Page 1

LIVE WILD get back to the wild

FA L L 2 0 2 0


Volume  0 2   No.  1 0   Summer  2 0 2 0 


CONTENTS

SECTION ONE

SECTION THREE

0 2  Get Back to The Wild, Get Back Home

4 0  Wild by The Mile

0 6

Beauty in Your Own Backyard

4 4  Wild Reads for Your Wild Mind

1 0

Redemption in the Palisades

4 6  Business in the Backwoods

1 6  Where Will Your Next Escape to the Wild Take You?

5 0  Get Back to The Wild Checklist 

SECTION TWO

SECTION FOUR

2 4  Your Brain on Nature

5 4  Recipes: Fuel Around the Fire

3 0  Wild Ways of Escape 3 6  Embracing the Past to Learn In the Present

Want to write for us? Drop us a line at info@wildwayoflife.com

LIVE WILD | 01


SECTION ONE

GET BACK TO THE WILD, GET BACK HOME Amanda Stelter

LIVE WILD | 03


SECTION ONE

You may have experienced a weight being lifted from your shoulders, a lightness in your chest as you take a deep breath, a wave of calm rush through your mind as your worried thoughts quiet. All of these sensations and experiences are a product of escaping into a home we feel most comfortable in, the wild. What does it mean to get back to the wild? Simple, to get back to the wild is to get back to nature. A place free from distractions, comparisons, rules, and societal norms that rule over your every decision. To get back to the wild is to retreat to the peace of the outdoors, a simple way of life that comforts our deepest, most primal desires. When we find ourselves walking below trees up above, through gentle breezes, bearing witness to the sweet songs of birds all around, we cannot help but feel right at home. To get back to the wild doesn’t require one to explore into the deepest forest. It doesn’t require one to move off the grid and into isolation. Anyone, at any time, can get back to the wild through their own two feet and a curiosity for what lies beyond the confines of the indoors. A slow walk through a nearby park, moments spent hammocking on a nearby river, a bike ride along endless winding trails, a picnic on a green patch of grass. In nature, we can indulge in comfort or intentionally push ourselves in relentless forward progress. Whichever path you choose, whatever activity you chase, let it be done in wild surroundings and a wild spirit.

Volume 02

To get back to the wild is to fall from the world and into yourself. Remove yourself from the world and enter into a simpler and more authentic mindset full of clear and uninterrupted thoughts. To get back to the wild is to return to freedom; shut the laptop, leave the phone, pack a journal and book of the moment, and find yourself right where you belong, outdoors. When we get back to the wild, the worries of the world cease to exist, and life is put into perspective in such a manner our minds could never reach as long as we are still of the world. Wrapping our eyes and minds in the wild of our surroundings and chasing our individual escapes into the wild instills in us an indescribable peace and understanding. Clear eyes and higher thoughts. All too often, we get caught up in daily obligations only to find ourselves feeling overwhelmed by all we feel we must do. We must ask ourselves, who am I living for? To help others, we must help ourselves. If you are being honest with yourself, is there really “just not enough time in the day,” or are you not being intentional with how you choose to spend your time? At the end of the day, we dedicate our time to the things that are most important to us. There are times when we should seek to sooner sacrifice obligations for a moment of freedom. It is these decisions for freedom that linger in our memory years later, not the obligations you chose to overlook. To get back to the wild is to indulge the desires deep within us, what we crave most: fresh air, uninterrupted solitude, and a present moment free from trivial worries.

No.11

fall 2020


we should seek to sooner sacrifice obligations for a moment of freedom

“

“


SECTION ONE

BEAUTY IN YOUR OWN BACKYARD Amanda Stelter

LIVE WILD | 07


SECTION ONE

When one adapts to their surroundings, one loses sight of the beauty that lies just before them. The eyes adjust to the environment they’ve seen countless times, the body adjusts to the familiar climate, the mind drifts to places far and wide, and before we know it, we find ourselves falling prey to the belief that the grass is greener on the other side. We daydream of faraway landscapes and convince ourselves that where our feet are planted is no longer good enough. We grow tired of our same familiar surroundings, not fully understanding all that we are taking for granted right below our feet. Undoubtedly, there will always be a prettier place, a friendlier community, a more rugged adventure escape, but, in the end, our hearts and minds will always drift to places unknown purely out of curiosity. Man is innately curious, a characteristic that should be celebrated. Keep in mind, it was your curiosity that brought you to the place you find yourself pulling away from today. As familiar as you become with a place, there is always something new to discover because nature is ever-changing. The wild will always be exactly that, wild. There is no taming it, nor can our eyes, senses, and minds ever fully understand it. It is constantly transforming before our very eyes through slow growth and decay, a continuous process. The grass will always be greener, the mountains taller, the flowers prettier elsewhere. If nature can teach us anything, it’s to appreciate the beauty that lies before and around us wherever we may find ourselves. Now that we are aware, we can begin to appreciate and deeply cherish the humble beauty in our own backyards. Traveling around the world will not satisfy the unquenchable thirst deep within us to be among the beauty of the wild. Each place with enough time will become normal. We will overlook the mesmerizing features that once left us in awe, leaving us yearning for the next best thing. Only once we become truly content with our familiar

surroundings will we be freed from endless daydreaming of places we, deep down inside, know will never fully satisfy us. Step into your backyard, into your local park, onto your neighborhood streets, and take notice. Whether your roots are planted in soft soil city concrete, as long as your feet are planted on earth, there is still wild to be noticed. From the fauna in the forest to the sprouts of grass reaching up from the cracks in the sidewalk, the wild refuses to be tamed and will always find a breakthrough.

TO BE MORE MINDFUL IN RECOGNIZING THE BEAUTY IN YOUR OWN BACKYARD, HERE ARE SOME TIPS: • Free yourself from any and all distractions – no phones, no music, no watches, nothing. • Try bringing along a piece of paper and a pen. Take note or sketch what you see. • Stop and smell the roses, literally. Take your stroll at your own pace, but try to slow it down as much as possible. • Quiet your thoughts and focus on your surroundings: the sky, ground, air, sounds, smells. Now is the time to indulge your senses. • Occasionally stop and turn to view where you stand. Turn a full 360-degrees and recognize anything you may have previously overlooked. • Satisfy your every curiosity. Carefully touch the interesting looking leaf, study the bright flower, close your eyes, and listen to the song of the bird. • Take mental snapshots with your mind of memorable moments and sights. As you continue your walk, replay the snapshot over in your mind for a few seconds.

LIVE WILD | 09


SECTION ONE

REDEMPTION IN THE PALISADES Connor Koch

LIVE WILD | 11


SECTION ONE

“we’ve climbed hundreds of peaks together, and knew the situation had the potential to get ugly”

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION ONE

It was the most spectacular sunset I’ve ever seen. Sierra blues faded into purples and reds, swirling across the sky in tendrils of orange, reflecting brilliantly off the gleaming white granite of Dusy Basin, Split Mountain, the Evolution Range, finally muting into gray as the iridescent moon arrived. This sunset was not to be celebrated, however; we were now on top of one of the highest and most technical ridgelines in the state with night closing in. I shared a quick, nervous glance with Jonny; we’ve climbed hundreds of peaks together, and knew the situation had the potential to get ugly. It was time to move towards the U-Notch Couloir, a steep chute of rock and snow that would allow us to passage back to the basin. Darkness enveloped us as we entered the icy couloir, shrouding our descent in mystery, obfuscating the path to the glacier. With no other options, we committed fully to the steepening chute. Charlie led, tirelessly kicking steps into the firm, near-vertical snow of Polemonium Peak’s north face, climbing down into the unknown. Mercifully, we made it to the bergschrund, a 35-foot chasm separating us from the relative safety of the Palisade Glacier. We rigged the last rappel of the day on a tongue of rock above the maw, sliding down the rope, over the gap, onto the firm snow of the lower glacier. After touching down, we trudged across the moonlit snow, making a quick camp on a sandy ledge near the base of Mt. Gayley. We slept until the sun woke us for the hike out. California’s Palisades are a beloved and infamous range, featuring serious alpine terrain, sustained technical

climbing, glacier travel, and surpassing views of the entire Sierra Nevada. The most famous section of the group encompasses five 14,000-foot peaks, a continuous and relentless ridge linking together Thunderbolt, Starlight, North Palisade, Polemonium, and Mt. Sill. This traverse, known as “Thunderbolt to Sill”, is most often linked over 3-4 days, camping in the basin and sleeping on the ridge. Along with my partners Jonny Morsicato and Charlie Firer, I had just tried - and failed miserably - to complete the route in 1 day. Well, as the saying goes, the best climbers have short memories. So it wasn’t long before I found myself longing for the cold embrace of the Palisades once more, dreaming of the exposed backbone of the Sierra, tracing my hands across featured granite under the warmth of the California sun. This time, we made some tweaks to the plan, setting up a truck at two trailheads to straighten out the route and avoid late-season snow climbing. Charlie had left for Bozeman, so we looped in local crusher and SAR member Dane Mulligan, hoping his long reach and permanent stoke would come in handy on the ridge. We started by headlamp, knocking out the approach miles swiftly as the Palisades loomed on the horizon, soaring black walls looming on the horizon. Before I knew it, I was roping up for the technical summit block of Thunderbolt Peak, making a few greasy moves with 3000 feet of air under my feet. I quickly lowered off as Jonny and Dane assaulted the summit, and we set our sights on Peak 2: Starlight,

LIVE WILD | 13


SECTION ONE

with its unique It was the most spectacular sunset I’ve ever seen. Sierra blues faded into purples and reds, swirling across the sky in tendrils of orange, reflecting brilliantly off the gleaming white granite of Dusy Basin, Split Mountain, the Evolution Range, finally muting into gray as the iridescent moon arrived. This sunset was not to be celebrated, however; we were now on top of one of the highest and most technical ridgelines in the state with night closing in. I shared a quick, nervous glance with Jonny; we’ve climbed hundreds of peaks together, and knew the situation had the potential to get ugly. It was time to move towards the U-Notch Couloir, a steep chute of rock and snow that would allow us to passage back to the basin. Darkness enveloped us as we entered the icy couloir, shrouding our descent in mystery, obfuscating the path to the glacier. With no other options, we committed fully to the steepening chute. Charlie led, tirelessly kicking steps into the firm, near-vertical snow of Polemonium Peak’s north face, climbing down into the unknown. Mercifully, we made it to the bergschrund, a 35-foot chasm separating us from the relative safety of the Palisade Glacier. We rigged the last rappel of the day on a tongue of rock above the maw, sliding down the rope, over the gap, onto the firm snow of the lower glacier. After touch-

Volume 02

ing down, we trudged across the moonlit snow, making a quick camp on a sandy ledge near the base of Mt. Gayley. We slept until the sun woke us for the hike out. California’s Palisades are a beloved and infamous range, featuring serious alpine terrain, sustained technical climbing, glacier travel, and surpassing views of the entire Sierra Nevada. The most famous section of the group encompasses five 14,000-foot peaks, a continuous and relentless ridge linking together Thunderbolt, Starlight, North Palisade, Polemonium, and Mt. Sill. This traverse, known as “Thunderbolt to Sill,” is most often linked over three to four days, camping in the basin and sleeping on the ridge. Along with my partners Jonny Morsicato and Charlie Firer, I had just tried - and failed miserably - to complete the route in one day. Well, as the saying goes, the best climbers have short memories. So it wasn’t long before I found myself longing for the cold embrace of the Palisades once more, dreaming of the exposed backbone of the Sierra, tracing my hands across featured granite under the warmth of the California sun. This time, we made some tweaks to the plan, setting up a truck at two trailheads to straighten out the route and

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION ONE

avoid late-season snow climbing. Charlie had left for Bozeman, so we looped in local crusher and SAR member Dane Mulligan, hoping his long reach and permanent stoke would come in handy on the ridge. We started by headlamp, knocking out the approach miles swiftly as the Palisades loomed on the horizon, soaring black walls looming on the horizon. Before I knew it, I was roping up for the technical summit block of Thunderbolt Peak, making a few greasy moves with 3,000 feet of air under my feet. I quickly lowered off as Jonny and Dane assaulted the summit, and we set our sights on Peak 2: Starlight, with its unique milk-bottleshaped summit. After what seemed like interminable scrambling up the knife-edge ridge, we busted out the rope again. This time, Dane took the lead, making quick work of the moves to the laptop-sized summit, flexing while he stood atop the tiny block. Jonny and I quickly followed suit, and we all lunched on some salami and cheese before moving on, thrilled that the most difficult climbing was now behind us. North Palisade and Polemonium Peak cruised by smoothly; we were in the groove now, shouting with joy as the beautiful vistas peeked around craggy corners, granite

flakes creaking under our weight as we flew down the ridge. Rather than waste time looking for easy passage, we rappelled a few steep chimneys. Our tiny alpine ropes left me hanging in space, twisting like a spider on a string, as the glacier creaked and yawned below, heat-activated rockfall clattering across the basin. Nearing the finish, the terrain opened up, angle lessening as we navigated toward the fifth and final 14,000-foot peak of the day, Mt. Sill. Dane in the lead, we romped across the third class blocks to the summit, dropping our packs a few hundred feet below and relishing the weightlessness, the joy beyond joy of pure movement in the mountains. The descent from Sill was loose and dangerous, vertical dirt interspersed with microwave-sized rocks, and some firm snow thrown in for good measure. Carefully, we navigated through the minefield, arriving at the safety of the lower glacier in high spirits - the end was in sight. As it always does, the sun began to dip below the horizon, casting that familiar hazy palette across the range, the snow, the smiling faces of my friends. We picked up a trail and turned on zombie mode for the long hike out as darkness enveloped us again, arriving at Dane’s truck for a total time of 17 hours, 42 minutes.

LIVE WILD | 15


SECTION ONE

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION ONE

WHERE WILL YOUR NEXT ESCAPE LEAD YOU? Amanda Stelter

Some many places to see, so little time. With the endless option of adventure destinations, it can be overwhelming to decide where it is you want to go next. Why not let us choose for you?

LIVE WILD | 17


SECTION ONE

FOR THE HIKING ENTHUSIAST Fo u r P as s Lo o p - A s p e n , C o lo r a d o Four Pass Loop, nestled in the beautiful Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness in White River National Forest, is a 27mile loop that features stunning alpine lakes, fields of wildflowers, and breathtaking mountain views from beginning to end. The trail takes you through staggering peaks such as West Maroon, Frigid Air, Trail Rider, and Buckskin of the Elk Mountains traverse. Hikers can trek along these 12,000-foot peaks and down into peaceful forests with the route typically taking three to four days to complete. To extend your adventure and take in more of the wild landscape, hikers can diverge from the loop to Geneva Lake and Willow Pass. Many recommend hiking the loop in a clockwise direction up West Maroon Valley for a less steep approach.

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION ONE

FOR THE AVID BIKER Th e W h ol e Enc h ila d a - M o a b , U t a h This well-known trail is regarded as one of the best mountain biking trails in all of Utah. The Whole Enchilada clocks in at around 26 miles and begins at 10,000 feett with an elevation gain of 1,400 feet before taking an epic descent. This trail also includes several others, such as Burro Pass, Hazard County, and Porcupine Rim. This trail offers it all, cruising through wooden forests, wide-open prairie land, and aside glistening alpine lakes. This technical trail will take you through a steep and treacherous single track until you find yourself beside the Colorado River

LIVE WILD | 19


SECTION ONE

FOR THE RELAXED WANDERER Sa v an n a h , G e o r g ia Not all adventures have to be strenuous; it’s absolutely necessary to escape for a relaxing and slow-paced experience. Oftentimes, adventures like these allow us to learn about and experience a place like we may not be able to when we’re busy challenging ourselves. Gain a new perspective while touring the famous Telfair Art Museum, take a trip to nearby Tybee Island for a relaxing ocean day, get up close with nature while kayaking the Savannah marshes, cruise along the Savannah River on a grand riverboat, and take a relaxing stroll through Forsyth Park. With plenty of nature and city escapes alike, in addition to homemade ice cream shops and craft breweries, there is no shortage of ways to embrace a relaxing adventure.

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION ONE

FOR THE FEARLESS CLIMBER Po t r er o C h i c o , N u e v o L e ó n Any seasoned climber has long known about the renowned Potrero Chico nestled in the Mexican state of Nuevo Leon. Limestone walls towering as high as 2,000 feet, some requiring 20 pitches, entice climbers from far and wide to try their hand at these impeccable routes. The approach is an easy 10-minute walk from camp, and nearly all the walls are bolted, making for a sport climbers paradise. Most of the routes are ten pitches or more with good bolts and hardly any runouts, and routes range primarily from 5.8-5.12 in grade with some 5.6 and 5.13 available. Sources recommend 15-20 quickdraws and one or two 70-meter ropes to give you access to any route you pursue. There are plenty of routes to easily keep a climber busy for a week. Don’t close yourself off to just climbing though. Venture into the town of Hidalgo and explore the biweekly central market to stock up on food and experience the fairlike atmosphere.

LIVE WILD | 21


SECTION ONE

FOR THE SNOWBIRD J a ck s o n H o l e , W y o min g Whether you’re looking to snowboard, alpine, or cross-country ski, Jackson Hole offers something for every winter sports enthusiast. Whatever you may be on the hunt to tackle: steeps, chutes, groomers, or hidden powder caches, you can find it all here. Resorts such as Jackson Hole Mountain, Snow King Mountain, Grand Targhee, and White Pine all come with their own special features. Jackson Hole Mountain is a technical option for avid snow adventurers looking for a challenge, while Grand Targhee is a safe option for families who are seeking a fun escape in the snow. Wherever you choose to stay and explore, there will no doubt be jaw-dropping views to keep you in awe.

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION ONE

FOR THE ADRENALINE-JUNKIE Al as k a S k y d i v e C e n t e r – P a lme r , A laska When you think of an adrenaline-pumping activity, what comes to mind? For us, jumping out of a plane thousands of feet up in the air takes first. Wouldn’t you agree? The experience of throwing yourself out of a moving plane is one thing, but the views you see on the way down are a whole other priority to consider. Most people don’t make it a habit of skydiving, so it’s important to choose the right place when you do! Views of the Alaska wilderness from Earth are alone to make anyone tear up, but to descend upon the icy and mountainous landscape with views from above and below is truly a remarkable sight to see. According to the Alaska Skydive Center, the views on a clear summer day are unparalleled with Mt. McKinley, the Denali range, and Knik glacier in plain sight all around you.

LIVE WILD | 23


SECTION TWO

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION TWO

YOUR BRAIN ON NATURE: 5 INCREDIBLE WAYS NATURE IMPACTS US Amanda Stelter

At this moment, close your eyes and think about how you feel when you are outdoors. How you feel when the sun warms your skin, the breeze softly blows your hair, the birds sing sweet melodies, the water envelops you in a refreshing embrace. You might be smiling now, or at least sense the tiniest bit of comfort deep within. This is not a feeling by chance, nor is it unique unto you. Our brains are as wild as the flourishing forest, the untamed river, and the never-ending ocean. As curious beings, it’s not enough for us to plainly enjoy the feelings nature brings about in us; we want to know why. Why does nature make our hearts swell with happiness? Why does the wild have a way of putting things into perspective for us? We’re done wondering, it’s time to understand more fully the ways nature can make us better human beings.

LIVE WILD | 25


SECTION TWO

1

I M M E DI ATE MO O D BO OST E R It doesn’t take a lengthy camping trip or full-day outdoors to feel the effects of nature on our emotions, but quite the opposite. According to a study published by the Journal of Positive Psychology, just 5 minutes spent in nature can improve our mood. In the study, 123 university students were placed in either an outdoor setting (a park on campus) or an indoor setting (a windowless laboratory room), asked to put away all electronic devices, and sit silently for five minutes. Students were asked to score a range of emotions, such as comfort, pleasure, and gratitude before and after the 5-minute session. Results showed that students sitting outdoors experienced an increase in all of the previously mentioned emotions after the session, unlike those students in the indoor setting.

Volume 02

2

R E DUCES SY M PTOM S OF DE P R ESS I ON AN D DE M E N T I A We have all experienced the feeling of weightlessness that comes when we are outdoors among the sunshine, bird songs, and gentle breeze. It is not hard to imagine, then, that these things found in nature can bring us peace of mind and body, and increase mental strength concerning dementia. A study of the effects of nature images and sounds on elders with dementia resulted in improved engagement and reduced disordered behaviors. Overall, this study showed the potential to increase the quality of life of those with Alzheimer’s. Growing evidence has shown that the benefits of nature on those with Alzheimer’s can be grouped into three categories: improved emotional state, improved physical health, and an improved sense of well-being.

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION TWO

LIVE WILD | 27


SECTION TWO

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION TWO

3

B R I N G P EO PL E TO GE T H E R There’s something about being immersed in the peace and quiet of nature that helps conversation flow more easily and surpass the surface level we often limit ourselves to abide. We dive deeper into each other’s thoughts, laugh more genuinely, and appreciate wholly. In the outdoors, we let our walls down and, without noticing it, are more inviting of others into our space and lives. According to a 2016 critical review, the existence of green space in a community can promote social cohesion and group activities, and children’s activities in such spaces enhance social development, and much more. When we disconnect from our phones to be fully present, we listen more deeply and enjoy the moments of silence in the sweet company of others.

4

A 2012 study found that after completing a 4-day backpacking trip, hikers were 47% more able to solve creatively-demanding puzzles than participants in a control group about to embark on the same hike. The study explains this occurrence may be due to the brain being activated differently when our senses are submersed in natural surroundings versus more urban and industrial settings.

5

I N CR E AS ES S E LF-AWAR E N ESS Anyone who has spent quality time outdoors is familiar with the energizing and freeing feelings nature brings about within. The outdoors has a way of bringing us back down to earth and opening our eyes to the reality of our circumstances from a realistic perspective.

EN H AN C ES C R E AT I V IT Y When we remove our attention and minds from the influence of those around us and the distraction that is technology, our minds are lighter. In nature, free from distractions and the opinions of others, we can truly be ourselves. Our attention shifts from that which lies outside of us, to our own ideas and opinions inside of us.

A 2010 study published by Social Science and Medicine found that even people surrounded by just a two-mile radius of green space were less impacted by daily stressors and better able to cope with demanding and stressful situations in their lives. By disengaging ourselves from the influences of the world around us, we can better listen to ourselves

LIVE WILD | 29


SECTION TWO

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION TWO

WILD WAYS OF HOW DIFFE CULTURES FIND AND CELEBRATE

ESCAPE: RENT PEACE IN, THE WILD

Alexandra Ruffo

From ancient times, cultures have understood nature as an incredible life-giving force and sought to honor this through customs and celebrations. While once abundant globally, as society continues to evolve into more modern, tech-driven environments, some of these events have become lost. Read on for some of our favorite traditions that have survived the test of time and are still currently practiced. We hope to inspire you to visit these cultures and draw inspiration for ways you too can get back to the wild and show Mother Nature your appreciation for all things natural and free in this world.

LIVE WILD | 31


SECTION TWO

SHI NRIN YOKU, J A P A N Shinrin Yoku, translated as forest bathing in English, is a practice the Japanese discovered in the early 1980s and use as a cornerstone health remedy to reduce stress, anger, anxiety, and sleeplessness. The belief is that physically connecting to nature, through means such as a short walk, nature will revitalize and restore your mind, body, and soul. While this concept is still relatively new to the western world, it’s been gaining momentum for its practice of simply getting outside and letting every sight, sound, scent, and sensation wash over oneself for everyday healing.

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION TWO

CONNEC TI ON T O L A N D, A US T R ALIAN IN D IG ENO U S CU LT U R ES Relationship with the land remains fundamental to the identity and way of life to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (ATSI), otherwise known as the Indigenous people of Australia. Rather than viewing land as something to be owned, a home, or a commodity, ATSI people see the land as owning them. In their culture, land is a mother figure, who’s health is important to preserve and protect. This belief has contributed to an extraordinarily sustainable way of life, as ATSI people have lived in complete harmony with nature for more than forty thousand years.

LIVE WILD | 33


SECTION TWO

F RI LUFTSL I V , N ORWA Y The key to happiness in Norway is simple: get outside. The word the Norwegians use to describe this love and appreciation of the outdoors is Frilufsliv, which is a fusion of the words free, air, and life, and signifies a fundamental understanding of the healing effects of nature. The Norwegian concept of Friluftsliv, today used across Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, was coined in 1859 by writer Henrik Ibsen, according to Mother Nature Network (MNN). It is believed that the practice can make a big difference in mental health as time spent outdoors has shown a direct correlation to decreased depression. This concept is so widely believed, and time spent outdoors is of such great importance that Friluftsliv is taught in schools.

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION TWO

BA BA M A RT A DA Y, BUL GA RI A You’ve likely heard of the Cherry Blossom festivals in Japan, but have you heard of Baba Marta Day, also known as Granny March Day in Bulgaria, which takes place every year on March 1? To celebrate, attendees wear and exchange white and red-colored gifts made of string, typically bracelets, called martenitsas to ward off Baba Marta, who, according to legend, is an old woman who controls whether or not spring and good weather come soon. Those adorned with martenitsas are spared her wrath of more winter and remove their martenitsas only once they see a tree in bloom. The symbolism between the colors chosen and the act of removing the martenistas by tying it to the tree spotted represents a wish for good health and prosperity for the rest of the year.

LIVE WILD | 35


SECTION TWO

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION TWO

EMBRACING THE PAST TO ADAPT IN THE PRESENT Ryan Riggins

LIVE WILD | 37


SECTION TWO

My heart was racing at a million miles an hour as I gazed motionless at a massive lighting storm occupying the horizon. Flashes of lighting synced with a spike in my adrenaline, a rush of anxiety dominated my senses. It sounds like a display reserved for a far-flung destination or remote land, but I was standing in Golden, CO. A place I had become well accustomed to over the last grip of years skiing in the mountains, climbing on the rocks, and drinking in the bars. But, two years earlier, a seed had been planted in my mind of an opportunity I wanted to give myself. The goal was simple— quit my job, sell my stuff, move out of my house, and cast off to destinations unknown-- leaving it all behind to indulge in the romanticized lifestyles I had been consuming through my phone over the last couple of years. I flashed back to getting towed behind a defender on a sled in Iceland, swimming with sharks on a remote coast off Panama, and dodging lightning bolts in the Canadian Rockies. All adventures in the archive of my memories that were collecting dust. I craved a fresh perspective and a renewed feeling of freedom to satisfy the urge to explore. I wanted to exchange day-to-day realities of grocery shopping, working, and scrolling for open-air markets, “funemployment,” and dazzling spectacles. But, having spent the better part of a year rambling through Central and South America with a detour to New Zealand for a couple of months, I was not naive to the reality of the idealized traveler. It wasn’t a lifestyle populated exclusively by rainbows and sunshine. It could be lonely, uncomfortable, and sometimes even scary. You’re a stranger in a strange land, all day every day; however, despite the hardships, I knew the triumphs would occupy more real estate in my memories. The seed that had been planted two years earlier had now matured into a plant, ripe with opportunity. I had saved everything I felt I needed, and the optimal time to leave was approaching.

Volume 02

Poised, eyes locked with strobes of lightning emanating from a dark cloud, I never thought the hardest part would be actually deciding to go. Later that evening, I purchased my ticket, and two days later on a rainy afternoon, I put in my notice. Almost immediately, a weight was lifted off of my shoulders. For the next 10 months, the world was my oyster. I touched down in over 10 countries, hopscotching over three continents—walking across Spain, surfing in Indonesia, riding motorcycles in Vietnam, partying in Bangkok, and so much more. It was a trip of a lifetime, and I wanted to share it with everyone. I started a blog called “paidinsunsets,” I devised a plan to post photos regularly and made sure I had a respectable camera to capture such important moments. After a couple of months abroad, I started to have a change of heart. A war waged in my mind about the benefit of putting so much effort into sharing my experiences. I wanted to simplify, indulge wholeheartedly in the experience for myself, and be sure I didn’t miss a minute of it. In my core, I felt a sense of guilt contributing to the “FOMO” that has chronically infiltrated the open office floor plans of our lives. The incessant need to share began to strip away the feeling of authenticity of my global escapade. I had a raw, unfiltered experience that was unfolding in front of me, and yet I was willing to spend an unnecessary amount of time experiencing it through a screen. It seemed my obligation shouldn’t be to friends and family at home, but instead to myself to make the most of an opportunity many only dream of having. I ceased to post on social, or contribute to my blog— instead, using that time to wander a bit further or stay out a bit later. But, I hadn’t given up on documenting my travels, so with a camera always in tow, I forged ahead.

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION TWO

This time with a re-oriented compass of priorities, I continued to capture the highs and lows of life on the road but reserved the frozen frames for myself to look back on at a later date. I continued to lead a life of wonder and heartache for another six months until, organically, I felt the call of friends and family percolate through me. After 10 months away on a February evening, I touched back down in San Francisco on my parents’ anniversary to surprise them. It was a cool, clear evening as I walked from the train station up a winding hill in the suburbs to my childhood home. As I walked in silence illuminated by the moon, I reflected on what I had just done. I was proud of my willingness to accept the risk and bet on myself, despite being unsure of what lay on the other end of this nebulous journey. I had grown so much, met so many people, and lived so many memories my heart was brimming. As I swung open the door, I felt the heat cascade over me and the elated reactions of my arrival begin to unfold. I was overwhelmed with a sense of satisfaction. I had lived my dream, reminded myself what I was capable of, and my soul was once again filled with wonder and energy.

It’s this energy that has helped propel me through the tumultuous times of our current reality. Adjusting from pure freedom to quarantine could have been crippling, but I still had my health, happiness, and gainful employment. For all of these things, I was thankful. I continued to avoid indulging in the freeze-frame spectacles accessible from the phone in my pocket. I was where I wanted to be and didn’t need to fantasize about an alternate reality anymore. I sought responsible connections with friends and the feeling of being grounded for the first time in a long time. Having been all over the world, I came to appreciate that my home was still one of my favorite destinations. And so, as a pandemic waged in the background and disrupted our realities, I refocused my lens on the local opportunities to explore new places out my back door. I started the new adventure of learning to thrive in a restricted reality and began to get the hang of it. Of course, it’s not a reality I would have picked for myself, but making the most of it has proven to be my best option. With that being said, until the travel ban is lifted, and I can once again cast-off to foreign lands with exotic tongues, I will stay local exploring what my immediate surroundings have to offer.

LIVE WILD | 39


SECTION THREE

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION THREE

WILD BY THE MILE Amanda Stelter

LIVE WILD | 41


SECTION THREE

We feel it the second we escape from the crowded city and break free into wide-open rolling hills, speed down long stretches of highway flanked by golden prairie grass, and wind between terrifying, yet at the same time, comforting mountains towering above. We feel it when we find ourselves standing in a place we’ve never existed but somehow feel right at home in the unfamiliarity of our surroundings. This feeling that rises from deep within us spreads to our faces bringing the corners of our mouths to a cheerful grin, causes our hearts to swell and minds to race with dreams of all that’s to come, is none other than freedom. The freedom of the open road is like no other. Time spent on the road, whether it be for hours or days, by sun or moon, in favorable or unfavorable conditions, teaches us patience and understanding. We cannot so easily leap from one end of the country to another but must slowly take in and adjust to the landscapes and ways of life as they come upon us. We stumble across communities that inspire and, at times, may even humble us. Our perspectives can’t remain stagnant, for our minds to remain closed, for our eyes to remain fresh behind rose-colored glasses. The open road brings along its own struggles, but the rewards far outweigh the obstacles in the road. I have always been drawn to road trips over plane flights. A small part of me is afraid of missing out on

Volume 02

sights unseen by passengers in the clouds, but even more so, I want to experience it all. The hardships and delights alike are welcomed. I have only just begun to roll over the pavement of the thousands of miles of road stretching all across the country, through sardine-packed highway lanes of Los Angeles and desolate backroads of Nevada - I embrace each with a full and grateful heart. I am right in the center of where I want to be, down below with every walk of life. As I look around at what we have become as a society, it doesn’t take long before I come to realize we have fixated on efficiency so much as to rule the process of pleasure as an inconvenience. The eager traveler tells himself happiness lies at the destination point; how quickly can I get from point A to point B? What the traveler fails to realize is little growth stems from jumping straight into paradise from mundane life. We should, given we have adequate time and freedom, seek to endure the unseen landscapes and ways of life that, at times may take our breaths away and other times leave us feeling unfulfilled. Hitting the open road is all a part of the process for seeing this planet and its inhabitants in a form so raw and real, we cannot help but get caught up in the simplicity of it.

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION THREE

LIVE WILD | 43


SECTION THREE

WILD READS TO INSPIRE A WILD MIND Amanda Stelter

Though we may not always be able to escape to the wild physically, we can surely give our minds the means to escape into an environment separate from our reality. We hope that each of these books helps to transport you to a new way of life, an unfamiliar adventure, and provide a thrilling and calming experience. By reading another’s tales of adventure and overcoming, we too can inspire our minds to accomplish exactly that.

FOR THE BACKPACKING ENTHUSIAST

“ W ild ” b y C h e ryl Strayed It’s safe to say most people in the backpacking community are not strangers to Strayed’s story, retelling her experience hiking a portion of the Pacific Crest Trail. If you’re looking forward to, or are interested in, the process of thru-hiking any one of the trails composing the triple crown (PCT, AT, or CDT), then this book is the honest and humble perspective you need.

FOR THE PHILOSOPHICAL NATURE LOVER

“ W a lk in g ” b y Henry Davi d Thoreau Most of us don’t give the simple act of walking a second thought, we blindly allow our bodies to take over until we find ourselves having traveled from point A to point B. Some might say this work by Thoreau is similar to his writings in Walden. It ponders the seemingly casual action of walking, but all too intentional meditation of putting one foot in front of the other with a loose sense of direction.

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION THREE

FOR THE SURVIVALIST

“ T o u c h in g t h e V oi d: The True St ory of One M an’ s M i racul ous S u r v iv a ” l b y J o e Si mpson If you’re in search of a story to keep you flipping pages and perched on the edge of your seat, then look no further than “Touching the Void.” Follow Simpson’s journey as he goes from climbing in South America to nearing death on multiple occasions. This book will have you wondering ‘how in the world?!’ and will make your heart skip a beat.

FOR THE WANDERING SOUL

“ T r a v e ls w it h Charl ey” by J ohn Stei nbeck Another classic, “Travels with Charley” is the story of Steinbeck’s journey across the backroads of America with his poodle Charley in their camper, Rocinante. Follow this witty and comforting story as Steinbeck wanders from New Jersey to the region of the Pacific Northwest, and through the deep south before finally looping back home. A story of true people, unheard-of places, and everything in between, this is a book that will warm your wandering heart.

FOR THE PERILOUS EXPLORER

“ B e y o n d t h e T rees” by A dam Shoal ts Told by the world-renowned explorer, Adam Shoalts, comes the story of his solo trek nearly 2,500 miles across the harsh Canadian arctic. For a perspective of the arctic wilderness many of us will never experience, this is the perfect book to gain a new perspective and appreciation for the wildly beautiful and terrifying splendor of mother nature. As the author of the popular adventure blog Voyageur Tripper so perfectly says, “I found the book to read kind of like an elaborate love letter to the wilderness.”

FOR THE LOVE OF CLIMBING

“ A n n a p u r n a : A Woman’ s P l ace” by A rl ene Bl um This book is the first-ever account of mountaineering from a female perspective. Follow this passionate, twist-turning, and honest story of thirteen women who flee from the bustling city of San Francisco to the Himalayan mountains in Nepal in hopes of being not only the first Americans but the first females to summit the world’s tenth tallest mountain, Annapurna.

LIVE WILD | 45


SECTION THREE

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION THREE

BUSINESS IN THE BACKWOODS Amanda Stelter

LIVE WILD | 47


SECTION THREE

Saving the planet lies not only on the shoulders of the consumer, but also businesses themselves. There are many ways to preserve and protect our planet, from mindful recycling to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and any effort is better than no effort at all. Wildway has always had a passion for the outdoors, so it comes as no surprise that we try to be mindful of the ways our business impacts our environment. The type of packaging we use, where we choose to source our ingredients, reducing food waste, and so much more, is at the center of our priorities. While many efforts to save the planet and better our environment are simple changes in practice, others are quite the opposite. One of the biggest changes we strive to accomplish is transitioning our packaging from non-recyclable to one less wasteful. Initially, we had the idea to skip recyclable packaging completely and go straight to the best and most effective packaging, compostable; however, we quickly realized this would be no easy feat. Compostable packaging requires that oxygen be able to penetrate the packaging, making this an unviable option since our granola cannot be exposed to oxygen or it will go bad more quickly, as with all-natural perishable foods over time. Although we’ve experienced our share

Volume 02

of roadblocks, we’re determined to find a better solution for the outdoors we love and hope to preserve. A huge recent accomplishment was Wildway’s partnership with Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation (TPWF). We had many great experiences trekking through our beloved Texas parks, and we’re grateful to be able to pour back into them in any small way we can. Our most recent seasonal flavor, Wild Blueberry, is our small token of gratitude for all that the parks have given us over the years. Ten percent of sales from our seasonal Wild Blueberry Grain-Free Granola, and seasonal flavors from here on out, will be donated to the TPWF to contribute to their mission of giving everyone access to wild places for peace and adventure. The giving doesn’t stop there. We also installed a feature on our website that allows customers to round up their purchases to donate excess funds to the foundation. We believe that every small act culminates to make a big difference, and at the end of the day, giving back to the places that feed our wild selves is what fuels us most. If you have an idea for how we can lend mother nature a helping hand through our business practices, we would love to hear what you think!

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION THREE

“ we’re determined

LIVE WILD | 49

to find a better solution for the outdoors we love and hope to preserve


SECTION THREE

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION THREE

GET BACK TO THE WILD CHECKLIST

To return to the wild looks a little different for everyone, but it involves everyone. The wild is accessible to anyone, so we encourage all to dedicate less time to being entranced by screens and more time to getting outdoors challenging yourself to grow. If you’re not sure where to begin, we’ve come up with some ideas to get started. Whatever brings a smile to your face, light to your heart, and fresh air in your lungs is worth dedicating time and energy to.

LIVE WILD | 51


SECTION THREE

TAKE A WA L K I N YOU R FAVO R IT E PAR K REN T S T A N D UP P A DD LEB O AR D S O R K AY AK S AND PAD D LE YOUR N E A RE S T RI V E R O R LAK E TAKE A WE E KE N D C AM PING T R IP TURN OF F YOUR P HONE FO R A W H O LE D AY DEDI C A T E A C OUP L E O F H O U R S EVER Y W EEK T O PICK IN G UP T RA S H I N YOUR N EIG H B O R H O O D / LO CAL PAR K SUMMI T T HE N E A RE S T M O U NT AIN HAMMOC K I N A N E W PAR K Y O U ’ VE B EEN W ANT ING T O VIS IT C RE A T E A BOUQUE T FR O M FLO W ER S PICK ED DU RI N G YOUR P A RK S T R O LL FLOA T A N D S WI M I N T H E NEAR ES T R IVER , LAK E, O R O CEA N LEA RN A N E W S KI L L O U T D O O R S FLY A KI T E REA D A BOOK F ROM C O VER T O CO VER GET C RE A T I V E I N T HE K IT CH EN -C OOK YOUR F A V ORIT E D IS H

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION THREE

P AC K A P I C N I C OF YO U R FAVO R IT E FR U IT S AN D S N ACK S A ND HE A D T O T HE P A R K BI KE YOUR F A V ORI T E T R AILS O R S T R ET CH O F R O AD EN J OY A F ORE S T BA T H ING S ES S IO N IN Y O U R B ACK Y AR D GROW A N HE RB GA RD EN TA KE A WA L K A N D S K ET CH AN Y T H IN G T H AT C AT C HE S YOUR E YE SPE N D A DA Y HI KI N G Y O U R FAVO R IT E PAR K GO F OR A N E V E N I N G D R IVE T O S T AR G AZE P R E S S F L OWE RS , GRAS S ES , AND FEAT H ER S C O L L E C T E D ON A P A R K S T R O LL TA KE YOUR P UP F OR AN EVEN IN G W ALK P R A C T I C E WA KI N G A ND G O ING T O S LEEP EAR LIER TURN OF F A L L S C RE E NS B Y 8 P. M . P AI N T ROC KS

LIVE WILD | 53


SECTION FOUR

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION FOUR

RECIPES: FUEL AROUND THE FIRE

Retreating to the outdoors doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice flavor for comfort. We strongly believe real ingredients and wholesome recipes are possible wherever you may find yourself, deep in the forest, high on the mountains, out at sea, and the like. These are easy camping recipes for every adventure. Simple ingredients that won’t break the bank and will make your heart feel full heading into or after a long day of exploration. So, gather around the fire in good company, and fuel your body the right and wild way.

LIVE WILD | 55


SECTION FOUR

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION FOUR

SIMPLE 4-INGREDIENT BANANA PANCAKES Ingredients:

Instructions:

2 Bananas, mashed

1. Separate the yolks and the egg whites into two separate small containers.

4 Eggs

2. In a large bowl, whisk together egg yolks, bananas, almond flour, and baking powder. In a separate bowl, whip egg whites for 5 minutes until stiff peaks form.

1 1/2c. Almond flour 1 tsp Baking powder

3. Gently fold the whipped egg whites into the batter until evenly combined.

1 tbsp Cinnamon TOPPINGS: Wildway Grain-Free Wild Blueberry Granola, fresh fruit, maple syrup, nut butter

4. Lightly grease a large nonstick pan with coconut oil and heat the pan over medium-low heat. Pour 1/4-c. batter onto the pan and cook until each side is lightly golden. 5. Stack pancakes and top with Wildway Wild Blueberry Granola and your other favorite toppings!

LIVE WILD | 57


SECTION FOUR

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION FOUR

ESPRESSO GRANOLA BOWL Ingredients:

Instructions:

1/4c. Wildway Grain-Free Vanilla Bean Espresso Granola

1. In a small bowl, add yogurt and smooth into an even layer. Top with your preferred sliced fruit: berries, chopped apple, sliced banana, whatever your heart desires.

1c. Yogurt 1 tbsp Chia seeds TOPPINGS: fresh fruit and nut butter

2. Sprinkle Wildway Vanilla Bean Espresso Granola on top and drizzle on a little nut butter. 3. Pop a spoon in and enjoy.

LIVE WILD | 59


SECTION FOUR

Volume 02

No.11

fall 2020


SECTION FOUR

BLUEBERRY BANANA HOT CEREAL PARFAIT Ingredients:

Instructions:

1 packet Wildway Blueberry Flax Hot Cereal

1. In a small pot, bring nut milk or water to a simmer over medium heat. Once simmering, add in mashed banana and cinnamon. Stir until well combined, then lower heat.

1/2 banana, mashed 1c. Nut milk or water

2. Cook hot cereal until it begins to thicken, then turn heat off and remove the pot. Add in mixed berries and stir gently.

1 tsp Cinnamon 1/4c. Wildway Grain-Free Banana Nut Granola TOPPINGS: seeds, nut butter, more fresh fruit

3. Pour hot cereal into a bowl and top with remaining sliced banana and Wildway Banana Nut Granola. Add on your choice of seeds and nut butter. Take a bite and enjoy!

LIVE WILD | 61


Copyright Š 2020 Wildway, LLC The information contained in the magazine is intended to provide broad understanding and knowledge of health and nutrition topics. This information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation, or advice from your physician or other healthcare provider. We recommend you consult your physician or healthcare professional before beginning or altering your personal exercise, diet, or supplementation program. Opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of ownership or management. No liability is assumed by Wildway, LLC regarding any content in this publication.

Profile for Wildway

Live Wild Magazine // Fall 2020  

Explore the topic of getting back to the wild with new trip ideas based on the type of adventurer you are, dive into the world of other cult...

Live Wild Magazine // Fall 2020  

Explore the topic of getting back to the wild with new trip ideas based on the type of adventurer you are, dive into the world of other cult...

Profile for wildway

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded