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WILLAMETTE WEEK PORTLAND’S NEWSWEEKLY

“I’LL RECRUIT OLD HIPPIE CHICKS.” P. 26

NEWS Jo Ann Hardesty’s Failed Power Play. P. 12 DRINK Casting Runes at the LARPer Bar. P. 25

RELIEF TRUMP’S REIGN IS OVER. LET’S REBUILD TOGETHER. PAGE 8

WWEEK.COM

VOL 47/03 11.11.2020

Long Way to Go: Oregon got “tough on crime” —and this family is still paying the price. By RACHEL SASLOW | Page 14


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Willamette Week NOVEMBER 11, 2020 wweek.com


FINDINGS TREVOR GAGNIER

YOU NEED WILLAMETTE WEEK, AND WW NEEDS YOU

“Trump scares the hell out of me, so we need independent journalism.” – Valerie

BIDEN-HARRIS VICTORY PARADE, PAGE 8

I’ve read WW forever, but in 2020, your reporting is more than critical.” – Jan

WHAT WE LEARNED FROM READING THIS WEEK’S PAPER VOL. 47, ISSUE 3 A QAnon believer beat U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley in two-thirds of Oregon counties. 5

Since Music Millennium reopened, sales have roughly equaled figures from last year. 21

Portland celebrated Donald Trump’s defeat on the same street as the last Blazers championship parade. 8

A new Pearl District market is probably the closest thing to a trip to Italy most Portlanders will get this year. 24

A party of seven can no longer be seated indoors at a Portland restaurant. 10

You can now drink a pint of mead and buy your LARPer gear in the same place. 25

Jo Ann Hardesty endorsed Sarah Iannarone too late. 12

At least one member of Oregon’s canna-vet community is celebrating Veteran’s Day by smoking her own crop. 26

Over a span of two decades, Black youth were 13.7 times more likely to be indicted on a Measure 11 charge than their white peers. 15 Larry Muzzy can’t coach his son’s Little League team because at 16, he helped rob a man of his wallet. 17 Last weekend, a local sandwich shop listed their soup of the day as “Trump’s salty tears—priceless.”

“Willamette Week has broken important stories that no one else did or could. The only investigative journalism left in Oregon.” – Bob

Become a friend of Willamette Week.

A Texas-based dancer couldn’t travel to Portland to perform, so he sent his hologram instead. 27

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Julianne R. Johnson was held by Martin Luther King Jr. when she was a baby at Vancouver Avenue First Baptist Church. 28

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ON THE COVER:

OUR MOST TRAFFICKED STORY ONLINE THIS WEEK:

Relief at the polls, jubilation in the streets, photo by Chris Nesseth.

Portland police union files a grievance against the city, challenging the reform measure voters passed overwhelmingly.

MASTHEAD EDITOR & PUBLISHER

Mark Zusman

EDITORIAL

News Editor Aaron Mesh Arts & Culture Editor Matthew Singer Assistant A&C Editor Andi Prewitt Music & Visual Arts Editor Shannon Gormley Staff Writers Nigel Jaquiss, Latisha Jensen, Rachel Monahan, Tess Riski Copy Editor Matt Buckingham

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DIALOGUE

Portland’s protests have not been curbed by election results. In his first public speech since winning election to the Portland City Council, Mingus Mapps denounced demonstrators who vandalized Commissioner Dan Ryan’s home after he voted against proposed police budget cuts. In his speech, Mapps referred to some of the protestors as “the white mob.” A week later, on Nov. 8, protesters broke the windows of Multnomah County Democratic Party headquarters, and spray-painted the building with slogans like “No presidents.” Here’s what our readers had to say:

@r_markillie via Twitter: “It’s almost like you people can’t tell the difference between Democrats and the actual left. ‘No presidents’ is actually a coherent and interesting political thought.”

swankcurtain via wweek.com: “I hope Mingus has a lot more to say. Expressing anger is not the point of direct action, which should aim to enlighten the populace. Provoking cops into acting like dicks isn’t good trouble. Not everyone did it, but everyone kept showing up, knowing full well what the fucking plotline was going to be. Don’t like a statue of some white dude who had the misfortune of being alive in a more primitive culture? Dress the bastard down in humiliating garb, and schedule a weeklong community roast, so everyone can pay their disrespect, before voting on its ultimate fate. That would teach people some shit to remember.”

@marknerys via Twitter: “Dem here cleaning up the glass tonight. I get [that] lots of people across the political spectrum don’t like us (I ain’t mad), but some people may be overestimating the ideological cohesion that exists at the county level. This is an all-volunteer organization.”

@dave_daley_pdx via Twitter: “Completely validates my vote for [Mapps]. A small group of hardcore anarchists has eroded what was once strong support for BLM. I believe they may have actually lost progressives the opportunity to win the U.S. Senate.”

@mayorwheeley via Twitter: “Since you clearly haven’t paid attention to the protests…protesters are not fighting for progressive policies. They are on the streets for Black/brown liberation and the dismantling of the police state. Did you libs abruptly lose critical thinking skills after the election?”

@lumbeescot via Twitter: “Maybe. But are you going to hold police accountable, Mr. ‘I took money from the police union’?”

@SkithDiphi via Twitter: “Huh. It’s almost like people who smash windows aren’t really interested in actual political thought.”

@SalKrinkle via Twitter: “People are stupid. This has gone long past any peaceful protests. I am pretty sympathetic to much of the cause, but the destruction and damage and chaos have deteriorated the efforts of others. This likely isn’t BLM/social justice groups, but even they need another path.”

Dr. Know

Willamette Week NOVEMBER 11, 2020 wweek.com

MW via wweek.com: “How come you don’t mention any of the Black leaders in support of the demonstrations, or the Black activists on the ground leading them? I mean, by now we all get where WW stands, but this article just seemed lazy. Looks like another two Portlanders using their platform to erase so many voices within the Black community.” LETTERS TO THE EDITOR must include the author’s street address and phone number for verification. Letters must be 250 or fewer words. Submit to: 2220 NW Quimby St., Portland, OR 97210. Email: mzusman@wweek.com

BY MART Y SMITH @martysmithxxx

In last week’s column, you wrote, “Penny buried the lead.” No, no, no! It’s “buried the lede.” Use “lede” in your column and send your readers scurrying to their dictionaries (OK, to Google) and they can be happy they learned a new word. —Patricia A. I’m not unsympathetic to your desire to flex on the masses by flaunting your knowledge of late 20th century newsroom slang, Patricia, but before I respond, let’s bring them up to speed. (Spede?) “Lede” is newsroom jargon for the first paragraph of a news story—you know, the one I usually waste on some joke about CrossFit for bears. According to the journalism classes I so conspicuously failed to take, this paragraph should grab the reader “by the lapels” with some gobsmacking revelation and “lead” them into the story. So why isn’t it spelled “lead”? The most frequently cited theory is that “lede” is a holdover from the days of lead type—the spelling “lede” was supposedly adopted to avoid confusion with “lead,” the metal. This strikes me as what we in the news business sometimes call “bullshit.” For starters, Merriam-Webster claims “lede” only dates back to 1970s, by which time hot-lead typesetting was nearing 4

@tamaralynn_g via Twitter: “I am by no means excited by the prospect of a Biden presidency. It is a relief to be done with Trump. I think these so-called anarchists that organize on the internet may have a better result by creating their own utopia somewhere than trying to force a city to change.”

extinction. The lead-type theory also doesn’t explain why other news terms are deliberately misspelled—“graf” for paragraph, for example, or “TK” as an abbreviation for “to come.” A more persuasive rationale is found in Writing to Deadline, a memoir by the probably cigar-chomping Boston Herald newsman Donald Murray: “We used the spelling lede for the word ‘lead’ so it would stand out on the [wire service teletype] printout.” For example, a new opening paragraph for an earlier story might be labeled with the words “NU LEDE.” The misspelling made it clear these words weren’t part of the story itself. All that said, the fact that journalists use this mangled orthography among ourselves doesn’t necessarily mean we should use it in print. After all, we don’t call WW a “nuspaper.” Be honest: Does the spelling “lede” really enhance clarity? Or is it just another pompous affectation to signal the writer’s membership in the journalism in-group? All that said, when I submitted the story I did spell it “lede.” I’ve never met a pompous affectation I didn’t like. QUESTIONS? Send them to dr.know@wweek.com.


MURMURS WESLEY LAPOINTE

REP. JANELLE BYNUM

BYNUM CHALLENGES KOTEK’S HOUSE LEADERSHIP: State Rep. Janelle Bynum (D-Clackamas) has embarked on a challenge to House Speaker Tina Kotek (D-Portland), the longest-serving speaker in Oregon history. Bynum, who is Black, and other members of the BIPOC Caucus are unhappy with Kotek for her handling of allegations against state Rep. Diego Hernandez (D-East Portland). Hernandez is the subject of a House human resources investigation for allegedly creating a hostile workplace for as many as seven womenthe Capitol. In May, Kotek called on Hernandez to resign, a move some members feel deprived him of due process. Bynum, like Hernandez, is a two-term incumbent. In her challenge to Kotek, who became speaker in 2013 and is often mentioned as a possible candidate for governor or Congress, Bynum hopes to knit together members upset by the Hernandez matter as well as moderate Democrats who feel disenfranchised in their caucus. Kotek is eager to hold on to her position and, even with House Democrats giving up a seat in last week’s election, would stand little chance in normal times of her losing the gavel. Bynum hopes to capitalize on the sense of change in the air. “This year has called into question whether we can continue with the status quo,” Bynum says. “More importantly, it is a chance to innovate and push the boundaries while casting aside systems and structures that are inequitable or no longer serve us best.” INFAMOUS WHITE SUPREMACIST DIES: Tom Metzger, neo-Nazi founder of the group White Aryan Resistance, died Nov 4 at age 82 in Southern California, according to the Times of San Diego. A Portland jury ordered Metzger in 1990 to pay $5 million for his role in the racially motivated 1988 murder of Ethiopian immigrant Mulugeta Seraw. Three young skinheads associated with the Portland white supremacist group East Side White Pride beat Seraw to death with

a baseball bat in the Kerns neighborhood. Two years later, a Southern Poverty Law Center attorney convinced the jury in a civil lawsuit that Metzger trained and motivated the men and was partly responsible for Seraw’s murder. CONSPIRACY THEORIST WINS IN 24 COUNTIES: Jo Rae Perkins, the Republican nominee for U.S. Senate who espouses the QAnon conspiracy theory (“Qregon,” WW, Sept. 30, 2020), won in 24 of Oregon’s 36 counties in the Nov. 3 election. Perkins lost to the incumbent, U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) by 57% to 39%. Her higher vote counts in the majority of Oregon counties—most of which are in Southern and Eastern Oregon— could simply be a reflection of GOP strongholds in those regions where residents automatically vote Republican. Although Perkins, a perennial candidate, received scant backing from traditional GOP donors and groups, her percentage of the vote still rivaled that of more mainstream candidates. State Sen. Kim Thatcher (R-Keizer), who ran for secretary of state, won in 28 counties statewide, losing to fellow Sen. Shemia Fagan (D-Portland) with 43% of the vote. Jeff Gudman, the Republican nominee for Oregon treasurer, won the same 28 counties as Thatcher, but got just 41% of the vote in his loss to incumbent Tobias Read. GARBAGE FEE INCREASE PANNED: Metro’s $4 billion transportation measure went down to defeat Nov. 3, as Portland-area voters rejected the largest local tax on the ballot. Within days, the regional government moved to shore up its finances in another department. Metro, which oversees trash and recycling for the tricounty region, told cities this week it would likely raise tipping fees, the charge per ton that haulers pay to dump garbage at Metro’s regional transfer stations, a change first reported by the Portland Tribune. Due to uncertainty about the fiscal

impacts of COVID-19s, Metro did not raise fees during its normal budget cycle in the spring but informed partners of a $9.29 per ton increase— about 8%—this week. It was not well received. In a Nov. 9 Tualatin City Council hearing, Mayor Frank Bubenik said, “Quite a few of us were shocked by this because it seems to come out of left field,” while Councilor Paul Morrison called the midyear hike “unprecedented and extremely unfair.” Metro spokesman Nick Christensen said the increase, on which the Metro Council is likely to vote Dec. 3, has nothing to do with failure of the transportation measure and is needed because garbage tonnage is down while costs are fixed. He says the fee hike would cost the average household just 60 cents a month. INMATE ACCUSED OF MAIL HARASSMENT: A registered nurse at the Multnomah County Jail in downtown Portland filed a lawsuit in circuit court Nov. 9, accusing the county of negligence, creating a hostile work environment, and sexual harassment by a non-employee after the nurse’s personal information was allegedly disclosed to one of the jail’s inmates. Plaintiff Tommie Norton says he received notification from his supervisor in November 2019 that his personal information had been “leaked” to an inmate named Colby “Tesla” Alpin. Norton then began receiving letters from Alpin at his home address. The lawsuit says the letters included “threats, explicit language, and personal information about plaintiff,” and that some letters contained unspecified “bodily fluids.” Norton says he notified the county of the unwanted letters, but the county did not intercept the correspondence until March 2020, when his attorneys sent a tort claim notice to the county for damages. Norton is seeking $100,000. The Multnomah County Sheriff ’s Office, which oversees the jail, did not respond to WW’s request for comment.

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TREVOR GAGNIER

Letter From the Publisher

his annual letter to you, our readers, is at least a week late. But I simply could not place this past year in context without knowing which future our nation faces. My joy at the result of last week’s presidential election is tempered by the fact that more than 70 million people were willing to vote for the incumbent, despite all we know about the damage he has wreaked on our country. I’ve never been so relieved to have an election behind us (despite what he may think). This nation urgently needs to heal. Nowhere more so than in this city, which has been torn apart by unemployment and unrest for the past six months, and no place more than downtown, Portland’s most important neighborhood, which faces enormous challenges if it is to restore its vitality. And with that, here is WW’s annual status report on how we are doing. As with most of you, it has been a year like no other.

A year like no other

Our finances

Our philanthropy

On March 13, our entire staff moved out of the office to work remotely, and we expect to continue to do so well into next year. On March 23, when Gov. Kate Brown ordered the shuttering of theaters, clubs, museums, bars and restaurants, our advertising revenue vanished. We responded by cutting the number of printed copies of the paper, reducing our workforce by a few non-editorial employees, and reducing the hours of some others. In June, we qualified for a federal loan under the CARES Act. In response to the recession, we put renewed emphasis on Friends of Willamette Week, a voluntary membership program (similar to what has long provided support for Oregon Public Broadcasting). Our appeal is simple—the new normal will simply not sustain a journalistic enterprise without reader revenue. Thankfully, more than 6,300 of you responded! The consequence of your support and the federal loan (a portion of which will be forgiven) means that, with a bit of luck, we will break even in 2020.

Among WW’s many endeavors, few make us prouder than Give!Guide, our annual campaign to raise money for almost 200 local nonprofits. Last year, we raised more than $4.7 million. This year, we have a new executive director, Toni Tringolo. Despite the recession and our need to cancel the traditional kickoff party, Tringolo hopes to raise $5 million for 174 local nonprofits. Let this be my encouragement for you to visit our G!G website and break out your credit card. And don’t miss any of our Big Give Days, which carry with them tremendous incentives.

Our events Like many organizations, we put all of our live events on hold this year. No Best of Portland party, no Cultivation Classic event at Revolution Hall. But the team at WW pivoted impressively. We turned Cultivation Classic— our annual competition for the best organically grown Oregon cannabis—into Willamette Weed, a week of virtual events, from a 420 social hosted by a local comedian to an “Ask the Budtender” evening to a virtual Cultivation Classic awards show. TechfestNW, a celebration of startups and the entrepreneur, is also going virtual this December with stimulating speakers and all ticket revenue going to local nonprofits. And even WW’s Oregon Beer Awards, scheduled for February, will be a virtual event. We’ve also been doing a number of smaller virtual events, such as an hour with Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Nigel Jaquiss, another with Dr. Know and, just last week, a livestream hosted by news editor Aaron Mesh with one of the country’s leading experts on elections law, former Oregon Secretary of State Phil Keisling. We will continue to try and use virtual platforms for our events as this pandemic continues.

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Our journalism In a year when many local newspapers slashed newsrooms and some even ceased publication, we felt we had to do the opposite. 2020 may have been the most important year for journalism in Portland in several decades. The public health crisis of COVID; the protests and violence and seeming inability of city officials to demonstrate leadership; the recession that has shuttered some of the very essence of Portland; and the election itself—this was a year when journalism needed to step up, not take a back seat. And we tried to do our part. Some of our standout work included: • Our analysis of why investigations of police misconduct go nowhere and remain secret. • Our investigation into the highly unusual use of campaign funds by state Rep. Jennifer Williamson, the Democratic front-runner for Oregon secretary of state. Because of our reporting, Williamson dropped out of the race. • Our revealing the location of the largest workplace outbreak of COVID -19 in Oregon, after state health officials wouldn’t release the information. Our reporting led to a statewide policy change—requiring the disclosure of all workplace outbreaks that sicken five or more people—and illustrated the plight of migrant farmworkers exposed to the virus while the state remained silent. • Our look at the environmental wreckage left off Oregon’s coast after Facebook tried to drill an undersea cable revealed how top state officials have sold Oregon’s beaches to corporate interests for a pittance. In April and again in October, we endorsed candidate and positions on measures in every race on Portlandarea ballots. Endorsements rarely win us any friends,

but they are a cornerstone of our civic responsibility to weigh in on the future of the state. We hope you agree that we fulfilled that duty during extraordinary times. WW’s staff responded to the challenges of this year in ways that even surprised me. In June, we added to our newsroom with the hiring of reporter Latisha Jensen, who amid her coverage of Portland east of 82nd Avenue, has documented the disparate experiences of being Black and white in Portland. Next week, Finder, typically our annual guide to Portland, has been reformatted and focuses on businesses owned and operated by people of color across this city. It will be included in every issue of the paper, and will be available at New Seasons and Powell’s Books. And not long after social distancing began, our staff began shooting daily 10-minute video interviews with prominent and little-known Portlanders. Called Distant Voices, it has become a way to tell the human stories that continue even as Portlanders remain in their homes. The result of all this is that WW has grown its audience significantly. While our print readership has declined a bit because we are printing fewer newspapers (and hope to increase circulation when the city opens up), our readership online has grown 65% year over year. And more than 40,000 of you subscribe to the Daily Primer, our digital version of the newspaper that arrives in your email every morning. For more than 30 years, my business partner Richard Meeker and I have been enormously grateful that we get to work in a city and state that, more than most, appreciates the importance of locally owned and genuinely independent journalism. We’ve never felt more strongly about that then we do this year, nor more aware of the responsibility we have to do an even better job next year. And we’ve never been prouder of a staff of people who are committed to the idea that democracy will not survive without robust, fearless and caring local journalism. With your help, we will continue to fulfill this role. It is only because of your engagement and support that we play our part in this wonderful city. Thank you, Mark L. Zusman, Publisher


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STREET

RELIEF Photos by Chris Nesseth On Instagram: @chrisnesseth

Portlanders started popping bottles before noon on Nov. 7. What better excuse to day drink? President Donald Trump had lost his bid for reelection, and jubilant citizens poured into the streets. Even as state officials announced a record one-day number of new COVID-19 cases—988 of them—this city’s residents were too excited to stay home. A four-year nightmare was ending. And a city Trump had made his scapegoat and testing ground for federal quelling of protest again took to the streets—to party. In the hours after news outlets declared former Vice President Joe Biden the next president, Portlanders shot fireworks, honked car horns, and held champagne parties in city parks. Residents of Pearl District condo towers banged pots and pans outside their windows, an echo of the nightly ritual of thanking hospital workers and first responders at the start of the pandemic. A line of honking cars circled Pioneer Courthouse Square, with children waving flags out of sunroofs and windows. The scene was a far cry from the bitter protests of the past four years that often pitted dueling groups against each other, and Portlanders against federal police. Instead, the car cavalcade recalled the last Portland Trail Blazers championship parade in 1977. “Na na na na, na na na na, hey hey hey, goodbye!” revelers chanted. That release then gave way to a new stage of suspense: An anxious nation now waits to see if the president will concede, if Republicans will back his false claims of voter fraud, and whether Trump will, at long last, cease to befoul the Oval Office. LATISHA JENSEN and AARON MESH.

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BRIAN BURK

NEWS

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS WEEK

TRENDING

COVID AT WORK

Maximum Occupancy The governor asks: How large is your party? 50 Number of people who can gather in a bar, restaurant, gym, fitness studio, bowling alley, ice rink, swimming pool or museum 6 Number of people who can gather in a private residence if the event includes people outside their household

EXTRAORDINARY MEASURES: Multnomah County elections workers triumphed amid a pandemic.

Outsiders In Voters showed their dissatisfaction after a summer of unrest in Portland. BY TE SS R I S K I

tess@wweek.com

In Portland, Nov. 3 was a change election. It just didn’t always result in change. The outsiders challenging incumbents at Portland City Hall made significant gains between the May and November elections. Voter dissatisfaction was sharp enough to oust Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, but Mayor Ted Wheeler barely held onto his job.

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Challenger Mingus Mapps trailed Commissioner Chloe Eudaly by less than 3 percentage points in the primaries. But in the November runoff, Mapps more than tripled his vote count; Eudaly did not. That resulted in a Mapps win by more than 12 percentage points last week. • Commissioner Chloe Eudaly received 66,757 votes in the primaries and 144,687 in the general election. That’s a gain of 77,930 votes. • Challenger Mingus Mapps received 61,049 votes in the primaries and 185,598 in the general election. That’s a gain of 124,549—46,619 more new votes than Eudaly gained. Source: Oregon Secretary of State

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Mayor Ted Wheeler failed to secure reelection during the May primary by less than 1 percentage point. That resulted in a N ove m b e r r u n o f f , where he beat his opponent Sarah Iannarone by over 19,000 votes, as of press deadlines on Oct. 10. But Iannarone narrowed the gap between herself and Wheeler significantly, by nearly tripling her vote total between races. • Incumbent Mayor Ted Wheeler received 109,159 votes in the primaries and 165,443 in the general election. That’s a gain of 56,284 votes. • Challenger Sarah Iannarone received 53,306 votes in the primaries and 146,299 in the general election. That’s a gain of 92,993 votes—36,709 more new votes than Wheeler gained.

PORTLAND CITY COUNCIL, POSITION 4

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An analysis of the raw totals of votes show a wave of support for the two candidates—Mingus Mapps and Sarah Iannarone—who had never before held elected office. Their numbers appear to be driven by a summer of protests and civil unrest, which resulted in a swell of anti-incumbent sentiment. Here’s what a comparison of the primary and general elections reveals:

Oregon COVID-19 cases are again spiking to never-before-seen rates. Infections were up more than 30% in the week ending Nov. 7. So too were the percentage of tests coming back positive: more than 10% in the week ending Nov. 7. On bad days, the state is nearing 1,000 new cases a day. Gov. Kate Brown’s solution is not to lock down the state or even counties—but to limit some activities in any county with 200 cases per 100,000 people in a two-week period or, in counties with a population under 30,000 people, 60 cases over a two-week period. So far, that means Baker, Clackamas, Jackson, Malheur, Marion, Multnomah, Umatilla, Union and Washington counties. All three of the most populous counties in the Portland metro region are on what Brown is calling “a two-week pause.” That pause starts Nov. 11. The governor’s magic number for reducing virus spread? Six people. That’s the cap she asked Oregonians to set on their home gatherings, and the largest party now allowed at an indoor table at a restaurant or bar. But 50 people, including staff, can still be in the same room at most businesses. Her effort earned mixed reviews: The state’s restaurants are pissed. They argue that only one part of the governor’s instructions is enforceable— the one that applies to them. “There will be thousands of operators across the state who will be unable to comprehend an additional arbitrary limit on the total number of people they can have indoors with no consideration given to the square footage available,” says Jason Brandt, president and CEO of the Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association. “We will have less paychecks to provide to struggling Oregonians, less opportunity for Oregonians to take a ‘mental health break’ in controlled restaurant environments, and we will drive more people to unregulated, private gatherings leading up to the Thanksgiving holiday.” One longtime critic who thinks Brown is playing politics with the pandemic is also raising questions—about allowing indoor drinking and dining to continue at all. “I do believe indoor bars and restaurants should probably be closed,” says Multnomah County Commissioner Sharon Meieran. “What our economy needs to be healthy is for people to be healthy.” RACHEL MONAHAN.


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Who Gets Targeted in Hate Crimes? Bias crimes have spiked since racial justice protests began. Most of the victims are Black. Dontae Mathis, a Black business owner, was a victim of hate crime this year. Mathis, 43, owns the T-shirt-making business Like Dat Apparel in the Foster-Powell neighborhood. On June 7, it was vandalized. Video footage shows two older white men gazing briefly at the shirts reading “Black Lives Matter” in his window before spray-painting, “All Lives Matter,” and posting cardboard signs crossing out the letters “BLM.” Mathis says that ever since he posted BLM material in the window, his shop has been graffitied at least once or twice a month. “I was upset. I was angered,” he says. “It kind of makes you question everybody that comes into your store, but also makes you question everybody that walks by that doesn’t look your way.” Mathis is experiencing a trend. According to the Oregon Department of Justice’s interactive portal, the number of reported bias crimes in the state more than doubled from May to June, when the racial justice movement erupted in protests. Among all reported hate crimes and bias incidents in Oregon this year, the most common motive for the perpetrator was race. Data reveals an unsurprising result: The majority of victims of those crimes were Black people. In June, Black people were the victims in 76 out of the 106 reported racially motivated bias incidents and have been overrepresented ever since. In August, that number was 113 out of 155, and in September, it was 47 out of 64. White people were victims in three or fewer

reported incidents each of those months. The nonprofit Portland United Against Hate also tracked hate crimes this year and cited race as the most frequently reported motive for attacks as well. Hate crimes are severely underreported across the nation. The FBI had 7,500 reports annually between 2013 and 2017 while the Bureau of Justice Statistics had over 200,000 reports annually. PUAH executive director Debra Kolodny says part of the reason is lack of trust. “Underreporting is horrific, for the reasons you would expect,” Kolodny says. “Targeted communities don’t trust law enforcement, so they’re not reporting to the police or the FBI for good reasons.” Is the increase in hate crimes a result of Black people being emboldened by protests into reporting incidents more often? Kolodny doesn’t think so. Instead, they say the spike in targeting is a byproduct of increased visibility—and backlash. Consider how Muslims were treated after Sept. 11, 2001. The DOJ website shows that in March and April, Asian communities reported the most cases of hate and bias incidents among all racial demographics. Now the targets are Black people, as protests for racial equity near 180 days. “For those of us who are targeted all the time, it’s not surprising,” Kolodny says. “It may be for those of us who live in glorious isolation who are not day to day affected by this.” LATISHA JENSEN.

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NEWS ALEX WITTWER

HARD CONVERSATIONS: Jo Ann Hardesty says her lived experience puts her in a different place from her colleagues: “White people will never be comfortable talking about racial inequality. Without discomfort, nothing significant will ever happen.”

Bad Timing Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty ceded some leverage at City Hall with tactical electoral missteps. BY NIG E L JAQ UI SS

njaquiss@wweek.com

City Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty was not on the ballot last week. But the night of Nov. 3 was in some important ways a defeat for her. To be sure, Hardesty can take credit for the biggest local win of election night—the 82% to 18% approval of Measure 26-217, which creates a new oversight board for the Portland Police Bureau. But the two City Council candidates Hardesty endorsed, mayoral hopeful Sarah Iannarone and incumbent Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, both lost. Two days later, Hardesty insisted on a vote on her proposal to cut $18 million from the PPB budget. Her colleagues, including Commissioner Dan Ryan, who won his seat in August with a ringing endorsement from Hardesty, voted against her 3-2. Hardesty seemed to recognize that an opportunity had slipped from her grasp. “Just for a second, Black lives mattered in Portland,” Hardesty said on the dais. “We will continue to talk about Black lives, but we won’t do anything to make them better.” The string of setbacks puzzled observers, who had watched Hardesty skillfully transition from an outside advocate to a skilled City Hall power broker. Since winning election in 2018, she used her decades of experience to advance an aggressive agenda on the Portland Clean Energy Fund, a new alternative to policing called Portland Street Response, and historic cuts to the police budget in June. Hardesty carried unmatched moral authority as the longtime champion of police reform and the only Black member of the City Council, and she wasn’t afraid to use it. For two years, she has often set the agenda at City Hall, particularly on public safety—and most other officials, including Mayor Ted Wheeler, have deferred to her. 12

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Her recent moves came in pursuit of the same agenda: greater equity for people of color and a diminution of power for the Portland Police Bureau. But this time, her decisions looked rash—and they produced different results. “She pulled back from the mayor, endorsed Chloe and put Ryan on the spot,” says lobbyist Len Bergstein. “I think her choices really isolated her.” Hardesty says police reform is more important than playing it safe and the nearly six months of protests have created a rare window of opportunity. “I’m frustrated with the pace of change,” she says. Hardesty is an experienced politician and advocate: She served three terms in the Oregon House from 1995 to 2001 representing Northeast Portland and later led Oregon Action and the NAACP of Portland. Since Minneapolis police killed George Floyd on May 25, Hardesty’s decades of advocacy for police reform gave her the authority to lead the conversation about how to remake the city’s largest general fund bureau. In June, she convinced Wheeler and Commissioner Amanda Fritz, who had been resistant to making additional cuts to the police budget, to join her in lopping off another $15 million. With Wheeler’s reelection bid looking shaky, and a largely peaceful Black Lives Matter movement dominating the political conversation, Hardesty appeared set to be in the driver’s seat as policing dominated the election agenda. In June, Hardesty publicly rebuked Eudaly for being a “performative ally,” pushing for $50 million in police budget cuts rather than the $15 million cut Hardesty had crafted. She said the larger number was unrealistic and untethered to any analysis or policy decisions.

But at the end of September, Hardesty abruptly reversed course and endorsed Eudaly. At the time, Eudaly trailed challenger Mingus Mapps by double digits in polls. Hardesty also decided to let her primary election endorsement of Wheeler lapse. But she did not endorse Iannarone until very late: Oct. 29, when most ballots had already been returned. “We would have preferred to have it as soon as possible,” says Iannarone’s campaign manager, Greg McKelvey. Hardesty acknowledges struggling with that decision. Most incumbents don’t endorse in contested races because they may have to work with somebody they rejected. Hardesty ignored that tradition—twice. “I could not in good conscience endorse the mayor,” she says. “I was going to stay out because of potential fallout. But I could not stay out.” Iannarone came very close to winning. She narrowed a 25% gap behind Wheeler in the May primary to 5 points in November. An unusually large number of voters—just over 13%—chose, however, to write in a candidate. (Elections officials do not release data on write-ins, but supporters of Don’t Shoot Portland founder Teressa Raiford ran an organized write-in campaign for her.) “Clearly, there was a disconnect on the left about what was good enough,” Hardesty says. “The left is consistent at pulling defeat out of the jaws of victory. There’s a purity test on the far left just as there is on the right.” Eudaly also lost badly to Mapps. Hardesty’s attempt to play kingmaker left progressives like Margot Black, a founder of Portland Tenants United, demoralized. “The Portland left struggles with its long game: defining it and organizing toward it in a cohesive and strategic way,” Black says. “In this case, instead of a strong progressive majority on council, one that would represent workers, renters and disenfranchised communities, we essentially decided to cut off our nose to spite our face. Renters and police accountability will pay the price.” Hardesty’s decision making looked more reactive than strategic: She endorsed Eudaly after Mapps questioned the elimination of the Police Bureau’s gun violence reduction team, a move Hardesty championed, and threw her support to Iannarone after Wheeler declined on Oct. 28 to support police cuts. Hardesty is at peace with the decisions she made, including calling her colleagues “cowardly” when they failed to support her push to slash police spending. “Whether I had a third vote [on PPB cuts] or not, it’s an important vote to have,” Hardesty says. “After 75,000 emails and hundreds of people writing letters and hundreds more testifying, it’s clear to me that the public wants a fundamental shift—and it’s clear the Police Bureau is out of control.” She says, despite the election results, she expects to have a productive relationship with Wheeler. “He and I agree on so many of the crises we are responding to,” Hardesty says. “I expect to get back to the relationship we had.” Wheeler, too, thinks he and Hardesty can resume their effective partnership. “Our relationship is solid,” he says. But Wheeler says that wanting change and actually implementing it are different. He points to Portland Street Response, which the council approved a year ago but, under Hardesty’s supervision, is still months from going live. “When people say I’m slow or methodical, that’s not the case,” Wheeler says. “I’m just being realistic. You can’t make new programs work on day one, and I’m always going to want to know how any changes affect public safety.” Wheeler’s goal, he says, is to pull together the newly elected council, which will also include Commissioner-elect Carmen Rubio, who succeeds Fritz in January. “People are tired of the divisiveness,” he says. “It’s exhausting and that’s not what we’re about here in Portland.” Hardesty’s not so sure. She says with soaring overtime costs and city revenues being crunched by COVID-19, she intends to renew her attack on PPB’s budget in January, when the new council is sworn in. “I’m not here,” she says, “to sing ‘Kumbaya.’”


NEWS HUMANISTIC

Search and Rescue Your phone knows you too well. Tom Gruber knows why. BY AN T H O N Y E F F I N G ER

aeffinger@gmail.com

Last month, the U.S. Department of Justice sued Alphabet Inc., saying its Google unit abuses monopoly power to fend off rivals in internet search and search advertising. Khari Johnson, a writer at VentureBeat, says the Google suit has a hidden target: artificial intelligence, or AI. In this case, AI is the algorithm that helps Google figure out what exactly it is you want to find while searching. Those algorithms learn by doing, so the more searches they do, the smarter they get. The strong get stronger. “The volume, variety and velocity of data accelerates the automated learning of search and search advertising algorithms,” the DOJ complaint says. One man understands how search practice perfects AI: Tom Gruber. He’s a pioneer in artificial intelligence and the co-inventor of Siri. Since selling Siri to Apple in 2010, though, Gruber has become one of a small group of technologists who have grown wary of the AI they helped create. He plans to talk about the danger—and promise— of artificial intelligence at WW’s virtual TechfestNW on Dec. 2-4. For Gruber, it’s all about the scale: YouTube, another Alphabet property, and Facebook have more than 2 billion users each, making them as big as the world’s two biggest religions, Christianity and Islam, Gruber says. “And I would add that even the people who pray to Mecca five times a day, only do it five times a day,” Gruber says. “Our millennials check their phones 150 times a day.” All that data makes the tech giants smarter, Gruber says. And he should know. Siri grew out of a Stanford spinoff called SRI International. Gruber consulted at SRI in 2007, and, soon

after, he and two others, Dag Kittlaus and Adam Cheyer, spun off a newer digital assistant technology that went beyond SRI’s work for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. They named the new company Siri, which means “beautiful woman who leads you to victory.” Siri is actually a collection of powerful neural networks: mathematical formulas running on computers that analyze huge amounts of data and learn the patterns within them. Turn a neural net loose on a million samples of spoken language, and it will start to recognize words and their meaning. No longer do programmers have to tell computers what to do, logic step by logic step. Steve Jobs persuaded Gruber and his partners to sell to Apple in 2010 for some $200 million, according to Wired magazine. Gruber retired from Apple in 2018 and founded Humanistic AI, a firm that helps companies use machine intelligence to collaborate with humans, not replace—or terrorize—them. Unlike some AI doomsayers, including Tesla inventor Elon Musk and podcasting neuroscientist Sam Harris, Gruber thinks AI can be tamed. Right now, it’s a science experiment gone wrong. Frankenstein never meant for his monster to become a killer, and Zuckerberg, he says, never intended Facebook to set us at each other’s throats, over politics or anything else. “My argument is that this is an unintended consequence,” Gruber says. “We’ll give them a pass on being evil geniuses. Maybe some of them are. But let’s assume good intentions.” When it comes to Zuckerberg, assuming good intentions is controversial. In July, Facebook agreed to pay a record $5 billion fine to settle charges by the

Federal Trade Commission that it abused users’ personal information. So call Gruber an optimist. He thinks the same algorithms that prey on our bad habits can be used to encourage good ones. Tech companies make excuses for why they can’t police their networks, and most involve money. So far, humans are better at sorting lies from truth, and hate from news. That means you have to hire a lot of humans, which is anathema to the tech monopolies. Gruber says they need to suck it up. “It’s like when the auto industry said, ‘Air bags are going to put us out of business, so don’t impose this onerous thing on us,’” Gruber says. “It’s all bullshit.” And there’s more. Why not run all these vast experiments on human behavior to improve human life, instead of wrecking it? Why not use AI to change the habits that lead to type 2 diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and suicide? “We have weak theories about what makes people tick and what to do to help them do better things,” Gruber says. “But AI has shown that if you want to get 2 billion people addicted to something that’s not good for them, you can do it.” AI doesn’t know if it’s operating for good or evil, Gruber says. Someday it may, but for now, it’s up to humans to direct it. So far, we’ve been crappy shepherds. Editor’s note: A slightly different version of this story appeared in WW in the spring, before TechfestNW was canceled due to COVID19 and rescheduled for this December. The event will be held virtually Dec. 2-4. Tickets are available at techfestnw.com.

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Larry Muzzy’s History Oregonians sent a frightened 17-yearold boy to prison. My family helped.

LONG WAY HOME: Larry Muzzy lives in Charleston, S.C. He tends bar, raises his sons, and wants a second chance. BY R AC H E L SAS LOW

Larry Muzzy, a 40-year-old father of two, has a box in his attic that makes him sick to his stomach. The box lives underneath his son’s old drum kit and next to the Christmas ornaments. It used to be heavy with court documents. Now, it contains a photo album, his mother’s wedding ring, his birth certificate, and a 1-gallon Ziploc bag with the paperwork that could change his life. What’s in that box is “really an emotional weight,” he said. “Kind of like dread.”

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n 1996, Muzzy was 16 and a popular varsity swimmer in his junior year at David Douglas High School. He had just earned a spot in the school’s elite Troubadours choir, all that belting out Boyz II Men ballads into his mom’s candlesticks paying off. 14

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Larry and his twin brother, Gary, were interracial children, raised by a single mother in the Parkrose neighborhood of Northeast Portland. Their father took off before they were born. The night before Halloween that year, Muzzy and four acquaintances left church youth group early in a car. They saw a man walking alone in the dark at East Burnside Street and 162nd Avenue. Court documents state that one of the teens, Daniel Solis, showed his friends a 3-inch knife and suggested they steal the man’s wallet. “At trial, defendant [Muzzy] continued his claim that he never saw the knife or knew that a robbery was going to occur,” the documents say. Solis and Muzzy got out of the car and stood in front of the victim on the sidewalk, and Solis demanded his wallet. When the victim, who declined to speak to WW, asked if

this was a joke, Solis pulled the knife and said, “Does this look like a joke, motherfucker?” The victim tossed them the wallet and ran. In the car, the boys were laughing and hyped up. They took out the money and ditched the wallet at a gas station. Muzzy got home and felt the pull of his conscience. “Something happened,” Muzzy told his mother. Muzzy and his mom went to the gas station and searched the trash cans, but two days had passed and the wallet was gone. “You have to turn yourself in,” Michele Straub remembers telling her son, so she took him to the Gresham Police Department, which has become her lifelong regret. Detectives interviewed Muzzy without a lawyer present. “My point of view at that time was, the truth will set him free and we will be good,” Straub said.


ALEX WITTWER

Instead, it led to a charge of first-degree robbery, a felony, because the state argued that Muzzy’s presence on the sidewalk prevented the victim from fleeing and was therefore “aiding and abetting.” More importantly, it was a Measure 11 crime. To many Oregonians, Measure 11 means little. To anyone who works or has interacted with the criminal justice system, it may be the most consequential change in state criminal law in the past 40 years. Passed in 1994 by voters, Measure 11 was Oregon’s contribution to the nationwide “tough on crime” era that began in the 1980s and coincided with the crack cocaine epidemic. In essence, Measure 11 removed the discretion of judges when sentencing defendants 15 and up convicted of any number of crimes, such as murder, robbery or rape. Under Measure 11, there was no possibility of parole, even with good behavior. The popular slogan for the law was “one strike, you’re out.” And while this new law might seem more at home in a less progressive state, Oregon voters passed the measure by a huge margin. “There was a really different culture throughout our government in the ’90s. Everyone wanted to fight the drug war and be ‘tough on crime,’” says Aliza Kaplan, a professor at Lewis & Clark Law School and director of the Criminal Justice Reform Clinic. “No blue state was immune from that.” Looking back at racism in Oregon, it’s easy to tsk-tsk the rise of the Ku Klux Klan in the state in the 1920s, the Vanport flood disaster of 1948, and running Interstate 5 straight through a Black neighborhood. It’s less comfortable to realize that a predominantly Democratic electorate in Oregon passed Measure 11 by a landslide of two-thirds, a law that has disproportionately affected the state’s Black community. Courts apply Measure 11 dramatically differently depending on race: From 1994 to 2012, Black youth were 13.7 times more likely to be indicted on a Measure 11 charge than their white peers, according to a report by the Oregon Council on Civil Rights. Oregon has made some important changes to its criminal justice system over the past decade, including further limiting the death penalty and, just last week, decriminalizing the possession of small amounts of hard drugs. But Oregon has yet to repeal Measure 11. Legislators have tinkered with it, trying to soften the effects of mandatory minimum sentences, but the law still stands. And in 1996, Muzzy was poised to be one of the first kids the state would put away under Measure 11.

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uzzy’s court-appointed attorney, Gary Bertoni, encouraged him to take a plea bargain that would give him three years in prison, but Muzzy refused and decided to take his chances at trial. The boy with the knife, Solis, was found guilty by a jury and sentenced to almost eight years, so Bertoni thought his client might have a better chance waiving his right to a jury trial and having his case decided by a judge. On Aug. 29, 1997, Multnomah County Circuit Judge Douglas Beckman’s courtroom was packed with Muzzy’s friends, family, coaches, pastors, teachers and neighbors. The judge had a stack of 52 letters by character witnesses for Muzzy on his desk. From a “concerned mother and citizen”: “Larry Muzzy is a tender, sweet young man, whom like so many of our youth, is simply a product of our imperfect world. The thought of such a person spending one night in the presence of ‘real’ criminals brings stinging tears of sadness and frustration to my eyes.” From the elderly couple on his block: “He is kind, courteous and considerate of all the neighbors.… Just the other day he kindly helped me move a large upright freezer from our house to our garage. I’ve seen him mow the lawn of a neighbor lady, Mrs. Swanson, who is alone, and she told me he wouldn’t allow her to pay him.” Even the victim asked the judge for leniency for Muzzy, saying he had played only a minor role in the crime. Judge Beckman—a white, Yale-educated, 52-yearold jurist who had been on the bench for four years— gestured toward the United States and Oregon flags behind him. “The flags are higher than I am because I am below the law,” he said. “I have to do what it says.” He sentenced Muzzy to the mandatory minimum: 90 months with no possibility of parole. The judge was my father.

BAND OF BROTHERS: Today, Gary Muzzy and his wife live in Damascus with their four children. He coaches Parkrose High School’s swimming and water polo teams and runs a youth sports nonprofit called Crush Athletics. “My life, in one word, is ‘blessed.’”

“The flags are higher than I am because I am below the law,” he said. “I have to do what it says.” —Judge Douglas Beckman

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rules of Measure 11. Mandatory minimums made him feel less like a judge and more like “a rubber stamp.” At the sentencing, he barely held it together. Since Measure 11 was so new, he wasn’t sure the Muzzys understood that his hands were tied. He knew the family was furious at him; he felt frustrated and sad. “I just hoped the time in custody would not crush a guy that I thought didn’t deserve it.”

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HANDS TIED: Retired Multnomah County Circuit Judge Douglas Beckman says Measure 11 reduced his ability to render just decisions. “We became just functionaries of the state,” he says. “Why am I even there, other than to run the trial and call balls and strikes when people made objections?”

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his summer, I got together with my father, who is now retired, on a quiet neighborhood street abutting a community garden in St. Johns to see a Black Lives Matter mural. For the first time, I learned about Larry Muzzy. I was also in high school in Portland in the late 1990s. Dad remembered the trial in surprising detail, considering he heard the case 23 years ago. “Tough case,” he said, shaking his head. A few weeks later, I pressed him for more details. He said Muzzy’s case was the hardest of his judicial career and that it made him “almost not want to be a judge anymore.” In the weeks between the trial and the sentencing, he pored over law books in his chambers. He researched state and federal law on disproportionality, unequal protection under the law, cruel and unusual punishment—anything to find wiggle room to give Muzzy a lesser sentence for his minor role in the crime. He asked Judge Harl Haas, who presided over Solis’ trial, to help him. They came up empty. “I hated this case,” he said. “As a judge, I have to follow the law, and the law was pretty clear that I had to do something that was unfair. I think it was horrible as applied to Larry.” I asked why he didn’t find Muzzy not guilty. “I wanted to. But I thought that he was guilty beyond a reasonable doubt,” he said. In a pre-Measure 11 world, he probably would have sentenced Muzzy to three years of probation, 200 hours of community service, and 30 days in jail “just for the lesson,” he said. My dad’s nickname has long been “Dudley Do-Right” in our family. He’s a rule follower to the extreme. Invite him to come over at noon and he’ll be on your porch at 11:55 am. In 1968, he took a break after his first year of law school at the University of California, Berkeley, to enlist in the U.S. Army and serve in Vietnam. It seemed like the right thing to do, he said, even though he was terrified. He finished his law degree after returning from Da Nang. But he bristled against following the

fter sentencing, Michele Straub didn’t get to hug her son or say goodbye. The bailiff handcuffed Muzzy and hustled him out of the courtroom. The pain was amplified by the fact that Straub had voted in favor of Measure 11 in 1994. Muzzy was one of the first juveniles to receive a Measure 11 sentence, and he got the sense that “the state didn’t even know what to do with me at that point.” The Department of Corrections has certainly had to figure it out since then: Measure 11 helped double Oregon’s prison population from 7,260 inmates in April 1995, when the law took effect, to 14,458 in April 2020, according to the department. He spent nine months bouncing between correctional facilities, including in Clackamas and Newport and the Multnomah County Justice Center downtown. Even though he was in protective custody because of his age, he says he could hear the prisoners on the next cell block yelling that they would find him upstate and rape him. “I would get phone calls from my son and he was crying,” Straub recalls. “He had to sleep on a floor and he wouldn’t have any blankets and they made him sleep with the lights on. Those sound like small things, but when you’re 17…” (Muzzy confirms her account.) Meanwhile, his brother Gary “pretty much gave up on life,” he said. The day Larry was sentenced, Gary went to Fred Meyer and stole snacks with friends. He got kicked out of David Douglas High School. He quit swimming. But mostly, Gary was angry at the judge. “It seemed like he wasn’t receptive of anything in terms of Larry’s character and where he was in the robbery,” Gary says. “It didn’t seem like a fair fight.” Larry Muzzy served most of his time at MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility in Woodburn. He earned his high school diploma, trained dogs, mentored others, and built so much trust with the staff that he was put in charge of driving visitors and employees around the property in a golf cart. David Vancil was a treatment manager who worked at MacLaren for 31 years and became Muzzy’s mentor. In Vancil’s “ownership group,” Muzzy reenacted his crime, except he played the role of the victim. “He always had our back and listened to us and built that trust,” Muzzy says about Vancil, “but he also kept us accountable and called us on our BS.”

KEPT APART: What most stings Muzzy is that he cannot coach his 7-year-old’s Little League team. Mentoring the younger generation is “at the core of who I am,” he says.


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“What people don’t realize is these ‘one strike, you’re out’ laws are really a life sentence.” —Larry Muzzy

Vancil remembers Muzzy as “delightful” and a “jokester.” They remain in touch. On July 15, 2002, after serving four years and 11 months, Muzzy was released with a rare post-conviction relief. Bertoni, his attorney, agreed to concede he had not provided Muzzy “adequate assistance of counsel,” and Beckman granted Muzzy, then 22, an early release. On the way up I-5 from Woodburn to Portland after his release, Muzzy “was freaking out because the car was going so fast,” his mother recalled. That night, he stood in awe under the stars he hadn’t seen in five years. He was hypervigilant, never turning his back to the door of a room. He tried to attend a Parkrose High School football game but had a panic attack in the stands and left. After months of job-searching, he finally got hired at Subway. He worked all the time, ate noodles and chicken every day, but Gary remembers that time living in a Beaverton apartment together fondly: “It was just awesome having my brother back.” Larry met his girlfriend in Portland 10 years ago when they were both working at the same bar. They now live in her home state of South Carolina, where she works in hospital administration and Muzzy stays home with their two sons, ages 2 and 7, and occasionally tends bar. He grows a garden of Thai ingredients—lemongrass, eggplant, kaffir lime and ginger—for his elaborate recipes. Muzzy roots hard for all Pacific Northwest sports teams but especially the Trail Blazers. He’s 40 now. He doesn’t want to be managing bars anymore, working all night around drunk people. (“It’s not good for my family life,” he said.) But what career will he pivot to, when every job application asks if he has ever been convicted of a felony? A criminal record gets in the way of finding housing. And this really stings: He cannot coach his 7-year-old’s Little League team. “What people don’t realize is these ‘one strike, you’re out’ laws are really a life sentence,” Muzzy said. “You’re telling me that at 16 I committed an offense so great that my children are going to have to pay for that? It’s just really lazy legislation, to give people a bunch of time and no recourse for rehabilitation.”

STARTING OVER: In 2013, Larry Muzzy (upper left, with his sons) asked Douglas Beckman for a letter in support of Muzzy’s clemency. Beckman wrote one (above). It reads: “Justice would be served by helping Mr. Muzzy move forward with his life, continuing on the good path he is choosing.”

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uzzy and my father have seen each other once since the courtroom. A few years ago, my father was picking up his work shirts from Tie’s Dry Cleaners in Hollywood one evening. Muzzy was working as the cashier and recognized him right away. They caught up about how Muzzy had been doing since his release, both of them awkward and in shock, until Dad cracked. “I just broke down and started crying,” he recalled. “I just started shaking. I think he could see what I felt about what I had to do in his case.” Last year, Aliza Kaplan wrote a report calling for Gov. Kate Brown to use her clemency power as a tool to mitigate the impact of those whose lives have been upended by Measure 11. A pardon by the governor is the only way for Muzzy and others in his situation to clear their records. Pardons are a slim shot: According to Kaplan’s report, out of 391 petitions to Gov. Brown for clemency from 2015 to 2018, she granted nine. However, “I’m happy to say she has been in a granting mood for the last six months,” Kaplan said. In 2013, Muzzy decided to seek clemency. He wrote to my father asking for a character letter in support of his petition: “I believe it true that society is better served with a full and more functional me, with no barriers, no hangups, no record. Please help me realize my goal.” My dad wrote him the letter. But Muzzy never sent his application for clemency to Gov. Brown. He has filled out the paperwork, but he can’t bring himself to send it in. It stays in the box in the attic. “It’s a weird phenomenon where if I hold onto this, then I still have the hope of someday my record clears,” he said. “If I send it in and I get denied, then I have to live with that reality.” Rachel Saslow is a journalist whose work has appeared in The Washington Post, Vox and Portland Monthly. She lives in Southeast Portland with her family. Willamette Week NOVEMBER 11, 2020 wweek.com

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Willamette Week NOVEMBER 11, 2020 wweek.com

Book It Why is Measure 11 still the law in Oregon?

In the 26 years since Oregonians passed Measure 11, lawmakers have chipped away at it, bit by bit. The Oregon Legislature passed bills in 1997 and 2001 that reduced the number of crimes that qualified for Measure 11 sentencing. Those tweaks had little practical effect, however. What did change the law significantly: a 2009 Oregon Supreme Court decision that found a Measure 11 sentence for a person convicted of her first crime was “cruel and unusual” punishment. Lately, lawmakers have gotten more traction. In 2019, the Legislature passed Senate Bill 1008, which softened Measure 11 penalties for juveniles in response to national trends and advances in neuroscience. All youth now start their cases in the juvenile court system. They also get “second look” hearings halfway through their sentences to see if they could possibly be released. The law also prohibits life without parole for children under 18. Oregon Sen. Floyd Prozanski (D-Eugene) has been the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee since 2009. He is now drafting a bill that would further gut Measure 11. The bill would create a “presumptive sentencing ” structure in which the mandatory minimum would be only a suggested sentence and the judge would be given back discretion. It would only apply to crimes committed on or after the date of the bill’s passage. “This is the next step in criminal justice reform,” Prozanski says. “One size should not fit all.” Wholesale repeal of Measure 11 does not seem in the cards to Prozanski, despite passage of the drug decriminalization Measure 110 last week. Measure 11 offenses are serious “person crimes,” such as rape, murder and robbery—and he has seen polling more than once that suggests a repeal of Measure 11 would be hammered at the ballot box. “The blood and guts in the first five minutes of the 11 o’clock news,” he says, “are all it would take to shut it down.” Retired Multnomah County Chief Criminal Judge Edward Jones says his advocacy for Measure 110 this year has made him think the political will to get rid of Measure 11 might exist. “It’s not hard to see that out on the horizon,” he says. “There is a current mood that we’ve gone too far and been too tough and not gotten the results. Whether that gets you all the way to armed robbery is another question.” Lewis & Clark College law professor Aliza Kaplan says the holdup for repealing Measure 11 is, in a word, “money.” Ballot measure campaigns require a lot of it, as well as public support, to have a chance. A more realistic path, Kaplan says, is to dismantle Measure 11 through the Legislature, as painstaking as that process is. “We’ve ruined enough lives,” she says. “It’s great that there has been a lot of reexamination and some movement for change, but it’s not enough and it’s not fast enough.” RACHEL SASLOW.


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Southeast sandwich shop Snappy’s lists the soup of the day as “Trump’s salty tears—priceless.”

INDEPENDENT JOURNALISM Parks employees will soon get around on three wheels instead of four when Portland Parks & Recreation pilots a partnership with a cargo e-bike company later this month.

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Due to the spike in COVID-19 cases, Multnomah County restaurants must cap indoor dining at 50 patrons for at least two weeks.

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After missing amusement park season for the first time in its 115-year history, Oaks Park Roller Rink reopens.

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Popular vegan spot Fermenter opens a second location and deli in its sister restaurant Farm Spirit, which is closed during the pandemic.

Beloved vegan Vietnamese pop-up Mama Dút opens a brick-and-mortar serving plant-based fish sauce wings and bao buns.

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Two sea turtles become stranded on Oregon beaches, and even more strandings are likely when winter hits.


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WHAT TO DO—AND WHAT OTHERS ARE DOING—AS PORTLAND REOPENS.

KEEPING THE RECORDS SPINNING Photo essay by Rockne Andrew Roll Founded in 1969, Music Millennium has survived Napster, smartphones and streaming. When the COVID-19 pandemic came, the store switched to curbside- and online-only service for 10 weeks but returned to limited in-store shopping in June. Now admitting up to 10 customers at a time, there is frequently a line to enter the store. Each month since reopening, sales have roughly equaled figures from the previous year.

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GET...OUTSIDE?

Music Millennium started as an 800-square-foot storefront in the westernmost end of the building, a former Piggly-Wiggly restaurant. It now occupies more than three times as much space. Owner Terry Currier worked as an assistant manager of a record store before graduating from high school. He became Music Millennium’s managing partner in 1984 and is now the sole owner. Used records and CDs are a significant part of Music Millennium’s business. In 1993, when Garth Brooks and recording executives threatened to cut off shops that traded in used media, Currier led a publicity campaign that forced the industry to back down.

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GET...OUTSIDE?

Unlike many independent stores, Music Millennium is connected to the major record labels and can special order almost anything a customer is looking for. While his business has persevered through myriad changes, Currier worries about the possibility of recording companies shifting away from the production of records and CDs, leaving the store without new product to sell.

“This is an institution,” says store employee and longtime Portlander Dan Sacks. “Working for Music Millennium is an honor.” Willamette Week NOVEMBER 11, 2020 wweek.com

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FOOD & DRINK

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AT HOME AND ABROAD: Coopertiva’s tuna conserva salad.

Cooped Up Cooperativa didn’t plan on a pandemic, but the market-cafe hybrid turned out to be ready for it. BY JAS O N CO H E N

Distance between tables or seats: 7-15 feet Safety measures: Staff sanitize high-touch surfaces every 30 minutes; optional order with QR code at the table; sanitizers at each seating area and at each entry. Small portable heaters are available for outdoor tables upon request. Peak hours: 12:30-1:30 pm and 5-5:30pm

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On Cooperativa’s online paninoteca menu, the mortadella sandwich is listed as a mortadella sandwich ($12). But the label on its paper wrapping bears a different legend: “Bologna” sandwich. The air quotes are the Italian grocery-cafe-restaurant’s way of telling you that yes, mortadella is just fancier—and fattier—bologna. But the emulsified meat is also of Bologna, where Cooperativa co-owner Sarah Schafer studied pasta-making. Cooperativa is all about the vibe and flavors of Bologna, of Florence, of Rome and the “slow food” movement that was born in Italy. But there’s plenty of Portland DNA. In addition to Italian-accented food, drink and sundries, Schafer and Anna Caporael’s Pearl District market has eight local vendor partners who provide much of what you’ll find inside, including Spella Caffè Coffee, Pinolo Gelato, Tails & Trotters, and Real Good Food. Cooperativa was already in the planning stages long before COVID-19, but it’s now perfectly suited to our current takeout, cook-at-home reality. It takes up an entire Portland city block, with lots of outdoor seating, and the Willamette River and two parks are just around the corner. For Schafer, Cooperativa’s inspiration was Mercato Centrale in Florence, an indoor market where you can move from butcher shop to pasteria to wine bar to produce stands to spice merchants to food stalls. It’s the Italian way: a hallmark of community and day-to-day life. “It’s also the Italian way by taking it easy,” says Schafer. “Come in, have a glass of wine. Oh, I’m hungry, I’ll have a slice of pizza. Or I’ll get this sandwich from the market. Or, oh yeah, I need to pick up these other things.”

Of course, this concept isn’t wholly foreign. Portland long had Pastaworks on Hawthorne Boulevard and City Market in Northwest, the precursors to Providore Fine Foods. Another obvious analog is Eataly, where tourists in places like New York or Las Vegas can pretend that they’re in Parma or Modena. Now, we might settle for pretending we’re in New York or Las Vegas. When you can’t travel at all, food is travel. Cooperativa is a grocery store, a coffee shop, an ice cream place, a sandwich shop, a bar, a restaurant and a pizzeria. Sean Coyne, formerly of Pizza Maria, helped develop the two different kinds of dough. There’s Pizza Bianca, the not quite focaccialike bread that, according to Schafer, was originally used in Rome to test the ovens. It’s for sandwiches as well as in the morning, including a breakfast pizza bianca with egg, asiago cheese, prosciutto, or all of the above ($6-$9). The other pizzas, available each day after noon, are al taglio, or “by the cut,” the most famous of which can be found at Rome’s Forno Campo de’ Fiori bakery. It’s square, relatively thin, crispy and minimally topped—the better to appreciate the flavor of the dough and the ingredients. Both Schafer and Caporael say their favorite is the Pizza Rossa, which is brushed with marinara, slivered garlic and oregano, no cheese, though Caporael likes to add a hint of pecorino ($4). But you can also get a regular margherita ($5.50), the classic combination of potato and rosemary ($5.50) and several more elaborate options, including broccoli rabe with ricotta, roasted garlic and abruzzo sauce ($7) or salumi and capicola with marinara and stracchino cheese ($7.50). When Schafer’s working at the pasta station, people can come right up to her, hoping to buy fresh tagliatelle or agnolotti practically right out of her hand. That’s something new. “For me, being the chef always behind the curtain, it’s like, I finally get to talk to these people,” she says. “It just blows my mind every day. What they say, what they ask. It’s fun to be able to interact with people and sort of guide

them through what they should be pairing with their pastas, or talk to them over pizza.” Mortadella will also eventually feature a pizza with pistachio, as well as within Schafer’s favorite pasta: coscarelli, which is stuffed with a mixture of mortadella, pork and prosciutto. Schafer’s Bolognese ($13) and sage butter ($12) are available as sauce to go, and prepared lasagna’s coming. Among the salads are the Cooperativa ($10), with treviso, radicchio, escarole and anchovy Parmesan dressing, and a tuna conserva ($14) with white beans, onions, fennel and baby kale. Schafer’s trademark Irving Street dessert, the caramel budino ($9.50), slots in nicely on an Italian menu, where it’s joined by a chocolate counterpart, and, eventually, she says, Nutella. At the bar is Joel Schmeck, formerly of Irving Street, with a mix of Oregon and Italian wines, a Negroni on tap, and such other cocktails as the “Grazie Mille,” made with two local gins, housemade limoncello and prosecco, and a “Milano Mule” with vodka, amaro and chinotto soda. The sight of the empty bar, with its living-roomlike group seating options, really drives home what Cooperativa wants to be in normal times: full of people, whether for morning coffee, lunch, or snacking and drinking after work before bringing things for dinner home. But at least you can still do those things, without the social bustle. “The people who find comfort in cooking, they can get their ingredients,” says Caporael. “The people who find comfort in being able to pick something up and make it quickly, great. And for the people who just want to be fed? We have that too.”

BOTH WAYS: Owners Anna Caporael and Sarah Schafer. EAT: Cooperativa, 1250 NW 9th Ave., 971-275-2762, cooperativapdx.com. 7 am-8 pm Tuesday-Saturday. Pizzeria noon-8 pm Tuesday-Saturday, bar 3-8 pm Thursday-Saturday.


FOOD & DRINK W Y R D L E AT H E R A N D M E A D

BAR REVIEW

DUNGEONS AND DRAUGHTS: Wyrd’s subterranean space gives guilds from all over town a fantastical place to gather.

Need for Mead Wyrd Leather and Mead is a meadery and artisan marketplace that blends Norse history and medieval fantasy. BY E L I Z A R OT H ST E I N

W Y R D L E AT H E R A N D M E A D

In 2017, Travis Sigler and Tayler Toll walked into a closet with a vat of honey. The Mead Market on Southeast Hawthorne Boulevard had recently shuttered its doors, and with it went Sigler and Toll’s supply of mead. The two relied on the fermented nectar to authenticate their medieval-themed barbecues, so naturally, they sought to rectify the loss and headed into a wardrobe. Six weeks later, Sigler and Toll emerged with the first bottle of Wyrd mead. In the years following, Sigler and Toll grew their operation beneath the clothes hangers into a meadery in Milwaukie and, now, into a proper drinking hall at Southeast 41st Avenue and Holgate Boulevard. Joined by Doug Wingate, founder of McMinnville’s Mac Mead Hall, the three aim to celebrate all things mead and medieval. At Wyrd Leather and Mead, you can wear your horn and drink from it too—it is both a meadery and artisan marketplace, and gives guilds from all over town a fantastical place to gather. You can listen to Nordic folk group Wardruna’s greatest hits, read the runic alphabet, purchase a leather-bound clamp to secure your drinking horn to the table, and warm your hands by one of two fires, all before the water is brought to your table. The hall’s décor blends Norse history and medieval fantasy, and Middle Earth with modern-day environmental pleas. There’s a handmade replica of the armor King Theoden wore in The Lord of the Rings standing next to a table full of totes that read “Save the Fucking Bees.” It is a space for heathens, cheese-eaters, pirates, LARPers, pagans, metalheads, and anyone else who appreciates a sustainably fermented beverage. As Sigler puts it, “It’s kind of a catchall place of everything that we enjoy.” Wyrd ferments its mead on the premises, but you can only taste the namesake elixir if you buy it in a bottle. The semisweet traditional mead ($25 a bottle) is the base of many of Wyrd’s flavored varieties. Fermented on Norwegian yeast, it tastes like a plump golden raisin.

It’s fitting, if deceptive, that Wyrd’s own mead isn’t the star of the menu. The owners are intent on highlighting what they call the “mead alliance”: a tight, yet growing number of meaderies in the Pacific Northwest. As Wingate points out, “There’s a broad spectrum of flavor profiles that we want to be available in Portland.” That range runs both dry to sweet and sessionable to boozy. In the future, Wyrd will offer everything from sipping meads to Braggot, a car-

WHAT A LARP: Wyrd is also a leatherwork shop.

bonated malted mead that sits at 6% ABV, perfect for a pint-sized goblet. For now, working through the inaugural menu is simple. First, decide how you’ll take your mead. Pick your own flight of four regionally brewed meads, or “cast the runes” and have the bartenders choose for you. Then decide how you’ll take your meat. You can have it on a board, alongside cheese, pickles, bread and pepper jelly made by Milwaukie’s Half Pints Jelly. You can have it in a $6 sandwich or a beef stew akin to what you’d find at a post-plunder feast in the 800s. As to why folks should descend into this cavernous hall, Toll cites the drink’s positive environmental impact. “Supporting mead makers helps support local beekeepers,” he explains. For Sigler, it’s the novelty: “Nothing like us exists in Portland.” SEE IT: Wyrd Leather and Mead, 4515 SE 41st Ave., 503-305-6025, wyrdleatherandmead.com. Noon-8 pm Tuesday-Friday, noon-10 pm Saturday, 5 pm-10 pm Sunday.

TOP 5

TOP 5

HOT PLATES

BUZZ LIST

Where to eat this week.

Where to drink outside this week.

First Street Dining Commons

Threshold Brewing & Blending

Birrieria PDX

Baerlic Brewing’s Super Secret Beer Club

Southwest 1st Street between Watson and Washington avenues, downtownbeaverton.org/blog/ dining-commons. 7 am-8 pm daily. At Beaverton’s outdoor dining hall, you can get the unfettered thrill of plate hopping some of Portland’s best spinoff restaurants— Ex Novo Brewing, Big’s Chicken, Top Burmese, and lauded ramen spot Afuri Izakaya. You can now cavort from restaurant to restaurant, collecting an assortment of spectacular dishes never before assembled for the same feast that you’ll unfurl and enjoy in the road.

16544 SE Division St., Portland, 971-336-6804. 11 am-9 pm Tuesday-Thursday, 9:30 am-9 pm Friday-Sunday. The birria boom has reached Portland, and this cart in deep Southeast is one of its main purveyors. Birria de res, like its sibling, barbacoa de res, has a long tradition in many parts of Mexico, but Birrieria PDX’s menu goes beyond classic applications: Other inventive options include the keto taco, made with crispy melted cheese instead of a tortilla, and birria ramen, the Japanese noodle soup made with the broth of the birria, resulting in something that tastes more like pho or Thai boat noodles.

Rock Paper Fish

2605 SE Burnside St., rockpaperfishandchips.com. 11 am-9 pm Wednesday-Sunday. Rock Paper Fish is yet another fastcasual Micah Camden restaurant, and yet another quick pandemic pivot. Open since mid-August, it’s a pickup- and delivery-only fish-andchips window operating out of what used to be Boxer Ramen in the Burnside 26 building. The seafood may be mostly local or regional, but the style is New England: doublebattered, double-fried, with thick fries reminiscent of Belgian frites.

Pacific Crust Pizza

2703 NE Alberta St., 503-719-5010, pacificcrustpizzaco.com. 4-10 pm Monday-Friday, 11 am-10 pm Saturday-Sunday. Normally, whenever Portland gets a new pizza joint, we ask ourselves if the city really needs another one. But, hey, it’s 2020. We’re going to need all the comfort we can get. In case the name didn’t tip you off, Pacific Crust has an outdoors theme, with Northweststyle ingredients, like elk fennel sausage and alder-smoked trout. You can also end the meal around the campfire, s’mores style, with a dark chocolate brownie with graham cracker and toasted marshmallow.

Han Oak

511 NE 24th Ave., 971-255-0032, hanoakpdx.com. 5-8 pm Friday-Sunday. Takeout only. Peter Cho’s Han Oak wows diners nightly with its modern, progressive take on Korean cuisine—at least, it did until, well, y’know. But the restaurant—one of Portland’s best, regardless of cuisine—has revved back up again, offering Cho’s worldbeating dumplings and what on paper sounds like it will soon be the city’s favorite new obsession: a steamed bao burger.

403 SE 79th Ave., 503-477-8789, threshold.beer. 4-7 pm TuesdaySaturday, noon-3 pm Sunday. The Montavilla brewery has built itself a shelter from the storms. To fortify their expanded streetside taphouse, the owners built a raised deck and put up three walls and a corrugated roof now adorned with dangling string lights. It’s a work in progress—but then, so is most of the city’s bar scene as it prepares for a COVID-ravaged winter.

1020 SE Grant St., 503-477-9418, baerlicbrewing.com. 2-8 pm daily. Baerlic Brewing is among that inspired group of entrepreneurs during the pandemic that looked at the cracked, gray parking lot behind its building and somehow saw a socially distanced party. The 6,000-square-foot space has turned into a Bavarian-inspired drinking lawn, complete with a huge faux foliage backdrop affixed with the words “Super Secret Beer Club.”

McMenamins Crystal Hotel Zeus Cafe

303 SW 12th Ave., 503-384-2500, mcmenamins.com. 7 am-10 pm daily. Business is back at McMenamins, though it doesn’t look quite like it used to, at least not at the Crystal Hotel’s streetside patio. The space was simple at first, with tables in the street along with a smattering of potted plants. Then Edgefield lent some of its collection of black, wrought-iron tables and chairs, along with barrels that evolved into miniature gardens.

Old Town Brewing

5201 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., 503-200-5988, otbrewing.com. 4-9 pm Sunday-Thursday, 3-9 pm Friday, noon-9 pm Saturday. While many makeshift pandemic patios are nothing much to look at, Old Town’s is different: It immerses you in nature. The temporary woodland is laden with trees on loan from the city of Portland’s Bureau of Environmental Services. Some are squat and bushy, others taller than the red umbrellas shading the patch with blooming flowers in a complementary shade of crimson.

Teardrop Lounge

1015 NW Everett St., 503-445-8109, teardroplounge. com. 4-10 pm Wednesday-Saturday. Reservations required. Unlike the other establishments on this list, the pioneering craft cocktail bar does not have outdoor seating. Instead, the bar has reopened with the intent of creating the safest possible environment for indoor imbibing. That includes a new, heavy-duty HVAC system and plexiglass around its center bar. Will it all make customers comfortable enough to drink inside again? Hard to say—but the cocktails remain mighty enticing.

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POTLANDER

Veteran Stoners In honor of Veterans Day, we asked members of Oregon’s canna-vet community how weed has helped them post-service.

BY BRIA N N A W H E E L E R

Cannabis is indeed medicine, and veterans deserve full legal access. According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, more than 20% of the millions of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans will experience post-traumatic stress or depression. Treating every veteran’s mental and physical health needs is not something the VA is equipped to handle, especially when the treatment of choice for so many is federally illegal. As complex as America’s military is—naturally there’s a difference between those who served during certain eras, under certain administrations, and under certain circumstances—one thing all veterans seem to agree on is, for the most part, military service has the inherent potential to invite some degree of trauma. Cannabis therapies have been proven to help cope with that trauma. In honor of Veterans Day, WW reached out to members of the canna-vet community to get their takes on what cannabis means to them post-service.

Christopher Roll, retired Navy submarine sailor and owner of Flying Walrus Cannabis Farm WW: What was your relationship with cannabis preservice? Roll: I was a teenager in the ’60s. Those are pretty formative years, there was a lot going on. Kind of like right now, but the ’60s were like that for 10 years. There was a lot of civil unrest, and the Vietnam War. It was a pretty radical time to be a teenager. During that time, I smoked a lot. But I got a draft notice to go to Vietnam, and when I was in the military, I didn’t smoke because we weren’t allowed. So I stopped.

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What role has cannabis played in your life postservice? Veterans have a lot of things going on medically and psychologically usually. But, you know, regular people do too. It’s just that veterans get exposed to a few things besides traffic accidents and all the other stuff that humans end up doing. They have another layer of stressors and character-building experiences. There’s a lot of people putting a lot of time into the medical side of cannabis, but I’m just kind of on the fringes of it. I do consume daily, but I don’t consider myself a stoner. I think I’m somewhere between recreational and medical. I don’t know that there’s a category for that, it is definitely a subgroup. How are you celebrating Veterans Day this year? Me and my neighbor are working on the farm. I’m 70, she’s 73. It’s a rock-and-roll retirement ranch. This would be a great way to have an assisted living facility. I kind of picture this 10-acre place where old hippies can hang out and try and find a way to make money without having to go to a job. And I know people that are successful to some extent here in Oregon combining the farm life with whatever they can make or build. So, I guess I’ll be trying to recruit some old hippie chicks.

Steve Danyluk, retired lieutenant colonel U.S. Marine Corps and founder of Warfighter Hemp WW: How has cannabis use affected your life postservice? Danyluk: My viewpoint on cannabis did a complete 180 after leaving the Marine Corps, where it was completely forbidden. For me the most significant impact was seeing the positive effect that it was having on so many of my colleagues who were struggling with opiates and other powerful medications that they were being prescribed by the VA. A lot of veterans, particularly the combatwounded ones who seem to prefer our stronger oils, many of these veterans are completely off of prescription medications as a result [of CBD therapy], and that is one of the things that we at Warfighter Hemp are most proud of.

How will you be spending your Veterans Day this year? My wife is still in active duty, so the first thing I will probably do when I wake up is kiss her and thank her for her service. Then, during the day, I will probably spend a few moments thinking about Dave Greene. Dave was a guy I served with and who is the highest-ranking Marine officer to have been killed in action in Iraq. He was an exceptional person on so many levels, and his loss was a loss for all of us.

Raina Casey, retired mortuary affairs specialist and founder of Oregon Handlers Fund WW: What role has cannabis played in your life postservice? Casey: I actually enjoyed the time I spent in the service pre-9/11. I’m sure that’s why I have the health issues I have already. I had to make a choice—cannabis or the VA. Guess which one I picked? Simply because the VA is a federal program, cannabis is still illegal on the federal level. All they do is push pills anyway. Give you a pill for constipation and when you can’t stop crap from rolling down your leg, you get one for the squirts! Cannabis helped a great deal with my mental health and the PTSD I’ve suffered. How do you celebrate Veterans Day? By trying to stay Black and alive! I’ve never cashed in on any special freebies at stores, etc. Now that I think about it, I don’t think any of us do that I know of. I’m usually with my comrades, family and other service members on Veterans Day. And I keep it moving. What’s your weed of choice on this holiday? My favorite product is CannaHoney and favorite strain is #GodDiva Kush, a cross of Obama Kush and Black Magic that I grew last year.


Editor: Andi Prewitt | Contact: aprewitt@wweek.com OREGON JEWISH MUSEUM

PERFORMANCE

The Safety Dance The virtual choreography of Adam McKinney’s Shelter in Place installation imagines one giant leap for humankind. BY JAY H O RTO N

WW: What’s the best way to approach the display as a viewer? Adam McKinney: There’s no one way to experience Shelter in Place. My goal is that everyone will connect to some element, and I offer these multiple avenues of entry for viewers so that they connect with perhaps the imagery, perhaps the music, perhaps the branches that wind and weave and coil throughout the space coming to a climax in the corner where the Glorious Clouds film plays, and these seemingly disparate sides come together as one full identity. What do the branches symbolize? The lynching of Mr. Rouse, but they’re also connected to the holiday of Sukkot. It commemorates the harvest and exodus and happiness. We build dwellings outside our homes and synagogues and schools, in which some eat and sleep and pray, and place branches on the ceilings so that we can see the stars above. They’re representative of the clouds of glory that God sent the Israelites after they left Egypt. But Shelter in Place is also representative of this particular moment when we’re working to reconcile histories of the enslavement of Black people. There’s an urgency to heal, to move in the direction of each other, and that’s really hard because COVID-19 is not allowing that to happen as needed. Shelter in Place is an inversion of the Sukkot to bring the inside out. As Oregonians, we have to ask, what sort of wood did you use? My goal was hackberry, the type of tree from which Mr. Rouse was hanged, but I couldn’t locate any. A cousin in Portland hooked me up with Flamingo Farms near Vancouver. They took pictures of some cherry branches and gave me a good price. It was all very serendipitous. Being so distant from the process, I had to make really clear, fast decisions just trusting that this huge experiment would all work out, and I think it did—beautifully.

Written by: Scout Brobst Contact: sbrobst@wweek.com

FIVE OF THE MOST ANTICIPATED RELEASES FOR NOVEMBER

The Best of Me, David Sedaris (Nov. 3) David Sedaris has written for long enough that it came time to release a “best of” collection, selected by Sedaris himself and spanning the two decades of his career. Included are the stories that he finds most memorable—falling in love, losing a parent, shopping for taxidermy, and hand-feeding a carnivorous bird, to name a few. The stories, all cobbled together from different beats in the cultural pulse, form a picture of Sedaris that will strike longtime fans and new converts as worth the read.

@hortland

The dizzying array of influences animating Shelter in Place, Adam McKinney’s stunning multimedia display for the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, reflects both the diverse heritage of its gay Jewish, Native, African American creator and the unprecedented challenges wrought by COVID-19. An assistant professor of dance at Texas Christian University and classically trained performer whose background includes stints with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in New York City and Switzerland’s Bejart Ballet Lausanne, McKinney had already immersed himself in projects centered on the 1921 lynching of Fred Rouse in Fort Worth, Texas. Shelter in Place features footage of McKinney dancing as Rouse alongside projected poetry, artful décor that pays homage to the Jewish holiday Sukkot, and new hologram film Glorious Clouds—an ecstatic representation of the providential skies that accompanied the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt. While readying the December premiere of his Fort Worth Lynching Tour—a bicycle journey of Rouse’s final night—McKinney spoke with WW about the meanings layered within Shelter in Place as well as the difficulties of assembling an installation he’s not yet been able to visit.

BOOKS

The Preserve, Ariel S. Winter (Nov. 3)

BRANCHING OUT: Texas-based artist Adam McKinney is performing in a Portland exhibit via hologram.

Had you been to the museum before? Never. When I danced with a ballet company in San Francisco, we toured Portland, and I had some familiarity with the area. And you could look around virtually? I was already thinking about transportation—transporting my body across time and space. Since I can’t travel to Portland, how can I end up performing this work there? I have this project looking at the history of colonialism by using subversion of border technology to bring people closer together—drone technology, for instance—and the idea of holograms was an exciting one for me. We worked with different types of technology to try and make that happen—mirrors, plexiglass—but it ended up as a dance film projected onto white vinyl. I’ve been in contact with other museums in North America about restaging this work. Shelter in Place has legs, and I hope that the holograms will be able to happen elsewhere. Were the downtown protests a consideration when assembling this project? Absolutely. Shelter in Place was not created in a vacuum. Thinking about the history of white supremacy [in Portland], I regularly checked in with my contact to inform the direction of the work and ensure that what I was doing was both in response to and part of what was happening there. Did you target visitors who would knowingly come to view the exhibit or random passersby? It’s for anybody and everybody. The intention for Shelter in Place was to maintain safety and social distancing, but coming upon it should feel like an exposé—kind of pulling back the curtain, you know? One needs to look a little closer and a little deeper. SEE IT: Shelter in Place is in the windows and first-floor gallery of the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, 724 NW Davis St., ojmche.org. Through Friday, Nov. 20.

The world that Ariel S. Winter creates in The Preserve is clever—in some ways a negative image of the world we live in now. Following a brutal and unforgiving plague, humans are left as the minority, while humanoid robots make up the larger ruling class. The book weaves in stories of interspecies kindness and conflict against the backdrop of a conventional murder mystery, with a tech-savvy hacker found dead in one of the world’s remaining human preserves.

Dearly, Margaret Atwood (Nov. 10) As it happens, Margaret Atwood was a poet before she was a novelist. Her first collection, Double Persephone, was published in 1961 with just over 200 copies handset by Atwood herself, and it tends to be overlooked in conversations about her legacy and literary stardom. Dearly may just throw Atwood back into the pecking order of the genre, with writing that flits from interest to interest—the nature of zombies, the nature of aging, the nature of nature. Each is written with an internal clarity that belies Atwood’s decades in the spotlight.

The Office of Historical Corrections, Danielle Evans (Nov. 10) In her second collection of short stories, released 10 years after Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self, Danielle Evans reminds readers why she is turned to for sharp, vivid analysis of the way we interact with one another and with the world. Each story points to greater issues of race and culture, and turns back again and again to the permanence of history and its stain on our lives. A favorite of Roxane Gay, it is a fast read that lives beyond its pages.

What Kind of Woman, Kate Baer (Nov. 10) Kate Baer’s debut collection of poetry, What Kind of Woman, reads like a personal valentine. It’s a testament to Baer’s ability to clear through the messiness and speak to the things that matter. The poems will be familiar to those who appreciate her candid—and popular—Instagram poetry, which fiercely defends femininity in all of the ways it might look. There is no barrier to entry for non-poetry readers, because Baer makes clear from the first pages that she is uninterested in literary tricks and heavy-handed metaphors. She’s more interested in sincerity.

Willamette Week NOVEMBER 11, 2020 wweek.com

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MOVIES

GET YO UR REPS I N

Editor: Andi Prewitt / Contact: aprewitt@wweek.com CAMERON BROWNE PHOTOGRAPHY

SCREENER

SEA CHANGE: Through a series of interviews, Tipping Point adds community context to the Portland protests.

Clearing the Air Portland became known for tear gas and flash bangs. Tipping Point goes beyond that to humanize the struggle to speak up against injustice. BY C H A N C E SO L E M - P F E I FER

@chance_s_p

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SEE IT: Screening links to Tipping Point are available at theoldchurch.org. It will be available for viewing for 48 hours Monday-Tuesday, Nov. 16-17. Free.

The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967) In this candy-colored French musical from Jacques Demy (Agnès Varda’s husband), a pair of twins (Catherine Deneuve and real-life sister Françoise Dorléac) yearn for a love strong enough to whisk them away from their picturesque seaside town. Their salvation soon arrives in the form of a sensitive artist sailor and a charming American musician (Gene Kelly, speaking fluent French). Amazon Prime, Criterion Channel, HBO Max, iTunes, Vudu.

Moonrise Kingdom (2012) Off the coast of a small New England island, 12-yearold Khaki Scout Sam and his angsty pen pal Suzy romantically run away together, provoking a kid hunt led by the town’s dimwitted police captain (Bruce Willis), Suzy’s parents (Frances McDormand and Bill Murray), and Sam’s Khaki Scoutmaster (Edward Norton). Written and directed by the always soothing and symmetrically satisfying Wes Anderson. Amazon Prime, Google Play, iTunes, Peacock, Vudu, YouTube.

Bringing Up Baby (1938) Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn, and director Howard Hawks combined forces to create this wildly influential screwball rom-com about a flighty heiress (Hepburn), a down-to-earth paleontologist (Grant) and a leopard named Baby (Nissa). Together, the unconventional trio inadvertently incite a load of mischief…and realize opposites attract. Amazon Prime, Google Play, HBO Max, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube.

Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day (2008) When dowdy English governess Guinevere Pettigrew (Frances McDormand) cons her way into working for ditzy American performer Delysia (Amy Adams), she learns to loosen up and have some long overdue fun in this bubbly homage to screwball comedies of the ’30s and ’40s. Lee Pace, who, lest we forget, is 6-foot5, co-stars as Delysia’s scrappy pianist love interest. Amazon Prime, Google Play, HBO, HBO Max, Hulu, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube. TCM.COM

At first blush, it might appear almost redundant to make a documentary about Portland’s racial justice protests, given that they were inspired, sustained, iconicized, polarized and revealed through the power of video. But Tipping Point, a feature-length documentary produced by nonprofit concert hall The Old Church, reaches for a deeper, depoliticized look at Portland’s spotlight-grabbing reckoning. “[Social media viewers] don’t remember anything but the tear gas, the flash bang and people screaming,” says The Old Church executive director Amanda Stark, the documentary’s impact producer. “If this is truly the largest civil rights protest in U.S. history, we need to know more about it.” Though it’s known primarily as a performance venue, The Old Church extends its mission to platform diverse voices with Tipping Point. With its 18 featured interviews and emphasis on community context, the documentary shares creative DNA and a host—Julianne R. Johnson— with the nonprofit’s quarterly We Can Listen series. And director Jon Meyer’s months of yet-unseen footage offer new vantages of burgeoning Black leaders, police violence and disagreements among protesters. Tipping Point, which screens free online Nov. 16 and 17, is an impressively sweeping yet deliberately structured reflection on a summer of chaos. It’s carved into implicit chapters like Oregon’s history of white supremacy, the horror of tear gas, the live-streaming revolution and the experiences of Black police. In this conceptual flow, the documentary disentangles the unrest while still letting its sources disagree just seconds apart on film. “We want to humanize the struggle,” says Johnson, the film’s co-producer and the music director at Portland Community College Sylvania. “These are all people’s stories. This is not somebody distant from you; this is you.” With its Black moderator and majority Black interviewees, Tipping Point steadfastly focuses on BIPOC perspectives. To remain on that course, every cut of the film garnered creative feedback from a “focus group” of BIPOC advisors, including veteran documentarian and University of Massachusetts Amherst media and cultural studies

professor Sut Jhally and social theorist Rodney Washington Moore, Portland activist Destiny Houston, local community strategist Royal Harris and The Old Church events director Juliana Tobón. Johnson’s interviews dive deep with local activist artists like Mic Crenshaw and C3 the Guru, young organizers like Alaysia Atkins, and established Black leaders like Pastor J.W. Matt Hennessee. Through the 18 conversations, Johnson says she primarily sought the subjects’ motivations—what precisely made them return to a volatile struggle night after night? The answers unfurl more than the filmmakers could’ve expected, and Tipping Point’s most profound moments explore the boundless “why” of the protests over their sometimes unwieldy “what.” Interviewees explain themselves via concepts like African principlism, indigenuity and how humans orient themselves in a natural universe. “We didn’t know it would go to the spiritual realm,” Stark says. “I don’t think anyone else is talking about this stuff right now, especially [regarding] the Portland protests.” For her part, Johnson has spent her entire life steeped in the Black activism of Portland. As a baby, she was held by Martin Luther King Jr. at Vancouver Avenue First Baptist Church. She remembers Stokely Carmichael lending her advice in a North Portland garage. She opened for Maya Angelou at the Schnitz in 2012. Johnson was also, in her estimation, the first Black performer ever to play The Old Church, where the Grammy-nominated vocalist has now been a 30-year staple. Illuminating Black experiences in America’s whitest major city runs through Johnson’s life, and she narrates an epilogue in Tipping Point that feels trained directly at a white viewer about to ask, “Well, what should I do now?” Johnson has no shortage of answers. “I want to help you help yourself. And that’s what I think this movie can do,” she says. “Wherever they land in the film, they’ll launch from there. My biggest plea is, if you’re going to start [engaging], be sure you won’t stop.”

While the local rep theaters are out of commission, we’ll be putting together weekly watchlists of films readily available to stream. After last week’s election, we could all use a well-deserved break in the form of some fluffy comfort watches. These five films are the cinematic equivalent of curling up with a plate of freshly baked cookies in a memory-foam bed.

Roman Holiday (1953) In this multi-Oscar-winning rom-com staple, a burntout princess (Audrey Hepburn) seeks refuge from her overwhelming life by vacationing in Rome. Here, she meets a dashing American reporter (Gregory Peck, 6-foot-3) who, after discovering her identity, becomes determined to snag an exclusive interview with her. As expected, burgeoning romance soon gets in the way. Amazon Prime, CBS, Google Play, iTunes, Pluto TV, Tubi, Vudu, YouTube.


MOVIES D A I LY B E A S T. C O M

TOP PICK OF THE WEEK

City Hall Celtics. Red Sox. Dunkin’ Donuts. Sam Adams. Mark Wahlberg. City Hall. Wait, what? Yes, lots and lots of city hall. Boston culture runs on more than Dunkin’ Donuts and slam dunks, and director Frederick Wiseman makes that very clear in City Hall. His 45th documentary in 53 years goes deep into the administration building that helps Boston function, a nine-story slab of concrete where the mayor works and the citizenry comes to petition (i.e., talk their way out of parking tickets). It’s a fitting setting for Wiseman, whose movies are all about the way human-made institutions function—how people work in tandem to keep their society going. Or, as Mayor Martin J. Walsh puts it, “democracy in action.” City Hall is sort of like watching a puzzle being put together in real time (it’s over four hours!), only the pieces are people, meetings, ideas and industries, and the final picture is of a stable democracy. That sounds intimidating, but I could have watched another hour of people talking to each other in conference rooms. There is no plot or music, no Celtics or Dunkin’ Donuts. In Wiseman’s long and leisurely film, we get to see a different side of Boston. The side that makes a difference. NR. ASHER LUBERTO. Virtual Cinema.

On the Rocks

OUR KEY

: T H I S M O V I E I S E XC E L L E N T, O N E O F T H E B E S T O F T H E Y E A R. : T H I S M O V I E I S G O O D. W E R E C O M M E N D YO U WATC H I T. : T H I S M O V I E I S E N T E R TA I N I N G B U T F L AW E D. : T H I S M O V I E I S A P I E C E O F S H I T.

ALSO PLAYING American Utopia Spike Lee directing a concert doc might sound bizarre. But a closer look at both American Utopia and its subject, David Byrne, reveals a deeper connection between the filmmaker’s body of work and this project. Performing with musicians from around the globe who make shimmering water on which Byrne’s voice floats, he sings about love, life, home, harmony and chicken heaven (yes, chicken heaven). The Talking Heads frontman invited Lee to shoot a screen version of his Broadway show of the same name, which opened in October 2019 and closed four months later. The result is an intimate look at a grand stage performance. Byrne starts out alone, pondering a model of the human brain. When he finishes, barefoot dancers and musicians enter the stage, one by one, all clad in gray and carrying their own instruments. The group’s message of unity binds together a set of songs—some new, some old (about half come from the Talking Heads’ catalog)—that is enhanced by Annie-B Parson’s glorious choreography. Cutting between 11 camera angles, in the crowd and onstage, Lee complements her work. The director also makes a powerful addition to the Janelle Monáe protest song “Hell You Talmbout” by showing photographs of the Black Americans killed by police who are mentioned in the anthem. Here, Lee is the same as he ever was. NR. ASHER LUBERTO. Amazon Prime, HBO Max, Hulu.

CITY HALL

Borat Subsequent Moviefilm Angrier, funnier and smarter than the original, Borat Subsequent Moviefilm: Delivery of Prodigious Bribe to American Regime for Make Benefit Once Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan brings back Sacha Baron Cohen’s fictional Kazakh journalist Borat Sagdiyev to prank real-life American bigots. Ordered to woo the Trump administration with a gift, Borat embarks on a quest to make Mike Pence marry his daughter Tutar (Maria Bakalova). The plot isn’t the point—it’s an opportunity for Baron Cohen and Bakalova to stage witty assaults on anti-Semitism, misogyny and racism (no one bothers to stop Borat from walking into the Conservative Political Action Conference dressed as a Klansman). Baron Cohen is just as dementedly entertaining as he was in the original Borat, but Bakalova relentlessly upstages him. Just when you think nothing can top the scene in which Tutar has her period and performs a fertility dance at a debutante ball in Georgia, Bakalova pulls off the film’s brashest stunt—an encounter with Rudy Giuliani that gleefully lays bare the sadism and sexism of Trump’s legal lapdog. That sequence is the film’s climax, but still to come is a twist that attempts the seemingly impossible: to make COVID19 funny. It’s a great gag and a great testament to Baron Cohen’s apparent belief that the world will only end when human beings lose their lust for inappropriate laughs R. BENNETT CAMPBELL FERGUSON. Amazon Prime.

When your second film is a universe of compassion, wit and wonderment, it’s not easy for the rest of your career to keep up. Yet On the Rocks is one of the most intelligent and moving films that writer-director Sofia Coppola has made since her transcendent Tokyo odyssey Lost in Translation. It’s the kind of movie that gets you guessing about what a great director is up to, then surprises and pleases you when she doesn’t go where you imagined. On the Rocks stars Rashida Jones as Laura, a writer who suspects that her husband, Dean (Marlon Wayans), is cheating on her. Since Laura’s father, Felix (Bill Murray), is eager for an excuse to spy on his son-in-law, the two embark on a shambling investigation of Dean, which culminates in a surreal sojourn in Mexico. Murray suavely sells the contradictions of Felix, a decrepit playboy who defends his daughter’s honor but delights in demeaning women. Felix can be a mesmerizingly phony charmer, but On the Rocks is about Laura awakening to the emptiness behind his incandescence—an awakening that sets the stage for her spiritual rebirth. That journey may not match the visual and emotional heights of Lost in Translation, but On the Rocks triumphs on its own terms by telling the story of a woman who, scene by scene, gradually claims the movie as her own. R. BENNETT CAMPBELL FERGUSON. Apple TV+.

Higher Love To say that Hasan Oswald’s debut documentary is a snapshot of America’s opioid crisis implies something too quick. There’s nothing snappy about spending 10 minutes cramped in a room of New Jerseyans endlessly shooting up. The camerawork is graphic and unsteady, and you can feel the lack of control permeating every inch of squalor. Despite this grotesque intimacy, Higher Love finds its more interesting subject idling outside the trap house. We first meet

Daryl, the 47-year-old printing press owner and father of eight, trolling dilapidated industrial parks in search of his pregnant girlfriend, Nani. If she’s depicted as one of the opioid crisis’s ceaseless tragedies (her mother died of an overdose), Daryl is one of its memorable supporting characters. You couldn’t script his boundless patience with Nani or his explosions of contempt at how deep her addiction runs. Secondary stories of other Camden residents battling the needle aren’t as layered, though they do reveal untold absurdities of the recovery system, like needing to score one final time in order to receive a suitably high dose of Suboxone for detox. In that light, Higher Love reveals utter extremity becoming dismally banal. For Daryl, the burning question becomes, when is giving up the only rational response? NR. CHANCE SOLEM-PFEIFER. On Demand.

American Dharma An eerie reversal kickstarts legendary documentarian Errol Morris’ sitdown with Steve Bannon. In Morris’ genre-altering The Fog of War (2003), he played the junior interlocutor to Robert McNamara and prodded the former U.S. defense secretary with his generation’s burning Vietnam War grievances. In American Dharma, it’s Bannon who professes to admire Morris. The Fog of War, the former Trump adviser says, was a life-changing look at how elite politicians betrayed everyday Americans. Hard to argue with that; it’s just 95% of the conclusions drawn afterward that make Bannon an eminently troubling subject. After that curious moment of bonding, Morris and Bannon never really speak the same language again. Bannon rails against globalism but keeps all the hatred and white supremacy wrapped up in that discourse entirely euphemistic. Unfortunately, Morris keeps his rebuttals to a career minimum in American Dharma—bad timing, considering his subject is an active fire-starter, not a regret-

ful, dried-out war hawk. That said, Morris depends on the audience to understand what they’re watching. He’s constructed a glimpse into Bannon’s mind, channeled through the John Wayne and Gregory Peck movies that defined the proud nationalist’s worldview. Some may call American Dharma platforming hate. Morris would probably call it knowing your enemy; he’s still taking lessons from McNamara. R. CHANCE SOLEM-PFEIFER. Topic.

Let Him Go In 1950s Montana, retired sheriff George Blackledge (Kevin Costner) and his wife, Margaret (Diane Lane), are rocked by the sudden, tragic death of their eldest son. Still struggling to cope, they watch with heavy hearts as their former daughterin-law weds a new man, the abusive Donnie Weboy (Will Brittain). But when Donnie and his unhinged family take off to the Dakota badlands with the Blackledges’ young grandson Jimmy, the last living tie to their late son, the bereaved couple will stop at nothing to bring him home. Thomas Bezucha’s direction is assured, eliciting chilling performances from his cast of talented actors. The women shine in particular: Lane as the vengeful matriarch projects a steely determination and commanding screen presence that pushes Costner to the sidelines, while the always brilliant Lesley Manville (who earned an Oscar nomination for her role in 2017’s Phantom Thread) steals the show as Blanche Weboy, Donnie’s mother and mastermind. Though both of these portrayals and the pastoral visuals of the Midwest mountains are breathtaking, the story itself is lethargic, never fully getting off the ground nor matching the strength of the source material, Larry Watson’s eponymous novel. Nevertheless, your repressed dad will probably love it for its themes of trauma, grief and masculinity. R. MIA VICINO. Mill Plain 8, Vancouver Mall 23.

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ART N’ COMICS!

Be a Willamette Week featured artist! Any art style is welcome! Let’s share your art! Contact us at art@wweek.com.

FEATURED ARTIST: Patrick Casey

64 year old Patrick J. Casey has been married to his wife Jill for 39 years. They have two children; Hannah, 34, and Gaelan, 31, and four cats. Patrick resides in Cornelius, Oregon. Patrick has been an artist all of his life. His specialty is in drawing caricatures.

JACK KENT’S

Jack draws exactly what he sees n’ hears from the streets. IG @sketchypeoplepdx kentcomics.com

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JONESIN’

Week of November 19

©2020 Rob Brezsny

by Matt Jones

"Leg Work"--keep on counting!

ARIES (March 21-April 19)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Back in 1974, poet Allen Ginsberg and his "spirit wife," Aries poet Anne Waldman, were roommates at the newly established Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado. The school's founder asked these two luminaries to create a poetics program, and thus was born the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Waldman described its ruling principle to be the "outrider" tradition, with a mandate to explore all that was iconoclastic, freethinking, and irreverent. The goal of teachers and students alike was to avoid safe and predictable work so as to commune with wild spiritual powers, "keep the energies dancing," and court eternal surprise. I think that would be a healthy approach for you to flirt with during the next few weeks.

"A little bad taste is like a nice splash of paprika," said Libran fashion writer Diana Vreeland. "We all need a splash of bad taste," she continued. "It's hearty, it's healthy, it's physical. I think we could use more of it. *Having no taste* is what I'm against." I understand that her perspective might be hard to sell to you refined Librans. But I think it's good advice right now. Whatever's lacking in your world, whatever might be off-kilter, can be cured by a dash of good, funky earthiness. Dare to be a bit messy and unruly.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Any legal actions you take are more likely to be successful if you initiate them between now and the solstice than if you'd begin them at other times. The same is true for any contracts you sign or agreements you make: They have a better chance to thrive than they would at other times. Other activities with more kismet than usual during the coming weeks: efforts to cultivate synergy and symbiosis; attempts to turn power struggles into more cooperative ventures; a push to foster greater equality in hierarchal situations; and ethical moves to get access to and benefit from other people's resources.

GEMINI (May 21-June20) Never follow an expert off a precipice. Nor a teacher. Nor an attractive invitation. Nor a symbol of truth nor a vibrant ideal nor a tempting gift. In fact, never follow anything off a precipice, no matter how authoritative or sexy or appealing it might be. On the other hand, if any of those influences are headed in the direction of a beautiful bridge that can enable you to get to the other side of a precipice, you should definitely consider following them. Be on the alert for such lucky opportunities in the coming weeks.

ACROSS 1 1990s Disney show with characters from "The Jungle Book" 9 Clear music holder 15 Prozac maker 16 Enter, as data 17 They have two legs each 19 Icon used in Twitch chat to express feelings

62 Comedian Sarah who once wrote "Hard work beats talent when talent doesn't work hard" 63 "Game of Thrones" actress Williams 64 Followed DOWN 1 Tiny laugh 2 Class reunion attendees

34 ___ profundo (lowest vocal range) 35 Morning TV host Kelly 36 Like some angles 41 Tiny ear bone 42 "American Gods" actor McShane 47 It might go over your head 48 Shimerman of "Deep Space Nine"

20 Uganda's Idi

3 Cars for execs

21 Being, Roman-style

4 Make happy

49 Streisand's "Funny Girl" role

22 "Tiny Alice" dramatist Edward

5 Mathematical ratio

50 Levy again

6 Middle East gp.

51 Bond, for example

25 Active chemical in cannabis

7 French 101 pronoun

52 Downhill runners

28 "Parklife" group

8 "All the news that's fit to print" initials

53 Hindu festival of colors

29 The heavens, for Olympians

9 Sevastopol resident

55 Rum ___ Tugger ("Cats" cat)

32 They have four legs each

10 Metric prefix for "tenth"

54 Maui, for one

37 Broadcast studio sign

11 "Call Me Irresponsible" lyricist Sammy

56 Bitter brew, briefly

38 Key to get out?

12 City southwest of Tulsa

39 Cover once more?

13 Sample of wine

58 One-hit wonder band behind "How Bizarre"

40 They have six legs each

14 Methyl ending

43 "Here are the words on the label ..."

18 Actress Issa

44 State with a three-word capital 45 Abbr. in a job posting 46 Charlie of "Hot Shots!" 48 Singer with the EPs "BLQ Velvet" and "PRINCESS"

22 Olympic flame lighter in Atlanta 23 Winter Games vehicles

60 Einstein's birth city

last week’s answers

25 "Is ___ fact?" 26 Poet Gil Scott-___ 27 Advanced very slowly

54 Abbr. on marked-down clothes

30 You are here

61 Like a difficult battle

59 "When the Rain Begins to Fall" singer Zadora

24 Rudely abrupt

52 "Transformers" actor LaBeouf

55 They have eight legs each

57 Athens X

28 Daft, in Derby 31 Van Gogh's brother 32 "Holy moly!" 33 Maternally related

©2020 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #JNZ990.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) Malidoma Patrice Somé was born into the Dagara tribe of Burkina Faso. After being initiated into the Dagara's spiritual mysteries, he emigrated to America, where he has taught a unique blend of modern and traditional ideas. One of his key themes is the hardship that Westerners' souls endure because of the destructive impact of the machine world upon the spiritual world. He says there is "an indigenous person within each of us" that longs to cultivate the awareness and understanding enjoyed by indigenous people: a reverence for nature, a vital relationship with ancestors, and a receptivity to learn from the intelligence of animals. How's your inner indigenous person doing? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to enhance your ability to commune with and nurture that vital source.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Psychologists have identified a quality they call NFD: "need for drama." Those who possess it may be inclined to seek or even instigate turmoil out of a quest for excitement. After all, bringing a dose of chaos into one's life can cure feelings of boredom or powerlessness. "I'm important enough to rouse a Big Mess!" may be the subconscious battle cry. I'll urge you Leos to studiously and diligently avoid fostering NFD in the coming weeks. In my astrological opinion, you will have a blessed series of interesting experiences *if and only if* you shed any attraction you might have to histrionic craziness.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) "Give up the notion that you must be sure of what you are doing," wrote philosopher Baruch Spinoza. "Instead, surrender to what is real within you, for that alone is sure." Spinoza's thoughts will be a great meditation for you in the coming weeks. If you go chasing phantom hopes, longing for absolute certainty and iron confidence, you'll waste your energy. But if you identify what is most genuine and true and essential about you, and you rely on it to guide you, you can't possibly fail.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) To convey the spirit of the coming weeks, I'm offering you wisdom from two women who were wise about the art of slow and steady progress. First, here's author Iris Murdoch: "One of the secrets of a happy life is continuous small treats, and if some of these can be inexpensive and quickly procured so much the better." Your second piece of insight about the wonders of prudent, piecemeal triumph comes from activist and author Helen Keller: "I long to accomplish a great and noble task, but it is my chief duty to accomplish small tasks as if they were great and noble."

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Sagittarian statesman Winston Churchill said that he was always ready to learn—even though there were times when he didn't enjoy being taught. That might be a useful motto for you to adopt in the coming months. By my estimates, 2021 could turn out to bring a rather spectacular learning spurt—and a key boost to your life-long education. If you choose to take advantage of the cosmic potentials, you could make dramatic enhancements to your knowledge and skill set. As Churchill' s message suggests, not all of your new repertoire will come easily and pleasantly. But I bet that at least 80 percent of it will. Start planning!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) In accordance with upcoming astrological indicators, I've got some good advice for you courtesy of your fellow Capricorn David Bowie. You'll be well-served to keep it in mind between now and January 1, 2021. “Go a little bit out of your depth," counseled Bowie. "And when you don’t feel that your feet are quite touching the bottom, you’re just about in the right place to do something exciting.” For extra inspiration, I'll add another prompt from the creator of Ziggy Stardust: “Once you lose that sense of wonder at being alive, you’re pretty much on the way out.” In that spirit, my dear Capricorn, please take measures to expand your sense of wonder during the next six weeks. Make sure you're on your way *in*.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Most of us aren't brilliant virtuosos like, say, Leonardo da Vinci or Nobel Prize-winning scientist Marie Curie. On the other hand, every one of us has a singular amalgam of potentials that is unique in the history of the world—an exceptional flair or an idiosyncratic mastery or a distinctive blend of talents. In my astrological opinion, you Aquarians will have unprecedented opportunities to develop and ripen this golden and glorious aspect of yourself in 2021. And now is a good time to begin making plans. I encourage you to launch your year-long Festival of Becoming by writing down a description of your special genius.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) In 1969, humans flew a spaceship to the moon and landed on it for the first time. In 1970, the state of Alabama finally made it legal for interracial couples to get married. That's a dramatic example of how we humans may be mature and strong in some ways even as we remain backward and undeveloped in other ways. According to my astrological analysis, the coming months will be a highly favorable time for the immature and unseasoned parts of you to ripen. I encourage you to get started!

HOMEWORK: Name something you feel like begging for. Then visualize in great detail that this something is already yours. Report results to FreeWillAstrology.com Check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes & Daily Text Message Horoscopes

freewillastrology.com The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at

1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700 Willamette Week NOVEMBER 11, 2020 wweek.com

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Sat Nov 14

Turtles Guitar Mafia w Jimmy Russell and Sean Badders B

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Willamette Week, November 11, 2020 - Volume 47, Issue 3 - "Relief"  

How Portlanders Celebrated the Defeat of President Donald Trump

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How Portlanders Celebrated the Defeat of President Donald Trump

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