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\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ Bachelor of \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ Architecture \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ WILLIAM JAMES CALLAHAN ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// 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let us begin


3

Chapters Selected Studio Work I. //Intl. Civil Rights Center for Art . . . 006 //Fulton County Public Library . . . 012 //Chicago Children's Hospital . . . 018 //Housing for Migrant Families . . . 024 //Davis Center Renovation . . . 032 //Suburban House Renovation . . . 034

Furniture

II. //Little Tree . . . 038 //Mobilia Abitabile . . . 042 //Concrete Bench . . . 044

Professional Work

III. //Kitchen Renovation . . . 048 //Dickson Building Plan . . . 050 //D3 Natural Systems . . . 052 //Design Cooperative . . . 056

Artwork & Photography

IV. //photography . . . 060 //artwork . . . 066

Supplemental Documents

V. //resume . . . 073


5

Chapters Selected Studio Work I. //Intl. Civil Rights Center for Art . . . 006 //Fulton County Public Library . . . 012 //Chicago Children's Hospital . . . 018 //Housing for Migrant Families . . . 024 //Davis Center Renovation . . . 032 //Suburban House Renovation . . . 034

Furniture

II. //Little Tree . . . 038 //Mobilia Abitabile . . . 042 //Concrete Bench . . . 044

Professional Work

III. //Kitchen Renovation . . . 048 //Dickson Building Plan . . . 050 //D3 Natural Systems . . . 052 //Design Cooperative . . . 056

Artwork & Photography

IV. //photography . . . 060 //artwork . . . 066

Supplemental Documents

V. //resume . . . 073


I N T E R N AT I O N A L C I V L R I G H T S CENTER FOR ART / / M O N T G O M E R Y, A L / / / / FA L L 2 0 1 2 — S P R I N G 2 0 1 3 / / P R O F E S S O R S R A N D A L VA U G H N & B E H Z H A D N A H K J AVA N This project strives to create a piece of iconic architecture that would strengthen the identity of the city and become a landmark object reconnecting the river to the city and providing much needed terminus for the urban corridor.

ABOVE: MONTGOMERY, AL COMMERCE STREET PHOTO

THESIS SUMMARY Survival of the sustainable city is dependent on memorarable experience and identity. Montgomery is the second largest city in Alabama as well as the state’s capital, but most of the working population commutes, leaving much of the downtown vacant outside of business hours. During the 1960’s, the city was not only the center of civil rights movements in the United States, but arguably the world. Today, there is little to suggest the importance of such events and little that gives meaning back to the city. By gaining an iconic object dedicated to sharing an international perspective of civil rights, the identity of the city is strengthened and memorable experiences are given new life.

ABOVE: MONTGOMERY, AL COURT SQUARE PLAZA PHOTO


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // INTERNATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS CENTER FOR ART

LEFT: MONTGOMERY, AL RIVERFRONT TUNNEL PHOTO

LEFT: MONTGOMERY, AL TRAIN SHED PHOTO

BELOW: MONTGOMERY, AL ALABAMA RIVER SKETCH

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ICONIC SKYLINES EXPERIMENT

ICONIC OBJECTS STRENGTHEN THE IDENTITY OF CITIES AND THE ‘LINK’ BETWEEN MEMORABLE EXPERIENCE AND PLACE.

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WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // INTERNATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS CENTER FOR ART

PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT SITE ANALYSIS

offices/ admin

lecture hall/ auditorium

multimedia gallery

artist studio + shop

plaza/ terrace

shop/ coat check

galleries

discovery lounge

entrance lobby

loading dock

cafeteria/ dining room

performance stage

bicycle parking/ rental

major adjacency winter winds prevail from NE minor adjacency

electric car rental

parking +125ft -140ft

river flood stages: Major Flood Stage: 53 Moderate Flood Stage: 45 Flood Stage: 35 Action Stage: 26 historic crests: (1) 59.70 ft on 04/01/1886 (2) 58.10 ft on 02/26/1961 (3) 57.10 ft on 12/11/1919 (4) 56.90 ft on 03/17/1929 (5) 56.00 ft on 11/30/1948

approx elevation of montgomery 200ft above sea level

summer winds prevail from SW p optimum orientation for verti vertical surface: due south sou

+165ft -100ft

capital to river .89 miles

+265ft -0

0ft +180ft ft -85ft

geo-coordinates 32o 22’ N - 86o 18’ W

t sst saa s o oo ppo lllaa l a tta ccee eerr m m m m ccoo

tal capital capi ing building build

sstt

e ar qu t s za ur la co p

dexter ave

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SKETCHES

SECTION LOOKING EAST


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // INTERNATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS CENTER FOR ART

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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STUDY MODEL

TERMINUS SKETCH

SECTION LOOKING SOUTH


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // INTERNATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS CENTER FOR ART

AXON LOOKING NORTHWEST

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SITE PLAN

F U LT O N C O U N T Y CENTRAL PUBLIC LIBRARY / / AT L A N TA , G A / / //SPRING 2012 // P R O F E S S O R S D AV I D YO K U M & BRIAN BELL The project investigates the role of the library within an urban context and aims to once again strengthen the relationship between civic architecture and pedestrian movement. Close proximity to a prominent intersection and a state college within the city drove much of the formal design, while the transitions of functionality within the contemporary library guided programmatic decisions.

AERIAL LOOKING SOUTH

program parking collections/books stacks reading areas computer areas library of the future educational/training areas exhibition/auditorium childrens areas material processing offices workrooms lockers/staff areas lobby/general areas bathrooms storage maintenance/building support mechanical/electrical

collections/books stacks reading areas computer areas material processing library of the future educational/training areas lobby/general areas exhibition/auditorium childrens areas offices workrooms lockers/staff areas mechanical/electrical storage maintenance/building support bathrooms parking

parking collections/books stacks reading areas computer areas material processing mechanical/electrical storage maintenance/building support bathrooms

offices workrooms lockers/staff areas mechanical/electrical storage maintenance/building support bathrooms


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // FULTON COUNTY CENTRAL PUBLIC LIBRARY

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

N

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

library of the future educational/training areas lobby/general areas exhibition/auditorium childrens areas mechanical/electrical storage maintenance/building support bathrooms

marta train station

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SECTION LOOKING WEST

E L E V AT I O N S O U T H


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // FULTON COUNTY CENTRAL PUBLIC LIBRARY

SECTION LOOKING EAST

E L E V AT I O N S O U T H

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PERSPECTIVES

SECTION LOOKING SOUTH


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // FULTON COUNTY CENTRAL PUBLIC LIBRARY

AUDITORIUM STREET RENDERING

NORTHEAST CORNER RENDERING

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TOTO PECTORE C H I L D R E N S C A R D I OVA S C U L A R H O S P I TA L / / C H I C A G O, I L / / / / FA L L 2 0 1 1 - S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 / / PROFESSOR CHRISTIAN DAGG Every child deserves the utmost level of care... As such, Toto Pectore, meaning “with all heart”, describes the dedication behind the design of the hospital and level of commitment to achieving wellness for everyone. Sensitivity to healthy levels of daylight, fresh air, efficiency, and the coexistence of work and play guided the design of the project. 3RD PLACE WINNER ALAGASCO COMPETITION

CONTEXT

site context clark street

harrison street

printers row

chicago,IL

STREET PERSPECTIVE OF ENTRANCE


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // CHICAGO CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

MASSING DIAGRAM program 15 public tree gardens 14 doctor’s offices 13 intensive care 12 nursing 11 central sterile supply 10 laboratory 9 prep/hold/recover 8 cardiovascular surgical suite 7 interventional/diagnostic cardiology 6 pharmacy 5 radiology 4 community services 3 dietary services 2 emergency room 1 patient visitor entrance

AERIAL PERSPECTIVE LOOKING SOUTH

14 13

15

12

10 5 4 3 1

9 7 8

11 6 2

21


toto pectore “with all heart” patient/visitor entrance 1 lobby 2 information 3 waiting 4 admitting 5 office 6 gift shop 7 lavatories emergency 8 ambulance 9 walk in 10 reception 11 triage 12 waiting 13 admitting 14 nurse station 15 exam rooms 16 clean supply 17 soiled utility 18 trash holding 19 consult room 20 medication 21 offices 22 staff lounge 23 conference

nursing 1 patient care unit 2 nurse station 3 clean supply/work 4 soiled utility

6

5 trash holding 6 medication 7 lavatory 8 family lounge 9 classrom

10 playroom 11 staff lounge 12 nourishment 13 staff conference

3

1

4

1 2

4

2

5

6 3 8

18

7

11 5

19 7 21 23

22

9

12

10

13

16

14

15 17

20

11

8

9

10 13 12

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

NURSING FLOOR PLAN


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // CHICAGO CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

VISITOR LOBBY

SECTION PERSPECTIVE

P L AY R O O M

P AT I E N T C A R E U N I T

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F L O O R P L AT E + E G R E S S D I A G R A M

The vertical circulation is also clear and simple. Two egress stairs are near the north and south ends of the builidng with three elevator cores evenly spaced between. There is also a celebratory staircase servicing public spaces such as the cafeteria and auditorium from the lobby. STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM

The project utilizes a steel structural system. The column grid is devised into 30’, 15’, and 20’ bays creating a simple and understandable rhythym.

S E C T I O N D E TA I L P E R S P E C T I V E


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // CHICAGO CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

MODEL PHOTOGRAPHS

ROOF GARDEN PERSPECTIVE

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AFFORDABLE HOUSING P R O J E C T F O R M I G R A N T FA M I L I E S //LAS CRUCES, NM // //SPRING 2011// PROFESSOR SHERI SCHUMACHER In the 19th century Southwest United States, the railroad annihalated our perception of space and time as well as brought a ood of new materials, architecture, industry, and culture. It has proven its effectiveness as a catalyst for urban growth at remarkable rates. Once a small agriculturally based town in New Mexico, Las Cruces is now the fastest growing urban center in the country. Urban expansion threatens agriculturally based life and culture, and the vast number of migrant workers in the region calls for a solution to integrate migrant housing into the community and the infrastructure of the sprawling city.

The design demostrates a commitment to social and environmental sustainability, while fulďŹ lling the need for better living within migrant housing and the surrounding community. The project will serve as a long-term catalyst for migrant living reform, and the architecture is carefully designed to respond to cultural nuance, add aesthetic value, and facilitate better communication within the community.


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // PROJECT FOR MIGRANT FAMILIES

THE LIFE OF MIGRANT FAMILIES

MIGRATION STREAMS

27


SKETCHES


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // PROJECT FOR MIGRANT FAMILIES

EXPLODED PERSPECTIVE

29


SCHEMATIC DRAWINGS

SOUTH VIEW

EAST VIEW

NORTH VIEW


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // PROJECT FOR MIGRANT FAMILIES

SITE PLAN

ASSEMBLY

SITE MODEL

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D A V I S S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y C E N T E R R E N O V AT I O N //BIRMINGHAM, AL // / / FA L L 2 0 1 0 / / PROFESSOR SHERI SCHUMACHER Through the adaptive reuse of the Davis Center, the building is reprogrammed to serve as an epicenter for the surrounding community. Mixed use elements provide places for people to work, play, eat, learn, and dwell. People gain an understanding of agriculture as they gather in pools of space circulating around the site. This project intends to create intriguing entry sequences that entice visitors into the building, while educating them about sustainability through the architecture.

CONTEXT


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // DAVIS SUSTAINABILITY CENTER

SKETCHES

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

33


3 ground story 1. entry pavilion 2. receptive office 3. sustainability education 4. AEC offices 5. recycling drop-off 6. lavs 7. JVUF offices 8. courtyard 9. demonstration kitchen 10. produce management

1

2

4

5

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

ABOVE: SECTION LOOKING NORTH BELOW: PERSPECTIVE LOOKING WEST

6

7

8

9

10


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // DAVIS SUSTAINABILITY CENTER

2

second story 1. lofts 2. health improvement 3. lavs 4. intern housing 5. outdoor education

3

4

5

11

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

ABOVE: SECTION LOOKING WEST BELOW: RESIDENT ENTRY SEQUENCE

35


S U B U R B A N R E N O V AT I O N RE-DWELL HOUSE / / P A L O A LT O , C A / / / / FA L L 2 0 1 0 / / PROFESSOR SHERI SCHUMACHER The Interiors Studio started with a remodeling of its own workspace. As a group, we worked together in a fast paced design charette over a few days and several different designs were congealed into one solution. The studio worked day and night to complete the renovation in a single weekend. Many materials found lying around the building and city were re-used i.e. chairs, shelving, wood, crates, even old car parts. Building on the experiences of our own renovation project, plans for two mid-20th century suburban homes were redesigned for imagined clients. The 24 x 36 inch boards were originally hand drafted.

House A


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SELECTED STUDIO WORK // SUBURBAN HOUSE RENOVATION

IDENTIFYING EXISTING CONDITIONS

House B

GEOMETRIES

RECLAIMING MATERIALS

RENOVATING

CREATING SPACE

PERSONALIZATION

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39

Chapters Selected Studio Work I. //Intl. Civil Rights Center for Art . . . 006 //Fulton County Public Library . . . 012 //Chicago Children's Hospital . . . 018 //Housing for Migrant Families . . . 024 //Davis Center Renovation . . . 032 //Suburban House Renovation . . . 034

Furniture

II. //Little Tree . . . 038 //Mobilia Abitabile . . . 042 //Concrete Bench . . . 044

Professional Work

III. //Kitchen Renovation . . . 048 //Dickson Building Plan . . . 050 //D3 Natural Systems . . . 052 //Design Cooperative . . . 056

Artwork & Photography

IV. //photography . . . 060 //artwork . . . 066

Supplemental Documents

V. //resume . . . 073


LITTLE TREE FURNITURE //AUBURN, AL // / / FA L L 2 0 1 2 / / FREEDOM BY DESIGN As the Project Manager for Freedom By Design, an AIAS design-build organization, I coordinated multiple aspects of the project while working for a local client. The aim of the project was to provide a more efficient use of space through alternative design solutions. These design solutions focused on creating storage that would be highly accessible for the teachers and enhance the learning environment for the students. STUDY MODELS

J O I N T D E TA I L


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // FURNITURE // LITTLE TREE

MOCK-UP

41


S H E E T L AY O U T S

CAD DRAWINGS


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // FURNITURE // LITTLE TREE

D I G I TA L M O D E L

43


I BOX M O B I L I A A B I TA B I L E FURNITURE //AUBURN, AL // / / FA L L 2 0 1 0 / / PROFESSOR ANA SOUZA A piece of furniture wants to be livable space. The aim of this group project was to design furniture that will provide a place to rest while enhancing the environment for all that inhabit the space around it. Likewise, a great piece of furniture is not one that can be sat on or lain upon, but it is an architectural unit that can be inhabited. The piece has a hybrid-cube form capable of being modiďŹ ed according to the wants of the inhabitant and the surrounding activities. William Callahan Tucker Maclamore Kevin Oh


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // FURNITURE // MOBILIA ABITABILE

USER SURVEY MOBILIA ABITABILE A total of forty-two people individually inhabited our furniture for a few minutes at a time. After they were asked a series of questions and replied on a scale of one to ďŹ ve, which was weakest to strongest respectively. The averages of their responses were: how does the project spark your interest? . . . . 4.19/5 how does the project engage you with your surroundings? . . . . 3.83/5 is the project comfortable? . . . . 4.14/5 is the project successful? . . . . 4.57/5 was your experience memorable? . . . 4.54/5

45


concrete i3ENCH As part of a class on structures, the task was to make a piece of concrete furniture. The requirements of the project stipulated a weight of no more than 300 lbs and the capability of being transported easily by two people. As a solution to these problems the bench is designed to be assembled, disassembled, and re-assembled with relative ease. The bench was selected to be moved to a new park addition to the Auburn/Opelika Medical Hospital.

A S S E M B LY D I A G R A M


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // FURNITURE // CONCRETE BENCH

CONSTRUCTED BENCH

RENDERED SKETCH

47


49

Chapters Selected Studio Work I. //Intl. Civil Rights Center for Art . . . 006 //Fulton County Public Library . . . 012 //Chicago Children's Hospital . . . 018 //Housing for Migrant Families . . . 024 //Davis Center Renovation . . . 032 //Suburban House Renovation . . . 034

Furniture

II. //Little Tree . . . 038 //Mobilia Abitabile . . . 042 //Concrete Bench . . . 044

Professional Work

III. //Kitchen Renovation . . . 048 //Dickson Building Plan . . . 050 //D3 Natural Systems . . . 052 //Design Cooperative . . . 056

Artwork & Photography

IV. //photography . . . 060 //artwork . . . 066

Supplemental Documents

V. //resume . . . 073


K I T C H E N R E N O V AT I O N DRAWINGS //CARTERSVILLE, GA // //SUMMER 2012// CLIENT WOODY SANDERS Hired by a client with a background in tile and s t o n e m a s o n r y. T h e d e s i g n phase of the project lasted approximately two weeks. The deliverables consisted of drawings generated from Autodesk Revit.


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // PROFESSIONAL WORK // KITCHEN RENOVATION

51


DICKSON BUILDING PLAN //OPELIKA, AL // //WINTER 2012// CLIENT RACE CANNON

-

-

Was hired by a developer to measure and draw the floorplans of a historic building in the downtown sector of Opelika. The deliverables included an accuratly dimensioned floorplan and photographs.

14' - 5"

3' - 4 1/2"

14' - 5"

3' - 0"

6' - 4 1/2" 13' - 4"

6' - 4 1/2"

3' - 4 1/2"

6' - 4 1/2"

15' - 3" 3' - 4 1/2"

10' - 7" 10' - 7" 3' - 0"

8' - 7"

6' - 0"

3' - 0"

3' - 4 1/2"

3' - 0"

10' - 9" 14' - 10"

9' - 0" 5' - 5"

6' - 5"

4' - 0"

13' - 4"

14' - 0"

12' - 5"

7' - 2"

3' - 4 1/2"

10' - 7"

3' - 4 1/2"

5' - 6" 15' - 3"


3' - 9 1/2"

6' - 5"

6' - 5"

6' - 5"

6' - 5"

11' - 3"

3' - 9 1/2" 3' - 9 1/2" 2' - 4"

2' - 4"

3' - 0"

3' - 0"

3' - 0"

3' - 0"

2' - 6"

8' - 2" 6' - 2"

4' - 8"

5' - 10" 2' - 6"

6' - 4 1/2"

6' - 4 1/2"

6' - 4 1/2"

6' - 4 1/2"

WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // PROFESSIONAL WORK // DICKSON BUILDING PLAN

53


D 3 N AT U R A L S Y S T E M S COMPETITION / / AT L A N TA , G A / / //SUMMER 2011// ARCHITECT TIM SLIGER

Certain crystals, such as quartz, contain a unique natural physical property that allows pressure to be converted into electricity. This property is called the piezoelectric effect. Using this natural process, pressure generated by human steps can be converted into power. Highly dense cities all over the world have the opportunity to generate vast amounts of electricity through the natural movement of their inhabitants. Using a ‘reactive’ floor system containing piezoelectric materials. Areas with high amounts of pedestrian movement would be the greatest sources for harvesting piezoelectricity: Subways, airports, street sidewalks and crosswalks, and even dance floors could be used to generate power and greatly contribute towards a more sustainable future. Set in Times Square, NYC, the pavilion could serve as an experimental application of this technology. Form and the ‘re-active’ floor are informative to visitors and work as one. While generating piezoelectricity, movement is accentuated by luminous effects on all surfaces of the pavilion. The success of the pavilion is further ensured by incorporating a popular theme. Action sports are entertaining refinements of movement and are at the center of extremely large and highly energetic crowds, which is perfectly fitting for such a pavilion. People are attracted to the experience, consequentially generating more power. Thus, the pavilion’s aesthetic, form, and function reinforce one another.

U K


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // PROFESSIONAL WORK // D3 NATURAL SYSTEMS

55

URBAN KINETIC


PIEZO ELECT

CONCEPT SKETCH


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // PROFESSIONAL WORK // D3 NATURAL SYSTEMS

57

OTRICITY


D E S I G N C O O P E R AT I V E INTERNSHIP / / AT L A N TA , G A / / //SUMMER 2011// ARCHITECT TIM SLIGER Over the summer of 2011, I had the opportunity to intern for Atlanta based architect, Tim Sliger. The experience gained from this internship signiďŹ cantly improved my Revit and model crafting skills while further developing my understanding of practicing architecture. In addition to model making in both Revit and by hand (see right), I was able to participate in the design and renovation of a commercial interior space.


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // PROFESSIONAL WORK // DESIGN COOPERATIVE

59

INTERN


61

Chapters Selected Studio Work I. //Intl. Civil Rights Center for Art . . . 006 //Fulton County Public Library . . . 012 //Chicago Children's Hospital . . . 018 //Housing for Migrant Families . . . 024 //Davis Center Renovation . . . 032 //Suburban House Renovation . . . 034

Furniture

II. //Little Tree . . . 038 //Mobilia Abitabile . . . 042 //Concrete Bench . . . 044

Professional Work

III. //Kitchen Renovation . . . 048 //Dickson Building Plan . . . 050 //D3 Natural Systems . . . 052 //Design Cooperative . . . 056

Artwork & Photography

IV. //photography . . . 060 //artwork . . . 066

Supplemental Documents

V. //resume . . . 073


DUDLEY HALL

UNOPENED TEXTBOOK


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // ARTWORK & PHOTOGRAPHY// PHOTOGRAPHY

F I R E S I D E C H AT

63


C H I N AT I F O U N D AT I O N

CAPPORICCI SHOES


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // ARTWORK & PHOTOGRAPHY// PHOTOGRAPHY

CHINA TRAVELS

65


NEW + OLD IN THE MIDWEST


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // ARTWORK & PHOTOGRAPHY// PHOTOGRAPHY

+

67


SUSHI ANYONE? 6’ X 3.5’ ACYLLIC PAINT ON BURLAP


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // ARTWORK & PHOTOGRAPHY// ARTWORK

69


CACTUS 22” X 32” COLORED PENCIL ON ARCHES (HOT PRESS)


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // ARTWORK & PHOTOGRAPHY// ARTWORK

WALTZ 34” X 57” ACRYLIC & LATEX ON PINE DOOR PANEL

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73

Chapters Selected Studio Work I. //Intl. Civil Rights Center for Art . . . 006 //Fulton County Public Library . . . 012 //Chicago Children's Hospital . . . 018 //Housing for Migrant Families . . . 024 //Davis Center Renovation . . . 032 //Suburban House Renovation . . . 034

Furniture

II. //Little Tree . . . 038 //Mobilia Abitabile . . . 042 //Concrete Bench . . . 044

Professional Work

III. //Kitchen Renovation . . . 048 //Dickson Building Plan . . . 050 //D3 Natural Systems . . . 052 //Design Cooperative . . . 056

Artwork & Photography

IV. //photography . . . 060 //artwork . . . 066

Supplemental Documents

V. //resume . . . 073


WILLIAM CALLAHAN // PORTFOLIO // SUPPLEMENTAL DOCUMENTS// RESUME

William J. Callahan 155 Clubhouse Dr. Kennesaw, GA, 30144

wjc0004@auburn.edu 404.394.3173

E DUC ATIO N 2008 – present Auburn University — Auburn, AL School of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, B.S. in Architecture, expected 2013 Honors College University Honors Scholar — GPA 3.6 2012 APLA Faculty & Staff Award Montgomery Chapter of Construction Specifications Institute Scholarship 2011 APLA Dean’s List Award 2010 Heritage Scholarship 2009 P R O F ESSIO N A L E X P E RI E NCE

PK General Contracting — Bedminster, NJ

07.2012 – 08.2012

Sub-Contractor, As a temp employee, I quickly gained hands-on experience renovating commercial office interiors. Learned skills in proper deconstruction methods, light steel framing, drywall, finishing, & painting.

Design Cooperative — Atlanta, GA

2011 & 2012

Intern Architect, As a full-time summer intern, I independently developed schematic drawings, hand-built models, digital BIM models, and construction documents. Gained experience in design-build work through the interior renovation of a commercial space into a professional cafe.

In/Ex Systems — Acworth, GA

07.2007 – 11.2007

Intern, As a part-time after-school hours intern, I independently researched fluid dynamics and mechanical systems as well as analyzed construction documents for operable partition specifications. Additionally, gained experience with job take-off sheets and contractor bidding. L EA DER S H IP E X P E R I E NCE

Freedom by Design — Auburn, AL

2012 – 2013

Project Manager, Coordinated the design and build of several projects for a pre-school specialized in the care of autistic children. The scope of the work ranges from organizational plans, interior renovation, landscape design, and color study to furniture.

Lost Mountain Swim Team — Kennesaw, GA

05.2010 – 08.2010

Assistant Coach, While collaborating with other coaches, administrators, directors, and parents, I coached a team of over 100 swimmers ranging in age from 5–18. Awarded into the team’s Hall of Fame.

Boy Scouts of America — Kennesaw, GA

2008 – 2009

Eagle Scout, Served as patrol leader and instructor of wilderness survival skills and first aid. Also independently directed the design, fund-raising, and build of a project for the Parks Department of Acworth. EX TR AC UR R IC U L A R

Tau Sigma Delta . Honors Society Delta Iota Epsilon . Honors Society Freedom by Design . Student Design-build Organization American Institute of Architecture Students . Student Organization Auburn University Club Water Polo . Athletics

2012 – present 2011 – present 2012 – present 2009 – present 2009 – present

S K IL L S Revit instructor; proficient in: AutoCAD, Ecotect, SketchUp, Adobe Creative Suite, Microsoft Office, OpenProj, sketching, hand-drafting, hand-modeling, and studio photography Fluent in English; semi-fluent in Chinese; basic French & Latin R EF ER EN C ES Christian Dagg, Associate Prof. & Program Chair of Interior Architecture / Auburn University / Auburn, AL daggchr@auburn.edu, 334.844.4519 Sheri Schumacher, Associate Professor of Interior Architecture / Auburn University / Auburn, AL schumsl@auburn.edu, 334.844.5440 Tim Sliger, Principal Architect / Design Cooperative / Atlanta, GA tsliger@d-coop.net, 404.889.5529

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Undergraduate Portfolio // William J. Callahan  

Undergraduate Portfolio William Callahan Auburn University School of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture

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