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38 AN INTRODUCTION TO BANKING, 2 EDITION ............................................................ nd

or call centre staff is one that must be taken seriously by banks. Poor customer service at the “coal face” can often result in loss of business and poor reputation developing as the customer spreads the word. At the same time, if this experience is a good one, then reputation is enhanced. It stands to reason then that customer-facing staff should be highly motivated, well trained, and reasonably well paid. This will help deliver a good customer service experience. The reality is that counter and call centre staff are often the least educated, most poorly paid staff in the bank. This does not look like a commitment to customer service excellence. The private banking arm of a UK bank has a policy that its call centre staff must all be university graduates. This makes them slightly more mature and educated than school leavers. At the same time, all management entry-level staff are required to spend a year working in the call centre before they are eligible for promotion to more senior roles. This makes the staff motivated to deliver good service, as they cannot progress if they receive poor customer feedback.

Follow-up and aftercare The automobile industry has a saying that the salesperson may be behind an initial sale, but it is the service department that ensures repeat business. This is applicable to banking as well. The initial loan approval, credit card issue, deposit facility, and so on are less likely to be followed by a long-term relationship if there is no follow-up service, or if there are errors in processing, issuing of statements, and so on. In the first instance, the front office staff should follow up with a general call or email; for example, if a personal finance loan was taken out to purchase a car, the salesperson might enquire if this had been successful, what type of car it was, and if the customer was happy with it. Making this sort of follow-up means that: • • •

The banker is demonstrating good customer service and a personal touch; If there has been a problem, the banker has demonstrated a proactive interest in the customer and moreover is in a position to fix it now; There is a higher chance of repeat business with this customer because of the positive impression made, and the customer perceives the banker has having an interest in the customer personally.

Regular, but not intrusive, follow-up calls and efficiency in account settlement and operational processes are the key to good customer service.

Introduction to Banking 2e Choudhry sample chapter minibook  

Sample chapters of Moorad Choudhry's widely adopted textbook An Introduction to Banking Second Edition. To order your copy visit www.wiley....

Introduction to Banking 2e Choudhry sample chapter minibook  

Sample chapters of Moorad Choudhry's widely adopted textbook An Introduction to Banking Second Edition. To order your copy visit www.wiley....

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