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UNDERGRADUATE PORTFOLIO Allison Wilke | Miami University


01 Haidhausen Diagramming 02 Der Neue Ostbahnhof 03 Lieblingsfabre 04 Lichtplanung 05 New York Skyscraper Competition 06 Cleveland Design Competition 07 Sunshade Project 08 Aquafina Chandelier 09 Freehand Sketches 10 Forney + Architecture

CONTENTS


Allison Wilke | (314)703-9657 | wilkeac@miamioh.edu | 346 Country Meadows Drive, St. Charles MO. 63303


HAIDHAUSEN DIAGRAMMING


1 Regan Henry’s Fall 2013 studio, “Identity of a City,” is an in-depth look into the phenomenology surrounding specific neighborhoods of our choosing. I selected a district in Munich called Haidhausen, and have been studying its relationship with its neighboring district, Berg am Laim, across the railroad tracks. These diagrams are the expressions of what I believe are the most critical characteristics of the neighborhoods. My figure ground diagram reveals the density of Haidhausen’s buildings and helps recognize how they create very specific and intricate spaces. Berg am Laim’s built forms, on the other hand, are set back from the street and do not create such defined spaces. From the figure ground, you might also gather an understanding of the differences in building stock. Since Haidhausen was fairly undamaged from the World War II bombings, it possesses hundreds of residences, offices, and shops that vary mostly between Renaissance and Neo-Baroque styles. The section of Berg am Laim that I am studying started developing around the 1970s and contains more contemporary designs.

Munich, Germany

Fall 2013


2

The second diagram represents elevations of the buildings along a main street. On the Haidhausen side, the buildings are elevated with the street to show their proximity, while Berg am Laim’s buildings remain on the ground to display their disconnect with the street.

3

My third diagram exposes the heights of the buildings across the two districts. Looking down at the model, the buildings with the darkest opacities are the tallest. Looking into the model, you detect relationships between the buildings how some overlook the entire area, and some sink very close to the ground. You would also notice that most of the buildings on the Haidhausen side are only about fifty to sixty feet tall.

4

The fourth and final diagram is a road and sidewalk map that reveals the small amount of connection between the two districts. Two main roads pass under the train tracks on the outskirts of the neighborhoods, as well as two underground pedestrian tunnels.


DER NEUE OSTBAHNHOF

(The N


ew East Train Station)

Final Project Fall 2013


Roof Plan 1” = 40’0”

Level 4 1” = 40’0”

Over the last semester I investigated the district of Haidhausen in Munich, Germany. After spending four weeks reading about and researching Haidhausen, I had a good understanding of its history, people, and culture. I also learned about the area’s building stock, and I began to pick up on “rules” by which its architecture designs were created. In the weeks following, I investigated the ways in which the history and people of Haidhausen influenced its built environment. This research was concretized in the development of diagrams. These diagrams sought to expose characteristics of the built environment which I feel are important to the orientation and identification of the neighborhood, such as the clear, continuous horizontal separation between rustication and stucco; the patterns in fenestration; and the buildings’ relationship to the ground and street level. Finally, with an understanding of the neighborhood’s history, community, and building stock, I chose to redesign the East Train Station with the intention to improve the site and its relationship to the city. The new design provides a connection between the Haidhausen side with the Berg am Laim side that did not previously exist. The entryway completes the circular plaza that is located on the other side of the street. In addition, the front facade provides a monumental end to a long avenue in Haidhausen.

Level 3 1” = 40’0”


In order to appreciate the culture and identity of Au-Haidhausen today, it is necessary to understand the history of this neighborhood, the city of Munich, and Germany as a whole. Long before Munich was a city, Haidhausen existed as a small village with tiny houses and a church. It was mentioned as early as the year 808, when it was referred to “Haidhusir,” which means “Houses on the Heath.” For several hundred years, Haidhausen would be home to brick makers, day laborers and brewers. Its relevance increases with Munich’s growth. It all began in 1156, when Henry the Lion, Duke of Bavaria, and Bishop Otto von Freising quarreled over rights to the toll on a certain bridge over the Isar River. This was the only way to cross the river on the salt trade route from Salzburg to Venice. As a result of the dispute, Henry the Lion built a new bridge close to the Benedictine Monastery at Tegernsee. He allowed the monks to mint their own coins and start a market. Then he burned down Otto’s bridge. In 1158, München (Munich), deriving its name from “zu den Münichen” (site of the little monks) became an official city, ruled by Duke Henry. Haidhausen advanced along with Munich because the salt trade route ran directly through the settlement. By 1173, Duke Henry had built a wall around present day Marienplatz in Altstadt and its 2,500 citizens, complete with watchtowers and five gates. In 1180, when Duke Henry got into a serious argument with Emperor Barbarossa, he was banished from Bavaria. The city of Munich was then passed to the Wittelsbach family to rule. This established the longest and most conservative reign in the history of Germany. The Wittelsbachs would continue to influence and govern Munich until the final days of World War I. In 1314, a Wittelsbach, Louis the Bavarian, became Kaiser of Germany, and later, in 1328, the Holy Roman Emperor. Therefore, Munich was transformed into the center of politics. The city’s population increased five fold due to migration from the countryside and its lack of plagues. Louis the Bavarian turned Munich into a monopoly for salt trade, requiring all trade from the salt mines in Hallein or Reichenhall to pass through the city. However, this prosperity did not last long. In 1327, a fire destroyed a third of the city, and in 1346, Louis the Bavarian was killed in a hunting accident, ending Munich’s role as the political headquarter. Soon after, in 1349, a 150-year plague erupted in Munich, exterminating around forty percent of the population. The water running through the Isar was unfit to drink, which lead to the brewing of beer. Several breweries emerged and beer was required to be made fresh, introducing the oldest sanitation law for a consumable item. Beer could only be brewed from St. Michael’s Day to St. Georg’s Day. In the 1400’s, Munich became a boomtown for trade, especially with Venice. Haidhausen participated in this trade as well. The brick and clay products that came out of Haidhausen were soon employed throughout Munich. Streets in the city were paved and the Alte Rathaus on Marienplatz was built. Jörg von Halsbach, the most prestigious architect in the city at the time, constructed the Frauenkirche, which remains to this day a symbol of Munich. By the 1500’s, Munich had become the beer capital of the world with over 14,000 people inhabiting the city. In 1517, Martin Luther released his 99 Theses, resulting in a split between the northern Lutheran Germany and the southern Catholic Bavaria. Meanwhile, Bavarian elector Maximilian aided the area of Munich to increase in wealth and power until the Thirty Year’s War, when the Swedes captured Bavaria. The Swedish King Gustav II would have burned Munich to the ground had he not enjoyed the city and their beer so much. He described Munich as “a golden saddle on a very scrawny horse,” in comparison to the rest of Bavaria, and he accepted many barrels of the famous Hofbräuhaus beer as subsidy payment. In 1634, the Spanish troops came to the rescue to wipe out the Swedish troops, bringing with them the Bubonic Plague. This destroyed one third of Munich’s population. In the 1700’s, wars developed in Europe over territory, wealth, and power, smashing the wine industry and allowing Bavarian beer to spread its influence. According to Jeffery Gabb, at this time, Munich was the “prettiest city in all of Germany,” consisting of beautiful Romanesque, Gothic, Baroque, and Rococo churches with around 1700 dwellings to match, 600 gas lamps lining the streets, and gorgeous women. The Rumford police station had given the beggars on the street food and places to work. The Enlightenment reforms in Bavaria required all of the children to go to school. Munich became more industrialized, utilizing factory labor and mass production. The city also became known as a center of the arts and music. In 1780, Mozart took up residence in Munich and created “Ideomeneo,” which he considered to be his greatest work. The 1800’s unveiled an “explosion of monument building,” as well as many political changes. Around 1803, Napoleon Bonaparte increased his influence in Germany by reorganizing the states along the French Border. He was also eager to guide Monteglas, Maximilian IV’s chief political advisor, in remaking Bavaria in the French revolutionary image. This authority transformed 138 kingdoms into 35 and substantially reduced the Church’s power. In 1805, Napoleon’s troops occupied Munich, compelling some families to house 50 to 60 soldiers, leading to a lot of anti-French sentiment. In 1806, Napoleon defeated the Prussian empire, bringing about the end of the First Reich, which had existed since 962. Then he elevated Bavaria to a Kingdom, appointing Max Josef as King Maximilian I. Maximilian issued the first Bavarian constitution in 1808, basing it heavily on the French model. However, in 1812, when Bavaria lost 30,000 troops in Napoleon’s plight against Russia, Maximilian switched sides, assisting the Russian troops to crush the Frenchmen. In 1825, Maximilian I died, passing the rule to his son, König Ludwig I, making him the third Wittelsbach to rule. During his reign, modern Munich was created. According to Peter Jelavic, Ludwig proclaimed, “I want to turn Munich into such a city, that no one shall know Germany who does not know Munich.” The 19th century brought about Munich’s greatest period of growth and development during which the population rose from about 100,000 to over 500,000. On Ludwigstraße, the state library, Ludwigskirche, and the University of Munich were constructed. On Königsplatz, (King’s Plaza,) he built the Glyptothek, Propyläen, and Alte Pinakothek. Jelavic also stated “Munich’s Gothic and Baroque core became surrounded by spacious boulevards lined with stark neoclassical and neo-Renaissance edifices that housed the offices of the royal administration and the cultural landmarks of the Capital.” In 1835, Haidhausen was a major suburb of Munich, home to 10,000 residents. In 1852, Ludwig’s successor, Maximilian II, came to power. He possessed a great love for art and history and formed the Maximilianeum Foundation in Haidhausen. The Maximilianeum was constructed in the “Maximilianstil” (Maximilian style) of architecture, which embodied pointed arcades and the verticality of Anglo Saxon and Neo Gothic style and modern building techniques. Before he died, however, Maximilian changed the design of the façade, giving it rounded archways instead. The Foundation enabled gifted Bavarian students (all men at the time) to study at a university in Munich without financial concerns. Today, this is still a very prestigious school. A major goal of the school was to expand culturally, so students could study abroad and were required to study several languages. In 1854, Au and Haidhausen combined and officially were annexed to the city of Munich. In 1870, the Franco-Prussian war culminated from tensions regarding the German Unification. Napoleon II declared war, but the Third Reich prevailed, uniting a Prussian Empire under Wilhelm I. The late 19th century came with the “Gründerzeit,” which was a period of economic revival for all of Germany. Au-Haidhausen grew strongly as a result of industrialization. Many breweries occupied Haidhausen on the high banks of the Isar. This was a perfect location because the high terrace allowed for beer cellars and deep natural water sources. The name “Keller” (cellar) is still used to refer to the breweries around this area. The “French Quarter” in Haidhausen emerged as a result of the French influences in the Franco-Prussian war. This area of Haidhausen today has many streets, buildings, and shops that greatly resemble the French style. In 1900, the French Quarter was supposed to provide affordable housing for the poorer population of Munich. This neighborhood then turned into one of the most densely populated areas in Munich. During this time period, Au developed into a worker’s suburb. According to Lief Jerram, in the 1900’s “the majority of the buildings [in Munich] were not Modernist with a on to say, “While hygiene and money were frequent ways to define the problem, at the turn of the century, however, some


LIEBLINGSFABRE

(Favorite Color)


“Nothing”

“All”

In the spring of 2013, I studied abroad in Rosenheim, Germany. While there, I took four classes: Lieblingsfabre (Favorite Color,) Wand Teppich (Wall Carpet,) Lichtplanung (Light Planning and Design,) and Projekt (Studio.) One of my favorite projects was from the Lieblingsfabre class. We were required to take a standard hotel room perspective and design its appearnace twice, using the themes “All” and “Nothing.” I took optical illusion I made earlier the semester in this class, and I used that for my models. In the “All” model, the squares on the optical illusion twist and bend where the walls, bed and floor meet. In the “Nothing” model, the room gets lost in the illusion because the squares are fixed, even though the angles of the walls are changing.

HOCHSCHULE ROSENHEIM Spring 2013


LICHTPLANUNG

(Lighting Design)


Spring 2013


Summer Solstice 8AM

12PM

4PM

Equinox 8AM

12PM

4PM

Winter Solstice 8AM

12PM

4PM

Lighting Studies


NY SKYSCRAPER COMPETITION


Fall 2012


A primary rary, trend-setting concept was derive of a couple dancin pelled to preserve to downtown Man fresh air are becko welcome the local towers is achieved light, reducing the tinted glass to dim ing the more trans entertainment wit


goal for the project was to blend Harlem’s distinguished mood with contempobusinesses to renew the area surrounding the Cotton Club. The City Dancers ed from the Cotton Club’s famous history of performance along with the cadence ng. A proposed Jazz Club located above the hotel attracts people who are comHarlem’s legacy. The Sky Garden atop the condominiums frames attractive views nhattan and the Hudson River. Residents desiring quality open green space and ned by the terraced green roofs. The conference center and ground level retail community as well as attract new visitors to enrich the area. Cooling within the through the stack effect while the glass skin allows for an abundance of natural e need for electricity. The masculine tower on the south side of the site is veiled in minish its heat gain. It shades the feminine tower on the north side as well, guardsparent façade from direct sunlight. We celebrate this venerable area of musical h our City Dancers.


CLEVELAND DESIGN COMPETITION


Cleveland is famous for it’s Rock and Roll history, its Hall of Fame and its orchestra. My goal in creating the Cleveland Museum of Music on the lower level of the Detroit Superior Bridge is to enhance Cleveland’s music heritage utilizing a historic structure. This Museum is a new opportunity for people of all ages to interact and experience music. The most enticing features of the museum will be the large instruments that are placed along the museum path. They include: an electric guitar, a Chime Hallway, a harp, a piano, an acoustic guitar, a xylophone, a violin, and drums. The concept is that individuals will work with a partner or team to create their music. Music can be recorded, burned on to a CD, or taken to the DeeJaying Center to amp it up. While you are playing the music, the sound barriers surrounding the participants will respond to the notes played by emitting different colors of light through fiber optic tubes. For individual play, human scale instruments exist in break out spaces. When played on either the large-scale instruments or individual instruments, your music is recorded on a radio station that people in the Dee-Jaying Center can use to mix in with the music they are creating. The museum has a studio for voice lessons, a CD and record store, an instrument store, several food options, and a large auditorium for performances by the Cleveland Orchestra or other musicians.

Fall 2012


SUNSHADE PROJECT


Initial Ideas

Fall 2012


Partner Work


Final Installation


In Murali Paranandi’s Fall 2013 Studio, one of our projects was to design a sunshade that would reduce glare in the Freshman studio. In the beginning of the semester, our studio split into groups to come up with various design solutions. My partner and I came up with an idea to upcycle plastic water bottles we would collect from around campus and the local recycling center. Although our design was not selected, it challenged our studio to come up with a solution that would be very cost effective and sustainable. The design that our studio came up with involved recycling used banners that had previously hung around Miami’s campus. We cut the banners into strips and then weaved them through the old net that had once hung in the Goggin Ice Hockey Arena. By weaving the banners onto the back side of the hoops, the glare from the southern sunlight in the Freshman Studio was greatly reduced.

Final Model


AQUAFINA CHANDELIER


When our design was not picked for the sunshade installation, we decided to transform the project into something new. During our initial design, we had noticed how sunlight transmitted through the bottles, so we decided to use this to our advantage. Our end product is a nine foot chandelier that is made entirely of recycled materials. We installed Christmas lights in the middle so that the chandelier shines brightly, especially at night. Today, over a year after its completion, the chandelier still hangs in the atrium of Alumni Hall, Miami’s architecture building. My partner has already graduated, but when I graduate this spring, we will donate the project to Oxford’s Recycling Center.

PHASE 2 Fall 2012


FREEHAND SKETCHES


Fall 2012


Qingdao English Townhouse

FORNEY + ARCHITECTURE

(Internship)


Tianjin French Townhouse January - March 2013


Glass Cabinet


A4.2

1

SCALE: 1/4" = 1'-0"

A4.2

2

LEFT ELEVATION Architecture, LLC

SCALE: 1/4" = 1'-0"

Check:

2828 Stonington Place

St. Louis, Missouri 63131

PRIVATE RESIDENCE

Custom Addition & Remodel for:

FRONT ELEVATION

SCALE: 1/4" = 1'-0" Check: Project #:

REAR ELEVATION

A 4.1

Project #:

janeann@forneyplus.com

RIGHT ELEVATION

FORNEY + architecture, llc 421 Emmerson Avenue Kirkwood, MO 63122 314-640-4447

Date: 03-25-2013

2

Progress Set

Issue:

A4.0

SCALE: 1/4" = 1'-0"

St. Louis, Missouri 63131

FORNEY

1

2828 Stonington Place

PRIVATE RESIDENCE

Custom Addition & Remodel for:

A4.0

FORNEY + architecture, llc 421 Emmerson Avenue Kirkwood, MO 63122 314-640-4447

FORNEY Architecture, LLC

janeann@forneyplus.com

Progress Set

Issue:

REV./REISSUED

JANE ANN FORNEY, AIA PROFESSIONAL OF RECORD

Front & Right Elevations

A 1.0 1203

REV./REISSUED

JANE ANN FORNEY, AIA PROFESSIONAL OF RECORD

Rear & Left Elevations

1205

Joe Residence

Date: 03-25-2013


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