that I envisioned for myself. To execute my dreams of who I want to be. I was taken by surprise when I was welcomed by an amazing group of students. I wanted to live the American dream.

“I believe in the power of positivity. I’ve not been lucky. I worked very hard to be lucky,” Abdo said. “… Luck

ROY ABDO, ON ARRIVING

favors the prepared.”

IN AMERICA IN 2006

Despite facing numerous hurdles over more than a decade of effort, Abdo became an American citizen on Dec. 15, 2018. A post on LinkedIn describing his emotions went

He graduated in 2008 in the

viral, garnering more than

midst of a global financial

1.3 million views. “I’m proving

crisis. Abdo sent more than

the American Dream is still

1,000 messages via LinkedIn

alive. I’m living the American

that led to an opening at

Dream right now. I’m so happy

the Washington, D.C.-based

and grateful that I’m living

Voice of America Middle

this kind of life,” he said.

The Jewell community greeted Abdo at the airport when he arrived in America in 2006: Abdo, host parent Connie Burr; S a r a h ( B u r r) L a g e r g r e n , ’ 0 5 , ’ 0 7; E m i l y Wa l e s , ’07; a n d Na t h a n We in e r t, ’0 8 .

FA L L 2 0 1 9 11


FA C U LT Y AWA R D F I N A L I S T S

THE highest STUDENT HONOR tional. She also delved into an intensive study in human rights at Germany’s Hessen International Summer University as a Hall Family Foundation Summer Academic Enrichment Grant recipient. Thais Quiroga, Facult y Award Winner

While studying at Oxford during her junior year, Quiroga was named Visiting Student of the Year at Mansfield College. Last fall, she returned to the University of Oxford for an interview as a finalist for the inaugural Rhodes Global Scholarship. She was one of just 11 students worldwide selected. At Jewell, Quiroga co-founded the student group SINCE 1980, JEWELL FACULTY HAVE

PRESENTED THE FACULTY AWARD TO

International Student Association and Philosophy

OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND

zerland, where she is pursuing a master’s degree in

A GRADUATING SENIOR ON THE BASIS EXEMPLIFICATION OF THE HIGHEST

IDEALS OF A LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION.

MEET THE 2019 WINNER AND FINALISTS. THAIS QUIROGA, faculty award winner

Thais Quiroga wrote her honors thesis for international relations on child labor in Bolivia. It’s a topic that strikes close to home for the native of La Paz, Bolivia. Human rights, and particularly

12

Mi Gente and held officer roles in Mortar Board, Club. Now her passion has led her to Geneva, Switchildren’s rights at the renowned Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies. MEGAN ANDERSON, finalist

Meg Anderson, physics and Oxbridge History of Ideas major, believes in getting science out of the lab and into the public. That’s why she served as a science outreach volunteer at the Oxford

children’s rights and human trafficking, have

University Museum of Natural History during her

driven the Oxbridge History of Ideas and interna-

year of study at the University of Oxford.

tional relations major since an internship in her

This summer, she interned with the Society of

home country through Save the Children Interna-

Rheology at the American Institute of Physics in

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


Washington, D.C. She is the U.S. delegate to the

his head down and laughing,” Daniel said. “That

International Association of Physics Students

started so much work with singing I wasn’t

Conference in Cologne, Germany, this fall. In

expecting because Dr. Maglione saw that in me

addition, she’ll participate in Physics Congress

and took a chance.”

in Rhode Island.

While an Oxbridge music major studying at

Her undergraduate experiences also included

Oxford, Daniel met up with fellow members of

serving as a Cardinal Host and interning in mar-

Jewell’s Concert Choir for a tour of England

keting and data analysis with Barkley agency in

and Scotland. He participated in intensive

Kansas City. Her career interest involves address-

programs in both Iowa and Canada. One of his

ing ethical issues inherent in emerging technol-

compositions placed second in the national

ogies. First, she plans to work at an engineering

Choral Project Composition Competition. He’s

firm and attend graduate school.

also proud of serving in QUILTBAG, Lambda Chi Alpha and as the founding vice president

ANNA BORGERT, finalist

of Students for Mental Health. After a gap year, he

When Anna Borgert was younger,

will pursue graduate school.

she wanted to be an Egyptologist. Though her interests have broadened,

JACOB DICE, finalist

she got a chance to pursue those childhood

Jacob Dice has traveled across the

dreams through Jewell. The English and history major used a Journey Grant to take a two-week tour of Egypt, hearing lectures from world-renowned archaeologists and visiting the Ministry of Antiquities in Cairo. Borgert was a member of Symphonic Band and Jazz Band. She also held leadership roles in Sigma

country for Jewell. “I think the neatest thing to highlight of all the travel is they apply to different things. I had experience in business conferences through DECA, design thinking and robust problemsolving through University Innovation Fellows and cutting-edge research at PhysCon,” he said.

d i d y o u k n o w:

Phi Alpha Theta and Mortar Board. She plans to

Dice knew his professors even before he started

FAC U LT Y AWA R D

attend graduate school for museum studies at the

college thanks to the Pillsbury Summer Research

DR. ANDREW

University of Central Oklahoma, located in her

Program. Once at Jewell, he was a leader in

P R AT T, ‘ 8 1 , A

hometown of Edmond.

Student Senate, the Society of Physics Students

CABINET MEMBER

Alpha Iota, Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Lambda Delta,

JONATHAN DANIEL, finalist

and DECA, qualifying to compete at DECA’s international conference. He also completed majors in

When Jonathan Daniel auditioned

both economics and physics, gained professional

for musical scholarships in piano

experience as an intern at Blue Cross and Blue

performance, he decided to try voice

Shield of Kansas City and the Federal Reserve

as well. He’ll never forget how the voice audition

Bank, and graduated in just three years. Dice has

ended. “I sang two solos, and the second was a

joined the Federal Reserve in Kansas City as a

German drinking song. It started with a really

full-time research assistant and plans to pursue a

low first note. I remember Dr. Maglione putting

master’s degree in the near future.

THE FIRST

WI N N ER WAS

LONGTI M E JEWELL WHO IS NOW DEAN OF THE CHAPEL EMERITUS AND

SPECIAL COUNSEL

TO TH E PRES I D ENT FOR DIVERSITY

AND INCLUSION.

FA L L 201 9 13


FA C U LT Y P R O F I L E

D r. P a t r i c i a S c h o e n r a d e

The Joy and Wonder of Dr. Pat WHEN PROFESSOR PATRICIA SCHOENRADE DISCOVERED EARLY IN HER TEACHING CAREER THAT

as the research shaping the teacher.”

STUDENTS WEREN’T CALLING HER OFFICE PHONE

Schoenrade grew up in Detroit in the 1960s amid

BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T KNOW HOW TO PRONOUNCE

riots and racial integration. “That gave me opportu-

HER NAME—SHANE-ROD, FOR THE RECORD—SHE

nities to grow in ways I wouldn’t have otherwise.”

ELIMINATED THE COMMUNICATION BARRIER.

She became fascinated with people’s stories and

“Dr. Pat,” as she’s been known for three decades at Jewell, considers it a privilege to intersect with students.

discovered if she talked about them, she didn’t have to talk about herself. Combining that with a love of social science—understanding what connects

“I know what’s at stake at this phase in their lives,

people, questioning one’s biases and critically

the decisions they have to make. I don’t have great

thinking about conclusions—led her to the field

wisdom, but it’s an honor to be one of the people they come to,” she said.

14

been a process of shaping the researcher as well

of psychology. After earning a bachelor’s degree at Purdue University Fort Wayne, she completed a

How does a self-proclaimed “introvert who’s always

master’s and a doctorate at the University of Kansas.

talking” find her way to the head of a classroom?

In 1989 when interviewing at Jewell, she recalls the

“My career has been managed by the grace of

fit was—and remains—so clear. She found the stu-

God,” Schoenrade said. “Initially I wanted to study

dents to be respectful, the College to be a valuable

people; it was about me and what I wanted to do.

part of the community and faculty Dr. Ray Owens

Now, it’s about what I’m supposed to be doing and

and Dr. Robert Troutwine to be ahead of their

how I can contribute to the lives of students. It’s

time. In her tenure, faculty and student research

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


mentally ill. She also sponsors student papers and presentations for the annual meeting of the Society of the Scientific Study of Religion. Alex Saxon, ’09, a psychology major who is an actor on a network television series, remains in contact with the professor who influenced his journey. “By the end of my time at Jewell, I was at a crossroads in the pursuit of medicine, psychology or my nascent acting career,” he said. “She brought her daughter to one of my shows at the Coterie Theatre and shared with me the experience. In so doing, she encouraged my unique path, in ways, legitimizing the pursuit as no less honorable than that of the M.D. or Ph.D. for which I had been preparing.” Psychology and Spanish major Grace (Miller) Morrison, ’18, an analyst at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, said Schoenrade has a way of knowing what someone needs right then they need it. expanded and the field became more focused on science. Now, under the leadership of Dr. Keli Braitman, the program is named Psychological Science and is one of the largest on campus.

“She always made me feel like I belonged and had a friend,” Morrison said. “Dr. Pat was the professor who made me love psychology again. She made me believe I could complete an honors thesis my senior year and spent extra hours helping me. She wants to

Schoenrade has served as chair of the Institutional

teach you for life, not just for the next midterm test.”

Review Board since its inception, leading a team to

And at Morrison’s wedding last year, she said

review research involving human participants. One

Dr. Pat cheered as they walked down the aisle.

of her own interests is religious doubt and understanding how people find meaning in life. Another is her decades-long study of wonder—that moment we’re awed by something we can’t explain. “There’s something in that moment that connects with a larger meaning,” she said. “Wonder inspires us to investigate scientifically, but it also does much to enrich the human spirit.” Researching with students, both in a lab and

Students describe her as bubbly, caring, compassionate, uplifting and positive. “She signs every note and email with ‘joy’ and leads her life and teaching from that very place,” said Saxon. Schoenrade finds her own joy rooted in many

D R . PAT R I C I A

SCHOENRADE

IS IN HER 31ST

Y E A R AT J E W E L L .

I F YOU ’ D LI KE TO CO N N ECT, D RO P HER AN EMAIL.

» s c h ro e n ra d p @ w i l l i a m .j e w e l l .e d u

places, such as spending time with her children and grandson, her 96-year-old mother, her dogs and in nature. She serves in her church and mentors urban core youth through A Sistah’s Love. She

interviewing in the community, is treasured work.

also enjoys hearing from former students.

She loves serving the Clay County Developmen-

“I love seeing the way they took what they learned

tal Disabilities Resource Board and getting stu-

from Jewell and actively integrated it into doing

dents involved with day programs for the chronic

good for others,” she said.

FA L L 2 0 1 9 15


PROGR AM SPOTLIGHT

The Honors Institute

INTRODUCING JE WELL’S NE W HONORS INS TITUTE IN FALL 2020, JEWELL WILL

Developed under the leadership of

Jewell experience and is designed

FELLOWS IN THE HONORS

Dr. Keli Braitman, associate professor

to fit within a four-year gradua-

of psychological science and chair, a

tion plan—even for double majors,

group of faculty undertook a year-

student-athletes and those in other

long exploration and development

co-curricular activities.”

process to craft an honors experience

With an honors course each

that is both high level and embedded

semester for two years, a practicum

in Jewell’s identity. The result is an

and a capstone, the Honors Institute

innovative and immersive program.

expands what students learn in

“We find that a number of incom-

the core curriculum through a

WELCOME ITS INAUGURAL INSTITUTE IN CRITICAL THINKING. WHILE OUR

LONGSTANDING FLAGSHIP

OXBRIDGE HONORS PROGRAM OFFERS MAJORS IN SIX

DISCIPLINES AND A YEAR OF STUDY IN OXFORD,

THE HONORS INSTITUTE

OFFERS A SECOND HONORS

OPTION THAT COMPLEMENTS

ing students want to be challenged beyond the demands of any one

and problem-based learning.

WORLD PROBLEM SOLVING.

curriculum,” said Dr. Maggie Sherer,

Dr. Mark Walters, professor of English

professor of physics and chair. “The

and chair, explains that while many

Honors Institute enhances the robust

honors programs delve deep into an

DISCIPLINARY AND REAL-

16

deeper study of critical thinking

ANY MAJOR WITH INTER-

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


area of study, Jewell’s Honors Institute

leadership, concern for the common

goes deep into critical thinking.

good and an informed ethic. During

“Our program is designed to develop critical ref lection and application, even at the personal level, teaching students to become aware of their own thoughts, responses and biases,” he said. “Ultimately, critical thinking should become a habit of being for these students rather than a toolbox from which they draw on occasion.”

PROGR AM COMPONENTS Each class of Fellows will advance through the program as a highly collaborative cohort. During the first two years, the focus is on coursework—about one class each semester—exploring what it means to be critical thinkers in community and its application within various disciplines. “We want to privilege cooperation rather than competition, and, therefore, humility, risk-taking, acknowledgment of error, collaboration and intellectual elasticity,” Walters said. This foundation prepares them for the junior year Honors Practicum. Guided by faculty and partnered with

the Honors Institute Capstone in the

HONORS PROGRAMS AT JEWELL

senior year, Fellows will ref lect on the practicum process and results, critique each other’s projects and share their experience in a public forum.

BECOMING A FELLOW Jewell faculty selects members of the Honors Institute from a holistic

C OMPLEMEN T S A NY M A JOR

review rather than identifying candidates solely through standardized test scores and high school achievements. A video submission about their critical thinking journey

A M A JOR IN 6 A RE A S OF S TUDY

and aspirations to be in the program is also part of the application process. Academically capable students who want to actively engage with ideas both in and out of the classroom and who value interdisciplinary

ACADEMIC HONORS AT JEWELL

approaches to thinking and problem solving will thrive as Fellows. “We’re looking for students seeking honors-level coursework who want to see things beyond one lens and who want to learn to think in a bigger way,” said Dr. Debbie Chasteen, professor of communication. “Employers

a community mentor, students will

tell us they want team members who

identify an issue they care deeply

can solve problems and think analyt-

about and spend the year working

ically, and Honors Institute Fellows

on the desired outcome. Dissecting

will be prepared to work in imagina-

a relevant, real-world problem will

tive ways with a high degree of inno-

incorporate elements of critical and

vation, divergent thinking and risk

creative thinking from multiple areas

taking. Graduates will find lifelong

of study and require responsible

benefits of the program.”

GR A DUATING WIT H HONORS

completion of a project within a d e c l a r e d m a j o r a n d a 3 . 5 G PA

GR A DUATING WIT H DIS TINC TION

completion of a project outside a d e c l a r e d m a j o r a n d a 3 . 5 G PA

SUMM A CUM L AUDE

3 . 9 - 4 . 0 G PA

M AGN A CUM L AUDE

3 . 8 - 3 . 8 9 9 G PA

F A L L 2 0 1 9 17


ALUMNI VOICES

Meaningful Change

In Pursuit of Access, Equity and Justice T h ro u g h J e w e l l ’s Cr i t i c a l T h o u g h t a n d I n q u i r y Co r e Curric ulum, st udents address c o m p l e x i s s u e s i n t h e w o rl d by asking three imp or tant question s: W hat is truth? W h a t c a n w e k n o w? a n d H o w s h o u l d w e l i v e? A number of students d e d i c a te t h e i r l i f e’s w o rk t o tackling these big question s. M e e t fo u r a l u m n i , d r i v e n b y personal experiences and p assion, who are living a meaningf ul life and creating meaningf ul change.

18

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


Ju s t i c e a n d E q u a l i t y fo r th e Po o r LILIA TOSON, ’07, A POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJOR, GRADUATED FROM NEW

y

Y O R K U N I V E R S I T Y S C H O O L O F L A W . Her jobs have included working as an

assistant attorney general in the Civil Rights and Health Care Bureaus of the New York State Office of the Attorney General and as a senior counsel in the Affirmative Litigation Division of the New York City Law Department. Toson now serves as a supervising attorney in the Civil Law Reform Unit of the Legal Aid Society, where she directs impact litigation to benefit low-income New Yorkers. D E S C R I B E Y O U R R O L E AT L E G A L A I D S O C I E T Y A N D W H AT Y O U ’ R E WORKING TO CHANGE.

I litigate cases related to laws and policies that adversely affect the poor, which is a group that intersects with populations of people of color, LGBTQ+ persons, the disabled and immigrants, among others. Many of the cases are against governmental entities and involve issues related to public benefits, health care, homelessness, housing and immigration. The goal of my work is justice and equality for all. Although I can’t accomplish this alone, I hope my work improves the likelihood that the most vulnerable among us receive just and equitable treatment when they need it most, especially from their local, state and federal governments. WHAT SHOULD WE KNOW ABOUT THE ISSUE? Lilia To s o n , ’07

Today’s legal shifts could impact the entire trajectory of our political system. Though many of the current federal administration’s proposals would disproportionately impact minority populations, the legal changes required to authorize these proposals—should courts deem them lawful—include changes to our Constitutional framework itself. All these changes, including a vast expansion of presidential power, would become precedent to be followed for administrations and decades to come. What happens now matters. HOW DOES YOUR WORK REFLECT YOUR PERSONAL VALUES? The Lord requires that each of us do justice (Micah 6:8), so I strive to fulfill that requirement in the work that I do every day. I also try to govern myself in accordance with the other tenets of my faith and the personal values they inform. One admonition that speaks very specifically to the work I do is Proverbs 31:8-9: “Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves, for the rights of all who are destitute. Speak up and judge fairly; defend the rights of the poor and needy.”

FALL 2019

19


ALUMNI VOICES

Meaningful Change

WHAT IS THE FOCUS OF YOUR WORK? I am a director at one of the world’s top public policy institutions in Washington, D.C. My mission is to conduct field research and Kimberly Flowers, ’99

convene leaders to improve U.S. leadership and policy that helps vulnerable people in other countries. I work to address childhood malnutrition and ensure that humanitarian assistance reaches those suffering from manmade conflicts. I have traveled to more than 60 countries in my role at CSIS: I was in Copenhagen moderating the World Food Summit in August, in Bangladesh visiting the Rohingya refugee camps in September, and in Iowa leading a panel on climate and conflict for the World Food Prize in October.

H u n g e r, Po ve r t y and Malnutrition

WHAT SHOULD WE

KNOW ABOUT HUNGER?

There is already enough food to feed everyone on the planet, yet more than 820 million don’t have enough to eat every day. Global hunger is on the rise predominantly because

KIMBERLY FLOWERS, ’99, USED HER

of climate change and conflict. One of the

COMMUNICATION DEGREE TO BUILD AN

biggest global malnutrition issues is the

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CAREER

significant increase of obesity.

FOCUSED ON ERADICATING HUNGER, P O V E R T Y A N D M A L N U T R I T I O N . From serv-

ing as a Peace Corps volunteer in Bulgaria and Jamaica to working on strategic communications for the U.S. Agency for International Development in Ethiopia, Jamaica and Haiti, Flowers has always chosen jobs that aim to help those less fortunate. Since 2015, she has been the director of the Humanitarian Agenda and Global Food

HOW DOES YOUR WORK REFLECT YOUR PERSONAL VALUES?

I have always felt compelled to serve, so I have focused on positions or organizations that I believe can make a positive impact in the world. While that has looked very different over the years—from serving in the Peace Corps, to working for the U.S. Agency for International Development, to

Security Project at the Center for Strategic and

influencing policymakers in D.C.—my focus

International Studies, a foreign affairs think

has remained on how to make the world a

tank. She resides in Washington, D.C.

better place.

20 W I L L I A M J E W E L L C O L L E G E


Educational Equity

the education I received. This work is personal. When I was a kid, scratching and clawing my way over obstacles to achieve my dreams, it would’ve been great to know some adult was

CHRIS ROSSON, ’06, IS A FIRST-GENERATION HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE GRADUATE.

He completed a master’s degree in international

ahead of me working just as hard to clear the path. I get to be that adult for generations of students like me chasing their dreams.

economics and international relations at Johns Hopkins University, traveled throughout the Mid-

WHAT IS THE IMPACT OF THE ISSUE?

dle East and researched the economic dynamics

The unconformable reality is that far too often

at the intersection of extreme poverty and global security. He was an advisor to the Governor of Missouri, a public affairs specialist in Washington, D.C., and a program director with the Federal Reserve System. In 2013, he joined Teach For America Kansas City as executive director.

demographics determine destinies. There is nothing inherently incapable about students of color and those growing up in poverty. What is validated for me daily is when students like me are given the right mix of opportunities, we rise. And when we rise, so does society at large. Economist Raj Chetty

TELL US ABOUT YOUR CURRENT ROLE.

posits that educational inequity undercuts

I lead Teach for America’s work in the heart

innovation in science and industry by creat-

of America, while also playing an executive

ing “lost Einsteins”—people who could have

leadership role in shaping TFA’s national

made highly impactful contributions but were

strategy, policy and innovation. The TFA

simply not afforded the opportunities they

vision is that one day, all children will have the opportunity to attain an excellent education. To that end, we develop leaders who

deserved. Eradicating educational inequity needs to be a top priority for more of us. Our future quite literally depends on it.

commit to eradicating educational inequity, beginning by teaching two years in a school that serves historically marginalized students. HOW DOES YOUR WORK REFLECT

YO U R VA LU ES A N D E X P E R I E N C ES ?

As a person of color growing up in a singleparent, low-income home in the highest violent

Chris Rosson, ’06

crime rate neighborhood in Kansas City, I know firsthand the transformational power of an excellent education. Education has not only transformed my life, but the lives of my five daughters, who are on a fundamentally different life trajectory than I was at their age because of

FA L L 2 0 1 9 21


ALUMNI VOICES

Meaningful Change

W H AT D O Y O U WA N T T O A C H I E V E ? Christopher C a r r, ’ 0 6

I see my role as working to help correct historical wrongs. Like our lives, our history is varied. There are parts of greatness, darkness, trauma, redemption and sacrifice. I work to create access, clear obstacles and shine a light on the spaces that have been unavailable to certain communities and groups. Sometimes shining light on our dark spaces is difficult and scary, so I try to stand in the gaps and set the tone for others to traverse the territory. And maybe I can make

D i ve rs i t y a n d I n c l u s i o n in Education

it a little less difficult and scary. WHAT SHAPED YOUR CAREER PATH? At William Jewell, I studied history to learn how to see the past with objective eyes—to

CHRISTOPHER CARR, ’08, EARNED A MASTER’S

know that its story is nuanced and that the

DEGREE IN PUBLIC POLICY AT PEPPERDINE

error of human storytelling can challenge

U N I V E R S I T Y . He has worked in educational access

for underrepresented students in STEM fields, led outreach for the National Science Foundation’s Graduate Research Fellowship Program and directed programs for the National Society of Black Engineers. In August, Carr became the first chief diversity officer at George Mason University’s Volgenau School of Engineering. He will complete a doctorate in education next year. TELL US ABOUT YOUR WORK. George Mason is the largest and most diverse

22

accuracy and perception. With international relations, it was much simpler: I wanted to change the world. We are increasingly interconnected. From globalization to intersectional identities, our world is much closer to us. It is harder and harder to ignore the problems of the world, as they are now our neighbors and friends. My path has always been oriented toward social justice, and while I never thought I’d find myself in STEM, it seems like a natural home for the passion and value I put in our humanitarian

public university in Virginia. While the campus

selves and our responsibility to each other

body reflects what a globalized society would

and our world. Many years ago, hanging

look like, like much of academia, the faculty

in Marston Hall was the Ephebic Oath of

does not. I spend time with faculty thinking

Athens, and it asked citizens to leave the

through how we can overcome implicit biases,

City-State better than they found it. Reading

break down barriers to access and create a

that oath many years ago set me on my path.

space where diverse talent thrives.

I’m still on it today.

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


JOURNEY BACK

F i r s t -Ye a r Tr a d i t i o n s

IN THE EARLY- AND MID-1900S AT JEWELL AND THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY, “BUTTONING” WAS A RITE OF PASSAGE.

Freshmen wore beanies and sandwich boards during inauguration week. At the request of a senior to “button up,” the greenhorns put their thumb on the button of the beanie and completed a deep-knee bend. The two who tallied the most upperclassmen signatures on the back of their sandwich boards were

FIRST YE AR TR ADITIONS f ro m b u t to n i n g to b a g p i p e s

crowned Beanie King and Queen at the football game. Each year seniors established inauguration guidelines—everything from requesting first-years to perform a snake dance before the football games, to denying them permission to sit on the J-Bench, cut across the Quad between Old Ely and Gano Chapel or use tobacco products outside. The seniors were good sports, and the week often ended with freshmen pushing the senior class president into one of the Twin Pools of Purity (campus ponds) located on the intramural field. Student Senate retired buttoning in 1969, and orientation rituals continue to evolve, from campuswide picnics, to joint service projects and team building at Tucker Leadership Lab. Today, a favorite tradition is the ceremonial First Walk Around the Quad behind a Celtic pipe band as families and the Jewell community cheer for new beginnings. The tradition comes full circle on Commencement Day, when graduates take their Final Walk Around the Quad.

FA L L 2 0 1 9 23


F E AT U R E

Legac y Family

Grace, John and Olivia Haug

CARDINAL IS THEIR COLOR

OLIVIA, GRACE AND JOHN WERE THE CLOSEST OF COLLEGE FRIENDS.

They had a standing Thursday lunch date, called each other for midnight study breaks, asked for interview advice, hung out at Raising Cane’s any chance they got and connected via FaceTime when they couldn’t meet in person. And on Sibling Day, they went out for ice cream. The Haugs have loved sharing their last name and their Jewell experience. Olivia, the oldest, graduated in May with a nursing degree. Grace is a junior elementary education major, and John is starting his second

24

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


year in chemistry. Growing up

the Pryor Learning Commons

in Marshall, Missouri, they have

coffee shop, for instance, they

always been a close family but

are served by barista Cindy

admit to a little birth order

(Langston) Eggleston, ’92, who

hierarchy at home. At college, though, they say it’s “complete peace. We’ve not only grown up together, we’ve matured together, whether it’s giving advice, standing up for another or calling each other at 2 a.m.,” said Grace. “At college we’re on a level playing field.” With alumni parents, the legacy children never recall being pushed to a particular school. All three say it was by chance, not persuasion, they selected the same college. Grace was the first Haug to choose Jewell. As a high school sophomore, she went along on Olivia’s senior campus tour. “I knew right away it would be a good community for me,” Grace said.

arranged the blind date for their parents as seniors at Jewell. For their career paths, Olivia chose nursing and John aspires to be a doctor after seeing their father’s impact as a physician and now as president and CEO of Fitzgibbon Hospital in Marshall. Their mom’s career has centered

John, Ben, Grace, Olivia, Sarah and Darin Haug at Commencement.

around education, from kindergarten and Title I to the elearning and outreach coordinator at Missouri Valley College. Similarly, Grace loves working with children. Olivia and Grace took classes with Dr. Brad Chance as did their mother. All three women are Delta Zetas. The three siblings sing in choirs and serve as first-year mentors, and John and Grace followed Darin as Cardinal Hosts. They

An introvert in high school, Grace got out of her comfort zone within the first few weeks at Jewell. “That wouldn’t have happened for me at a big school,” she said. John extends much credit from his first year of college to his sisters. “From academics, social, fashion advice on what to wear for interviews ... without a doubt, I wouldn’t be who I am

Olivia then committed, being

have each made their journey

drawn to the nursing program

their own, however. Olivia was

and Jewell’s size. John experi-

in Mortar Board and Student

As the oldest, Olivia didn’t

enced campus when he per-

Nurses Association. Grace serves

start college with familiar faces,

formed with his high school

on the Student Conduct and

but is grateful to have ended

Review Board. John is focused on

it with them. “It’s been nice to

the pre-med program and enjoys

have a little piece of home,” she

being a FIJI (Phi Gamma Delta).

said. With Olivia’s new home

The siblings have a long list of

“Every activity you’re involved in

near her emergency department

shared connections with each

lets you be well-rounded,” said

job at St. Luke’s Northland Hos-

other and their parents, Sarah

Olivia. “Professors encourage you

pital, the Haug trio anticipate

(Raynor) Haug, ’91, and Dr. Darin

to dig in and make these years

her apartment will become their

Haug, ’91. When the kids go to

the best four years.”

new favorite dinner spot.

choir in Gano Chapel. He was impressed with Jewell’s choral and science programs.

without them.”

FA L L 2 0 1 9 25


H A R R I M A N-J E WEL L S ER I ES

Richard Harriman greeted Luciano Pavarotti at the airport before his 1983 return recital in Je well ’s Gano Chapel.

Luciano Pavarotti professional recital debut in Gano Chapel; he returned four times.

1965

Edward Villella and Patricia McBride, N e w Yo r k C i t y B a l l e t , s t a r r e d i n t h e inaugural performance.

1986 Last performance in Je well ’s Gano Chapel; events moved to Kansas City venues

1973

2000 1971 Events with three of the world ’s greatest sopranos: Beverly Sills, Leontyne Price and Birgit Nilsson

Bringing the Best HARRIMAN-JE WELL SERIES CELEBR ATES 55TH SE ASON

William Jewell College Fine Arts Program renamed Harriman Arts Program

A N I D E A H ATC H E D I N A J E W E L L H A L L

FAC U LT Y O F F I C E I N 1 9 6 5 H A S C H A N G E D T H E C U LT U R A L L A N D S CA P E O F K A N S A S

C I T Y A N D E N R I C H E D T H E N AT I O N A L A R T S S C E N E . N O W A F E W S E AS O N S AWAY

FROM ITS 1,000TH PERFORMANCE, THE HAR R I MAN -J E W ELL S ER I ES R E ACH ES

N E A R LY 3 0 , 0 0 0 P E O P L E A Y E A R T H R O U G H

EVENTS AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMMING.

Co-founders Dr. Dean Dunham and the late Richard Harriman, ’53, believed the performing arts were essential to a liberal arts education. They also were moved to fill the void for a culturally underserved Kansas City community. From their shared office in the English Department,

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE

H A R R I M A N -J E W EL L S ER I ES

» hj s e r i e s .o rg

26

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

the visionaries proposed a fine arts program based on educational ideals.


2004

2006

Free Discovery Concerts are introduced to season lineup

Harriman Arts Program renamed HarrimanJewell Series

2003

Longtime staff member Clark Morris, ’91, named executive director; Richard Harriman transitioned to artistic director

2010 Impresario Richard Harriman died on July 15 at age 77

2011

Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts opened; became home for many Series events Photo: Chicago Symphony Orchestra in Helzberg Hall, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. P h o t o b y To d d R o s e n b e r g .

With funding from the College and donors, the

Perlman, Beverly Sills, Marilyn Horne, Emanuel Ax,

William Jewell College Fine Arts program was born,

Edward Villella, Luciano Pavarotti, Joyce DiDonato

featuring two performances on a $3,000 budget the

and many more appeared on the Series early in

first season. True to the founding mission of access

their careers. With Clark Morris, ’91, as the current

to the arts, the program offered affordable tickets

executive and artistic director, the world’s best

for all and free admission to Jewell students—a

performers continue to headline. Still ahead in the

commitment still honored. Harriman, who served

55th season are many globally acclaimed artists

as director for nearly 45 years, often stated his goal

and ensembles, including violinist Anne-Sophie

was to “bring the best” of the world to local stages.

Mutter, Mark Morris Dance Group, pianist Mitsuko

His focus on quality, variety and discovery remain

Uchida and the Boston Pops On Tour.

brand hallmarks today.

Perhaps lesser known is the educational out-

Harriman had an uncanny ability to recognize

growth of the Series, offering free master classes,

gifted artists before they were stars, before they

workshops and discussions that allow students

sang at the Met or Carnegie Hall, before they

and community members to view artists in a

appeared on “The Tonight Show” or graced the

less formal setting. Last season alone, the Series

cover of Newsweek. Fresh talent like Itzhak

offered 50 free education events.

FA L L 2 0 1 9 27


COOL CLASS

Critical Care Nursing

RE AL-LIFE SCENARIOS THROUGH HIGH-TECH SIMUL ATION 28

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

top and middle: Jewell’s Simulation Center bottom: A k i e r A t e r, ‘ 1 9 , and Assistant Professor Sarah ( Landram) Light, ‘06, review monitoring equipment in the mock hospital room.


HE TALKS, BREATHES, BLINKS AND BLEEDS. ONE DAY HE NEEDS CHEST COMPRESSIONS AND A BREATHING TUBE; THE NEXT HE HAS A SEIZURE. THROUGH IT ALL, FUTURE NURSES ARE AT HIS

less overwhelming. Being an alumna of Jewell’s program has many benefits, she says, and having been in the

BEDSIDE IN MARSTON HALL, PRACTICING THEIR CRITICAL CARE

student’s chair, literally, connects her

SKILLS. SIMMAN 3G®, A HIGH-FIDELITY SIMULATION MANIKIN,

with students on a different level.

PLAYS AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN COMPLEXITY AND ADULT CARE MANAGEMENT, A REQUIRED SEVEN-WEEK COURSE FOR SENIORS.

“I remember the rigor, but you are prepared when you are finished with the program, and I can show them

Assistant Professor Sarah (Landram)

potential patient within the health

Light, a 2006 Jewell nursing alumna,

care system.

appreciates the importance Jewell gives critical care as a dedicated course. It builds on other classes, such as Adult Health Acute Conditions, as students learn how the body’s systems work together, practice advanced critical care skills and master the equipment in the mock hospital room. Armed with knowledge, students then participate in a simulation scenario. With faculty and staff in the control room, students don’t know what

Michelle Wilkerson, who attended Jewell after serving in the Army, feels prepared after taking the course. “You never know what direction your patients will take, or if they will lose consciousness, so you need to be educated to the highest level,” she said. That is what Light wants students to take away from the course, emphasizing that the complexity of the patient is the whole picture.

how classes like Critical Thought and Inquiry relate to nursing through my own experiences,” she said. Light, who holds a master’s degree in nursing education, currently works in cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation at Liberty Hospital. She says keeping up with technology and staying current in practice is important as an educator. Joe Reith says Light shares experience in class that she gained from working in critical care throughout the metro. He especially appreciates her firsthand knowledge, as he accepted a critical

condition or crisis they will encoun-

“Not every unit will have the technol-

ter. The lab provides a safe learning

ogy and monitoring used in critical

environment to respond in real time

care,” Light said. “Nurses have to walk

Light says she and her colleagues

as changes are happening with the

in a room and use their eyes to assess

love keeping in touch with students

patient. An equally important amount

and critically think through it: ‘This is

after graduation.

of learning occurs after the exercise in

different. Why? What do I do about it?’”

a debriefing, where students watch the

She says it’s hard to talk to a manikin

they’re getting to enjoy in the nursing

but believes role play helps students

profession, sometimes working beside

While the course focuses on critical

with the “critical thinking moments”

them, and to remember that they started

care, it also prepares students for any

in real life and makes the situation

with us on The Hill,” she said.

video and reflect on their performance.

45 Years of Nursing With four track s to choose from, the program i s g o i n g s t r o n g . T h e f o u r- y e a r B S N c o h o r t h a s a f i r s t- t i m e N C L E X p a s s r a t e o f 1 0 0 % . See more highlights at je well.edu/nursing.

care position at an area hospital.

“It’s fun to keep up with the success

In 1969, the Bachelor of Science in Nursing was authorized by William Jewell and was approved by the Missouri State Board of Nursing. Fourteen students were in the first graduating class in 1974. This year, as Jewell’s largest major, the nursing program graduated 76 students from its traditional and accelerated tracks. “Our focus on integrity, compassion, scholarship, leadership, excellence in practice and service to others prepares nurses from all generations for the holistic care of patients and families,” said Dr. Leesa McBroom, associate professor of nursing and chair. FA L L 201 9 29


C A R D I N A L AT H L E T I C S

Douglas Elly

Eddie Horn

Chuck Lliteras

Chris McCabe

INTRODUCING OUR NEW COACHES DOUGLAS ELLY, tennis

Professional tennis player and coach Douglas Elly joined Jewell in January to lead the men’s and

As a student at Southwest Missouri State University (now Missouri State), Elly played No. 1 singles and doubles, was a two-time Conference Player of the

women’s tennis teams. He came to Jewell from Fort

Year and earned three All-Mid-Continent honors.

Myers, Florida, where he served as the assistant

After college, he played professionally and earned

pro for Legends Golf and Country Club. Before that,

a national rank of No. 3 in Men’s 45 singles in 2008.

he spent 22 years in Springfield, Missouri, as the

Elly participated in the Team USA Dubler Cup

associate pro at Hickory Hills Country Club and

World Championships, was a Gordon Murphy USA

Cooper Tennis Complex. No stranger to collegiate

Team member and was a National Grass Court

coaching, he has made stops as the head coach of

Doubles Champion for three consecutive years. His

Missouri State and Evangel universities and was

playing career took him to France and Finland as a

the assistant coach at Drury University.

part of the Team USA Fred Perry Cup World Cham-

30 W I L L I A M J E W E L L C O L L E G E


pionships in 2015 and 2016. On the court, he was

improvement as defensive coordinator. He has

mentored by three former top-ranked athletes:

mentored three all-GLVC student-athletes.

Rod Laver, Pancho Segura and Bobby Riggs.

In his 39th year as a football coach, his college coaching experience includes stops at Fort

E D D I E H O R N , m e n’ s s o c c e r

Benning, Union College, William Penn, Chadron State and Garden City Community College, where

Missouri High School Soccer Coaches Association

he helped the Broncs to the 2016 NJCA A National

Hall of Fame inductee Eddie Horn joined the Cardi-

Championship. He has 25 years of experience as a

nals in the spring as men’s soccer coach after two

head coach at the high school level and was a 2013

seasons as assistant coach at the University of Mis-

inductee into the Missouri High School Football

souri-Kansas City. Before UMKC, he helped restart the soccer program at State Fair Community College by coaching the men’s and women’s teams. Horn spent 26 years coaching the boys’ and girls’ programs in the Jefferson City School District,

Coaches Hall of Fame. Off the field, he has served as president of the Missouri High School Football Coaches Association. Lliteras is a military veteran who has served two tours in the Army.

where the high school soccer field was renamed for him. With more than 500 wins, he led the boys to a winning record in 23 of 26 seasons and the girls to the Class 4 Final Four in 2014, after which he was named the Coach of the Year by both the Missouri High School Coaches Association and the National Soccer Coaches Association of America. He coached the All-America Game in 2013 and served on the Olympic Development staff, recruiting players for eight tours of Europe. In addition, he has served on multiple committees for the NSCA A National Convention and was the director of coaching for the United Soccer Club.

C H R I S M c C A B E , m e n’ s b a s k e t b a l l

A national search found Chris McCabe to take over as the 14th coach in history for the Jewell men’s basketball program. He comes to Jewell from Liberty North High School, where he started the program and spent nine seasons as head coach. He has called Liberty home for nearly 15 years, serving as the assistant basketball coach before the district split the high school into two. The Eagle program has seen tremendous success with McCabe at the helm, including a 158-94 record and eight district final appearances in nine seasons. His players have been recognized with 19

CHUCK LLITERAS, fo o tb al l

Jewell has a Hall of Famer and Army veteran leading its football program with Chuck Lliteras

All-Conference selections and four All-State honors. McCabe got his start at Johnson County Community College as a student assistant before heading to Kansas State University, where he served

as interim head football coach.

under coach Jim Wooldridge for three seasons.

This fall will mark his fifth season at Jewell,

In addition to his coaching duties at Liberty

having served previously as Jewell’s defensive

North, McCabe also served as assistant principal

coordinator and linebackers coach. During the

and is a member of the board for the Missouri

2018 season, he led the Cardinals to a 100-point

Basketball Coaches Association.

FA L L 2 0 1 9 31


G R A D U AT E H I G H L I G H T S

Class of 2019

MAKING THEIR MARK Congrat ulation s to our ne west alumni as the y launch their careers and graduate st udy in places near and far. See what’s next for a few members of the 2019 class.

32

Denver Strong, Ph.D., Chemistr y and Materials Science, Princeton Universit y, Ne w Jerse y

Zachary Carroll, M . D i v., Ya l e D i v i n i t y S c h o o l , New Haven, Connecticut

D a n i e l E s s i e n , D . O , A .T. Still Universit y, Kirk s ville, Mi s s o u r i (s ta r t i n g fa l l 2 0 2 0)

Erika Carvan, RN, Operating Ro o m , C h i l d re n’s Me rc y Hospital, Kan sa s Cit y, Missour i

Nick Hartwig, D o c tor of Phar mac y, Universit y of Missouri-Kansas City

Caleb White, Financial Representative, Northwestern Mut ual, Kan sa s Cit y, Missour i

Emily Dema, MSc in Applied Infec tiou s D isea se Epidemiolo g y, University College London, London, England

Anthony Aranda, U.S. Nav y SEAL, Boot Camp—Great Lakes, Illinois; SEAL training— Coronado, California

C h r is t ine Wein ho ld , Si x-Month Animal Care Internship for Sea Otters, Monterey Bay Aquarium, Montere y, Califor nia

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


Hannah Waine, Graduate Analyst, Macroeconomic and F i s c a l P o l i c y Te a m a t t h e N e w Z e a l a n d Tr e a s u r y , Wellington , Ne w Zealand

EmmaRae King Carroll, M . A . i n Re l i g i o n (e m p h a s i s i n l i t u r g i c a l s t u d i e s) , Ya l e Institute of Sacred Music, New Haven, Connecticut

R a c h e l F o r r e s t e r, M . S . i n F a m i l y Studies and Human Services (s p e c i a l i z i n g i n c o u p l e a n d f a m i l y t h e r a p y) , K a n s a s S t a t e Universit y, Manhat tan, Kan sa s

Zoee Risdal, Juris Doctor and M . S .W. (S o c i a l Wo r k) , D r a k e Universit y, D es Moines, Io wa

D ylan McCloud-Le wis, RN, Medical ICU, Universit y of Kan sa s Ho s p ital , Kan s a s Cit y, Kan s a s

Kellsie Hermann, University-Level English Te a c h e r, P e a c e C o r p s , C h i n a

Naomi Griffin, C i t y Ye a r K a n s a s C i t y

Ky ra Li t t l e , En g l i s h , t h e a t re , debate, literacy and forensics t e a c h e r, S o u t h e a s t H i g h S c h o o l , Kan sa s Cit y, Missour i

99.1% OF JE WELL ALUMNI ARE EMPLOYED OR AT TENDING GR ADUATE SCHOOL WITHIN 6 MONTHS

M e g h a n R e c k e r, M a s t e r o f M u s i c (c o n c e n t ra t i o n i n c o m p o s i t i o n), Ea st Carolina Universit y, Greenville, North Carolina

J o s h Va r e l a , A s s o c i a t e B u s i n e s s A n a l y s t - I T, H & R B l o c k , Kan sa s Cit y, Missour i

FA L L 2 0 1 9 33


CL ASS NOTES

News

C l as s Notes

1970s PHILIP LOVE, ’71,

retired as managing director of the

SEE MORE CL ASS NOTES OR SUBMIT ONE OF YOUR OWN AND BROWSE OUR NEW ALUMNI WEBSITE.

Yale Center for Faith and Culture

» a l u m n i .j e w e l l .e d u /c l a s s- n o te s

at Yale Divinity School. He serves on the board of Angel Flight Central and was awarded the organization’s Distinguished Service and

1940s

Leadership Award.

1960s

DR. STEPHEN COHLE, ’72,

is a forensic pathologist with MichREV. PAUL POWELL, ’47,

DR. HOMER DREW, ’66,

recently resigned from his position

was inducted into the National

as pastor and retired after 75 years

Collegiate

of church ministry. He has lived

Fame. He amassed more than 600

most of his life in St. Louis and

wins as a college basketball coach,

recently moved to Abilene, Texas,

largely over 22 seasons at Valpar-

to be near three of his sons.

aiso

1950s

Basketball

(Indiana)

igan Pathology Specialists and the Hall

University.

of

He

medical examiner for Kent County, Michigan. He recently presented on sudden cardiac death at a conference in Veradero, Cuba. LINDA (HIGGINBOTHAM)

resides in Nashville, Tennessee.

SCHALLER, ’72,

DR. JAMES PETTIJOHN, JR., ’69,

documentary, “A Spark of Nerve,”

was one of six 2018 inductees into the Missouri State University Wall of Fame. He helped the school’s

of San Francisco, had her latest air on select public television stations. She is a four-time Emmy winner for her documentaries on the

REV. JERRY OSTROM, ’57,

College of Business Administra-

has served as pastor of Farber

tion earn AACSB accreditation

(Missouri) Baptist Church for 12

while serving in a variety of roles,

BOB STERGOS, ’77,

years after retiring from a 34-year

including associate dean and pro-

and his wife co-founded A Seat at

pastorate at Centennial Baptist

fessor. He and his wife, ROBIN

the Table, a nonprofit that helps

Church in Mexico, Missouri.

PE TTIJOHN, ’ 71,

reside in O’Fallon.

under-resourced 18- to 25-year-

arts, history and medical science.

JEWELL LEGACIES

Congratulations new alumni! We enjoyed hosting our legacy families at Commencement and celebrating their Jewell graduates. B ra d l e y D i c e ’ 16 , Ja c o b D i c e ’ 19, Pa m e l a ( Pe n c e) D i c e ’ 8 2 , D a v i d D i c e ’ 8 2 , S h a ra (C l e v e n g e r) B r i c e ’ 91 , Jo e l B r i c e ’ 19, D a v i d An d e rs o n ’ 91 , Me g a n An d e rs o n ’ 19, Am y (C h a s ta i n) An d e rs o n ’ 91 , D a r i n H a u g ’ 91 , S a ra h ( R a y n o r) H a u g ’ 91 , O l i v i a H a u g ’ 19, Ma rk Po r t h ’ 8 7, Me l i s s a (S h a r p) Po r t h ’ 9 2 , S u t to n Po r t h ’ 19, L a k ie S p e n c e r ’ 19, S te v e n S p e n c e r ’ 81 , a n d Mi r i a m (Mc Co y) S p e n c e r ’ 8 2 .

34

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


adulthood

broker with Meyer and Associates

through residential mentoring in a

at RE/MAX Alliance in Fort Collins,

Christian family environment. They

Colorado, and resides in Windsor.

olds

transition

to

reside in St. Louis. DR. STEVEN POPEJOY, ’79,

WITH TH E ALU M N I O FFI CE TO G E T

was hired as general manager of

Work

KCME and Jazz 93.5 in Colorado

Missouri—The

People

Have Spoken,” published in the

Springs,

University of Missouri-Kansas City

resides with her husband.

Law Review. He is the chair of the School of Business Administration and professor of business law at the University of Central Missouri. He resides in Blue Springs.

Colorado,

STEPCHILD OR SIBLING IN HIGH

S C H O O L ? S H A R E T H E I R I N F O R M AT I O N

ROBYN (BRECKENRIDGE) SEDGWICK, ’86,

wrote an article, titled “Right to in

A LU M N I , D O YO U H AV E A C H I L D,

where

she

TH EM CO N N ECTED TO JE WELL . U P O N EN RO LLM ENT, TH E Y WI LL RECEIVE

T H E H E R I TA G E A W A R D . T O R E F E R A

S T U D E N T, C O M P L E T E T H E F O R M AT:

» a l u m n i .j e w e l l .e d u /re fe r ra l- p ro g ra m s

JODY JENSEN SHAFFER, ’86,

has had her 2017 picture book, “Prudence the Part-Time Cow” (Henry Holt Children’s), named as a finalist for the 2019-2020 Missouri Show Me Award by the Missouri Association of School Librarians.

1980s

1999 while continuing to design professionally in regional theatre. She resides in Decatur, Illinois. MATTHEW MYERS, ’98,

retired from the U.S. Navy as a lieutenant commander after multiple combat deployments. He completed a second master’s degree

1990s

ROBERT KIRKLAND, ’81,

in library and information science

of Liberty, is managing partner of Kirkland Woods & Martinsen LLP. Earlier this year, the firm opened its fourth office in Clayton. The firm concentrates its practice in trusts and estates law, with capacity in closely held corporate and real estate law. TIMOTHY KRAUSE, ’83,

authored a book about his son’s mountain biking accident, “Finding Theo: A Father’s True Story

from the University of Washington

LISA O’BRIEN ENGER, ’90,

is vice president of university relations

for

Lindenwood

Uni-

versity. She has served in exec-

and is pursuing a second career in librarianship. He resides in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

utive director positions at the Clayton Chamber of Commerce, the Susan G. Komen for the Cure

2000s

St. Louis affiliate and the United Soybean Board. She and her husband reside in St. Louis.

GUS “JACK” WETZEL, III, ’01,

has been appointed to the Haw-

COL. ERIC T. OLSON, ’90,

thorn Bancshares, Inc., board of

was appointed the 24th super-

directors. He is president of Mead-

Jorja (Morton) Krause, ’83, reside

intendent of the Missouri State

ows Construction Company and

in Dallas.

Highway

Mike

Meadows Development Company,

Parson. Olson is a graduate of the

both of Clinton, where he resides.

of Loss, Courage and Discovery” (Clovercroft). He and his wife,

JEANETTE MEYER, ’83,

received the 2018

Patrol

by

Gov.

FBI National Academy.

SUVIR DHAR, ’02,

Quality Service

JANA HENRY FUNDERBURK, ’96,

was named to the St. Louis Busi-

Certified Platinum

was promoted to full professor of

ness Journal’s “40 Under 40” list

award, the highest level

theatre and dance at Millikin Uni-

for 2019. He is a Simmons Hanly

of service achievement in the real

versity. She has been teaching the-

Conroy shareholder focused on

estate industry. She is a real estate

atre design and technology since

mesothelioma litigation.

FA L L 2 0 1 9 35


CL ASS NOTES

News

director for disability services at

organization’s Program Planning

has joined Husch Blackwell in

Union University in Jackson, Tennes-

Committee and the education and

Kansas City as a partner in its

see, where he resides with his family.

professional development program

CRYSTAL HOWARD, ’02,

tax practice group and its Financial Services and Capital Markets industry team. She advises a variety of business types on all aspects of federal income taxation. DR. CHRISTOPHER STRELLUF, ’02,

had his new book, “Speaking from the Heartland: The Midland Vowel System of Kansas City,” published by the American Dialect Society and Duke University Press. He works as an assistant professor of linguistics at the University of Warwick in Coventry, United Kingdom. CARRIE (VANDERFORD) SANDERS, ’03,

was named director of community

manager at Children’s Mercy Hos-

DR. AMY SMITH, ’04,

earned a Ph.D. in music therapy

pital. She resides in Kansas City.

from the University of Kansas and

HEATHER JONES, ’06,

is an assistant professor in music

was hired as executive director of

therapy at Sam Houston State

Iowa Sister States, a nonprofit that

University (Texas).

manages Iowa’s nine official inter-

DR. ALAN WEGENER, ’04,

national partnerships. She resides

Wegener,

in Des Moines, Iowa.

Optometrists in 2018 in Liberty.

SEAN RIORDAN, ’06,

opened

Richards

&

He also serves as treasurer for

is a research assistant profes-

the Missouri Optometric Associa-

sor at Children’s Mercy Hospital

tion. He and E M I L Y ( W O M M A C K )

and the University of Missouri-

and their three

Kansas City. He is researching

WEGENER, ’05,

sons reside in Kansas City.

brain damage caused by severe

DR. MICHAEL STRICKLAND, ’05,

hyperbilirubinemia in babies. He

was awarded a $650,000 grant from

and RACHE L (BUTZ) RIO R DA N , ’ 0 6 ,

wood College, where she has been

the National Science Foundation to

reside in Lenexa, Kansas.

serving on faculty. She is also the

research the effects of agricultural antibiotics on soil food webs and

ELIZABETH WALSH YODER, ’06,

founder and CEO of Hope Community Capital. She and her family

the ecosystem. He is an assistant

reside in Middleton, Wisconsin.

professor at the University of Idaho.

DR. GREGORY BOHNER, ’04,

DR. GAYLA HUFFMAN, ’06,

health statistician for the Kansas

earned a Ph.D. in counseling and

was elected as director of the

City Health Department, she was

student development from Kansas

Society of Pediatric Nurses board.

the only recipient chosen from

State University. He serves as the

She is also the chair-elect of the

Kansas and Missouri.

engagement and impact at Edge-

was named to the de Beaumont Foundation’s inaugural 40 Under 40 in Public Health list. A public

ADAM HILL, ’07,

was named president and COO of the Darren Prenger, ’03, COO of ECCO

Scarbrough Group of

Select Corp., was named the 2019

Companies in Kansas City. He

Emerging Philanthropist of the Year by

began at Scarbrough, a logistics

Nonprofit Connect. He was nominated

provider, as an account represen-

for his philanthropy and board service

tative and most recently served as

with nonprofits, including the YMCA of

the executive vice president. He

Greater Kansas City, FIRE Foundation

and DR. TIFFANY (KE LLER ) H ILL, ’ 0 7 ,

and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater

reside in Parkville.

Kansas City, as well as his success in recruiting others to support worthy causes. His family resides in Parkville.

36

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE

DR. LISA (BUSH) LAUCK, ’07,

earned a doctorate in educational leadership from Baker University.


Jessica (Connery) Montague, ’13, pictured with Jewell Professor of Education Dr. Jeanine (Rockford) Haistings, ’92, was one of 16 winners selected among 157 Kansas City nominees for the inaugural Jedel Excellence in Mathematics Education Awards with a $10,000 prize. Montague is a fourth-grade teacher at Clardy Elementary in the North Kansas City (Missouri) School District, where she also serves as a science and mathematics demonstration teacher.

She also was published as a con-

SARAH TAYLOR, ’09,

bio-organic chemistry. He resides

tributor to “Herstory: Woman in

of Kansas City earned a master’s

in Greensboro, North Carolina.

American History,” a publication

degree in international advocacy

created by National History Day

and leadership from Avila University.

ADAM YOUNG, ’14,

completed an Executive MBA from

Foundation in conjunction with

Rockhurst University in May 2018 and

History and Lifetime. Lauck teaches

is employed by Burd and Fletcher.

eighth grade English language arts Excelsior Springs (Missouri) School District. She and J A K E L A U C K , ’ 0 7 , reside in Liberty with their daughter.

He and HALE Y (JONE S) YOUNG, ’ 14 ,

2010s

and coaches cheer and dance in the

reside in Prairie Village, Kansas. BROOKLYN BRADLEY, ’16,

TRISTA TURLEY, ’12,

was hired as staff attorney for the Ohio Court of Claims. She pre-

JOHN BARBER, ’08,

viously worked as assistant attor-

of Kansas City, was

ney general at the Ohio Attorney

promoted to vice

General’s Office.

president, general counsel and compliance officer of UGA Finance, after joining the organization in 2017 as its in-house counsel. He received a Juris Doctorate from Florida Coastal School of Law and has previously practiced in the private sector for two law firms.

the Year at Byhalia (Mississippi) Elementary as a result of successful test scores in reading and math, as well as for her community involvement in starting the school’s first music club.

DREW MITRISIN, ’13,

earned a master’s degree in public management from Johns Hopkins University and works in industry

REED BROWN, ’17,

is in the doctorate in physical therapy program at Regis University in Denver.

affairs for the American Trucking

PARKER WOOD, ’17,

Association.

ANGIE

(PE TE RSE N)

has been named a managing part-

M ITR ISIN, ’ 14,

completed a mas-

ner with Josh DeShong Real Estate

ter’s degree in education-reading

in Heath, Texas, where he resides.

from Johns Hopkins University

ALEX SAXON, ’09,

and is employed by KIPP DC. They

was cast in a main role as Gabriel

reside in Washington, D.C.

Johnson in the ABC drama “The

was named the 2018-2019 Teacher of

JESSA (ADAMS) HAHN, ’18, AND COURTNEY EDDINS, ’18,

received Outstanding Beginning

DR. ANDREW WOMMACK, ’14,

Teacher Awards from the Mis-

received the Ruth Ridenhour Schol-

souri Association of Colleges for

His work in other shows includes

arly and Professional Achievement

Teacher Education. Hahn teaches

recurring characters on “The Fos-

Award from High Point University.

math at Kearney (Missouri) High

ters,” “Finding Carter” and “Ray

He is an assistant professor of

School and Eddins is a fourth-

Donovan.” He resides in Sherman

chemistry whose research focuses

grade

Oaks, California.

on synthetic organic chemistry and

(Missouri) Elementary School.

Fix” that premiered in March.

teacher

at

Brookfield

FA L L 2 0 1 9 37


CL ASS NOTES

In Memoriam

B id d in g fa re w e l l to m e m b e rs o f th e Je w e l l fa m il y

1940s

Athene (Crook) Brazelton, ’45, of Kansas City, Missouri, Jan. 25, 2019 Dorothy (Anderson) Hyder, ’47, of Kansas City, Missouri, Dec. 6, 2018 Bill Riggs, ’47, of Liberty, Missouri, Jan. 5, 2019 Shirley (Griffin) Seidel, ’47, of Salt Lake City, Utah, Dec. 27, 2018 John McFarland Jr., ’48, of Breckenridge, Colorado, Dec. 14, 2018 Margaret “Betty” Shouse, ’48, of Kansas City, Missouri, April 30, 2019 Paul Adams, ’49, of Kansas City, Missouri, April 7, 2019 Bill Hahn, ’49, of Independence, Missouri, Feb. 2, 2019 Rev. Betty (Stone) Ludwig, ’49, of Newbury, Vermont, Nov. 2, 2018 Margaret (Beasley) Thomson, ’49, of Liberty, Missouri, Feb. 26, 2019 1950s

Ercell (Head) Binns, ’50, of Gaithersburg, Maryland, April 2, 2019 Henry Dice, ’50, of Liberty, Missouri, Jan. 1, 2019 Keith Fenton, ’50, of West Des Moines, Iowa, March 5, 2019 Daniel Hacku, ’50, of Northford, Connecticut, March 21, 2019 Margaret Irminger, ’50, of Liberty, Missouri, April 7, 2019 John Jaeger, ’51, of Kirkwood, Missouri, Feb. 26, 2019 Dr. Bob Titus, ’51, of Commerce, Texas, Nov. 6, 2018 William Bowman, ’52, of Farmington Hills, Michigan, April 3, 2019 James Dollins, ’52, of Kansas City, Missouri, Jan. 28, 2019 VIEW MEMORIALS

Rev. David Fison, ’52, of Auburn, Washington, Jan. 31, 2019

SINCE JAN . 1 , 2017

Edward Lundgren, ’52, of Spring Hill, Kansas, April 18, 2019

» a l u m n i . j e w e l l . e d u / memoriam

Alexander Boltniew, ’53, of White Stone, South Carolina, Feb. 13, 2019 Dr. Robert Coleberd Jr., ’53, of Granada Hills, California, Dec. 5, 2018 Dallas Divelbiss, ’53, of Gaithersburg, Maryland, March 9, 2019 Ormand Leavel Jr., ’53, of La Jolla, California, March 7, 2019 Rosa (White) Pace, ’53, of Borger, Texas, April 14, 2019 Rev. Roy Werline, ’53, of Smithville, Missouri, April 20, 2019 Joan (Pryor) Barth, ’54, of Chesterfield, Missouri, May 3, 2019 Joyce (Ramsey) Blount, ’54, of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, March 1, 2019 Bob Goepfert, ’54, of Marion, Illinois, Nov. 16, 2018 David Hoy, ’54, of Streamwood, Illinois, Dec. 16, 2018 Joyce (Wheeler) Wollard, ’54, of Excelsior Springs, Missouri, Jan. 10, 2019 Ruth (White) Budgett, ’55, of Uniontown, Ohio, March 1, 2019 Billy Kuykendall, ’55, of St. Louis, Missouri, April 3, 2019 Dr. Donald Darnell, ’57, of Erie, Colorado, Feb. 20, 2019 Jo (Hartnett) DeShon, ’57, of Kalamazoo, Michigan, Jan. 26, 2019 Donna (Maple) Cox, ’58, of Kansas City, Missouri, March 9, 2019

38

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE


John Duggins Jr., ’58, of Ovilla, Texas, March 7, 2019 Robert Honeyfield, ’58, of Lansing, Kansas, Feb. 20, 2019 Garnett Peters III, ’58, of Lee’s Summit, Missouri, Nov. 22, 2018 Tom Sherwood, ’58, of Bellingham, Washington, Feb. 7, 2019

Richard “Dick” Johnson, ’68, of Rogersville, Missouri, March 28, 2019 Clifford Tuttle, ’68, of Fargo, North Dakota, April 16, 2019 1970s

James Myers, ’70, of Independence, Missouri, Feb. 1, 2019 Jay Thomas, III, ’70, of Louisiana, Missouri, May 18, 2019

Marion Botts, ’59, of Independence, Missouri, Jan. 19, 2019

Ray Crawford, ’72, of Kansas City, Missouri, Dec. 10, 2018

Paul Casper, ’59, of Carbondale, Kansas, Feb. 8, 2019

Ann Todoroff, ’75, of Gladstone, Missouri, Jan. 24, 2019

Dr. Jim Coleberd, ’59, of Hannibal, Missouri, Dec. 15, 2018

Stephen McGarvey, ’76, of Gladstone, Missouri, March 19, 2019

Charline (Smith) Seele, ’59, of Kansas City, Missouri, Dec. 10, 2018

Rebecca Long, ’77, of Overland Park, Kansas, Dec. 22, 2018

1960s

Laurie Anderson, ’79, of Leawood, Kansas, March 3, 2019

Rick Bailey, ’60, of Lawrence, Kansas, Jan. 11, 2019 Warren Bergman, ’60, of Florissant, Missouri, April 11, 2019

Mary Bell, ’73, of Liberty, Missouri, April 19, 2019

Michelle Lahey, ’79, of Independence, Missouri, Feb. 13, 2019 1980s

Bill Kramer Jr., ’60, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, Nov. 21, 2018

Mark Ball, ’81 (faculty), of Prairie Village, Kansas, Feb. 9, 2019

Phyllis (Strawn) Kilver, ’60, of Jacksonville, Illinois, Feb. 27, 2019

Mertie Denney, ’88, of Kansas City, Missouri, Jan. 31, 2019

Ken Ragsdale, ’60, of Ozark, Missouri, March 7, 2019

1990s

Donald LaFontaine, ’61, of Arnold, Missouri, Jan. 19, 2019 Robert McGee, ’61, of Lee’s Summit, Missouri, April 28, 2019 Jim Prather, ’61, of Kansas City, Missouri, Nov. 5, 2018 Gary Webster, ’61, of Bradenton, Florida, Nov. 15, 2018 Michael Chu, ’62, of Kearney, Missouri, Feb. 8, 2019

Laura (Pruitt) Marsh, ’90, of Kansas City, Missouri, May 18, 2019 Scott Cypert, ’93, of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, Oct. 1, 2018 2010s

Matthew Oliver, ’17, of Kansas City, Missouri, April 1, 2019 FRIENDS

Larry Seelinger, ’62, of Raymore, Missouri, Jan. 12, 2019

Dr. Bill Henning (former faculty) of Winona Lake, Indiana, April 11, 2019

Richard Stertz, ’63, of Santa Fe, New Mexico, Jan. 7, 2019

Ruth McCoy (former staff) of Kansas City, Missouri, April 22, 2019

Rev. David Winfrey, ’63, of Savannah, Missouri, Dec. 4, 2018

Dr. Catherine (Crowe) Vera (former faculty) of Lawrence, Kansas, Dec. 14, 2018

Barbara Hay, ’65, of Lawson, Missouri, Nov. 29, 2018 Keith Oberkrom, ’67, of Liberty, Missouri, Nov. 18, 2018 Esther (Thornton) Glover, ’68, of Houston, Texas, April 7, 2019

To n o t i f y u s o f t h e p a s s i n g o f J e w e l l a l u m n i , plea se email alumni@ w illiam .je well.edu or mail the obituar y to the Of f ice of Alumni Relations.

FA L L 201 9 39


THE CRITICAL THINKING COLLEGE ®

NON-PROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID WILLIAM JE WELL COLLEGE

500 COLLEGE HILL LIBERTY MO, 64068

Belle, Jason, Shep, Molly and Emery Lauber

WHY WE GIVE “It’s hard to put into words what Jewell means to us. Jewell brought us together. It provided us a place to meet our closest friends, explore learning in small classrooms with professors who truly cared about our education and our well-being, and it gave us an opportunity to continue to play sports on a collegiate level. In the years following graduation, we gave what we could; however, that changed when the true value of William Jewell continued to show itself in our everyday life. For us, giving to the Jewell Fund is an expression of how much we believe in the Jewell way and community. We were recently asked, ‘Where is Liberty and what’s there? ’ and the answer was simple: William Jewell is Liberty, and to not contribute to what sets Liberty apart from other small towns in America would be to turn our backs on the principles we hope to instill in our own children as they grow in the community we continue to believe in.” Molly (Miller) Lauber, ‘02 , and Jason Lauber, ‘02 , met at Je well— on their f irst day—married in 200 6 and have made Libert y home for their family of f ive. Molly is a p artner with Finle y & Lauber LLC, a family law f irm in Libert y. Jason is a sales representative with Medtronic Spine and Biologics. T he y are members of the John P riest Greene Giving Societ y, and Molly ser ves on the Alumni Bo ard of Go vernors. 40 W I L L I A M J E W E L L C O L L E G E