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Willamette

January/February 2021

LIVING

The lifestyle magazine for Oregon’s Willamette Valley

HELLO 2021 (where have you been all my life?)


liverpool

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Pendleton Corvallis 204 SW Madison Ave. 541-752-5518

Eugene 323 Oakway Rd. Suite F 458-210-2827

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Locally owned and operated since 1962, The Clothes Tree provides exceptional quality merchandise and excellent customer service for all ages and sizes.

•

A Sampling of the Quality Brands We Carry... NYDJ

Renvar

Hobo Bags

Sanctuary

Fenini

Charlie B

Pendleton

UGG Apparel

Tribal

Uno de 50

Liverpool

Joseph Ribkoff


In This Issue...

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

18

OSU's Own Dr. Jane Lubchenco Restoring the role of science. Regulars 9 Art in the Mid-Valley 20 The Bookshelf 40 Sten: On the Money 41 Real Estate Update 42 Kris on Health 43 New Beginnings 44 Gardening With Brenda 45 Style

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Earl Newman On the Cover:

9

The Arts Center

Gwen Gray soaks up the fleeting January sun on Marys Peak. Photo: Trevor Witt www.trevorwittphotography.com facebook.com/willametteliving

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ESCAPE PLANNING!

Another Fabulous Kitchen from Powell & Co.

pinterest.com/willamettelivin

Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

coming in the MARCH/APRIL Issue

@WillametteLiving

advertising information www.willametteliving.com ads@willametteliving.com 541-740-9776

issuu.com/willametteliving


Mercedes-Benz of Salem

Presents The GLC Class

The GLC-Class The Mercedes-Benz GLC has been in the market for four years, and is

The GLC Coupe stands out with its dynamic appearance and elegant

the brand’s most popular SUV model. The strengths of this mid-size

lines. This model shows how harmoniously the design features of a

model include outstanding driving characteristics both on and off

coupe can be reconciled with those of an SUV, with a descending

the road, spaciousness, practicality and comfort. Features of the new

roofline, a greenhouse that blends perfectly into the silhouette, the

model now include a more stylish appearance, a new control concept,

character line in combination with the distinctive chrome strip on the

the infotainment system MBUX, innovative driving assistance systems

high beltline, and muscular shoulders.

and a new range of engines. The numerous upgrades also benefit the GLC Coupe, which combines the sportiness of a coupe with the

Both models are now equipped with LED High Performance

practicality of an SUV.

headlamps as standard. Their contours have been significantly changed, and they are now smaller and flatter. This makes the torch-

The exterior design is characterized by sporty features. A distinctive

like outline of the daytime driving lights even more prominent, and

off-road look is accentuated by muscular surface contours and striking

the distinctive Mercedes-Benz light signature even more recognizable.

details such as the redesigned headlamps and the heavily contoured

The LED Intelligent Light System with Adaptive Curve Illumination and

radiator grille.

Adaptive Highbeam Assist is available as an option. Redesigned all-LED rear lights are also included as standard.

Mercedes Benz of Salem 2405 Commercial St. SE Salem | Sales: 800.336.4148

www.valleymb.com www.willametteliving.com

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From the Home Office in Corvallis...

Publisher's Update

Take a look at this issue online, just visit our website and click to view the digital edition. Plus, there are more in our archive, and you can take a look at them all, for free.

Well, here we are in 2021. I had hoped for complete change on day one, but maybe that was a little unrealistic? I definitely didn't anticipate the downfall of American Democracy being broadcast on live TV, six days into 2021. Like the Capitol Police and the FBI, apparently, I DID NOT see that coming.

Scott Alexander, Publisher

In the office, where I am now, all the time, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It's the best!

Skin-Nourishing Handcrafted Soaps Made in Oregon’s Willamette Valley

503.883.3272

sacredrootsco@gmail.com

But, it's only better and brighter from here... right? I'm glad we have the vaccine on the horizon, and I'm OK with mask wearing for a while longer, even though it means total blindness with the glasses upon any change in temperature, like when I go outside. Fortunately, I never do that anymore. Seriously though, I am really looking forward to getting out, hitting the open road, logging some miles, and putting together some new "Getaways" for Willamette Living! After thinking about it for a while, we decided we need more "wine stuff." We are, after all, in the "Heart of the Valley" -- Oregon's Wine Country, Pinot paradise! So, we're working on a new feature section for the year, The Grapevine. I hope you enjoy our first installment featuring a new release from Emerson Vineyards, Oregon Pinot Noir, and a unique offering from Compton Family Wines, Sea02. Both with pairings suggested by the winemakers themselves. We've also come to notice that we have little stuff for every issue that comes in that may not warrant a major feature, but IS something we want to share, so we've got another new section, "Notepad." Kind

of a corkboard, except paper. Also, we are well aware that 2020 has not been a banner year for many local businesses, so we're offering a limited number of spaces on our new section, "Marketplace." One of them is our new advertiser, Sacred Roots (left). That is an actual size 1/9 page ad. If you want one, let us know - there will only be nine! Well, eight now. There are some inspiring Oregonians in this issue (as usual) OSU's own Jane Lubchenco is working with the incoming administration to restore the role of science in public decision-making, Earl Newman, local artist, is working away happily, at 90 years of age, and all of our local professional contributors are onhand to offer sage advice. We've also got some great recipes this time, thanks to the First Alternative Coop, and our local winemakers. So while you're hunkering down, you can try a few! In the meantime, I'm going to try the hummus recipe, and dream of traveling -to anywhere! Stay well, and enjoy this issue of Willamette Living and as always, thanks for reading!

Scott

www.sacredrootsco.com Welcome to a new advertiser, Sacred Roots Co. a purveyor of handcrafted soap. To the left is a charcoal soap, very cleansing! Look for their different soaps in our upcoming "Marketplace." 6

Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

www.willametteliving.com/subscribe Spending more time at home? Spending ALL your time at home? Save yourself the trip to pick up a free copy, and subscribe to Willamette Living.


Willamette

LIVING

T H E L I F E S T Y L E M AG A Z I N E F O R W E S T E R N O R E G O N

Publishers

Scott & Gayanne Alexander

Willamette Living is published every two months by Willamette Life Media LLC

   

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Contributing Photographer Trevor Witt Trevor@willametteliving.com

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In print at hundreds of locations in the Willamette Valley. The digital edition is free online at www.willametteliving.com

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Event Calendar

Submit your events at: willametteliving.com. Please submit as far ahead as possible. Please check your submission for accuracy. Please allow time for approval. Select events may also appear in the print magazine.

Mailing Address

Willamette Living 922 NW Circle Blvd Suite 160 - 179 Corvallis, OR 97330

a breath of fresh air

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All editorial material, including comments, opinion and statements of fact appearing in this publication, represents the views of the respective authors and does not necessarily carry the endorsement of Willamette Living or its officers. Information in Willamette Living is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy of all information cannot be guaranteed. The publication of any advertisements is not to be construed as an endorsement of products or services offered unless it is specifically stated in the ad that there is such approval or endorsement.

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*Products/books/samples for review to same address please.

DiscoverYachats.org | 800.929.0477 www.willametteliving.com

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“SHE SAVED MY LIFE” ADVERTISEMENT

ALBANY OREGON RESIDENT BARB R. HAD BEEN EXPERIENCING THE PAINFUL SIDE EFFECTS OF PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY, “MY FEET AND LEGS WERE EXTREMELY PAINFUL, AND MY DOCTOR TOLD ME THERE WAS NOTHING THEY COULD DO. THAT I WOULD HAVE TO TAKE GABAPENTIN FOR THE REST OF MY LIFE.” THEN SHE MET ONDRIA HOLUB OF BALANCE POINT ACUPUNCTURE LLC. Peripheral Neuropathy is the pain, discomfort and numbness caused by nerve damage of the peripheral nervous system. Barb explained that daily tasks like opening doors and using the bathroom were overwhelmingly painful. “How can you live for the next 30 years when you don’t even want to get out of bed to do simple things?” She was experiencing the burning, numbness, tingling, and sharp pains that those suffering with neuropathy often describe. “The way that I would describe it it’s equivalent to walking on glass.” Barb hadn’t worn socks in five years and was wearing shoes two sizes too big so that nothing would “touch her feet.” Unfortunately, Barb’s story is all too familiar for the over three million people in the US suffering from peripheral neuropathy. If you’re unfortunate enough to be facing the same disheartening prognosis of not sleeping at night because of the burning in your feet, you have difficulty walking, shopping, or doing any activity for more than 30 minutes because of the pain, you’re struggling with balance, and living in fear that you might fall, your doctor told you just live with the pain and you’re taking medications that aren’t working or have uncomfortable side effects.

Peripheral Neuropathy? Call (541) 714-3200 to schedule a consultation!

Fortunately, eight months ago, Barb read an article about Ondria Holub and the work she was doing to treat those suffering from peripheral neuropathy. Without invasive surgeries or medications. Ondria Holub founder of Balance Point Acupuncture, LLC in Corvallis Oregon is using the time-tested science of acupuncture and a technology originally developed by NASA that assists in increasing blood flow and expediting recovery and healing to treat this debilitating disease. “Now when I go to bed at night, I don’t have those shooting pains. I don’t have that burning sensation. I don’t have pain coming up my legs,” Barb enthusiastically describes life after receiving Ondria’s treatments. “I can wear socks and shoes!” Barb and her sister now operate a successful dog walking business. Sometimes covering up to five miles a day. “It’s life-altering. As far as I’m concerned, Ondria saved my life!” Ondria has been helping the senior community for over 13 years using the most cutting edge and innovative integrative medicine. Specializing in chronic pain cases, specifically those that have been deemed “hopeless” 2005 NW Grant Ave. Corvallis, Oregon. (Northwest corner of Kings and Grant Ave.)

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or “untreatable,” she consistently generates unparalleled results. What was once a missing link in senior health care is now easily accessible to communities in the Willamette Valley. If you’ve missed too many tee times because of pain or you’ve passed on dancing the shag down on Main Street because you’re afraid of falling, it’s time to call Ondria Holub of Balance Point Acupuncture, LLC. It’s time to let your golden years BE GOLDEN. Ondria is now accepting patients at her new location in Corvallis, Oregon. 2005 NW Grant Avenue, at the corner of Northwest Grant and Kings. Give her a call at (541) 714-3200 to schedule a consultation today.


The Art Scene

Art in the Mid-Valley By Brian Egan

Happy New Year and welcome to 2021! Let’s all get vaccinated and start planning for a new normal, where we are once again free to socialize and enjoy life. While that may take a few months, we can start by returning to art galleries and shops on a limited basis to renew our love of art and help artists regain financial footing.

Soul Calling Tamae Frame

Starting January 7th, The Arts Center will host Tamae Frame and Erika Rier for an exhibit titled Singular Mythologies. The show is about women and their lives. Both created a very personal language, a personal mythology around what it means to be a woman. Both are also self-taught, finding their medium to best express their goals. Is it a coincidence that both have a level of surrealism? Frame has her female figures coming out of clouds, having feathers for eyes, being blue. Rier called her style “folk surrealism” Japanese-born Tamae Frame creates her sculptures in ceramic. She chose the medium for the countless possibilities in surface treatment and fluidity in shapes. This ability intrigues her imagination and makes it possible for her to show the subjects character along with its mood and feeling. Multimedia artist Erika Rier will primarily show paintings in Singular Mythologies, but she also works in mixed media, designing clothing, ceramics and interdisciplinary art forms. Her first love was writing. Rier specifically portrays the inner lives of women and the expectations of women’s roles in art. In her words: “It is important to me that when a female-identifying person looks at my work they see their own struggles and realities and dreams reflected back at them and that they see the beauty we each possess is our ability as women to persist no matter the obstacles.” Don’t be put off guys, consider this show another way to try and understand www.willametteliving.com

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Artists in residence at The Arts Center

Cora Freyer

Citlalmina Xochitl Rios

Eileen Hinckle

Jess Felix

Jill Myer

Caitlin Rose

how woman think, something we have been pondering since the dawn of time.

Introvert

Tamae Frame

What: Singular Mythologies, work by Tamae Frame and Erika Rier When: January 7 – February 13, 2021 Where: The Arts Center, 700 SW Madison Ave Corvallis OR 97333 Please check theartscenter.net for current hours of operation The Annual Howland Community Open is the The Arts Center’s most popular exhibit and offers an opportunity for artists of all ages and skill levels to have their work displayed in the main gallery of The Arts Center. The Open invites ALL people living in Linn or Benton Counties to show their art. The exhibit reflects the joy of art-making and the engagement of our community with the visual arts. Art-making is a valuable means of expression for beginners and seasoned professional artists alike. The 2020 show featured over 200 artists showcasing painting, sculpture, fiber arts and more. For more information and submission rules go to https://theartscenter.net/call-to-artistshowland-community-open-2021/ What: The Annual Howland Community Open When: Drop off artwork February 16th to 20th, 10

Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

17.75"h x 9.5"w x 6"d, Materials: Earthenware Clay, Underglaze, Feathers.


SO. MUCH. ART! noon to 4pm. Show Dates are from February 25th to April 17th. Artist Reception and Awards Ceremony will be scheduled at a later date dependent on covid protocols. Where: The Arts Center Artist Residencies at The Arts Center are an investment in one’s professional career, with dedicated time, studio space and collaborative support. Artists in Residence receive studio space and participate in supportive peer development through casual critiques, professional development lectures, progress meetings, and preparation of a body of artworks to exhibit at The Arts Center. Residents are selected for professional and personal growth potential, as well as an ability and willingness to contribute to a thriving artist community. This year’s artists in residence each bring a unique perspective to their creative business and art practice. Eileen Hinckle recently finished the ‘Greetings from Corvallis’ Mural. Citlalmina Rios uses poetry, cyanotypes and photographs to address trauma. Caitlin Rose is a contemporary choreographer and dancer. Cora Freyer is a painter exploring landscape and texture. Jess Felix is a ceramic artist and Jill Myer is a watercolor and encaustic painter. Please join The Arts Center in celebration of these emerging artists. Results of their residencies will be showcased in the Corrine Woodman Gallery during February and March. The Howland Open What: Work of Resident Artists When: February 11 – March 27, 2021 Where: The Arts Center, Corrine Woodman Gallery Will spring and summer art festivals return in 2021? We certainly hope that by summer the pandemic will be under control and we can enjoy art under sunny skies. The artists are eager to move the last years’ worth of work out of their studios where it can be enjoyed by art lovers. ARTS CENTER HOURS Noon to 5pm Thursday through Saturday (at time of publication, please check website for updates) Phone 541-754-1551 www.theartscenter.net  Erika Rier www.willametteliving.com

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Five ways to take part in Oregon’s history and honor our great state The Oregon State Capitol Foundation encourages Oregonians to rally around our state’s heritage during these historic times. Submitted by the Oregon State Capitol Foundation Historic moments are happening all around us every day. Now, more than ever, it’s important to know what our state stands for and embrace its heritage. In addition to voting, we can all make a difference in our local government by making a conscious effort to get involved. The Oregon State Capitol Foundation encourages Oregonians to come together, support our great state and learn more about what makes Oregon, Oregon.

As a proud sponsor of the Capitol History Gateway program, the Foundation has partners throughout the state offering interesting ways to get involved and learn more about our state’s history. Check out these ideas, many of which are available virtually, and become an active participant in Oregon’s history: 1.

Mrs. Margaret Howe carrying the Oregon shield during a march

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Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

Visit woman suffrage exhibit and get your 19th Amendment desk flag — a gift from the Oregon State Capitol Foundation to visitors of

the Oregon Historical Foundation’s original exhibition: “Nevertheless, They Persisted: Women’s Voting Rights and the 19th Amendment.”

The exhibit shows how Oregon history connects to the national woman suffrage movement and the work necessary to win the 1920 ratification of the 19th Amendment which granted most women the right to vote. For a preview of the exhibit, watch the trailer online at


www.ohs.org/museum/exhibits/nevertheless-theypersisted.cfm. Visit the exhibit through August 15, 2021 at the Oregon Historical Foundation at 1200 SW Park Ave. in Portland. Additional historical information and photos from the exhibit can be found on the Foundation’s website at www. oregoncapitolfoundation.org/woman-suffrage/. 2.

Listen to “Voices of the Valley” — an oral history project sponsored by the Willamette Heritage Center and available at www.willametteheritage.org/ collections/voices. The collection of stories includes interviews from past and present with some dating as far back as 1958 chronicling Oregon’s complex history. The Willamette Heritage Center also offers other social distancing learning opportunities with virtual tours of some of our area’s most historical sites and scenes, a series of educational web courses, lesson plans for teachers and parents and Pinterest education activity boards. All of these are available online at www.willametteheritage.org/socialdistancing-learning-resources.

3.

Visit the exhibit “Discrimination and Persistence, An Oregon Primer” — at the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education at 724 NW Davis in Portland. The exhibit shows the resistance of discrimination in the past to create a more equal society. Learn more at www.ojmche.org/events/discrimination-andresistance-an-oregon-primer. The online exhibition “Good Trouble” is also available at www.ojmche. org/exhibitions/online-exhibitions and portrays a number of social movements reminding us to use our voices to create positive change.

19th Amendment Desk Flags

4. Tune in and listen to “The Register” — weekly biographies of some of the most noted African Americans in Oregon’s history. The 5-minute broadcast is co-produced by Oregon Black Pioneers and KMUN. Learn more at oregonblackpioneers.org/2020/09/22/obplaunches-the-register and listen to the recordings on the program’s podcast page at www. coastradio.org/series/the-register. 5.

Read the story “In These Uncertain Times” — by Oregon Humanities and available at www.oregonhumanities.org/rll/magazine/outsidesummer-2020/in-these-uncertain-times. The story provides diverse perspectives by profiling Oregonians coming together during the coronavirus crisis.

The Oregon State Capitol Foundation is a non-profit organization working to enhance the beauty of the Oregon State Capitol and preserve the history it represents. The Foundation also funds educational programs focused on Oregon’s heritage and democracy. The Foundation’s office is located in Salem, Oregon. For more information, visit www. oregoncapitolfoundation.org or call 503-363-1859.

The Jewish Museum

Uncertain Times

www.willametteliving.com

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Meanwhile, at the home of local artist of note, Earl Newman... A new installation on the side of his house! Earl's mastery of uplifting color is the thing we all need right now. Earl's 50 years of posters for the Monterey Jazz Festival are in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution! Earl is crusing through the pandemic, but he says he misses seeing everyone. Earl will be 91 in 2021. More: facebook.com/EarlNewmanPrints


2009 NW Woodland Dr in Corvallis. 4 bd, 3.5 ba, 2,749 Sq. Ft. lot size: .24 acre

In one of our most coveted neighborhoods, Edgewood Park, this home will delight you on so many levels. A spacious ofďŹ ce, the updated, sunny, and bright kitchen and fresh paint make it move in ready. Well maintained throughout the years, the one owner home will make life easy for you. Need a great dual living option? The lower level with separate entrance, family room, bedroom and full bath delivers. An outstanding home in a great location !

Annette Sievert

Number one Coldwell Banker agent in Oregon! 541-207-5551 | asievert@valleybrokers.com

“Have Expectations� www.valleybrokers.com/asievert

If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit oerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully. Š2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell BankerÂŽ is a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each oďŹƒce is independently owned and operated. Š2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell BankerÂŽ is a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each oďŹƒce is independently owned and operated. Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

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Bill & Leslie Witt

wittconsulting.com Ta x • L e g a l • A cco u n t i n g • Co n s u l t i n g

“Bill, Leslie, and Co. are an indispensable part of our dayto-day business. They’ve also become good friends over the years. If you need clarification, Witt Consulting should be your first choice. With vast knowledge of tax law, creativity, and an always positive outlook, they’re not your average accounting firm.� Scott Alexander, Publisher Willamtte Life Media

www.willametteliving.com

15


Getaway to Rockaway

Rockaway Beach: Family traditions, new experiences With its seven miles of wide, sandy coastline, it’s no wonder Rockaway Beach on the north Oregon Coast is such a popular destination. One visit and you’ll understand why families have been flocking to this little beach town for more than a century. While many people see the beach as the perfect kite-flying destination, the place offers so much more, year-round. Make your spring break plans now.

Old Growth Cedar Preserve and Boardwalk In winter and early spring, familiar forests can become completely new and unexplored kingdoms. Give the Old Growth Cedar Preserve a try for an easy, all-accessible stroll. Located at the south end of town, this cedar-plank walk through wetlands leads you to the grand dame of Rockaway Beach: the 1,200-year-old cedar tree. Watch a video about it on the home page of www. visitrockawaybeach.org

Metal detecting is a treasure hunt A walk on the beach is always a great idea. But take along a metal detector, and you may find surprising treasure. Rent a detector from Troxel’s Gem and Jewelry store in the center of town, and start searching. If it’s stormy, stay away from logs and waves. Instead walk closer to shore or on a coastline trail and, above all, never turn your back on the waves. Call or text Troxel’s at 541-418-2842

Ride the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad Riding the rails in a historic train, pulled by a restored steam engine, not only provides a view of the coast like no other, but it’s also a step back in time experience. The Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad is the opportunity to sit back, take in the experience of leisurely moving along the bay, ocean and wetlands on the Oregon 16

Flying kites at Rockaway Beach

Coast, wave at passers-by, and listen for the train whistle at crossings. Catch the train in Rockaway Beach or nearby Garibaldi for a 90-minute round trip. If the weather cooperates, sit in the open-air car, and take in the fragrance of forests and ocean air. Purchase tickets online at

Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

oregoncoastscenic.org

Walk around downtown for a different type of treasure hunt One of the most fun things to do in


Rockaway Beach is to go shopping and antiquing. Think of all the perfect treasures waiting to be found. We have several suggestions: Simply Charming, The Little Crow, Troxel’s Gems and Jewelry, Etcetera, Beach Crafters, Trash & Treasures, Flamingo Jim’s, Little White Church Antiques and, at the south end of town, Warehouse 10. Just be sure to give yourself plenty of time because there is so much to see — in fact, you may need a few days to explore all the stores.

Enjoy a local meal, from seafood to Pronto Pups

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad

Whether you want a hearty breakfast, bowl of chowder or seafood dinner, there are lots of options in Rockaway Beach. There’s Old Oregon Smokehouse, Sand Dollar Restaurant (oceanfront), Upper Crust Pizza, Lakeside Hideaway, Sunrise

Rings and coins are common finds at Rockaway Beach

Café, Beach Bite and Pronto Pup — you can’t miss it. There’s a giant pronto pup on the roof. If you haven’t heard, legend has it that Grumpy’s Cafe is inhabited by a ghost that the staff calls Roger. He’s not always around, but you can see his effects now and then if you’re lucky.

from the 700-foot Garibaldi Pier. Or head north from Rockaway, and go crabbing at Kelly’s Brighton Marina or Jetty Fishery. Staff will show you how to crab from the dock or from a boat. You can even cook your catch in a big pot before heading back to Rockaway.

Catch your own seafood dinner

Rockaway Beach also makes a great basecamp for exploring other activities. Nearby is the Tillamook Creamery, Tillamook Air Museum, Cape Lookout State Park, Nehalem Bay State Park and many other destinations. For more information and to plan your trip, go to www.visitrockawaybeach.org

Staying in a place with a kitchen? Then try your hand at clamming and crabbing. In Garibaldi, just four miles south along Tillamook Bay, you can dig for clams when the tide is low, or cast a line or crab pot

Old Growth Cedar Boardwalk and Preserve

www.willametteliving.com

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JANE LUBCHENCO | PHOTO: OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

OSU distinguished university professor calls on

Biden to restore role of science in government By Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039, steve.lundeberg@oregonstate.edu Source: Jane Lubchenco, 541-737-5337, lubchenco@oregonstate.edu

Jane Lubchenco, distinguished Oregon State University professor and former head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, outlines a “science restoration” plan for Presidentelect Joe Biden in an article published in Scientific American. “During the campaign, Joe Biden 18

pledged to get science back into government and to allow science to guide government actions,” said Lubchenco, who worked with Biden while serving as NOAA director in the Obama administration. “As a longtime member of the scientific community and a former government official, I have some ideas for how to do that.”

Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

Lubchenco, who forged a relationship with the then-vice president during on-one-one discussions during the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, offers four overarching recommendations: • Make science and scientists prominent. • Restore and strengthen the conditions that enable science to thrive and


inform decisions. • Modernize the use of science across the agencies. • Depoliticize science. “When we flew aboard Air Force Two to the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon disaster and in the car after landing, Joe Biden peppered me with a wide range of questions that made it clear how much respect he has for science and how able he is to lean on scientists’ help in understanding complicated issues,” Lubchenco said. “He also has tremendous capacity for integrating science into his messaging in ways that make science useful and relevant to people’s lives.” Lubchenco said Biden’s first job as president is to make clear that his administration has the same respect for scientists that he does personally. “Nominating a ‘Science Team’ that includes the president’s science advisor immediately after cabinet nominations makes a clear statement that science is back and is a priority,” she said. “Moreover, elevating the science advisor to cabinet-level status would underscore the relevance of science across the executive branch.  “We also need new, transparent mechanisms to make sure science is at the table every time a key decision needs to be made,” Lubchenco said. “Every major special team the White House creates needs a lead scientist, and a visible one. And every time a major decision or action is announced, it needs to include a summary of the applicable science.” Lubchenco, who served as an inaugural member of President Barack Obama’s Science Team and as the first U.S. Science Envoy for the Ocean, said that as president, Biden should issue powerful scientific integrity guidelines that forbid anyone in the executive branch from “cherry-picking, manipulating, suppressing or distorting scientific information.” “Agency scientists have to be free to talk to the press about their findings without a gatekeeper or politically constrained talking points,” she said. “Scientific integrity policies are the backbone of a healthy scientific enterprise in the government. Over the last four years, many scientists throughout the federal government were demoralized and/ or left. We need to reconstitute our scientific capacity with a diverse group of early-career scientists who will benefit the nation for

decades to come. The more that scientists look like the rest of America, the more they will be trusted.” Lubchenco said holistic approaches – including thinking across complex systems and integrating social and economic dimensions – are needed to tackle current challenges including climate change. She noted that President Obama created a National Ocean Council to harness the power of the 26 agencies and offices connected to ocean issues. “Biden should avoid dealing with issues in silos and instead seek holistic solutions across agencies and issues,” she noted. “For example, he can listen to the scientific information that identifies powerful opportunities for healthy ocean ecosystems to help address climate change, biodiversity, economies, health, coastal resilience and equity. And he should empower a new National Ocean Council and policy to harness this power of a healthy ocean.” The ocean, just like science, is not a partisan topic, she emphasized. “Americans understand and appreciate that science needs to be free from political interference to have maximum impact on their well-being,” Lubchenco said. “They get that things like hurricane forecasts need to be based on science and they want to know what the experts think, unencumbered by partisan pressure.” Science must be one of the factors that decision makers across the government spectrum regularly and necessarily consider, she said. “The more opportunities we can all provide for people to participate in science, the better,” Lubchenco said. “Those opportunities help to demystify science, make it accessible and drive home that it’s not political. The messages and actions that come from the top matter a lot, and I’m encouraging our new president to embrace and use science, even when it might not be convenient. The nation and world will be much better off if he does so.” About the OSU College of Science: As one of the largest academic units at OSU, the College of Science has seven departments and 12 pre-professional programs. It provides the basic science courses essential to the education of every OSU student, builds future leaders in science, and its faculty are international leaders in scientific research.

WHO IS JANE LUBCHENCO ? Jane Lubchenco, University Distinguished Professor at Oregon State University, is a marine ecologist with expertise in the ocean, climate change, and interactions between the environment and human well-being. She served as the U.S. Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and an inaugural member of President Barack Obama’s Science Team from 20092013. From 20142016, she was the first U.S. State Department Science Envoy for the Ocean, serving as a science diplomat to China, Indonesia, South Africa, Mauritius and the Seychelles. Dr. Lubchenco is one of the “most highly cited” ecologists in the world with eight publications as “Science Citation Classics.”

www.willametteliving.com

19


Books All the Devils are Here

five years before to Bob, a strange, green creature who cannot recall who or what he is.

by Louise Penny

Boys of Alabama by Genevieve Hudson

Horrified when his billionaire godfather is targeted in a near-fatal accident, Chief Inspector Gamache follows clues deep within the Paris Archives to uncover gruesome, decades-old secrets. By the award-winning author of A Better Man.

Bob by Wendy Mass

The Future of Nutrition

by Dr T. Colin Campbell, PhD with Nelson Disla Thriving in his new Alabama home, a sensitive German teen pursues a relationship with a pangender classmate before the realities of the postwar South challenge their perspectives on identity. A first novel by the author of Pretend We Live Here.

Broken People: a novel by Sam Lansky

Visiting her grandmother in Australia, Livy, ten, is reminded of the promise she made

A novel about coming to grips with the past and ourselves follows recovering alcoholic Sam as he, with his sponsor’s blessing, partakes in a healing ceremony involving an ancient herbal medicine administered by a shaman over the course of three days.

Librarian’s Picks

Corvallis-Benton County

PUBLIC LIBRARY 20

Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

With the continued goal of increasing awareness of the science-based benefits of a whole food, plant-based lifestyle, T. Colin Campbell, PhD, a pioneer in the field of nutrition with six decades of research experience​, releases The Future of Nutrition​.​In his third book, Dr. Campbell takes a deep look into ​the history of disease care, the current state of the nutrition industry, and how decades of nutrition research challenge scientific dogma. ​ “I am humbled to share my most recent findings in The Future of Nutrition​,” said Dr. Campbell. “My primary interest is furthering an understanding of nutrition as a science for the entire population, both among citizens and governmental authorities. In this book, we address major societal problems like environmental issues and health care costs and their many manifestations. We review the science behind a whole food, plant-based lifestyle by focusing on health care over disease care.”


Crooked Hallelujah

experiences of five women in her family who were separated by the Iron Curtain for more than 40 years and who endured terrifying Communist rule before being reunited after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

by Kelli Jo Ford

I Quit Sugar: your complete 8-week detox program and cookbook by Sarah Wilson

Forward from Here: Leaving Middle Age- and Other Unexpected Adventures by Reeve Lindbergh

A week-by-week guide to reducing sugar intake for weight loss, improved energy and bolstered health draws on the author’s experiences with hypoglycemia and autoimmune diseases while offering more than 100 simple recipes complemented by suggestions for overcoming cravings.

A first collection by an award-winning Cherokee writer traces four generations of Native American women as they navigate cultural dynamics, religious beliefs, the 1980s oil bust, devastating storms and unreliable men to connect with their ideas about home.

Forty Autumns: a family’s story of courage and survival on both sides of the Berlin Wall

In a poignant compilation of never-beforepublished autobiographical essays, the author of Under a Wing and No More Words reflects on growing older, her famous parents, family secrets, and the transition out of middle age.

by Nina Willner A former American military intelligence officer traces the

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Offbeat Oregon History

No. 593

By Finn J.D. John

Running From the FBI? Try Hiding in a Small Oregon Town HAPPY NEW YEAR! In the spirit of the American tradition of the season, today we’re going to explore the stories of two Missouri men whose New Year’s Resolutions probably once included “Give up crime” and “Hide from the F.B.I.”

Hipple’s adventure is a story for another day. Today we are going to talk about two other fugitives, both of whom had the bad luck to be on the lam 90 years after Hipple’s successful scampering-off. Their luck would not be as good as his.

This is the sort of thing that used to be very easy to do in Oregon, which is actually the only state (so far as I have been able to learn) to have ever had one of its U.S. Senators serve under an alias which he adopted while running from law enforcement. (That would be John M. Hipple, a.k.a. John H. Mitchell — a cool, amoral Gilded Age rascal after whom the town of Mitchell is named — who in 1860 abandoned his wife and family in Connecticut, “borrowed” $4,000 from his employer, and fled with his mistress to the West Coast to start a new life under a new name.)

Like Hipple, neither was a killer. One of them was arguably not even a “real” criminal. But both of them were fugitives from justice who were caught “laying low” under aliases in little towns in Oregon, and both were caught through the media — in one case, the newspapers, and in the other, a radio show.

Orba Elmer Jackson (a.k.a. Ken Van Kempen): IN MARCH OF 1950, Clide Adams, the postmaster in the town of Tualatin, was going through a packet of FBI “Wanted” posters preparatory to putting them up on the post-

office wall when he noticed a familiar face looking up at him from the stack. The name on the poster was Orba Elmer Jackson. But the picture — well, if that wasn’t Ken Van Kempen, a local handyman who occasionally worked at the house across the street, it had to be his twin brother. He showed the poster to Bernice Ladd, his postal clerk; and she agreed it had to be the same man. Ken, they knew, had recently taken a permanent job at Cy Kirkland’s chicken farm in Aloha, and had left a forwarding address with them. So Clide sent off a letter to the FBI office in Portland, telling of his suspicions and giving the forwarding address. Two days later, the “FBI’s Ten Most Wanted” appeared in the Portland newspapers. Orba

Cast members and Foley sound technicians recording an episode of Gang Busters in August 1938. (Image: Morehead State Public Radio)

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Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

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Jackson was No. 7 on the list, and several other of “Ken’s” acquaintances also made the connection and reached out to the FBI. Everyone who knew “Ken” would be flabbergasted by the FBI’s description of the vicious-looking, hardened criminal whose sour puss glared out at the reader from his newspaper mugshot: “Orba Jackson is now a fugitive,” the FBI wrote. “He is considered dangerous and is believed to be armed. He may attempt to ‘shoot it out’ with law enforcement officers should his capture become imminent.” Readers also learned that he got into a life of crime early, as a Missouri farm-boy teenager. Basically, he was a car thief. He drew a fouryear sentence for auto theft in 1924, when he was 18, and served it at the Missouri state pen; a few months after he got out, he got busted for another car theft, and was sent back for another three years.  After he got out, he went straight for a few years before making the biggest mistake of his life: joining an accomplice to try to rob a rural general store. The robbery went badly — not as badly as it could have, but badly enough: The old man who ran the store grabbed Jackson’s accomplice’s pistol. The accomplice punched him in the face to make him let go. Then the old man’s brother-in-law came in with a rifle. Jackson got the drop on the rifleman, grabbed the gun and yanked it out of his hands. At that point, the two of them decided things were getting too rich for their blood, and ran for it.  They knew they were in trouble, but at first had no idea how much. The thing was, there was a little post office in the back of the store they’d robbed. Armed robbery was bad enough, but robbing a post office was a much bigger deal, and a federal offense to boot. So on this, Jackson’s third trip to the Big House, the sentence was 25 years.  Seventeen years into his sentence, Jackson walked away from a work crew he was assigned to as a “trusty” and disappeared. That was in 1947.  He moved out to the West Coast, settled down in Tualatin, changed his name to Ken Van Kempen, and started a new hobby as a landscape painter.  But, of course, the FBI wasn’t ready to let bygones be bygones. His offense, armed robbery, may have been comparatively minor; but, as an escapee from a federal prison, he was pretty high on their priority

Orba Jackson’s mugshot and profile as they appeared in the “FBI’s Ten Most Wanted” feature in the Portland Oregonian. (Image: FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin)

list — high enough to make No. 7 on the Ten Most Wanted. He made it fairly easy for them, too, making no attempt to change his appearance by, say, growing a beard or even changing hairstyles. “That’s a hoosier trick,” he said. “That’s what they expect you to do.” 

had invited him to come back to Tualatin and resume his old job after his release, he didn’t return. But he didn’t turn back to crime either; given the chance to go straight, Orba Jackson took it. When he finally died, in 1993, he was living in California, having kept his nose scrupulously clean for the last 40 years of his life.

He told reporters the FBI’s bulletin on him was “a pack of lies.”

John Harvey Bugg, a.k.a. Cowboy Jim Williams

“To put me on the list of the ten worst criminals is the silliest thing I’ve ever heard of,” he grumbled glumly. “I haven’t done anything very bad. The paper said I was dangerous and probably armed. Hell, I haven’t had a gun since I got out. What do I want with a gun? I got enough trouble without one.”

LATE IN THE MONTH of March, 1948, in the small coastal town of Gearhart, Pauline Virgin, 12, and her cousin Navarre Smith, 14, were listening to the famous “Gang Busters” radio program on radio station KEX (A.M. 1190). Gang Busters, as you may recall, was billed as “the only national program that brings you authentic police case histories.” It was, basically, “America’s Most Wanted” for the Golden Age of Radio.

Orba Jackson was bundled into Rocky Butte Jail to await extradition back to Leavenworth to finish his sentence, plus a few extra years for the escape. Meanwhile, his friends in Washington County rallied around, offering moral support and more. Chicken farmer Cy Kirkland, Jackson’s employer, started a legal defense fund for him and wrote letters urging the parole board to be merciful.

The radio host was telling the story of a wanted criminal named John Harvey Bugg, who back in 1945 had kidnapped a county sheriff, robbed him, and tied him to a telephone pole. Listeners were urged to be on the lookout for a man who walked with a limp, loved horses, and had the word “LOVE” tattooed across the knuckles of his left hand.

“We think he has paid plenty for his crimes, and that he has been honestly trying to go straight,” said Cy Kirkland’s wife.

“Why — that’s Cowboy Jim!” Pauline exclaimed.

It must have worked, because he was out by 1955, about ten years before his sentence would have been up. Although the Kirklands

Cowboy Jim Williams was a popular 31-yearold ex-rodeo cowboy who, after several years of living the “Amarillo by Morning” lifestyle www.willametteliving.com

25


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Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021


following the rodeo circuit, had settled down in Gearhart and taken a job at a riding academy. He’d been doing the job for a year by then, teaching kids like Pauline and Navarre how to handle ponies. He was good with kids, even better with horses, and widely loved.

“I made pretty good money working at rodeos,” he told reporters, “but I was afraid of the publicity. They almost caught me at Redding. Some friends tipped me off and I headed north.”  Now, tracked down at last, Bugg waived extradition and eagerly took a visiting Oklahoma sheriff up on an offer to drive him back east to face the music.

But he always kept strips of masking tape wrapped around the knuckles of his left hand, and rebuffed the kids’ requests to know why. Pauline, in particular, had been very curious about the tape, and one time after she pressed him on it, he actually got angry. Now, she thought, she knew why. So she shared her suspicions, first with the editor of the local paper (who didn’t take her seriously) and then with one of Gearhart’s police officers, who passed the tip up the line. A couple weeks passed, during which time Cowboy Jim himself heard the rumors and realized things were about to get too hot for him in Gearhart. Obviously loath to leave the community that had been so welcoming to him, he went to Hillsboro to lie low in a friend’s house and see if anything should happen. Unfortunately for Cowboy Jim, the FBI, when it learned about him, did some legwork and learned his Hillsboro friends’ address. So after three agents came to Gearhart and found him gone, they checked there — and found Cowboy Jim trying to hide behind a baby’s crib, his fancy Western boots sticking out behind it and giving the game away. He was taken into custody without incident. “Cowboy Jim” Bugg’s story was an interesting one; he’d committed an extraordinarily serious offense — menacing, robbing, and kidnapping a law officer — almost by accident. What had happened was this: As a young buck working on an oilfield in Seminole, Okla., Bugg one day bought a Buick. The car’s price was $2,200, but the salesman told him he could finance the whole price if they’d do a little paperwork dance: They’d write the sale up at $2,700; Bugg would write a check for $500; and the dealership would “lose” the check. That way, the finance company would think it wasn’t financing the whole price of the car.  Bugg wrote the check and drove away the car. Then … the dealership cashed the check. Or, rather, tried to. Bugg’s $500 check bounced halfway to low-Earth orbit.

John Harvey Bugg’s mugshot made the back cover of the FBI’s bulletin in November 1947. (Image: FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin)

Several days later, Bugg drove his new car to Greenfield, Mo., to visit his parents, and was met there by the local sheriff, who arrested him for passing a bad check. Bugg, angry and frightened, made a really bad decision. With his hand in his jacket pocket as if gripping a pistol, he bluffed the sheriff into dropping his gun, then ordered the sheriff to drive him, in his new car, to the dealership in Oklahoma to straighten out the whole bounced-check thing. But when they crossed the state line, the sheriff told Bugg he’d just violated the Lindberg Act — under which kidnapping someone and transporting him or her across state lines was a federal offense. Bugg freaked out, and apparently decided that if he was now a criminal, he might as well go the whole hog. Accordingly, first he ditched his Buick and, with the sheriff, hailed a taxi. He then forced the taxi driver to drive a short distance out of town before stopping, robbing him and leaving him tied to a tree by the side of the road. Several hours and another state line later, he stopped and tied the sheriff to a telephone pole, robbed him of all his cash, and fled alone. Abandoning the stolen taxi a short time later, he made his way west as a fugitive. He kept a step or two ahead of the law for several years by following the rodeo circuit. He was already a seasoned rodeo cowboy — he’d won about $3,000 at the Madison Square Garden rodeos in New York in 1941 and 1942. Now he got back into the business as a way to make money while on the lam.

Once there, he appeared in court. The riding academy posted bail for him, and he promptly journeyed back to Gearhart to resume teaching his students. When he arrived, about 30 youngsters gathered to give him a rousing welcome. Pauline and Navarre weren’t there, but both were among the very first to sign a petition to the Oklahoma authorities urging clemency. Bugg was eventually sentenced to 10 years, but became eligible for parole after 15 months. His Oregon friends petitioned the parole board on his behalf, and the riding academy assured him he could have his job back when he got out; but I have been unable to learn whether or when this happened. The moral of the story, in the newspaper and on Gang Busters alike, was always, “Crime Does Not Pay.” For these two onetime outlaws, that maxim was definitely borne out. Both lost decades of their lives through bad decisions they made when they were young and full of too much spunk. But bad though their luck might have been in life, it could have been a whole lot worse for both of them. Both of them were, at least, lucky in their choice of places to hide out, and the friends they made while on the lam in the quiet parts of Oregon. (Sources: Law and Order at the End of the Oregon Trail, a book by Ken and Kris Bilderback published in 2015; FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, Nov. 1947 and Jul. 1949; archives of Portland Morning Oregonian and Portland Journal, 1948-1950) Finn J.D. John teaches at Oregon State University and writes about odd tidbits of Oregon history. His book, Heroes and Rascals of Old Oregon, was recently published by Ouragan House Publishers. To contact him or suggest a topic: finn@offbeatoregon.com or 541-357-2222.

www.willametteliving.com

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Kitchen Upgrade

New Year, New Kitchen! By Heidi Powell | Powell Construction, Corvallis At the start of a new year we are always reflecting on the past 365 days. For a lot of people this year, that means reevaluating your family’s needs in your home. The clients for this kitchen remodel had done just that, and after a few minor updates, came to us ready to tear out their kitchen and start from scratch. The existing kitchen was large, but not laid out well for the everyday use it was getting. A bulky double fireplace in the center of the living space took up a lot of room and made the dining room feel disconnected from the kitchen, despite the substantial opening between the two. We removed the oversized wood burning fireplace and replaced it with a smaller gas one with shiplap above, creating a stylish featured piece. Meanwhile the kitchen was reimagined and reorganized into a functional space for a home chef that will work better for years to come. These homeowners’ main concern was 28

Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021


to update the style and function, as well as having quality materials that would stand the test of time. They wanted updated, gray cabinets; but didn’t want to lose any of the warm feeling of their home. Together with our design team they chose a light, warm gray for the perimeter cabinets and a darker gray to make the island a focal piece. The warm, light colored quartz countertops blend with the lighter gray and contrast nicely with the island. The textured dark blue backsplash tile adds a fun and exciting pop of color without stealing attention from any of the other pieces. To further maintain the warmth, they chose a rich walnut flooring with bold grain patterns.

When the homeowners fell in love with some contemporary brass colored light fixtures, they were nervous that they would compete with their stainless steel appliances and other silver toned pieces. By keeping all the lights in the same color family, we were able to achieve a look that feels intentional and modern. The corner 3-light pendant adds light and interest to the space. Not wanting to take up wall cabinet space with a bulky microwave, they opted for one built into a base cabinet. The other small appliances are neatly hidden away behind custom appliance garages. For the fireplace, we focused on a

clean, bright look that would stand out and look beautiful without competing with the neighboring kitchen. A small powder bathroom was also reorganized to better utilize the potential storage space and add counter space for guests. The style of the kitchen cabinetry was incorporated into the bathroom as well as into the dining room, which featured glass front cabinets to display dishes and mementos. The redesigned space resulted in a warm and beautiful kitchen and dining area that will be enjoyed for years to come. The main floor living space now feels as cohesive as it was always meant to.

www.willametteliving.com

29


The Grapevine

Sea 02 notes

Tasting Notes

Just minutes from Corvallis or Salem!

Review By Great Northwest Wine on March 23, 2019 Sea O2 had me excited from the moment I picked up the glass. Wow. Strawberries and rose petals (rosé petals?) fresh herbs, and a hint of salinity waft into my nose. Tasting it, more fresh strawberry, pomegranate and citrus do a bouncy dance in the appealing bubbles and fizz. Balance? There’s good acidity with just enough of the brioche/yeast aspect of good sparklers to soften the edges. Whether you’re celebrating or relaxing after a long day, things will look better with a glass of this happy making wine. One of the most exciting new sparkling wines at a very reasonable price. www.comptonwines.com www.greatnorthwestwine.com

ines ly W

ipe:

Rec

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Chantarelle and Bacon Quiche

Pairs with SEAO2 Sparkling Wine

VISIT EMERSON The winery is open to visitors daily from noon to five. If you’d like to come out at other times, we’d love to have you. Please email or call to arrange a visit. For our safety, and yours, we’d appreciate it if you wore a mask when you enter. We’ll also ask you to give us your contact info so we can provide information to Polk County and the Oregon Health Department if needed. We’re excited to welcome you back!

Phone: (503) 838-0944 www.emersonvineyards.com 30

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Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

Pie Crust Our family pie crust recipe uses canola oil and we love it. This is a double crust, so recipe so put one in the freezer for later when you are making the quiche. Ingredients • 2 cups of all-purpose flour • 2/3 cup canola oil • 6 tablespoons of ice water Directions 1. Mix together flour, oil, and ice water. 2. Divide dough in half. 3. Roll each piece between two pieces of plastic wrap.

Quiche

Ingredients • 1 ½ cups of light cream • 6 eggs • 2 cups of your favorite cheese • 1 ½ tablespoons butter

• 7 ounces Chanterelle mushrooms (they are in season) cleaned and cut up • ¾ pound Bacon cooked and cut up small • 1 large Onion • Parsley and chives • Salt and pepper to taste • Sautéed Kale (optional) Directions You may want to cook the pie crust for 15 minutes before you fill 1. Cook bacon and chop up in pieces  2. Sauté up onions in the bacon fat (you may want to remove some of the fat), add butter and sauté the mushrooms – season with salt  3. Mix cream and eggs together in blender  4. Place all the veggies and bacon in your pie crust that you have already places in your pie pan  5. Add the cheese on top  6. Pour in the wet ingredients.


The Grapevine

Emerson Vineyards Release, Oregon Pinot Noir!

Le Patissier

This Pinot Noir captures the essence of Oregon. It’s earthy and fruit-forward at the same time. This wine is vibrant and full of stone fruit flavors. Our Pinot glows with a ruby color. Aromas of cherry and plum compliment the complex blend of cola, brambleberry and cocoa. This smooth balance leads to a beautiful lingering finish. Pair this lovely Oregon Pinot Noir with curry, pad thai, pork loin, or your favorite meal. www.emersonvineyards.com

Pad Thai recipe Ingredients • 1 pound Wild-Caught Shrimp • 1 teaspoon sesame oil • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil • 2 cloves garlic (minced) • 1 cup onion (chopped) • 1/2 pound rice noodles • 1 orange bell pepper (thinly sliced) • 1 yellow bell pepper (thinly sliced) • 3 tablespoons fish sauce – Can be found a local asian market • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar • 1 teaspoon pepper flakes • 1 teaspoon tumeric • 2 tablespoons curry powder • 2 eggs (beaten) • 2 cups bean sprouts

Directions Prepare rice noodles by placing them in a large bowl and cover with boiling water. Allow to stand for 6-8 minutes, until softened but still firm. Drain well. Heat sesame and vegetable oil in a large skillet or wok over medium high heat. Add the minced garlic and onions and cook until onions are translucent. Add shrimp and stir-fry in wok quickly. Add carrots and peppers to the skillet. Stir in the fish sauce, rice vinegar, red pepper flakes, turmeric and curry and mix thoroughly. Add rice noodles and heat through. Add wellbeaten eggs and allow them to set slightly and then stir into mixture. Add bean sprouts and toss again. Serve hot.

French Pastry Savory Dishes Wedding Cakes Special Events

All prepared in-house from the freshest ingredients available.

541-752-1785

956 NW CIRCLE BLVD CORVALLIS

Vive la France ! www.willametteliving.com

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Notepad: Hello from the Partners at River Gallery! We have a bit of information to share with you about the upcoming months. In January 2021 we will reopen after the holiday season on January 15th. We are open Fridays through Saturdays from 12:00 noon to 4:00pm during January. Stop by to view our new exhibits. Focus Artist at River Gallery in January + February 2021 - Becki Hesedahl Window Artist for January + February 2021 - Dale Bunse

"Nuthatch" - Becki Hesedahl

Dale will be displaying his show titled “Pot Luck” early this year. His playful ceramics will brighten your day with a potluck of his favorite pots and sculptural vessels. Stop by to see his ceramic treasures.

ics

www.newmorningbaker y.co

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HEALTH FITNESS

FUN

The most current state-of-the-art fitness equipment, and trained staff available to answer your questions. More than 120 hrs. per week of group exercise classes including Zumba, Nia, Pilates, 3 types of yoga, Step, Cardio, Goup Power (weights) and even Line Dancing!

Our Bad! In a recently published issue, we did a profile focused on the history of a Corvallis landmark, the New Morning Bakery.

Connect with us on Facebook for current events, specials and more!

The article focused on the founding and history of the bakery, and as prior owner Ann Weinstein noted, we forgot to mention the current owners who have been working through thye pandemic to bring us all that NMB goodness!

facebook.com/TimberhillAthleticClub

So without further ado, here are Keara and

Aquatic Exercise Classes

2 indoor pools for classes and lap swimming Warm water pool for therapy fitness for arthritis, fibromyalgia and orthopedic type issues

2855 NW 29th St. in Corvallis Call Us Today at 541-757-8559

WWW.TIMBERHILLAC.COM 32

Dale Bunse - Ceram

Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

Tristan James with the bakery "babies" Althea and Ambrose.


Natural looking - time saving – smudge proof Eyebrows – Eyeliner Lip Color - Corrective Areola Repigmentation

FREE ations by appointment.... 541.740.1639 or consult rs a www.OregonPermanentMakeup.com & webin

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Helping you gain more confidence, time and freedom

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MAJESTIC THEATER'S ONLINE STREAMING

OLD GOLD JEWELRY • ROLEX WATCHES STERLING SILVER FLATWARE & JEWELRY

FOLLOW OUR FACEBOOK PAGE FOR ONLINE STREAMING AND UPDATES

facebook.com/majestictheatre

ENJOY A VARIETY OF SHOWS AT THE COMFORT OF YOUR HOME

Majesticpiece Theatre January 16 | 7:30 PM Majestic Readers’ Theatre Company presents: The Sweet Delilah Swim Club January 30 | 7:30 PM January 31 | 2:30 PM Majestic Chamber Music February 5 | 7:30 PM Teatro Milagro presents Blast Off! February 6 | 2:30 PM

Pick What You Pay $10-$15-$20

541-758-4055

5th & Madison Downtown Corvallis

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT MAJESTIC.ORG

Online Streaming General Admission

www.willametteliving.com

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DESIGNING AND BUILDING

Your Dreams

kitchens | bathrooms | additions | remodels | new construction www.powellconstruction.com

call us 541-752-0805

cb#102594


HELP OUR RESTAURANTS THROUGH THIS, CALL FOR TAKEOUT!

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Mon, Wed & Thurs: 8:00 - 8:00 Friday: 8:00 - 9:30 Saturday: 7:30 - 9:30 Sunday: 7:30 - 4:00 Closed on Tuesdays 208 2nd St. SW in Albany

Albany’s new sushi sensa�on. Kaiyo Sushi is the place for a quick lunch mee�ng, date night, or family night out.

Delicias Valley Cafe Owners LupĂŠ & Carlos invite you to come have breakfast, lunch or dinner. Delicious, authentic Mexican foods prepared in-house.

Watch as expertly prepared sushi oats past your seat on our conveyor, and pick your favorites.

Fresh ingredients & skilled chefs combine to bring you savory dishes your whole family will love.

  



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A taste of Japan, in Albany. Come by today and have some sushi! Open 11 am to 10 pm 2826 San�am Hwy SE, Albany, OR 97322 (Next to Elmer’s)

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A local landmark for over 30 years. Our bakers and chefs are at work around-the-clock preparing all your favorite dishes and baked goods using only the finest ingredients. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, or anything in between. Now offering catering too. Mon-Sat 7:00 - 9:00 Sunday 8:00 - 8:00

Kaiyo Sushi

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New Morning Bakery

219 SW 2nd St. Downtown Corvallis NewMorningBakery.com 541-754-0181

541-967-9488 www.novakshungarian.com

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Opened in 1984 by Joseph and Matilda Novak, Novak’s is Oregon’s only Hungarian restaurant!

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An exciting menu of new Latin fusion cuisine. Fabulous riverfront bar, special events, extensive wine list. A truly memorable dining experience.

Our Asian fusion menu will delight you. You’ll love our chic new restaruant, and our delicious menu items presented with style. Many reviewers have called ours “the best asian food in Corvallis,� come find out why.

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Mon - Sat: 8:00 - 9:00 Sunday: 8:00 - 8:30 Breakfast Buffet Sat & Sun Only: 9:00 - 12:00 933 NW Circle Blvd in Corvallis

(Across the street from Market of Choice)

541-753-0599 www.deliciasvalleycafe.com www.willametteliving.com

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Garlic

In-Season

Garlic’s antioxidants kill bacteria, which can help to support skin health. Anti-inflammatory traits can help fight autoimmune disease.

Protect your garden by making a natural pesticide out of garlic, mineral oil, water and liquid soap. Critters and pests don’t like garlic!

Cure your rose plant from aphid attacks by spritzing the leaves with a crushed garlic/ water mix.

vitamin B6. It also includes vitamin C and copper, selenium, phosphorus, vitamin B1 and calcium.

Garlic is a member of the Lily family, and is closely related to onions, shallots, leeks and chives.

Garlic doesn’t need to be refrigerated. There are 300 varieties of garlic grown worldwide.

Garlic contains only 4 calories per clove. Alliumphobia is the extraordinary fear of garlic.

Keeping garlic nearby is said to ward off mosquitoes.

April 19 is National Garlic Day. Garlic wards off Vampires! (not verified) Garlic is a good source of manganese and

Grilled Salmon with Garlic-Cilantro-Yogurt Sauce

Roasted Garlic Ingredients • 1 or 2 garlic bulbs • ¼ cup olive oil • Sprigs of Rosemary • French Baguette

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Ingredients • 2 fresh salmon fillets (never farmed salmon) • 2 Serrano chilies • 3 garlic cloves • 1 cup fresh Cilantro leaves • ¾ cup plain yogurt • 1 tbs virgin Olive Oil • 1 tsp honey • Sea salt Do This Remove and discard seeds from chilis (cut lengthwise, scrape with knife)

This is a very simple recipe, and very delicious. Just cut off one end of a bulb of garlic (the pointy end, not the root end) to expose the garlic inside, then put in an oven-proof dish, drizzle with olive oil and rough-cut Rosemary, cover with foil and bake in a 400 degree pre-heated oven for about 30–40 minutes. The garlic will brown and become very soft, rich and mellow compared to normal raw garlic.

In a blender, puree chilis, garlic, cilantro, yogurt, oil, honey and ¼ cup water until smooth, add salt and stir.

Serve on toasted baguette slices.

Save the rest of the sauce and drizzle on the salmon when it’s on plates.

Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

Salt salmon on both sides and grill until almost done cooking – done cooking is a matter of taste, in the case of salmon. Brush some of the sauce on the salmon as it finishes cooking


Roast Garlic Hummus Two whole heads of garlic may sound like a lot but roasting them whole like the recipe calls for mellows the flavor considerably—enough so that they can be eaten by themselves as a rich, savory treat. If you’re a garlic fan, you owe it to yourself to give it a try! Ingredients: • 2 whole heads of garlic (to be roasted) • 1 can garbanzo beans • Juice of 1/2 a lemon  • 2 Tbsp tahini • 2 Tbsp olive, plus more for thinning • 1/2 tsp salt • dash of black pepper

Directions Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Remove the outermost layer of skins from the heads of garlic, leaving the individual clove skins intact. Trim the top of the garlic head enough to remove the tips of all the cloves. Toss the garlic heads in olive oil and then wrap fully in foil. Roast for approximately 40 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool fully. Put garbanzo beans into blender. Squeeze the soft, roasted parts of the garlic cloves into the blender with the beans. Place all remaining ingredients into blender and blend until fully blended and smoothtextured. Additional olive oil may be added to thin the texture of the hummus. Serve in a bowl with an optional sprinkle of chopped parsley and paprika.

www.willametteliving.com

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Notepad: Scio Hardware and Mercantile, your local hardware and general merchandise store for the novice and experienced DIY’er.

The valley's premier men's store, The Natty Dresser, has moved. Oscar and Tamalynne Hult purchased the historic building at 124 Broadalbin St. SW in Albany. The new Natty Dresser location is celebrating a grand re-opening January 11-16. If history is a guide, the new location will be spectacular! For more informating about live music and prizes surrounding this event visit: www.thenattyddresser.com

6000 square feet for your home, garden, ranch or farm needs.

Keys, Fax, ODFW, UPS

Scio Hardware and Mercantile 38737 N. Main St. Scio Oregon 97374 503.394.3824 Monday to Saturday, 7:30-5:30 facebook.com/sciohardware 38

Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

The Cannon Beach Arts Association is pleased to present a collaborative event with the Cannon Beach Historical Center and Museum. January 6 - January 31, 2021 the Gallery will be screening a historical film courtesy of the Cannon Beach Historical Center Archives. The film is a compilation of footage of Cannon Beach from the 1930 - 1960s. The film will run on a loop from 11 - 4pm

Wednesday - Sunday in the gallery. We are in midtown 1064 S. Hemlock St. Cannon Beach, OR. Corresponding with the film the gallery is featuring a winter salon. The salon is a curated collection of local and regional artists represented by the gallery. Featuring a variety of mediums such as fiber arts, watercolor, paintings, and ceramics.


Pump or Water Issues?

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is your local go-to, family owned, full service plumbing resource. Whether you’re a contractor in search of a sub-contractor, a home owner looking for upgrades or repairs, or a farmer who needs to make it rain, Midway is always your logical answer. In business in Albany since 1964!

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Yes! We can solve your well pump and water treatment challenges!

DESIGNING AND BUILDING

Your Dreams

kitchens | bathrooms | interiors | remodels | new construction www.powellconstruction.com

call us at 541-752-0805

2428 Three Lakes Rd. Albany, OR 97322

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www.J-Jelectric.com 885 22nd Ave. SW in Albany • 541-928-8488 www.willametteliving.com

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YOUR FINANCES

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

How to Set Financial Goals You Can Keep Compliments of Sten Carlson The start of a new year gives many people motivation to take a fresh look at their finances and focus on their goals for the future—but, as the year progresses, this enthusiasm can fall to the wayside. If you’re someone who falls into this trap, there are steps you can take to stay motivated and set attainable goes for 2021 and beyond. Be specific and realistic. Setting aspirational goals, such as living the life you want in retirement or taking a coast-to-coast road trip, is exciting and can be a great place to start. Yet, broad goals can quickly become overwhelming, so tangible ones can help you keep the commitment. The best way to make your dreams a reality is to break each goal into small, specific tasks that are realistic to accomplish this year. Prioritize. You’re not alone if you have a myriad of financial goals. However, it can be hard to achieve them all without focus or unlimited resources. Pick one or two goals, tailoring your savings, time and resources accordingly. If you have competing priorities such as saving for your child’s education and retirement, create a plan that will help you make measurable progress toward both. Remember, incremental changes and savings made over time can make a big difference in the long run. Set deadlines. Without target dates in mind, goals tend to drift. As you set deadlines for each task, consider adding a reminder on your calendar to keep the goal a priority throughout the year. If you fall short of what you want to accomplish, Sten Carlson PacWest Wealth Partners in Corvallis, OR. Contact him at Sten.E.Carlson@ampf.com 541-757-3000

don’t give up. Adjust your dates and get back on track. Enlist family support. If you’re married or in a committed relationship, involve your spouse or partner in financial goal setting. If your goal is a family affair, consider including your children in the process. Your children can benefit from watching you make smart financial choices. With everyone on the same page, you can support one another and overcome obstacles together.

Work with a professional. Share your goals with your financial advisor, tax professional or estate planner, as appropriate. These specialists may be able to suggest additional strategies to help you reach your goals, while being mindful of your other financial priorities.

Sten

Sten Carlson, CFP®, CLTC, CKA, MBA, is a Financial Advisor with PacWest Wealth Partners, a financial advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. in Corvallis, Oregon. He offers fee-based financial planning and asset management strategies and has been in practice for 25 years. To contact him, visit the team website at www.PacWestWealthPartners.com or call at 541-757-3000. Office address is 2396 NW Kings Blvd., Corvallis, OR.

Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. and its affiliates do not offer tax or legal advice. Consumers should consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding their specific situation. Investment advisory products and services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment adviser. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. © 2019 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021


REAL ESTATE

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

Should I list now, or wait? By Annette Sievert Thinking about selling your home? Great! The inventory is so low, we are welcoming every new listing! As of right now there are 45 houses in all of Corvallis, 44 in Albany and 23 in Philomath for sale. That is as low as I have ever seen it. Of course, the current situation plays a role in this, people are still hunkering down. If you want to sell your home you are probably asking yourself a lot of questions, and one of them is, when is the best time? My advice is: be on the market before all others. Most sellers think their hydrangeas need to bloom and there should be some leaves on the trees in order to make a house look as attractive as possible. But with our inventory being as low as it is that does not apply and for that matter, it

Do you have a real estate question? Ask Annette, at Coldwell Banker Valley Brokers in Corvallis 541-207-5551

never applies. You should go on the market in February or latest early March. That way you will have all the buyers who are looking and have found nothing over the winter, and you do not yet have the competition of everybody who wants their landscaping to shine. Landscaping is not unimportant but in the big picture it is more important to have the house in tip top shape, updated and clean and as welcoming as possible.

light fixtures, counters, floors etc. The seller invested about $12,000. The house as it was would have brought maybe $380,000. With work completed there were multiple offers and it sold for $455,000. This has been a persistent pattern, the better the houses were prepared, the more money they sold for. With these measures and the optimal timing, you will be very happy with the result. I wish you a happy and free 2021.

You should prepare thoroughly. A home I recently brought to the market needed a lot of small repairs, removal of wallpaper (we say 90% of buyers hate wallpaper, and 10% will hate your wallpaper), paint, new

Annette

If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit offerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully. ©2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each office is independently owned and operated. ©2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each office is independently owned and operated. Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

www.willametteliving.com

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HEALTH & FITNESS

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

The Importance of Letting Go By Kris Denning As we begin the year 2021, with whatever New Year’s resolutions we have set for ourselves, none may be more important for your health than “Letting Go”. This last year has been one of the worst, if not the worst year for many of us and for many people around the world. We have lost loved ones, witnessed horrific events, and have struggled with fear and worry over what may come. It is time now, to Let Go. Each year is a new year. Each day is a new day, and each moment is a new moment. Pulling emotions from our past into the present, only serves to hold us back from living happier, healthier lives. Some of us have been holding onto emotional pain and trauma from decades ago. Emotional scars can prevent us from achieving our present goals and finding fulfillment in life. They keep us stuck. It’s time to let go. When we surrender and let go of the anxiety and worry, a signal is sent to our bodies to relax. When our bodies are relaxed, our blood flows better, digestion is easier, and breathing is deeper. When we are calm, we think clearer and feel better about ourselves because our thoughts aren’t in the forefront wreaking havoc. Learning to let go is the number one thing we can do to make 2021 and the rest of our lives, better. Here are some ways to accomplish this. Meditate. There are apps you can get on your phone or computer, like Insight Timer (I use this one and love it), or Headspace. You can choose from a huge library of meditations from one minute in length to more than an hour, and then just listen.

Find one you like and repeat it. Or just sit or lie down and listen to your breath, just taking notice of your thoughts. Do it for 30 days straight to make a habit of it. New habits are best kept if they are made into a daily ritual. Replace the bad thoughts with good ones. Instead of thinking about the things you don’t want to have happen in your life (like when you worry), tell yourself what you want to happen! Retrain your thoughts. Also, and I cannot emphasize this enough, the words and worries we consume on media can be all consuming and detrimental to our emotional wellbeing. If it isn’t serving to make you feel better, then it’s better to leave it alone.

Yoga, Tai Chi, and any mind/body exercise is incredibly helpful. Whatever you can do to strengthen your connection to your peace is powerful. One yoga session will help calm you for the entire day. When you are calm and at peace in your mind, you can achieve anything. Let go of 2020. You have survived it. You have learned from it. That is all. Time to move forward.

More ways to weed out negative thoughts include journaling, going to counseling, or confiding in a trusted

Kris Denning is a Certified Holistic Nutritionist and a yoga/pilates teacher at Timberhill Athletic Club. Contact her at

healthytothesoul.com

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friend. Let those thoughts out. Having a journal handy to write out all your worries about the future, or present and past experiences that have traumatized you, is incredibly helpful. Keep what you have written or burn it if you want. Just get it out of your head.

Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

www.healthytothesoul.com

Kris


New Beginnings By Cheryl Lohman

LOOKIN' GOOD

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

As I’m writing this in December, I can’t help but wonder what 2021 will bring us. I know we are not out of the woods yet regarding Covid, but I’m hoping the worst is behind us. I’m sure there are many things that will never be the same as before. But perhaps we can continue the positive things. I’ve heard from many people that they have enjoyed the slower pace and acknowledge a deeper realization of how important their friends and family are. As a business owner, I’ve been heartened by how the community has rallied behind small local business to keep them in business. Together, we can get through anything! Some of the things that I’ll continue in the New Year for my customers: • Consultations through Zoom (in person also available) • Zoom Webinars – virtual group consultation & open house (they are really fun) • Wellness screenings • One client at a time in the studio • Extra sanitizing between clients Another thing I’ve noticed is that people are paying more attention to their eyes and eyebrows now that we are wearing masks. It’s makes sense. Without the visual clues with the mouth…the eyes give clues

to the expression of the person. With well-designed eyebrows and eyeliner, permanent makeup can show off your beautiful eyes. Plus, wouldn’t it be nice to not have to apply makeup everyday? You may have experienced that during the shutdown when we all stayed home a lot more. I love that the new year allows us to reflect, reset and dream about new beginnings. What new beginnings are you creating for yourself? If you’d like to explore the possibility of permanent makeup, it is essential to have a consultation with a highly trained and qualified artist. Now more than ever it’s

Cheryl Lohman CPCP, is a Certified Permanent Cosmetic Professional and owner of Oregon Permanent Makeup. Contact her at 541-740-1639 Learn More at

important to look for an artist who will keep you safe. This is not a service you want to bargain shop for and you will want to see actual photos of their work. Today, most professional permanent cosmetic artists are members of the world’s leading, not-for-profit society devoted to this field, the Society of Permanent Cosmetic Professionals (SPCP). This organization sets standards of practice for its members, which assures the public of the highest levels of professionalism and safety. After permanent makeup — you’ll be among those who enjoy a carefree natural look that lasts a long time and a new begining of freedom.

Cheryl

www.oregonpermanentmakeup.com

www.OregonPermanentMakeup.com

www.willametteliving.com

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GARDENING

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

Nature Wins By Brenda Powell Over the last nine months one of my greatest pleasures has been watching the birds, bees, unusual pollinators and myriad creatures that visit my landscape and farm. True I’m not excited when the rabbits eat my lettuce, the squirrels dig up my plants, or the Bluejays and Blackbirds run off the smaller songbirds. The Cucumber Beetles and the Coyotes still scare me. I do, however, treasure the afternoon the Goldfinches feasted on my Sunflowers, the dinners on the deck with the Hummingbirds as special guests, Bats feasting at dusk, and the appearance of Golden Digger wasps on my Mint. My husband and I want to attract more of this wildlife and hope to create a farm where nature is in balance. Recently, I read Nature’s Best Hope by Douglas W. Tallamy. It challenged me to do even more to attempt to save species and to create habitat corridors between our public natural spaces. To accomplish these goals, I know I will have to tolerate some untidiness, witness the hawks killing field mice, and plant more native species. Native plants are best for attracting native pollinators, natural predators, yearround avian residents as well as those birds that migrate through our area. They attract the insects that form the basis of the food chain pyramid that supports them all. In the past, I have looked at some natives as weeds that ruined my designed landscape and garden. Now I wish to encourage plants that are native even if they spread, and some of those “weeds” may help me attract the insects to pollinate my vegetable crops. I have a lot to learn. So, I have been checking out websites to see what plants will work in my landscape and farm. Benton County

Soil and Water Conservation District has a native plant data base that I really like: bentonswcd.org/plant. Recently I discovered the Audubon Society has one, too: audubon.org/native-plants. These websites will give you more details about the plants listed below. My needs are different than others but here is a short list of native plants that I planted or want to plant to provide food, nectar and cover: Vine Maple (Acer circinatum): Small tree, Oregon White oak (Quercus garryana): Large tree, Scouler’s Willow (Salix scouleriana): Large shrub, Oregon grape (Mahonia sp.) Three native

species, Chokecherry (Prunus viginiana), Oceanspray (Holodiscus discolor), Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflora) Blueblossom (Ceanothus thyrsiflorus), Orange honeysuckle (Lonicera ciliosa), Goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), Douglas Aster (Symphyotrrichum douglasii aka Aster subspicatus), Broadleaf Lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus), Wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca and F. chiloensis).

Brenda Brenda Powell is a fourth generation owner of Garland Nursery in Corvallis.

www.garlandnursery.com

44

Willamette Living Magazine January / February 2021

Follow her writing at garlandnursery.wordpress.com


STYLE GUIDE

PROFESSIONAL HELP: Tips from local leaders in their industry

Did 2020 Leave you Feeling Frumpy? By Oscar B. Hult Welcome to 2021, I think I can speak for all of us when I say we are happy to welcome the new year! An annual tradition for many is a New Year’s resolution. If your resolution is to make sure that you dress better in the coming year; my number one suggestion to you would be to make sure that your clothing fits correctly. A great start is to take clothing that you already have, and have it assessed by your local Tailor, they can advise you on whether or not the items you have in your closet can be altered to fit you better. Your Tailor should also be able to direct you to a local clothing store that offers a professional wardrobe assessment to determine which items you need, to replace any garments that the Tailor can’t alter. If you do not already have a relationship with a local Tailor, stop by The Natty Dresser, in our new location at: 124

www.facebook.com/thenattydresser

Broadalbin St., SW In Historic Downtown Albany. We take in alterations for men’s and women’s clothing purchased here or not. We not only have an in-house Tailor, but we also have two in-house seamstresses and professional sales associates who can help you find the colors, styles and fit that work best for you and your needs.  If you have not made a resolution for the new year, May I suggest that it include dressing better. Our motto speaks volumes; “Dress well, be confident, find success!” Oscar B. Hult Haberdasher The Natty Dresser

Oscar Oscar B. Hult is a co-owner of The Natty Dresser in Downtown Albany. 541-248-3561 Contact him at

www.thenattydresser.com

www.willametteliving.com

45


Historic Nye Beach

*Mecca for the literary, scholarly and artistic.

Queen of Hearts

Jovi

Gifts & Lingerie 232 NW Coast St. Suite B

541-265-8220

708 NW Beach Dr.

541-265-2118

A Taste of Ireland on the Oregon Coast Traditional Irish Fare, Imported Irish Beers on Tap, Full Bar, Minors welcome until 10pm, Patio Seating, Live Music. Winter Hours Sunday-Thursday 11am-9pm Friday and Saturday 11am-10pm

www.nanasirishpub.com 613 NW 3rd St.

541-574-8787

Nye Beach Wine Cellar

255 NW Coast St.

541-265-3292


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Willamette Living January 2021  

Happy New Year! Here's the first issue, enjoy.

Willamette Living January 2021  

Happy New Year! Here's the first issue, enjoy.