Page 1

WILEY BUSINESS SOLUTIONS GROUP

Health Info Technology Market Trends & Curriculum Guide

Program Overview • Market & Labor Trends • Salary Information • Consumer Demand • Recommended Curriculum & Course Sequence • Recommended Learning Content and Media Assets • Curriculum Development Services • Subject Matter Experts • Professional Development & Training • About Wiley’s Business Solutions Group


[HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MARKET TRENDS & CURRICULUM GUIDE]

Table of Contents Introduction Market Trends Nature of the Work Job Duties Work Environment Training, Education, Advancement Employment and Job Outlook Earnings Health Information Technology Bachelor’s Degree Program Description Major Course Sequence and Description Health Information Technology Associate’s Degree Program Description Major Course Sequence and Description Health Information Technology Certification in Coding/Billing Program Description Major Course Sequence and Description Wiley Textbook Recommendations by Course BSG Solutions and Services About Us Curriculum Development Subject Matter Experts Professional Development References 1


[HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MARKET TRENDS & CURRICULUM GUIDE]

Introduction Wiley’s Business Solutions Group (BSG) is a dedicated services and solutions group focused on the needs of the private postsecondary market. The development and maintenance of long-term customer relationships through trust and performance is our goal and priority. We combine market-leading content from Wiley’s publishing programs with expert academic and business consulting services to help sustain- and, more important, expand- your business. BSG is committed to providing you with services that meet your academic and business needs. Our Market Trends & Curriculum Guides are just one way we provide support to our customers. Whether you are looking to create a new program, revise an existing program, or find new learning materials for your courses, this Market Trends & Curriculum Guide is designed to help you and your institution. Inside you will find market trends relating to the program, including the nature of the work, job duties, work environment, training and education, employment and job outlook, and salary information. You will also find descriptions of the programs as well as the course sequence and course descriptions. Finally, you will find a list of the textbooks available for these courses, as well as further information about our services and support. Please contact us for additional information: E: bsg@wiley.com P: 201-748-6826 W: www.wiley.com/go/bsg

2


[HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MARKET TRENDS & CURRICULUM GUIDE]

Market Trends Nature of the Work Medical records and health information technicians assemble patients' health information including medical history, symptoms, examination results, diagnostic tests, treatment methods, and all other healthcare provider services. Technicians organize and manage health information data by ensuring its quality, accuracy, accessibility, and security. They regularly communicate with physicians and other healthcare professionals to clarify diagnoses or to obtain additional information. The increasing use of electronic health records (EHR) will continue to broaden and alter the job responsibilities of health information technicians. For example, with the use of EHRs, technicians must be familiar with EHR computer software, maintaining EHR security, and analyzing electronic data to improve healthcare information. Health information technicians use EHR software to maintain data on patient safety, patterns of disease, and disease treatment and outcome. Technicians also may assist with improving EHR software usability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of health information networks.

3


[HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MARKET TRENDS & CURRICULUM GUIDE]

Training, Education, Advancement Entry-level medical records and health information technicians usually have an associate degree. Many employers favor technicians who have a Registered Health Information Technicians (RHIT) credential. Education and training. Medical records and health information technicians generally have an associate degree. Typical coursework in health information technology includes medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, health data requirements and standards, clinical classification and coding systems, data analysis, healthcare reimbursement methods, database security and management, and quality improvement methods. Applicants can improve their chances of admission into a postsecondary program by taking biology, math, chemistry, health, and computer science courses in high school. Certification and Other Qualifications. Most employers prefer to hire credentialed medical record and health information technicians. A number of organizations offer credentials typically based on passing a credentialing exam. Most credentialing programs require regular recertification and continuing education to maintain the credential. Many coding credentials require an amount of time in coding experience in the work setting. The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) offers credentialing as a Registered Health Information Technicians (RHIT). To obtain the RHIT credential, an individual must graduate from a 2-year associate degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM) and pass an AHIMA-administered written examination. In 2008, there were more than 200 CAHIIM-accredited health information technology colleges and universities programs. The American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC) offers coding credentials. The Board of Medical Specialty Coding (BMSC) and Professional Association of Health care Coding Specialists (PAHCS) both offer credentialing in specialty coding. The National Cancer Registrars Association (NCRA) offers a credential as a Certified Tumor Registrar (CTR). To learn more about the credentials available and their specific requirements, contact the credentialing organization. Health information technicians and coders should possess good oral and written communication skills as they often serve as liaisons between healthcare facilities, insurance companies, and other establishments. Candidates proficient with computer software and technology will be appealing to employers as healthcare facilities continue to adopt electronic health records. Medical records and health information technicians should enjoy learning, as continuing education is important in the occupation.

5


[HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MARKET TRENDS & CURRICULUM GUIDE]

Employment and Job Outlook Medical records and health information technicians held about 172,500 jobs in 2008. About 39 percent of jobs were in hospitals. Health information technicians work at a number of healthcare providers such as offices of physicians, nursing care facilities, outpatient care centers, and home healthcare services. Technicians also may be employed outside of healthcare facilities, such as in Federal Government agencies. Employment is expected to grow much faster than the average. Job prospects should be very good; technicians with a strong understanding of technology and computer software will be in particularly high demand. Employment change. Employment of medical records and health information technicians is expected to increase by 20 percent, much faster than the average for all occupations through 2018. Employment growth will result from the increase in the number of medical tests, treatments, and procedures that will be performed. As the population continues to age, the occurrence of health-related problems will increase. Cancer registrars should experience job growth as the incidence of cancer increases from an aging population. In addition, with the increasing use of electronic health records, more technicians will be needed to complete the new responsibilities associated with electronic data management. Job prospects. Job prospects should be very good. In addition to job growth, numerous openings will result from the need to replace medical record and health information technicians who retire or leave the occupation permanently. Technicians that demonstrate a strong understanding of technology and computer software will be in particularly high demand.

7


[HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MARKET TRENDS & CURRICULUM GUIDE]

Health Information Technology Bachelor’s Degree (B.S.) Program Description A bachelor’s degree in health information management/administration is a four-year, entry-level program offered by universities and colleges. Wide-ranging classroom instruction and practical training prepares students to take a leadership role in managing the administrative, clinical, and research-related aspects of health information technology. The curriculum covers medical terminology, basic and advanced coding, quantitative analysis, pathophysiology and pharmacology, legal and ethical issues, management principles, billing and reimbursement, human relations, leadership skills, quality of care, research methods, and on-the-job experience. Applicants for admission must have a high school diploma or GED and take a college entrance exam. In addition, many programs require students to have an associate’s degree in health information technology or to first complete particular lower-division courses, such as computer science and/or accounting.

Program Objectives Upon completion of the program, students will be able to pursue career opportunities such as: 1. Have the knowledge and skills necessary to organize and manage computerized health information so it meets medical and administrative needs, and complies with technical, legal, regulatory, and ethical standards. 2. Be equipped to serve as a critical link between clinical, administrative, financial, and information systems staff, and between the healthcare organization, insurers, and patients. 3. Have a thorough understanding of medical terminology, coding systems, and quantitative analysis. 4. Demonstrate critical-thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills. 5. Be eligible to take the national qualifying exam for certification as a registered health information administrator.

9


[HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MARKET TRENDS & CURRICULUM GUIDE]

Major Course Sequence Semester I Introduction to Health Information Management/Administration This course reviews the functions of information technology departments in healthcare organizations and the basic management principles that guide them. Topics include the history of the profession, accreditation agencies, the format and content of health records, documentation guidelines and standards, patient registries and indexes, and data storage, retrieval, tracking, and retention. Medical Terminology This course familiarizes students with the building blocks of medical language—root words, prefixes, suffixes, and common abbreviations—related to anatomy, physiology, pathology, diagnostic procedures, and pharmacological, surgical, and other treatments. Special emphasis is placed on the definition, pronunciation, and spelling of terms. Pathophysiology and Pharmacology This course introduces students to the causes and symptoms of common diseases, surgical and other treatments, and diagnostic tools such as laboratory tests and imaging. The emphasis is on pathology from the perspective of disease classification in clinical information systems. Topics include classes of medications, drug indications and contraindications, and the use of desk references.

Semester II Health Information Systems This course provides an overview of the types, design, and use of health information systems, and some of the important issues they raise. One focus is the central role of electronic health records. Other topics include the interoperability of and technical standards for information systems, differences between administrative and clinical systems, regulations that impact electronic health records, emerging technologies, and numbering and filing systems.

10


[HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MARKET TRENDS & CURRICULUM GUIDE]

Wiley Textbook Recommendations by Course for Bachelor’s (B.S.) Degree Introduction to Health Information Management/Administration Health Information Management: Principles and Organization for Health Information Services, 5th Edition Margaret A. Skurka (Editor) ISBN: 978-0-7879-5977-7 www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0787959774,miniSiteCd-BSG.html

Medical Terminology Medical Terminology For Dummies Beverley Henderson, Jennifer Lee Dorsey ISBN: 978-0-470-27965-6 www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0470279656,miniSiteCd-BSG.html

Quick Medical Terminology: A Self-Teaching Guide, 4th Edition Shirley Soltesz Steiner ISBN: 978-0-471-23359-6 www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471233595,miniSiteCd-BSG.html

Pathophysiology and Pharmacology Pharmacology for the Health Care Professions Christine Thorp ISBN: 978-0-470-51018-6 www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0470510188,miniSiteCd-BSG.html

21


Order your complete Market Trends & Curriculum Guide Click HERE!


The Business Solutions Group We Make Your Business ... Our Business

To view our other Market Trends & Curriculum Guides go to www.wiley.com/go/bsgcg

bsg@wiley.com ∙ 201.748.6826 ∙ www.wiley.com/go/bsg

health  

bsg health catalog

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you