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High School Course Descriptions Booklet 2013 - 2014


Vision Statement Together we dare to imagine, inspire to succeed, and courageously make a difference

Mission Statement We are a diverse, international community providing a balanced and nurturing learning program that fosters personal grow th, provides meaningful opportunities for achievement, and promotes positive contributions to society.


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American International School of Johannesburg


Table of Contents AISJ Vision .................................................................................................................................. 1 AISJ Mission ............................................................................................................................... 1 Contact Information .................................................................................................................... 1 Graduation Requirements ........................................................................................................... 1 Waiver of Graduation Requirements ........................................................................................... 2 International Baccalaureate Programme ..................................................................................... 3 AISJ’s Current IB Course Offerings: ............................................................................................ 7 English Department .................................................................................................................... 8 Social Studies Department........................................................................................................ 11 Mathematics Department .......................................................................................................... 15 Science Department ................................................................................................................. 19 Information Technology Department ......................................................................................... 23 World Languages Department .................................................................................................. 25 Fine and Performing Arts Department ....................................................................................... 27 Physical Education Department ................................................................................................ 31 Special Programmes................................................................................................................. 33


AISJ Vision Together we dare to imagine, inspire to succeed, and courageously make a difference.

AISJ Mission We are a diverse, international community providing a balanced and nurturing learning program that fosters personal growth, provides meaningful opportunities for achievement, and promotes positive contributions to society.

Contact Information Mr. Tony Mock

HS Principal

tmock@aisj-jhb.com

087 350 2498

Ms. Sandy van Nooten

HS Coordinator

svannooten@aisj-jhb.com

087 350 2507

Mr. Will Hurtado

IB Coordinator

whurtado@aisj-jhb.com

087 350 2446

Ms. Melissa Johnson

HS Counselor

mjohnson-schnyder@aisj-jhb.com

087 350 2449

Ms. Ann Ireland

HS Counselor

aireland@aisj-jhb.com

087 350 2439

Ms. Debra Barltrop

Student Services

dbarltrop@aisj-jhb.com

087 350 2452

Ms. Carol Kasambira

HS Office

ckasambira@aisj-jhb.com

087 350 2546

Mr. Cleopas Khumalo

HS Office

ckhumalo@aidj-jhb.com

087 350 2444

Graduation Requirements AISJ offers an American style curriculum, enriched with a diversity of international courses and programs. Twenty six (26) credits are required for graduation. Students will not be given high school credit for any courses taken before high school. Students receive 0.5 credit for semester courses and 1 credit for fullyear courses. The following minimum number of credits must be earned in each course area:

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Subject

Number Courses of Credits

English

4

English 9, 10 IB English A: Literature, IB English A: Language and Literature

Social Studies

3

World Geography, World History, International Relations, US History, Introduction to Economics Introduction to World Religions IB Geography, IB Economics, IB History, IB ITGS, IB ESS


Mathematics

3

Algebra I, Geometry Algebra II/Trigonometry (regular or Honors) Integrated math 9, 9(Ext), 10, 10(Ext) and 10(Hon) IB Math (HL), IB Math (SL), IB Math Studies

Science

3

Biology, Chemistry, Physics Earth Science IB Biology, IB Chemistry, IB Physics, IB ESS, IB SEHS

World Languages

2

French or Spanish (must be same language) IB French B, IB Spanish B, IB French ab initio, IB Spanish ab initio

Physical Education

1.5

PE

Health

0.5

Health

Fine Arts

1

Art, Band, Choir, Drama, Theatre Tech, Photography, South African History through Film IB Visual Art, IB Music, IB Theatre

Community Service

0.5

For Class of 2014 onwards.

Electives

7.5

If a student does (for example) 3 credits of world languages, the first 2 credits will count towards the World Language requirement, the 3rd credit is counted here

Total:

26

Requirements for graduation are established by the School Director and approved by the school’s Board of Directors. They are consistent with the stated philosophy and goals of the school, as well as the requirements for admission to the most selective colleges and universities in the world. Admission to the High School will depend on the applicant’s previous academic records, including his/her ability to complete AISJ’s graduation requirements before his/her 20th birthday.

Waiver of Graduation Requirements In rare and exceptional circumstances, the Principal may waive a particular graduation requirement. These situations may include, but are not limited to:

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Physical disabilities

Documented learning disabilities

Master scheduling conflicts

Required class not being offered during a particular academic year

Master scheduling conflict in the senior year due to participation in the IB program


International Baccalaureate Programme Recognizing the diverse needs of students for college and university preparation, the High School offers its Grade 11 and 12 students the opportunity to complete the following options: 

The full International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP), which will give the successful student an IB Diploma, as well as the AISJ High School Diploma.

A selection of IB Diploma courses, which will give the successful student IB Certification, as well as the AISJ High School Diploma.

A student may select only non-IB courses, which will give them the AISJ High School Diploma.

What is the International Baccalaureate Diploma? The International Baccalaureate Organization’s Diploma Programme is a rigorous, demanding preuniversity curriculum that is designed for highly motivated secondary school students aged 16 to 19. The IB Diploma Programme has earned a global reputation for rigorous assessment, thus giving IB Diploma holders access to the world’s leading universities. For over 40 years, the International Baccalaureate Organization has shown that IB students are often better prepared for university work than their peers and are now widely accepted by universities worldwide.

The International Baccalaureate Mission Statement The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment. These Programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

The IB Diploma: Content, Structure and Requirements The IB Diploma is taught over Grades 11 and 12. It provides a rigorous educational experience across six academic subjects allowing for focus and depth to occur in the Higher Level subjects and breadth to occur in the Standard Level subjects.

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The Diploma Programme Model and the IB Diploma Course Structure 

Six academic subjects studied over two years, one to be selected from each of Groups 1 to 5, with the sixth subject from any Group.

Three of these subjects must be studied at the Higher Level (HL) and three at the Standard Level (SL).

Theory of Knowledge (TOK)

Extended Essay (EE)

Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS)

The Trans-disciplinary subject (Environmental Systems and Societies) can be taken as a Group 3 or a Group 4 subject, or it can be taken as both Group 3 and Group 4.

Methods of Assessment  A range of internally and externally assessed components across all academic subjects.  Internal Assessments (IA’s) include language orals, Math portfolios, Economics commentaries, Science labs, focused project based on fieldwork in Geography, etc. These wide ranging Internal Assessments are marked internally by AISJ teachers and samples are then externally moderated by IB examiners.  External Assessments (EA’s) include all IB exams, the World Literature Essay(s), the Theory of Knowledge (TOK) Essay, Extended Essay (EE), etc. These External Assessments are graded by IB examiners.  Students will receive school grades throughout the two years. At the end of the two years, the IB will award and send final grades and appropriate certification. The six academic subjects are graded on a scale from 1 (minimum) to 7 (maximum). The EE and TOK are graded on a scale from A (Excellent) to E (Unsatisfactory) and contribute between 0 and 3 additional points.

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 The maximum IB Diploma score is 45 points. (6x7) + 3 = 45 points  The Diploma is awarded for a minimum of 24 points, with the following guidelines: o A minimum of 12 points from Higher Level Subjects o A minimum of 9 points from Standard Level Subjects o No IB grades of 1 in any subject and no more than one score of 2 o A passing grade for Extended Essay (EE) and Theory of Knowledge (TOK) o Successful completion of the Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS) requirements

o NOTE: A minimum of 28 points is required if either EE or TOK grades are unsatisfactory.

The Core Requirements of the IB Diploma The Extended Essay (EE) offers students the opportunity to investigate a topic of special interest and acquaints them with the independent research and writing skills expected at the university level. Every IB Diploma candidate must submit an Extended Essay in order to obtain the Diploma. The essay is expected to take approximately 40 hours of work and will be 4,000 words in length. Every student is assigned an advisor whom they will meet with on a number of occasions throughout the essay-writing process. The Theory of Knowledge (TOK) course is central to the educational philosophy of the IB Diploma. It challenges students and their teachers to reflect critically on diverse ways of knowing and areas of knowledge while encouraging students to become aware of themselves as thinkers. Teachers engage students in a critical examination of knowledge and encourage them to gain and apply their own knowledge with greater awareness and responsibility. Participation in Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS) is a requirement of the IB Diploma. The students themselves decide on their own CAS program by the activities they create and in which they become involved. CAS activities need to be done throughout the two-year period and some sustained activities are required.

What are IB Courses? (Formerly called ‘Certificates’) Students who decide not to take the full IB Diploma may still take individual IB course. A student will be awarded a certificate which shows their performance in each of their IB courses. IB Diploma courses, especially those at the Higher Level, may be used to gain advanced standing or credit in many colleges and universities. A student who wants to do IB Courses does not have to adhere to the subject selection criteria essential when choosing courses for the full Diploma. There are no restrictions on the number of Higher and Standard Level subjects, nor which groups the subjects come from.

Should I take the IB Diploma or IB Courses? The IB Diploma is the most demanding course of study at AISJ. Although students need to be highly motivated, it is designed so that an average student can reasonably undertake the two-year Program. However, “average” students, apart from being motivated, must be willing to organize themselves, work hard on their study skills and be determined to meet deadlines. Attention to detail is a key attribute of Diploma students. Most IB Diploma students cope well with its demands, but there will be stressful times.

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Teachers will have high expectations of IB students and you will have to “change up a gear” from Grade 10 to meet these expectations. The IB Diploma journey is not always smooth; however, it is eventful, stimulating, busy and rewarding with a final destination that is worth the effort. When deciding whether to opt for the IB Diploma, remember that it is possible to pull out at points along the way but difficult to join once the first semester is truly underway. For those planning to study outside North America, successful completion of the IB Diploma may well be a necessity. Students who complete the IB Diploma and wish to pursue higher education in North America may be granted advanced standing in colleges and universities; in a number of colleges and universities, ‘sophomore’ standing may be obtained. However, please note that it is the college or university, not the IB that grants advanced placement.

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AISJ’s Current IB Course Offerings: Group 1 – Studies in Language and Literature 

English A – Literature (H/S)

English A – Language and Literature (H/S)

Self-Taught Language A – Literature (S) (by arrangement)

French A - Literature

(H/S) (by arrangement)

Group 2 – Language Acquisition 

French B (H/S)

French ab initio (S)

Spanish B (H/S)

Spanish ab initio (S)

Group 3 – Individuals and Societies 

Economics (H/S)

Environmental Systems and Societies-ESS (S)

Geography (H/S)

History (H/S)

Information Technology in a Global Society-ITGS (H/S)

Group 4 – Experimental Sciences 

Biology (H/S)

Chemistry (H/S)

Environmental Systems and Societies-ESS (S)

Physics (H/S)

Sports, Exercise and Health Science-SEHS (S)

Group 5 - Mathematics 

Mathematical Studies (S)

Mathematics (S)

Mathematics (H)

Group 6 – The Arts

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Music (H/S)

Theatre (H/S)

Visual Arts (H/S)


Course Selection for IB Diploma and IB Courses Teachers will recommend students for subjects in which they believe they will be successful. Students also need to think realistically about their future plans and ambitions before choosing their courses, especially at Higher Level.

English Department Four credits of English are required for graduation. Gr. 11 & 12

Gr. 9

Gr. 10

English 9

English 10

Yearlong Elective

Yearlong Elective

Yearbook

Journalism

Available Gr. 9 -12

Available Gr. 9 -12

IB English A Literature HL/SL IB English A Lang & Lit HL/SL English 11/12*

* Occasionally, a student may be part of an IB class, but doing the course for AISJ credit only. Since this student is not fulfilling all the IB requirements, English 11 or English 12 will appear on their transcript.

English 9

Gr. 9

1 year, 1 Credit

English 9 will lay the groundwork for a sequential program of college-preparatory study of English. It offers the opportunity to gain grade-level mastery in reading, writing, and speaking by placing emphasis on learning to read carefully, to write effectively, and to speak clearly and persuasively. Students will also learn how to organize and present ideas orally and in writing. Learning formal grammar and vocabulary, and applying this knowledge to speech and writing, are integral components of the course. Students will additionally engage in a formal research investigation on a topic of their choice, and will present their findings orally and in writing. Works covered over the course of the year include: select short stories, Night (Wiesel), Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare), To Kill a Mockingbird (Lee), select poems, and outside reading.

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English 10

Gr. 10

1 year, 1 Credit

English 10 continues the sequential High School program where English 9 left off. While enhancing students’ preparation by offering them more advanced grammar and writing skills, the course is focused on the study of literature in its thematic and stylistic aspects. In particular, the students will examine issues raised in a broad survey of world literature through a variety of works, ranging from ancient Greece to modern times. They will also do close, critical analysis of works and comparative analysis between works. Students will develop their ideas formally in regular essays and speaking assignments. Works covered over the course of the year include: The Odyssey (Homer), select short stories (Marquez), The Great Gatsby (Fitzgerald), Long Walk to Freedom (Mandela), My Children My Africa (Fugard), Much Ado About Nothing (Shakespeare), and selected poems.

Yearbook (Elective)

Gr. 9 - 12

1 year, 1 Credit (each year)

School Publications/Yearbook is a fast-paced, hands-on class where students create the school yearbook, from drawing board to actual distribution. Students will learn photography, layout design, editing, marketing and sales and basic desktop publishing software, and they will work with outside businesses on strict deadlines.

Journalism (Elective)

Gr. 9 - 12

1 year, 1 Credit

In this hands-on course, students learn the art of journalism in order to publish the school newspaper four to six times a year. Basic journalism skills are introduced and developed throughout the course, including news gathering, news writing, structuring different types of articles, editing, and layout design. This elective is perfect for hard-working students who are interested in writing and want to be a part of producing and publishing original content in our newspaper. Gr. 11 and 2 Years, 2 Credits 12 The English A: Literature course encourages students to appreciate the artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and by considering a range of critical approaches. In view of the international nature of the IB and its commitment to intercultural understanding, the English A: Literature course does not limit the study of works to the products of one culture or the cultures covered by any one language. The study of works in translation is especially important in introducing students, through literature, to other cultural perspectives. The response to the literature is through oral and written communication, thus enabling students to develop and refine their command of the language (IB Guide, 2011). Works covered over the course of the two years of study include: select speeches, select essays, On Photography (Sontag), Into the Wild (Krakauer), Metamorphosis (Kafka), Anna Karenina (Tolstoy), and selected short stories (Murakami). SL candidates will cover 10 works, and HL candidates will cover 13 works.

IB English A: Literature (HL/SL)

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IB English A: Literature (HL/SL)

Language

and

Gr. 11 and 12

2 Years, 2 Credits

English A: Language and Literature comprises four parts - two relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. A key aim of the English A: Language and Literature course is to encourage students to question the meaning generated by language and texts, which, it can be argued, is rarely straightforward and unambiguous. Helping students to focus closely on the language of the texts they study and to become aware of the role of each text’s wider context in shaping its meaning is central to the course. The English A: Language and Literature course aims to develop students’ skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and nonliterary, and can be seen as autonomous yet simultaneously related to culturally determine reading practices. An understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used to create meaning in a text is combined with an exploration of how that meaning is affected by reading practices that are culturally defined and by the circumstances of production and reception (IB Guide, 2011). Works or topics covered over the course of the two years of study include: journalism and rhetoric, 1984 (Orwell), The Metamorphosis (Kafka), Selected Poetry (Walcott), Selected Poetry (Duffy), Maus (Spiegelman), Julius Caesar (Shakespeare). SL candidates, in the literature component of the course, will cover 4 works and HL students will cover 6 works.

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Social Studies Department Three credits of Social Studies are required for graduation.

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11/12 IB Econ HL or SL IB Hist HL or SL

World Geog/World Hist 9 1 semester of Geography, 1 semester of History

World Geog/World Hist 10 1 semester of Geography, 1 semester of History

IB ITGS HL or SL IB Geog HL or SL Non-IB equivalent eg. Geog 11 & 12*

Half-year electives World Religions

Intro to Econ

International Relations

US History

Available to Gr. 9-12

Available to Gr. 10-12

Available to Gr. 10-12

Available to Gr. 10-12

* Occasionally, a student may be part of an IB class, but doing the course for AISJ credit only. Since this student is not fulfilling all the IB requirements, English 11 or English 12 will appear on their transcript.

Students will take World Geography and World History in Grades 9 and 10 (one semester of each in both Grades 9 and 10). Students can choose from the following IB classes: IB Geography, IB History, IB Economics and IB Information Technology in a Global Society. Social studies electives include: US History, International Relations, World Religions, and Introduction to Economics. A non-IB student can meet the social studies graduation requirement by taking 2 social studies elective semester courses to make up their 3rd credit. 1 sem Gr. 9, 2 Semesters, 1 Credit 1 sem Gr. 10 This course provides a forum in which to examine the constantly changing world in which we live. Students concentrate on the interactions between the physical and human aspects of our planet, through space and time. The Grade 9 World Geography focuses on Physical Geography: studying the solar system, the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere as well as exploring the aspects of weather and climate. The Grade 10 World Geography course then focuses on Human Geography: exploring global cultures, economics, politics, population dynamics, resource consumption, and sustainable development in terms of regional and urban settlement patterns. Key geographical skills including cartography, graphing/illustrating data and introductory statistics, are integrated into all facets of the course.

World Geography

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1 sem Gr. 9, 2 Semesters, 1 Credit 1 sem Gr. 10 The World History course introduces social studies students to the people, ideas, and events that have shaped world history. In a broad sense, the course is organized chronologically; however, a variety of themes will be developed throughout the course to ensure that students grasp the larger connections between seemingly disparate events in world history. The means by which this will be achieved include reading, discussion, writing, and various other projects. Particular emphasis is placed on developing a variety of skills, including critical thinking, primary and secondary source analysis, oral and written articulation of ideas, determining cause and effect relationships, and developing research skills.

World History

Course Objectives: 

To expose students to a variety of historical writings.

To foster an intellectual and lively atmosphere for debate and discussion.

To provide an historical context for the study of world history.

To improve students' reading comprehension, writing, and listening skills.

To understand, or question, the uniqueness of world history.

To answer the question "What is History?"

Introduction (Elective)

to

World

Religions

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 5 Credit

Introduction to World Religions is a one semester elective course that gives students the opportunity to explore the major religions of the world. The course will begin by briefly exploring the origins of religion and tracing its development in two distinct global areas: the Middle East (Abrahamic Religions) and the Far East. Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism will be looked at in terms of their origins, basic beliefs, rituals and scriptures, as well as their roles in shaping our world today. The course aims to leave students with a better understanding of different belief systems that they may encounter in their everyday life, as well as developing a heightened awareness of the role religions of the world have played, and continue to play, in shaping the world we live in - from economics and politics to art, architecture and music.

Introduction (Elective)

to

Economics

Gr. 10 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of economics, covering classical as well as modern theories, basic concepts, and current debates and with special emphasis on a Green Economy. The course will utilize pertinent films, magazines and newspapers to highlight themes stressing the current economic milieu on an international and local experience. Students will continuously develop a critical thinking capacity, through analysis, discussion, personal enquiry and formal presentations.

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International Relations (Elective)

Gr. 10 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

This is a course that engages a variety of Humanities skills and disciplines including history, geography, political science and sociology. Students who are interested in both current events and in understanding how the global political system works will benefit from this course as they explore causes and solutions to global and regional issues. Students will examine a wide variety of current world issues from a national, transnational, and global perspective to develop knowledge and an understanding of global interdependence. Students will explore problems and concerns facing contemporary leaders, and search for solutions through research and debate. It is the aim of this course to develop in the students a global outlook, and sound communication, critical thinking, research, and problem solving skills through simulations leading to understanding of opposing ideas and active participation in world citizenship.

U.S. History (Elective)

Gr. 10 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

This course introduces students to the people, ideas, and events that have shaped U.S. history. While the course is organized chronologically, several themes are studied throughout the semester. While students learn American history and study the themes it presents, they develop a variety of skills including analysis of primary and secondary sources, oral and written articulation of ideas, determining cause-and-effect relationships, and researching. Gr. 11 and 2 Years, 2 Credits 12 This course is designed to teach each student that history matters because it is concerned with evidence about human beings that have actually lived and how human lives have changed in the 20th century. Students will experience that history is concerned with explanations and origins and with the contemporary world as much as with the past. History also demands evidence to support statements about human beings, and it depends on skills of reasoning, criticism and communication. This course will prove to students that history is concerned not with the conveying of accepted facts but with the making of informed judgments, and to the displaying of the evidence on which those judgments are made. This two-year course offers a systematic and critical study of 19th and 20th century world history topics.

IB History (HL/SL)

Peacemaking, peacekeeping – International relations, 1918 –1936.

Causes, practices and effects of war.

Origins and development of authoritarian and single-party states.

Aspects of the history of Europe and the Middle East o

Imperial Russia, revolutions, emergence of Soviet State 1853 – 1924.

o

European diplomacy and the First World War 1870 – 1923

o Interwar years: conflict and co-operation 1919-1939 In addition, both the Higher and Standard Level students write an Internal Assessment Essay, which is an historical investigation of their choice.

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Gr. 11 and 2 Years, 2 Credits 12 Geography is the study of the earth's landscapes, peoples, places, and environments. It is, quite simply, about the world in which we live. IB Geography is unique in bridging the social sciences (human geography) with the natural sciences (physical geography). It puts this understanding of social and physical processes within the context of places and regions - recognizing the great differences in cultures, political systems, economies, landscapes and environments around the world, and the links between them. Understanding the causes of differences and inequalities between places and social groups underlies much of the newer developments in human geography and will be explored not only through classroom activities but also through practical fieldwork in and around the cities of Johannesburg and Pretoria.

IB Geography (HL/SL)

Gr. 11 and 2 Years, 2 Credits 12 IB Economics is a dynamic social science, forming part of the study of individuals and societies. The study of economics is essentially about the concept of scarcity and the problem of resource allocation. While addressing these issues, the IB course focuses on the interconnectedness of world economies and events. Although the course involves the formulation of economic theories, the course is not purely theoretical. Theories are applied to real-world examples and the two year course incorporates elements of history, geography, psychology, mathematics, sociology and political science. Throughout the course, students are taught to consider economic theories, ideas and happenings from the points of view of different individuals, nations and cultures in the world economy. Students electing to complete this course on the Higher Level should be aware that all sections of the course require the development of quantitative skills in order to explain and analyze economic relationships.

IB Economics (HL/SL)

Gr. 11 and 2 Years, 2 Credits 12 See the course description for Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS) within the IT Department course descriptions.

IB ITGS (HL/SL)

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Mathematics Department Basic Information and Requirements Three credits of mathematics in Grades 9 – 12 are required for graduation. It is strongly recommended that college bound students successfully complete four year of study in mathematics.

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11/12

Int 10 Hons. (1)

IB Math HL

Int 9 Ext. (3)

Int 10 Ext. (2)

IB Math SL

Int 9 (2)

Int 10 (2)

IB Math Studies SL

A one yr course

Business Math For Gr. 11 or 12

Math 11 & Math 12*

* Occasionally, a student may be part of an IB class, but doing the course for AISJ credit only. Since this student is not fulfilling all the IB requirements, Math 11 or Math 12 will appear on their transcript. The various levels of math are offered to achieve an optimal match between student learning and teaching pace, as well as to provide sufficient depth and breadth of content in preparation for a wide range of mathematics needed for future university work. The appropriate math class is determined for each student through the use of placement tests, previous mathematics performance and teacher recommendations. An integrated approach to algebra, geometry, functions, probability and statistics is used throughout the curriculum. To make mathematical content more meaningful to students, problem-solving applications connecting mathematics to the real world and other disciplines are integrated within each course. To facilitate discovery and analysis, as well as to reinforce the understanding of abstract mathematical concepts, the use of technology (particularly graphing calculators and computer software on graphing, spreadsheets and geometric explorations) is integrated across the mathematics curriculum. All High School math courses require a Texas Instruments (TI) graphing calculator. If students already have the TI-83 PLUS, this is sufficient through Grade 12. New students to AISJ are highly recommended to buy the TI-84 PLUS, TI-84 PLUS Silver Edition or the TI-83 PLUS Silver Edition. An important consideration is cost. The school does have a stock of TI 84 PLUS models for students to purchase. The price is roughly R950 each; however, it is strongly suggested that students who travel overseas purchase their graphing calculators abroad at considerably more favorable prices in order to avoid high customs duties in South Africa. As a reminder, please note that graphing calculators are required for the first day of class.

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Integrated Math 9

Gr. 9

1 year, 1 Credit

Pre-requisite: Integrated Math 8 (or teacher recommendation) Integrated Math 9 guides students through the process of developing their mathematical abilities and laying a firm foundation. This course is intended for students who have had some previous study of basic algebra and who might be interested in pursuing IB Math Studies when they reach Grade 11 and 12. The following units are covered: Data Representation and Interpretation (Statistics), Real numbers OR Rational and Irrational Numbers, Patterns and Algebra, Pythagorean Theorem and Trigonometry, Linear Functions and Inequalities, Financial Mathematics, Measurement (Area and Volume), Probability and Chance.

Integrated Math 9 Enriched

Gr. 9

1 year, 1 Credit

Pre-requisite: Integrated Math 8 Enriched (or teacher recommendation) This is a faster paced course covering topics to greater depth to prepare students for the more advanced courses of IB Math SL and HL. This course is intended for students with strong abilities and keen interest in mathematics. It is designed to develop analytical thinking and deductive reasoning among students so that they can solve more challenging problems. After completing this course, students have the option of either taking Integrated Math 10 Enriched or Integrated Math 10 Honors. A teacher’s recommendation is required to take Integrated Math 10 Honors. The following units are covered: Data Representation and Interpretation (Statistics), Real Numbers OR Rational and Irrational Numbers, Patterns and Algebra, Pythagorean Theorem and Trigonometry, Linear Functions and Inequalities, Financial Mathematics, Measurement (Area and Volume), Probability and Chance.

Integrated Math 10

Gr. 10

1 year, 1 Credit

Pre-requisite: Integrated Math 9 (or teacher recommendation) The course continues from the foundation laid down in Integrated Math 9. It is for students who might be interested in pursuing IB Math studies when the reach Grade 11. The following units are covered: Rational and Irrational Numbers, Linear Algebra and Functions, Trigonometry, Quadratic Equations, and Functions, Exponential Functions, Measurement and Geometry and Probability and Statistics.

Integrated Math 10 Enriched

Gr. 10

1 year, 1 Credit

Pre-requisite: Integrated Math 9 Enriched (or teacher recommendation) This course is for students who have a strong foundation in Math. Integrated Math 10 Enriched is intended for students who have satisfactorily completed Integrated Math 9 Enriched. This course integrates more Advanced Algebra, Geometry, Probability and Statistics to prepare students for IB Mathematics SL. The following units are covered: Functions, Geometry, Logarithms, and Radical equations, Trigonometry and Statistics and Probability.

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Integrated Math 10 Honors

Gr. 10

1 year, 1 Credit

Pre-requisite: Integrated Math 9 Enriched + teacher recommendation Integrated Math 10 Honors is intended for highly motivated students with very strong abilities and a thorough background in mathematics. The aim of this course is to prepare the students for IB Mathematics HL. Emphasis is given to an in-depth understanding of concepts, together with meaningful acquisition and refinement of advanced algebra and pre-calculus skills. The following units are covered: Functions, Geometry, Logarithms, Radical Equations, Trigonometry, Statistics and Probability, Trigonometric Ratios and Functions, Trigonometric Graphs, Identities and Equations, Complex Numbers, Vectors and Sequences and Series.

Mathematical Studies (SL)

Gr. 11 and 12

2 years, 2 Credits

Pre-requisite: Integrated math 10 Math Studies is designed for students with varied mathematical backgrounds and abilities with an emphasis on applications of mathematics, and the largest section is on statistical techniques. It offers students opportunities to learn important concepts and techniques and to gain an understanding of a wide variety of mathematical topics. It prepares students to be able to solve problems in a variety of settings, to develop more sophisticated mathematical reasoning and to enhance their critical thinking. Students taking this course are well prepared for a career in social sciences, humanities, languages or arts. The compulsory core is numbers and algebra, sets and logic, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, functions and financial mathematics and an introduction to differential calculus. In addition, students must complete an individual project which is an extended piece of work based on personal research involving the collection, analysis and evaluation of data.

Mathematics (SL)

Gr. 11 and 12

2 years, 2 Credits

Includes Pre-Calculus and Calculus Pre-requisite: Integrated Math 10 Enriched Math SL caters for students who already possess knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who are equipped with the skills needed to apply simple mathematical techniques correctly. The majority of Math SL students will expect to need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for future studies in subjects such as chemistry, economics, psychology and business administration. This course fulfills the college requirement for high school calculus and is designed to meet the needs of most students. In the first year students learn a variety of Pre-Calculus topics including limits. In the second year, a full semester is devoted to differential and integral calculus. Students will also be expected to complete a mathematical exploration.

Applied Math

Gr. 11 or 12

1 year, 1 Credit

Pre-requisite: Integrated Math 10 This is a one year, slower-paced course intended for students who do not necessarily want to do IB Math but need the Math credit. Provides learners with the opportunity to apply mathematical concepts and skills to independent real-life situations. Emphasis is placed on daily financial management and preparations for the future.

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Mathematics (HL)

Gr. 11 and 12

2 years, 2 Credits

Pre-requisite: Integrated Math 10 Honors This is a fast-paced, demanding and comprehensive course that caters for students with a good background in mathematics who are competent in a range of analytical and technical skills. The majority of these students will be expecting to include mathematics as a major component of their university studies, either as a subject in its own right or within courses such as physics, engineering and technology. In addition to the IB Math SL syllabus the following topics are also covered: complex numbers, extended vectors, differential equations, and infinite sequences and series. Students will also be expected, as an internal assessment, to do a significant mathematical exploration.

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Science Department Grade 9

Grade 11/12

Grade 10

IB Chem HL or SL IB Phys HL or SL Science 9

Chem Phys Biol IB Biol HL or SL

Taught by specialists (rotating)

IB ESS SL IB SEHS SL * Occasionally, a student may be part of an IB class, but doing the course for AISJ credit only. Since this student is not fulfilling all the IB requirements, Chem 11 or Chem 12 (for example) will appear on their transcript.

Non-IB Equivalent eg. Chem 11 & 12*

Earth Science Available to Gr. 11 & 12 as a non-IB science elective

Science 9 – (Bio/Chem/Phys)

Gr. 9

1 Year, 1 Credit

The grade 9 Science course is the first year of a two year course taught in grades 9 and 10. The course gives students the opportunity to study biology, chemistry and physics within a coherent syllabus. Students learn about the basic principles of each subject through a combination of theoretical and practical studies. The course aims to develop successful students who have the required understanding, knowledge and scientific skills essential for studying one or more sciences in the IB Diploma Programme. It also teaches students the learning and thinking skills that help them become independent learners and equip them for life. The following topics will be covered during the course: Biology: Characteristics of living organisms, cells, enzymes, organic chemistry, animal and plant nutrition. Chemistry: Particle nature of matter, experimental techniques, atoms, elements and compounds, atomic structure and the periodic table. Physics: Waves, light, electromagnetic spectrum, sound, simple kinetic molecular model of matter, matter and thermal properties, transfer of thermal energy and magnetism.

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Science 10 – (Bio/Chem/Phys)

Gr. 10

1 Year, 1 Credit

The grade 10 Science course is the second year of a two year course taught in grades 9 and 10. The course gives students the opportunity to study biology, chemistry and physics within a coherent syllabus. Students learn about the basic principles of each subject through a combination of theoretical and practical studies. The course aims to develop successful students who have the required understanding, knowledge and scientific skills essential for studying one or more sciences in the IB Diploma Programme. It also teaches students the learning and thinking skills that help students become independent learners and equip them for life. The following topics will be covered during the course: Biology: Circulatory system, transport in plants, immune system, cellular respiration, respiratory system, nervous system, homeostasis, genetics, evolution and ecology. Chemistry: Ions and ionic bonding, molecules and covalent bonding, giant structures, introduction to organic compounds, electricity and chemistry, stoichiometry, the mole concept, acids, bases and salts. Physics: Motion, energy, work, power, electricity and electric circuits.

Earth Science

Gr. 11 - 12

1 year, 1 Credit

Pre-requisite: Physics/Chemistry 10 for 2013/14, Science 9 and 10 thereafter This course is designed for Grade 11 students who are not interested in pursuing the more advanced IB Science courses at AISJ. Earth Science is an introductory course to acquaint students with their physical environment. Topics include an examination of the earth’s composition, plate tectonics, structure, and land formations. An exploration of the atmosphere and a relationship to climatic characteristics will be explored. Oceanography will give students an understanding of the characteristics of ocean water, life in the ocean, and how water influences global climate. Finally, astronomy will explore the solar system with an emphasis on elementary physics. Through extensive hands-on activities, students will be exposed to the natural forces that have shaped the earth and the environment in which they live. Students will be required to apply scientific principles and processes learned in earlier courses in order to analyze and interpret things that they experience daily. Gr. 11 and 2 Years, 2 Credits 12 Pre-requisite: Biology Grade 9 and Physics/Chemistry 10 for 2013/14, Science 9 and 10 thereafter. This two-year course is designed to teach a limited body of fact as well as a broad general understanding of Biology as a whole. A lot of emphasis is placed on doing investigations and writing lab reports. The topics covered are: statistical analysis, cells, the chemistry of life, plant science, genetics, ecology and evolution, and human health and physiology. HL students are required to study some topics in greater depth, to study additional topics, and to study extension material of a more demanding nature in the common topics. The Group IV project is a compulsory part of the course. The course is internally assessed by the laboratory experiences and lab reports (24%) and an externally assessed exam (76%).

IB Biology (HL/SL)

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Gr. 11 and 2 Years, 2 Credits 12 Pre-requisite: Physics/Chemistry 10 for 2013/14, Science 9 and 10 thereafter This two year course follows IB chemistry curriculum by covering the following topics at both the standard and higher level: stoichiometry, atomic theory, periodicity, chemical bonding, energetic, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, organic chemistry, as well as two IB Chemistry Options. There is a strong emphasis on both laboratory experiences as well as theory. The Group IV project is a compulsory part of the course. The course is externally assessed by written exams (76%) and laboratory experiences (24%).

IB Chemistry (HL/SL)

Gr. 11 and 2 Years, 2 Credits 12 Pre-requisite: Physics/Chemistry 10 for 2013/14, Science 9 and 10 thereafter Note: IB Math SL or IB Math HL should be taken concurrently with IB Physics HL Physics has always been a science of theory and explanation. This two-year course is a combination of complementary activities. The first part is theoretical: abstract models and mathematical systems are formulated to explain phenomena and make predictions. The second aspect is experimental, in which these abstract concepts are linked to reality. Topics for both standard and higher level candidates include measurement, mechanics, energy and sources, thermal physics, oscillation and waves, electricity and magnetism, fields and forces, atomic physics, astrophysics, quantum and nuclear physics. Higher level candidates have additional topics such as thermodynamics, electromagnetic induction and alternative current, electric potential, gravitational potential, projectile motion, orbital motion and Kepler’s Law, wave phenomena, digital technology, special and general relativity. The Group IV project is a compulsory part of the course. Physics is externally assessed by written exams (76%) and internally assessed by laboratory experiences (24%).

IB Physics (HL/SL)

IB Environmental Systems and Societies-ESS (SL)

Gr. 11 and 12

2 Years, 2 Credits

IB Environmental Systems and Societies (ESS) is a two-year Humanities and Science course that provides students with a coherent perspective on the environment. The emphasis is on the scientific and geographic details of our local environment with field work and practical experiments in a lab setting. Students will draw on concepts from the natural sciences and apply this scientific understanding to political and social issues. Students will be expected to build on what they learn to establish positions on public policy, to consider diverse environmental perspectives, and to appreciate the international nature of resolving major environmental issues. The course is transdisciplinary, so it can satisfy either group 3 or 4 requirements at the standard level.

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IB Sports, Exercise and Health Science-SEHS (SL)

Gr. 11 and 12

2 Years, 2 Credits

The Diploma Programme course in Sports, Exercise and Health Science (SEHS) involves the study of the science that underpins physical performance and provides the opportunity to apply these principles to understanding health and human performance. The course incorporates the traditional disciplines of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, psychology and nutrition, which are studied in the context of sport, exercise and health. Students will cover a range of core and option topics and carry out practical (experimental) investigations in both laboratory and field settings. This will provide an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and understanding necessary to apply scientific principles and critically analyze human performance. Where relevant, the course will address issues of international dimension and ethics by considering sport, exercise and health relative to the individual and in a global context. The sports, exercise and health science course is offered at standard level only.

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Information Technology Department Discover Computer and Technology Design (CandTD1)

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

The primary goal of CandTD is to create products that reflect the interests of the students. Using powerful and versatile software applications, students will work with elements of programming, text, graphics, video, music, animation, voice and sound effects to produce, among products such as interactive animations and games. Students will learn how to use the design cycle to manage and implement technology projects. The course is specifically designed to be flexible enough to keep up with changing trends in computer technology.

Explore Computer and Technology Design (CandTD2)

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

Prerequisite: Discover Computer and Technology Design (CandDT1) Following on from Computer and Technology Design Level窶的 this course will provide students with the opportunity to hone their skills at applying the design cycle to large scale technology projects. During this course, students will focus on the creation of a single meaningful product for a pre-identified client further developing the skills and approaches they acquired in the Level I course.

Discover Film (Film 1)

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

Film is a creative course that balances textual analysis with practical application of film language. There is a particular focus on organization, collaboration and creative intelligence including problem solving. Students are expected to work together in teams to create films from the idea stage through to the premier at the film festival. The Discover Film course is aimed at the student who has had a limited exposure to the film production process. There is an emphasis on developing an understanding of the language of film and the practical application of this knowledge to projects. Evaluation of these projects is an integral part of the assessment process.

Explore Film (Film 2)

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

Prerequisite: Discover Film (Film 1) Film is a creative course that balances textual analysis with practical application of film language. There is a particular focus on organization, collaboration and creative intelligence including problem solving. Students are expected to work together in teams to create films from the idea stage through to the premier at the film festival. Following on from Discover Film, the Explore Film course builds on the experience gained in the Intro to Film course. Students are expected to produce more polished films. Film History and Genre is explored in much greater detail.

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Discover Robotics (Robotics 1)

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

This is a problems-based course in which students will work primarily in teams to design, build, and program robots. The main materials for building will consist of VEX Robotics equipment and RobotC will be the software most often used for programming. Creativity, teamwork, critical thinking and a solid grounding in the design cycle will be crucial for success.

Explore Robotics (Robotics 2)

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

Prerequisite: Discover Robotics (Robotics 1) Explore Robotics will pick up where Discover Robotics left off. With VEX Robotics hardware and a sufficient knowledge of programming, student teams will take on more challenging problems. Explore Robotics will emphasize the use of sensors, autonomous control, and changing environments that the robot must respond to.

IB Information Technology in a Global Society窶的TGS (HL/SL)

2 Years, 2 Credits

This is a 2-year, course which focuses on the study and evaluation of the impact of information technology (IT) on individuals and society. ITGS explores the advantages and disadvantages of the use of digitized information at the local and global level. ITGS provides a framework for the student to make informed judgments and decisions about the use of IT within the social context. Although ITGS shares methods of critical investigation and analysis with other social sciences, it also considers ethical questions found in the study of philosophy. Students come into contact with IT on a daily basis because it is so pervasive in the world in which we live. This widespread use of IT inevitably raises important questions in which we live. This widespread use of IT inevitably raises important questions about social and ethical issues that shape our society today. ITGS offers an opportunity for a systematic study of these issues, whose range is such that they fall outside the scope of any other single discipline.

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World Languages Department Basic Information and Requirements Two consecutive credits of a world language are required for graduation from AISJ. For students planning to attend college or university, at least three credits are recommended. Students will select either the school’s French or Spanish track. Faculty will determine the student’s placement based on his or her level of proficiency. All new students will undergo a placement test to determine this level of proficiency. Native and near-native speakers will not be permitted to choose a language at which they already have a high degree of fluency before Grade 11. An independent study of literature in the native language might be recommended by the teacher and IB Coordinator.

Optimal language course flow Gr. 9 Intermediate (Level 3)

Gr. 10 Advanced (Level 4)

Gr. 11

Gr. 9 Pre-Int (Level 2)

Gr. 10 Intermediate (Level 3)

Gr. 11

Gr. 9 Beginner (Level 1)

Gr. 10 Pre-Int (Level 2)

Gr. 11

Before & during Gr. 10 Maximum of 1 yr of French Maximum of 1 yr of Spanish

Gr. 12

IB Language B HL Gr. 12

IB Language B SL Gr. 12

Does not lead smoothly to IB Language B

Gr. 11

Gr. 12

IB French ab initio SL IB Spanish ab initio SL

Spanish or French – Beginner (level 1)

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Year, 1 Credit

An introduction to French or Spanish, this course is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in their new language. They will start to develop the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the target language. They will also be introduced to some cultural aspects of interest.

Spanish or French – Pre-Intermediate (level 2)

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Year, 1 Credit

The purpose of pre-intermediate Spanish or French is to continue the development of the four skills in a variety of social, private, and public situations. Students will have the opportunity to manipulate the language and they will learn new structures and vocabulary.

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Spanish (level 3)

or

French

Intermediate

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Year, 1 Credit

The main objective of this course is to prepare students for a more advanced study of the languages. Students will continue exercising the four skills and will investigate more complex texts, including some literary texts of the target language. They will also learn about new aspects of the corresponding culture.

Spanish or French – Advanced (level 4)

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Year, 1 Credit

The purpose of this fourth year is to offer students the option of further language study before they enter the IB program. Students will continue to develop all skills in the target language and will have the opportunity to examine cultural aspects more in depth, i.e. the geography, history and literature of the people that speak the target language.

Prerequisites for IB Group 2 Language Courses Students must follow the course that is deemed best suited to their present and future needs and that will provide them with an appropriate academic challenge. The degree to which students are already competent in the language and the degree of proficiency they wish to attain by the end of the period of study are the most important factors in helping students identify the appropriate course. Consequently, all new students to AISJ registering for one of the courses below will undergo a placement test to determine his or her current level of proficiency.

IB French or Spanish ab initio – (SL only)

Gr. 11 and 12

2 years, 2 Credits

Prerequisite: A maximum of one year studying the target language The IB course for beginners, this two-year course is an intensive, accelerated version of the normal three year high school sequence, allowing highly motivated students to work towards the intermediate level of proficiency in the selected language during their junior and senior years of high school. This course culminates with an external exam and fulfils the Group 2 requirement of the IB Diploma. Gr. 11 and 2 years, 2 Credits 12 This is an advanced foreign language course that is designed to allow students to progress to the Pre-advanced or Advanced (B1 or B2) level of proficiency in their world language. In this course, students practice using the target language flexibly and effectively for a wide range of social, academic and professional purposes. Emphasis is placed on producing clear, well structured, detailed texts on a variety of complex subjects, fluently and precisely. Students are introduced to a demanding selection of literature, reading at least two literary texts over the two years when selecting our HL option. There is an external written exam as well as an internal oral exam and a written assignment, which are moderated externally. This course fulfils the Group 2 requirement of the IB Diploma.

IB French B or Spanish B – (HL/SL)

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Fine and Performing Arts Department Introduction to (Art 1 Semester version)

Art

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

This course serves to lay the basic foundation for various art skills. It will concentrate on the five principles of art; line, color, tone, texture, and shape. These principles will be explored in as many varying techniques and media as possible.

Introduction to (Art 1 Yearlong version)

Art

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Year, 1 Credit

This course incorporates all the elements of the semester version, but allows time and space for students to learn further art concepts and to practice and consolidate their skills. It will concentrate on the five principles of art; line, color, tone, texture, and shape. These principles will be explored in as many varying techniques and media as possible.

Explore Art (Art 2)

Gr. 10 - 12

1 Year, 1 Credit

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Art (Art 1) This course is the second step in a basic foundation of art. The principles and elements of design addressed in Art I will now be practiced in unification with one another rather than individually. Drawing and design skills will continue to be taught, but at a more advanced level. Art history will play a more significant role in this course, focusing on important styles and time periods. A variety of materials and techniques will again be emphasized with more advanced projects.

Introduction to Drama (Drama I)

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

This course offers the students three perspectives: (1) drama as a performing art (2) drama as literature and (3) drama as a unique craft that requires training in special skills. Students will perform and also study to improve their voice and diction, use of body language, and knowledge of other facets of drama from structure to history. Students will have the opportunity to reach out “across the footlights� and communicate through voice, body, and other means at the performer’s disposal.

Explore Drama (Drama 2)

Gr. 10 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Drama (Drama 1) This course is a continuation of the essential elements covered in Drama I. Performance skills will be honed as students continue ensemble work along with the various acting techniques and characterization activities. All students will have an opportunity to explore basic elements of technical theatre. A directorial perspective will be achieved through practical play analysis as students turn play scripts or scene studies into theatrical productions.

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Theatrical Design and Production

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

This course gives students exposure to several aspects of technical theatre. Students will have practical and theoretical experience in set design, set construction, lighting, sound, stage craft, costume design and special effects. As a part of this course, students will cover the foundation and theory of design, and then apply them directly to the production of the HS Play/Musical. A final design project based on a chosen play/musical will culminate the class experience.

Photography

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

This course will cover sound photograph-taking skills based on the elements and principles of art/design. This will take nine weeks and there will be many assignments that are mostly done for homework. Thereafter students will learn/practice simple darkroom techniques in Adobe Photoshop. The skills learned will include basic adjustments, color variation, simplifying and stylizing images, hand coloring, and creative manipulation of the printed image. There will be a component of selfassessment of the images created. Students will each be provided with a digital camera to work with. This is a rigorous course whereby students need to keep up with assignments and homework.

High School Band

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Year, 1 Credit

High School Band is an instrumental music instruction and performance course for all students who already play a woodwind, brass, string, or percussion instruments. Students will rehearse as a large ensemble and perform music appropriate to the high school level. The music will be varied, including popular, classical, jazz, and world music. Basic music theory and history will be addressed within the course. Regular concerts will be scheduled at school and community events, including two large semester-end concerts and the AISJ Graduation ceremony. Assessment is based on attainment of performance standards in class and regular practice of material. It is preferred that the course be taken for the entire year; however students who need to take other required semester courses (e.g. Health) can join for a semester with teacher approval.

High School Choir

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Year, 1 Credit

High School Choir at AISJ will be a performing ensemble of mixed voices (sopranos, altos, tenors, and basses) for singers of all levels of ability and experience. Using a movement-based approach to developing vocal skills, choir will focus on voice production, body and breath support, harmonizing with others, and beautiful, resonant singing. This course will improve students’ singing voice, whether they are experienced performers or have never been in a choir before! Choir will also build skills in music literacy and sight-singing, to prepare those singers who might like the option to join choirs, singing ensembles or a cappella groups at other high schools or at the college or university level. The High School Choir will sing music from many genres, i.e. light classical, spirituals, jazz and pop, world music, a cappella, etc. Classes will include movement and rhythm work, “body percussion� pieces, ensemble choreography and improvisational movement. We will also explore vocal improvisation and composition. Students will have the opportunity to audition for singing solos, and those who play percussion or other instruments may have the opportunity to accompany the choir in a concert. As a performing ensemble, the choir will seek out opportunities to perform for the school, the community, and at choir festivals and competitions in the region. 28


South African history through film

Gr. 10 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

The course will provide students with a concise history of South Africa from 1948 to the present. The class will utilize relevant films from and about South Africa, highlighting its unique history and addressing the following themes: apartheid, race, activism, black consciousness, civil disobedience, socio-economics, society, culture, arts, and important individuals in South Africa. Students will continue development of critical thinking skills and analysis through watching these films and analyzing their messages through class discussion, personal inquiry, writing, and presentations. The class will culminate with each student preparing and presenting a short 5-minute film using relevant themes covered in class. Gr. 11 and 2 Years, 2 Credits 12 Prerequisite: Intro or Explore Art and/or teacher recommendation. The aims of the Visual Arts course at HL and SL are to enable students to investigate past, present, and emerging forms of visual arts and to engage in producing, appreciating and evaluating these. They will thus develop an understanding of visual arts from a local, national, and international perspective. The production of Research Workbooks provides an avenue in which to do this. Students will respond visually and creatively to personal and cultural experiences through their studio work. They will develop skills in, and sensitivity to, the creation of works that reflect their active and individual involvement. Students will take responsibility for the direction of their learning through the acquisition of effective working practices. Students produce two to three Independent Research Workbooks (40% of their overall grade) and Studio Work (60%). The Research Workbooks are internally assessed and their Studio work is externally assessed.

IB Visual Arts – (HL/SL)

Gr. 11 and 2 Years, 2 Credits 12 Prerequisite: All students interested in IB music must have a prior background in music. Students interested in HL must have approval from the instructor. The IB Music program uses a broad approach to music which integrates critical thinking, performance, theory, history, and composition. The course is designed for students to build on prior experience in music while encouraging the development of new skills, techniques, and ideas. Students will have an opportunity to engage in a wide range of musical activities to facilitate the skills to become lifelong participants in music. Assessment is completed through musical perception essays and either solo performance, group performance, or Music Creation at SL and a combination of solo performing and Music Creation at HL.

IB Music – (HL/SL)

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IB Theatre – (HL/SL)

Gr. 11 and 12

2 Years, 2 Credits

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. This course focuses on the performance and craft aspects of theatre and all its facets. Students participate in productions by performing on stage or working backstage, keeping journals; observing external performances and conducting research projects on aspects of theatre from various historical periods and places in the world. No written exam is required at the end of the 2-year course. The final grade is determined through a combination of research, analysis, and performance assignments.

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Physical Education Department Basic Information and Requirements Students are required to earn 1.5 credits of physical education (PE) and .5 credit of health. The majority of the students will take a PE/Health class in Grades 9-10. Students who plan to enroll in the IB Diploma program in Grade 11 should get their PE and health requirements completed in Grades 9 and 10.

Health

Gr. 9 - 10

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

This course considers concepts of health and wellness as well as choices confronting young people today. It is concerned with a variety of topics from nutrition, the importance of physical fitness, values and emotions, to sex education, sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse and coping with stress. The aim of the program is to encourage students to examine their own behaviors and lifestyles and to provide students with the opportunity to develop knowledge and skills that will help them make the reasonable choices and decisions necessary to effectively change negative health behaviors.

Football Codes

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

In this course students will participate in various football codes e.g. Soccer, Rugby codes, Gaelic Football, American Football and Aussie Rules Football. Students will examine ways of improving individual performances as well as the performance of others. Key components of the course include: designing and implementing practice drills, evaluating the role of tactics and game strategies, developing referee and peer coaching skills and working on personal skills. Knowledge of the rules and fitness components required of each code will also be covered.*

Ball-istic

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

This course is based on various team sports e.g. Volleyball, Basketball, Handball, Water Polo and Dodgeball*. Students will examine ways of improving individual performances as well as the performance of others. Key components of the course include: designing and implementing practice drills, evaluating the role of tactics and game strategies, developing referee and peer coaching skills and working on personal skills. Knowledge of the rules and fitness components required of each code will also be covered.

Bats, Balls, Whack it

Racquet

and

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

This course focusses on the use of an implement be it racquet, stick or bat. E.g. Hockey (floor, field and underwater), Lacrosse, Cricket, Baseball, Tennis, Badminton, Table Tennis, Golf and Pickle Ball* form the basis of this course. Students will examine ways of improving individual performances as well as the performance of others. Key components of the course include: designing and implementing practice drills, evaluating the role of tactics and game strategies, developing referee and peer coaching skills and working on personal skills. Knowledge of the rules and fitness components required of each code will also be covered.

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Movers and Shakers

Gr. 9 - 12

1 Semester, 0.5 Credit

This course will focus more on individual fitness and performance, enhancing student’s ability to be lifelong movers. Sports covered may include Track and Field, Weight Training, Swimming, Running, Dance, Boot Camp, Croquet, Yoga, Ultimate Frisbee, Rock climbing* and more. Students will examine ways of improving individual performances as well as the performance of others. Key components of the course include: designing and implementing practice drills, evaluating the role of fitness components, peer coaching skills and working on personal skills. * Please note that at times it may not be possible to complete EVERY sport listed in a particular category. The number of sports explored will be dependent on many variables including class size, availability of teaching spaces, semester interruptions etc.

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Special Programmes Gr. 9 – 12 1 Semester, 0.5 Credit (as assigned) The Resource Program in the high school is designed to assist and support individual students who exhibit academic/behavioral needs. Students assigned to this program participate during designated periods during the school day on a regular basis as part of their schedule. Student placement and interventions are determined using teacher referral, student observation/interviews, and psychoeducational assessment reports. Student goals within the Resource Program are individualized and identified with the student when they begin their participation within the Resource Program. Goals include, but are not limited to, the development of study-skill strategies, time and task management assistance, after school support, improvement of organizational skills and monitoring of student progress. Students are encouraged to learn new skills to improve themselves academically and behaviorally and then return to independent learning and problem solving.

Resource Class

Part Gr. 11, 1 Year, 1 Credit Part Gr. 12 Theory of Knowledge is required for all full diploma IB students but is open for any juniors or seniors, if space is available, as an elective credit (along with the Extended Essay). In this course students examine issues in knowledge and the validity of truth-claims and reflect critically on the subjects they encounter in the diploma program. In addition to IB requirements for a paper and an oral presentation, students in this course at AISJ read on a variety of demanding topics, write frequently, and participate in the class discussions and activities.

Theory of Knowledge

1st Quarter

2nd Quarter

3rd Quarter

4th Quarter

Gr. 11

Research Skills

TOK

TOK

TOK (Presentation)

Gr. 12

TOK (Essay)

College Apps and Final EE

Senior Mission

Senior Mission

This is a blank line of text

Global Citizenship/Mission

Gr. 9 – 10

No Credit

All Grade 9 and 10 students at AISJ are assigned to Mission/Global Citizenship as one of their 8 classes. The grade 9-10 Mission teachers deliver the Global Citizens curriculum and help students progress through their service learning responsibilities. Additionally, study skills sessions may be facilitated. This Mission component is a supervised independent study hall where students are expected to work on assignments, complete research in the library or mission room, or check in with teachers for academic help (e.g. make-up work or tests). Mission teachers help students of concern return to academic success.

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Mission

Gr. 11 – 12

No Credit

All grade 11 and 12 students at AISJ are assigned to Mission as one of their 8 classes. At this level, it is primarily a supervised independent study hall where students are expected to work on assignments, complete research in the library or mission room, or check in with teachers for academic help (e.g. make-up work or tests). The grade 11-12 Mission teachers run study skills workshops, for which students are able to sign up, while also helping IB full diploma students stay on track with their CAS programs. Mission teachers help students of concern return to academic success.

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AISJ IB Course Guide  

The subjects offered at AISJ at diploma and courses level

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