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Nelson and Marlborough’s magazine /

ISSUE 126 / JANUARY 2017 / $8.95

BIKING BOOM thousands take to two wheels

Interview Liam Malone Wildboy Brando

Glamping

Galley Must-Haves

Sailing in Picton Holden Colorado

Canada beckons Kereru Gallery


Creating stylish outdoor rooms One thing Kiwis are great at is outdoor entertaining. Spending so much time outside over summer means we are now seeing the importance of creating great outdoor spaces. Like any room, when designing these areas it’s a great idea to start from the ground up. Surfacedesign offers a large collection of beautiful outdoor porcelain tiles for decks, patios, courtyards, the garden and poolside delivering the look you are after along with excellent technical performance to stand up to our weather conditions. •

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NELSON 03 546 7832


for sale

2

3

2.5

Designed by Paul Richards

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Total Area 205 sqm This single level contemporary home has been specifically designed to maximise the potential views and northern orientation for passive solar gain. This simple floor plan is ideal for family living, with great indoor/outdoor flow. The drive-through garage provides extra parking/ storage space for the trailer or small boat. The entry lobby and internal access provide a nice feel when entering the home. The open plan living area is functional and practical and has rustic qualities provided by the fire/chimney and recessed bookcases. The black & white kitchen is complemented with a utilty room combo of scullery and laundry. Fully tiled bathrooms, quality fittings, built-in wardrobes and eco credentials further reinforce that this home is something unique and special.

David Reid Homes Nelson Tasman Region Contact Melissa for a viewing. P. 021 855 481 54 Sanctuary Drive, Marsden Park E. melissa.richards@davidreidhomes.co.nz 0800 000 007 | davidreidhomes.co.nz


Nelson and Marlborough’s magazine

Features Issue 126 / January 2017

38 “I don’t really believe my own hype. I’m just a goofy dude from Nelson who just runs in circles and reads books.”

22 The Interview: Liam Malone

L I A M M A L O N E , PA G E 2 2

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eoff Moffett talks to Nelson’s heroic Paralympian about the past, the present and the future

26 Biking boom

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wo wheels is the trendy way to get around, as Phil Barnes discovers while looking into the burgeoning biking industry across the Top of the South

34 By bike or boat

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xplore the Top of the South by bike or boat, suggests Lynda Papesch

38 Going glamping

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uxury and indulgence are top of the list for today’s glampers, writes Brenda Webb

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Columns Issue 126 / January 2017

INTERVIEWS

20 My Big Idea Cyclist Craig Harper explains why he’s attempting to break the length of New Zealand cycling record with his Long White Ride

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82 My Education Wildboy Brando Yelavich believes life is one big adventure so NMIT’s Adventure Tourism programme was the natural thing to do, he explains to Stephen Berg

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ACTIVE FASHION

45 Fashion Styling by Kelly Vercoe Photography by Ishna Jacobs

52 Men’s Style A look at what's in store for fashionconscious men

68 Travel Alex Gradeen writes about a place where she is right at home - Canada

70 Adventure Inspiring the next generation of sailors in Picton is up to a Brit, says Sophie Preece

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71 Boating LIFE

54 My Home A new home built for the views combines old and new to stunning effect. By Marine Apap

60 My Garden Make it easy on yourself with holiday home gardens, writes Lynda Papesch

64 My Kitchen An easy-to-make Strawberry and Peach Galette from Nicola Galloway

65 Dine Out Restaurant reviewer Maxwell Flint recommends Mahana for a quality meal in quality surroundings

66 Wine Make it Mahi wine for depth and character suggests Phillip Reay

67 Beer If you want to slake your thirst for beer knowledge this summer, Alice Galletly’s How to Have a Beer is a good place to start, says Mark Preece 6

Sailing can be a breeze with the proper instruction, writes Steve Thomas

72 Motoring Holden’s new Colorado makes overtaking and hill climbs a breeze, while around town it’s surprisingly easy to wield through roundabouts, says WildTomato motoring writer Geoff Moffett

CULTURE

74 Arts Mapua artist Karen Walters sculpts works that strongly reflect the vitality of nature and her connection to it, as Lynda Papesch explains

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76 Music Show us the money, says Pete Rainey, expounding on arts funding in the region

79 Film Watching Paterson could be compared to sipping brandy – both have a warming after-effect and make you reflect on life, writes reviewer Eddie Allnutt

REGULARS

8 Editorial 10 Bits & Pieces 12 Events 14 Snapped 75 Gallery Must-Haves 78 Quiz


Proud sponsors of the Adam Chamber Music Festival Gala Dinner, Mahana Estates 2 February 2017

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Shop 1, 295 Trafalgar Street, Nelson +64 3 539 0216 nzsothebysrealty.com Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Browns Real Estate Limited (licensed under the REAA 2008) MREINZ.

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Editorial

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Get on your bike this summer and see for yourself why biking has become so popular.

elcome to a new year. Hopefully you’re all out there relaxing, enjoying family time and catching up on some of the exciting activities and events in the Top of the South. If you’re short of ideas, we have a few we can highly recommend in WildTomato’s January issue. Biking or cycling for instance, whether it is a gentle family ride along an established track, or a more adventurous blast on one of the hard-out trails in our regions. The Top of the South is fast becoming a mecca for biking and the benefits of that are far-reaching. From bike retailers to tourism operations, accommodation suppliers to restaurants, the ‘industry’ has a flow-on effect across an increasing range of businesses, creating yet another dimension to the Top of the South’s economy. Adding to the dynamic is the number of international biking events being organised here, bringing worldwide exposure and lots of active visitors to our regions. My advice: get on your bike this summer and see for yourself why biking has become so popular. Whole new areas have been opened up across Nelson and Tasman and in Marlborough, allowing far greater access to the scenic wonders of places such as The Sounds, Abel Tasman and Kahurangi National Park. Often bikes can go where vehicles and boats cannot, making such ventures into the wilderness so much more exciting. While we’re on the subject of our spectacular outdoors, many have jumped on the glamping trend during the last two years, heading back to camping-style holidays with added luxuries. Soft beds, fine dining and glamourous settings are top of the list, whether in a tent, a retro caravan or a cute shack. Again, this is proving a welcome boost for tourism ventures across Nelson, Tasman and Marlborough, and a ripple effect for the economy. I have to mention what was arguably the biggest news in New Zealand last month, the sudden resignation of Prime Minister John Key, and the selection of Bill English as his replacement. Being head honcho for more than eight years has been no easy task and, mostly, John Key has gained international respect for his political performance, not to mention generating worldwide publicity for New Zealand with other causes, antics and gaffes. Think flags, modelling and pony tails! He’s a hard act to follow. The timing of his resignation also allows voters to gauge his replacement’s performance well before the next general election. So much is happening and it is exciting to be part of the changes. My New Year’s resolutions include keeping WildTomato a great read for its 39,000 readers, both in print and online. Happy New Year and relaxing reading everyone. LY N D A PA P E S C H

Editor

Lynda Papesch 021 073 2786 editor@wildtomato.co.nz

Manager

Laura Loghry 027 378 0008 laura@wildtomato.co.nz

Design & art direction Cover image: Anka Martin on Nydia track by Sven Martin

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Floor van Lierop Klaasz Breukel thisisthem.com

Sales Excecutives

Subscriptions

$75 for 12 issues Chrissie Sanders 03 546 3384 027 540 2237 chrissie@wildtomato.co.nz wildtomato.co.nz/ subscribe Thelma Sowman 021 371 880 Readership: 39,000 thelma@wildtomato.co.nz Source: Nielsen Consumer and Media Insights Survey Resina Bradley (Q3 2015 - Q2 2016) 027 525 3875 resina@wildtomato.co.nz

Publisher

Jack Martin WildTomato Media Ltd Bridge St Collective 111 Bridge St Nelson 7010 PO Box 1901 Nelson 7040 info@wildtomato.co.nz wildtomato.co.nz


CONTRIBUTORS

Selling your home?

Eddie Allnutt Film

Phil Barnes Feature

Sadie Beckman Stephan Berg Business My Education Profiles

Get maximum exposure with Property Press. With over 742,000* nationwide readers each week, you can be sure you're reaching the biggest pool of potential buyers.

Klaasz Breukel Design

Patrick Connor Maureen Ad design Dewar Proof reading

Maxwell Flint Dine Out

Ana Galloway Photography

Nicola Galloway My Kitchen

Alex Gradeen Travel

Ishna Jacobs Photography

Floor van Lierop Geoff Moffett Design Interview, Motoring

Mark Preece Beer

Sophie Preece Adventure

Pete Rainey Music

Steve Thomas Boating

Kelly Vercoe Fashion

Amber Watts Ad design

Phillip Reay Wine

Brenda Webb Feature

Get in front of serious property hunters. Ask your real estate agent about Property Press, New Zealand’s favourite property magazine.

Also available online at www.propertypress.co.nz

*2,177 members of the HorizonPoll national panel, representing the New Zealand population 18+, responded to the survey between 27 June and 12 July 2016. The sample is weighted on age, gender, employment status, education status and ethnicity. The survey has a maximum margin of error at a 95% confidence level of Âą2.1% overall.

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BITS & PIECES

LETTERS

A GOOD CAUSE

Dear Editor,

New dolphin & whale watch app

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ocals on the waters and along the beaches in Nelson, Abel Tasman and surrounds are being recruited to help fill in knowledge gaps of our enigmatic, endangered little Hector’s dolphins. A free phone app has been developed by Wellington company ThunderMaps, in conjunction with Gemma McGrath, Whale & Dolphin Conservation consultant. Photos can be uploaded instantly with the app, which is called ‘Hector’s Dolphin Sightings’. The app enables you to record other whale and dolphin species too. Hector’s dolphins are the smallest dolphins in the world and are unique to our coasts. Little is known about their local movements in the Top of the South. Recent aerial surveys sighted three Hector’s in Golden Bay and there is a resident population of about 20 or so in Queen Charlotte Sound. Hector’s dolphins are also sometimes seen off Nelson’s Boulder Bank, the Abel Tasman and other parts of the Sounds. “Locals are excellent citizen scientists. You’re out observing the environment every day. With correct species identification, you can provide real scientific data. Hector’s dolphins are very distinctive from other dolphins. There’s nothing pointy about their fins, they’re very smooth and rounded. All other dolphin species have pointed fins. It’s now really fun and easy to report sightings, at the touch of a few buttons,” says McGrath. Every dolphin sighting is important. Data will be co-managed with DOC, universities and other scientists to assist in dolphin conservation and local knowledge gaps. Remember, dolphins are taonga, treasured species and should be treated gently, with respect. If you’re on a boat, approach them slowly, at a no-wake speed, from behind.

I enjoyed your article on heritage buildings in the December issue. Nelson and Marlborough both have some amazing old homes, as well as the commercial and civic buildings, that have survived countless decades, rebuilds and tenants. Luckily we still have enough people who prefer the benefits of restoration and renovation rather than demolition, although I can understand the cost factor influencing many decisions. For those of us who have travelled overseas, especially around Europe, looking at heritage buildings is often a valuable part of the experience. Imagine if someone decided to bowl Notre Dame Cathedral, or get rid of Rome’s Colosseum because of the cost of its upkeep. The world would be that much poorer. Money isn’t the only factor that needs to be taken into account.

Frances Anderson

WHERE DO YOU READ YOURS?

CONGRATULATIONS

The winner of the WildTomato reader giveaway of the Dyrberg/Kern bracelet from Shine, is Juliet Partington, from the Waterymouth Café in Blenheim. 10

Gina Piper reads her WildTomato, hand-delivered by family from Nelson, in Christchurch where she lives. Send your image to editor@wildtomato.co.nz ONLY .JPG FILES ACCEPTED, MIN. 1MB


HAVE A GO! and try out the e-bike that suits your lifestyle. No one needs a car. All our transport needs can be met by one of our bikes! We have some that can fit mum and three or four kids, even some that can carry groceries!

We have a great range of all styles of bikes and mobility scooters. Come on in and let's talk bikes.

REMEMBER IT'S

BETTER with BATTERIES 61 Queen St, Blenheim Phone: 03 578 0433

bikemarlborough.co.nz 11


EVENTS

JANUARY EVENTS NELSON/TASMAN Tues 3 to Fri 6

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Fri 20 to Sun 22

Nelson Jazzfest

Evolve Festival

Four days of music, showcasing some of New Zealand’s finest jazz musicians playing a range of styles. Opening concert features ‘Sing Sing Sing’, Tom Rainey’s Hammond Organ Quartet, The Nelson Big Band, Cover Me and Django Schmango. Full programme at nelsonjazzfest.co.nz

Evolve offers a broad programme featuring over 60 free workshops and seminars, 100+ exhibitors and live music and entertainment. Camping available onsite. FOUNDERS HERITAGE PARK

Thurs 26 London Klezmer Quartet

FOUNDERS HERITAGE PARK

Tues 3

Tues 10 to Wed 18   

Summer Movies Al Fresco - HELP!

A Midsummer Night’s Dream  

Head to the region’s airiest cinema for one of the classics, Help! (1965) G, 92 mins, featuring cult members, mad scientists, sacrificial rings and The Beatles.

An evening of comedy and romance in a beautiful outdoor location with Shakespeare’s most loved play. 6.30pm start. Suitable for the whole family. FAIRFIELD HOUSE

TAHUNA BEACH HOLIDAY PARK

Thurs 5 Richter City Rebels Blending RnB, soul, hip-hop, jazz and funk with the heart and soul of New Orleans brass band music. FAIRFIELD HOUSE

Fri 6 & Sat 7 Gary McCormick and Paul Ubana Jones An intimate show featuring the comedy styling of Gary McCormick in an off-the-cuff stand-up comedic routine and the electric acoustic soul jams of Paul Ubana Jones in an evening of laughter and the blues. THE PLAYHOUSE CAFE

Fri 13, 20 & 27 Tahuna Summer Sounds Two stages, three epic nights. Live music returns to Tahunanui Beach this summer with the finest local bands and musicians performing on three Friday evenings. Also beachthemed sports, games and interactive challenges. If wet, rescheduled to the next day (Saturday). TAHUNANUI BEACH RESERVE

Fri 20 Parcel of Rogues Tastes of alternative country, bluegrass and folk with a sprinkling of Celtic spices form the band’s sounds. Supported by Pretty Tricky Pony, a (mostly) two-piece act latterly from Wellington, performs originals and covers, old-time bluegrass and country music through to post punk and pop. THE BOATHOUSE

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The toe-tapping and tearforming tunes of the almostlost folk music of Jewish Eastern Europe. Starts 7.30pm.

Rattlesnakes, Easy Pieces and Mainstream albums, along with tracks from his first four solo albums. THEATRE ROYAL

Sun 29 Sarau Festival A late afternoon festival celebrating the fabulous Moutere Valley, its people and the NZ black currant growing industry. Interesting stalls, artisans, workshops and events, along with music, food and beverages. MOUTERE HILLS COMMUNITY CENTRE

FAIRFIELD HOUSE

Sat 28 to Mon 30 Top Gun Mountain Bike Weekend This fantastic trilogy of mountain biking has a focus of finding the best overall rider ‘Top Gun’ and features many of Nelson’s world renowned trails. NELSON & SUBURBS

Sat 28 Lloyd Cole Bringing his classic songbook tour to NZ, Lloyd Cole will perform material from the

Luminate

Sun 29 The Mockers Kiwi legends The Mockers reform their classic line-up for their first NZ tour in 30 years! Look forward to hits like Forever Tuesday Morning, Swear It’s True, One Black Friday, My Girl Thinks She’s Cleopatra, and so many more - all performed by the classic line-up of Andrew Fagan, Brett Adams, Geoff Hayden and Tim Wedde. THEATRE ROYAL


MARLBOROUGH Sat 7, 14, 21, 28

Sat 7

The Nelson Market

Hopai Sports Day

A vibrant showcase of regional arts, crafts, fashion, jewellery, fresh local and organic produce.

An old-fashioned family day out for everyone to enjoy, heading by boat to Hopai. Take a picnic lunch, swim suits, deck chairs, sunshade, suntan lotion and get ready to participate or just be a spectator. A sausage sizzle, small bar, drinks and ice creams available.

MONTGOMERY SQUARE

Sun 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Motueka Market

Arts, crafts, food and drink, along with fresh local produce and entertainment, every Sunday morning. DECKS RESERVE CARPARK, MOTUEKA

Wed 4, 11, 18, 25

Nelson Farmers’ Market Local fresh produce and products from throughout the Top of the South.

HOPAI BAY, PELORUS SOUND

Sat 7 UB40 Red Red Wine Tour UB40, featuring the original members Ali Campbell, Astro and Mickey Virtue, bring their successful Red Red Wine Vineyard Tour to Marlborough. VILLA MARIA MARLBOROUGH

MORRISON SQUARE

WINERY

Wed 1 to Wed 8 Feb

Fri 20 to Sun 22

Luminate

Interislander Summer Festival Blenheim Trots

A vibrant festival of cuttingedge live and electronic music, visual and performing arts, inspirational knowledge sharing and pioneering environmental initiatives. Numbers are capped at 5000 with a total of 3500 tickets. Visit luminatefestival.co.nz CANAAN DOWNS, PIKIKIRUNGA, GOLDEN BAY

Thurs 2 to Sun 5 Feb Nelson Buskers Festival Street performers from around the world take to the streets of Nelson for four days of actionpacked shows. Buskers from the USA, Canada, Britain and NZ. Visit nelsonsummer.nz ASSORTED VENUES

London Klezmer Quartet

Swap your high heels and suits for shorts and jandals, gather the kids and head along to the trots. WATERLEA RACEWAY, BLENHEIM

Sat 28 Sweet Az Sun Fest This daytime family orientated festival includes #1 charting NZ artist Kings (Don’t Worry Bout It), plus from Holland, voodoo electric soul funk tribal blues trance live band My Baby, plus Chch reggae/ soul artists Soulsystem plus Nelson electronica maestro Alion, Blenheim Rockquest stars Havasnak and at least three more major NZ bands. From noon till 8.30pm. LANSDOWNE PARK

Sat 7

Sat 7, 14, 21, 28

King and Queen of the Withers

Marlborough Artisan Market

Starting from 7.45am till 11.30am, you can run or walk this popular 10k hill race in the Wither Hills Farm Park, Blenheim. Great views over the town across to Taylor Pass and a challenging but fun course attract participants of all abilities, from first timers giving it a go to some of New Zealand’s top runners.

Food, coffee, jewellery, preserves, veggies, art, crafts, woodwork, pottery and more.

WITHER HILLS FARM PARK

Sat 21 Picton Maritime Festival From 11am till 11pm, the Maritime Festival is a day to spend with your family and friends. Chat, eat at the yummy food stalls and just chill out and listen to the fantastic line-up of entertainers from all over NZ. Halo will be back this year from Auckland. Also featuring a huge variety of family friendly activities, static displays, water activities. Fireworks at 10pm.

WYNEN ST, BLENHEIM

Sun 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

Marlborough Farmers’ Market Freshest seasonal fruit, vegetables and produce, locally grown and sourced food, sold by the producer. A&P SHOWGROUNDS

Sat 4 Feb The 5th Annual Healthy Bastards Bush Pilot Champs New Zealand’s premier national short take-off and landing and precision landing competition. Starts 10am. Participants must register at marlboroughaeroclub.co.nz MARLBOROUGH AERO CLUB

PICTON FORESHORE

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Snapped

WildTomato goes out on the town…

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WildTomato Christmas party The Suter Art Gallery, Nelson P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y A N A G A L L O WAY

1. Craig Taylor, Jan Taylor & Simon Duffy

5. Nicole & John Hogan

2. Michael Bortnick, James Wheatley, Matt Lawrey & Eddie Allnutt 3. Scott Dodd & Steve Kelso

6. Emilie Scrase, Rebecca Dawson, Sophie Lafotanoa & Tatiana Sklyamina 7. Laura Loghry, Pic Picot & Anne Rush

4. Teresa Waring

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5 Starts 3pm, see you there! What’s on this year at the Sarau Festival? Find out at saraufestival.co.nz $5 per adult, children free

Sunday 29 January 2017 th

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Moutere Hills Community Centre, Moutere Hwy, Upper Moutere. FREE ONSITE PARKING

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S NA P P E D

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8. Rachel Boote

13. Sharon Sendall

9. Tony Bowater

14. Russell Campbell

10. Amanda Kane, Sally Shaw & Allan Innes-Walker

15. Thelma & Alistair Sowman

11. Grant Maxwell

17. Kimberly Bortnick & Lynda Papesch

12. Eddie Allnutt

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16. Jessica Bouchut

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Offering you experience, expertise and one to one personal service.

03 548 3440 www.havenpm.co.nz Property Management is more than just collecting the rent

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HiLo Fashion Show Bowater Hyundai, Nelson P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y A N A G A L L O WAY

1. Talia Ellison, Delia Collins, Indyah Madsen, Jan Arnold & Donna Costello 2. Michael Newton 3. Hannah Nott 4. Danielle Ashdown 5. Claris Jones-White & Olivia Nott

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6. Anthea Shearer 7. Hitomi Nagahama 8. Kellie Todd, Jen Bossellman & Donna Costello 9. Miranda Monopoli & Rebecca Collier

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10. Lucy Upton & Jessica Bouchut 11. Peter Howe & Alana Riley

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03 545 0038 | 022 411 4727 | WWW.LYNNCROSSLAND.CO.NZ | ASH.LYNN@XTRA.CO.NZ

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S NA P P E D

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2 Lynfords Furniture Outdoor Expo Lawsons Dry Hills, Marlborough P HO T O G R A P H Y BY JA N E T OP P

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1. Scott, Katie & Pru Adams

5. Ray & Diane Corbett

2. Melissa Wills, Shane Tapp & Katie Wills

6. Lorraine Nicholls & Geoff Taylor

3. Dan Taylor, Sienna Miranda-Taylor & Patricia Miranda- Taylor

7. Sandi Lock, Tania McCaa & Vanessa Evans

4. Austine Thompson & Stella Greenwood

8. Georgia, Colette & Sam Marfell

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“I love the outdoors, and now I can see the detail it’s even better...” “I had my HD LASIK® with Dr Kent eight years ago giving me amazing eyesight, being able to do the things I love without the hassle of glasses makes all the difference. I have also had the pleasure of working with clients at Fendalton Eye Clinic, helping them achieve a life changing vision experience.”

Ernest Smolej Clinical Co-ordinator Phone or book online for your free laser assessment available in Christchurch & centres throughout the South Island Christchurch • Invercargill • Dunedin • Queenstown • Nelson

focus your future Fendalton Eye Clinic 10 Otara Street, Fendalton Christchurch, www.Lasik.nz

0800 4 LASIK 0800 45 27 45

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NZ Cider Awards Founders Park, Nelson

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVE HUSSEY

1. James Ostergren

7. Beata Kelly

2. Paul Donaldson & Matt Kamstra

8. Jody Scott & Greg Small

3. Alix Muir & Hamish Jackson

9. Caroline Peckham

4. Jarrod Robinson

10. Nicola Kidson

5. Jordan Spinks & Alan Spinks

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6. David Macintosh, Hamish Jackson & Rachel Gilmore

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10 Nelson Premium Property

TA L K TO T H E TA L E N T E D T E A M

More experience than most at working with buyers and sellers in the premium end of the Nelson and Tasman property market. If you have a ‘significant’ home or property requirement in Nelson or Tasman check our website first. www.nelsonpremiumproperty.co.nz

ROB WALLACE

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S NA P P E D

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Insite Host the Kiwi Pair Insite, Nelson P HO T O G R A P H Y BY I S H NA JAC OB S

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presents

7. Mark and Robyn Cessford & Bob Monopoli

2. Ange Mudgway

8. Justin Fletcher

3. Richelle Taylor

9. Evander Currie

4. Chester Gaskin

10. John van der Schootbrugge & Mark Cessford

5. Brian Egerton 6. Eric Murray & Eddie Mold

11. Ian Ord, Mitchell Mayne-Ord & Jo Ord

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7 6 LLOYD COLE

1. Hamish Bond, Lynette Goulding & Eric Murray

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MOCKERS PLUS1, PHANTOM & THE SOUND PRESENT

REUNION TOUR OF CLASSIC LINE-UP AFTER 30 YEARS AWAY!

NEW ZEALAND TOUR 2017 PLAYING HIS CLASSIC SONGBOOK 1983-1996

SATURDAY 28 JANUARY THEATRE ROYAL TICKET DIRECT

Details at PLUS1.CO.NZ | LLOYDCOLE.COM

SUNDAY 29 JANUARY THEATRE ROYAL TICKET DIRECT

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MY BIG IDEA

THE LONG WHITE RIDE

Cyclist Craig Harper is on a mission called The Long White Ride. He explains more…

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hat is your Big Idea? The Long White Ride is my attempt to break the length of New Zealand cycling record. It is a solo ride with vehicle support. The current record stands at four days and 19 hours, set by Colin Anderson in 2007. The training has been going to plan and I’m starting to feel stronger than ever on the bike. I am extremely excited and counting down the days to leaving Cape Reinga on February 20. Why do you do it? I don’t know if this comes to people naturally or you develop it. Some call me crazy or stupid. Everyone asks why. My explanations differ, depending on the day or mood I’m in. Often I laugh with them and sometimes try to explain the beauty of riding in the middle of the night with a sky full of stars. My rowing coach used to say: “Those that do it can’t explain. Those that don’t do it, don’t understand.” It seems to sum up a few things nicely.

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What’s involved? There have been two sides to organise, with the arranging of sponsorship and fundraising, along with the biking logistics including gear, support crew and route. I have been fortunate to have some good support in this initial build-up, and while I have been searching for local businesses to sponsor me and get behind the cause, I have also secured some great donated services to aid me, like Garden City Helicopters, who will fly me across Cook Strait and into Picton to save precious time. The clock doesn’t stop from Cape Reinga to Bluff, so good planning will be key. We have managed to lock in a fundraising evening prior to the ride, and I am using social media to help spread the word, drum up support and provide updates. We will even have live GPS tracking during the ride for supporters to follow. Because of the recent earthquake, it looks unlikely the east coast section of SH1 will be an option. That’s just added to the challenge as far as I am concerned and my exact route will probably not be decided until closer to the time.

Who will it benefit? I am undertaking the challenge with added motivation, because I am supporting the KiwiCan programme, run by The Graeme Dingle Foundation. One of four programmes run by the Foundation for our youth, KiwiCan is in over 70 schools nationwide and works specifically with primary school children teaching values such as integrity and respect through fun, physical, mental and creative challenges. It is a great programme that is close to my heart, with two primaryaged daughters myself. It is expanding in Marlborough and I hope to help fund this valuable programme’s growth. I am also using my ride to help promote the new Marlborough Road Safety Stride ‘n’ Ride challenge, getting more kids walking or riding to school. How can we help? Look out for my upcoming ride on Facebook and support the kids on our Givealittle page. facebook.com/thelongwhiteride givealittle.co.nz/longwhiteride


BUSINESS PROFILE

and is again showing its commitment to progress, innovation and technology by bringing this product type into its portfolio. Currently though, Vantage windows and doors are one of the company’s most popular mainstream lines. As New Zealand building and housing designs have evolved, so has the Vantage range, and it now incorporates a huge variety of options, with the scope to select specialised features within each category type.

“We have been in Nelson for 12 years, but if you add up our industry time, our team offers over a hundred years of experience.”

Front-runners in windows and doors BY SADIE BECKMAN P HO T O I S H NA JAC OB S

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indows can really make or break a building, so to speak. Whether residential or commercial, top-notch windows that are designed for optimum aesthetics and functionality make a huge difference. Insite is a Nelson company that has been recognised as an industry leader since its very inception. Offering a portfolio of market-leading window and door design in aluminium – with PVC available soon – Insite is at the forefront when it comes to expertise in windows and doors. Insite is run by directors Mark Cessford and John van de Schootbrugge. Mark says the business offers clients decades of experience. “We have been in Nelson for 12 years, but if you add up our industry time, our team offers over a hundred years of experience,” he says. “We pride ourselves on supplying windows and doors that are pleasing to the eye while adding value and enjoyment to your home or commercial property, using only superior materials and

employing skilled and experienced staff.” Insite supplies residential window and door systems from Vantage, Smartwood and the Architectural Series, as well as undertaking a huge variety of commercial projects. The company is located in purpose-built premises that reflect its commitment to supplying top-quality aluminium window and door systems. Potential clients are welcome to visit the Stoke base and see these products for themselves. Whatever window or door type you are after – awning, casement, sliding, bifold, overhead, custom or pretty much anything you can think of – Insite will be able to find a solution. PVC windows, which the company will offer from later this year, are a relatively new phenomenon in New Zealand, although John says anyone who has lived in Europe will probably have experienced them. Known for their superior thermal properties, they are an excellent option for noise reduction and eliminating condensation. Insite will supply Klima brand PVC windows

There is even a thermally efficient ThermalHEART option for climatic situations where interior comfort and full insulation are required. In these products a thermal insulator is cleverly included around each window and door to ensure that cold transfer is minimised and interior warmth retained. This powerful enhancement, combined with doubleglazing, makes for the ultimate in sensible year-round living. Mark says he admires Vantage as a supplier because they back high performance not only in windows and doors, but in New Zealand’s best sportspeople too. “Vantage is the main sponsor of star Olympic gold-medallist rowers Eric Murray and Hamish Bond,” he explains. “We were lucky enough to have them visit our premises for a barbecue recently as Vantage ambassadors, and we’d really like to thank them for dropping by.” You might not be lucky enough to catch a glimpse of a famous face yourself should you decide to drop into Insite, but both Mark and John assure you that the faces you will see are friendly, experienced and highly skilled in helping you with the design, supply and installation of the perfect window or door solution for your project, whether big, small, commercial or residential.

Contact insitenelson.co.nz Phone: 03 547 0562

21


Interview

Photo: Getty Images

Liam Malone stole the nation’s heart at Rio with his athletic prowess and his goofy humility. Nelson’s favourite son tells Geoff Moffett of the personal tragedies that forged such a unique personality. 22


LIAM MALONE

THE MAKING OF A CHAMPION T

he sheer single-mindedness of Liam Malone to change my prosthetic limbs causing my legs to bleed. And all without himself from a hard-drinking, bad-diet ‘typical student’ any external encouragement day-to-day apart from my own into a double-gold Paralympic medallist in three years is will,” Liam says – without a trace of self-pity. the stuff of comic-book superheroes. Once he hooked up with coach James Mortimer, a former This Nelson 22-year-old with dancing ‘blades’ and 200m New Zealand sprint champion, and moved to Auckland, self-effacing wit made himself a household name at the Rio Malone started to add speed in readiness for Rio. “He was the Paralympics. guy who really fitted the accelerator.” Gold medals in the 400m and 200m – including beating The blueprint might involve building superb fitness, Oscar Pistorius’ games record time in the 200m – and a silver strength and endurance, then adding running technique, but in the 100m were just reward for the hard work, bleeding leg Liam’s winning edge is his resilient inner-strength forged stumps and lonely, twice-daily training that he forced himself from life struggles. Like Oscar Pistorius, Liam was born with to endure. fibular hemimelia, where the fibula bone is missing. Both legs Liam’s rise to international stardom was also a personal were amputated below the knee when he was 18 months old. redemption. He set a deliberate plan to The Stoke boy who went to Nayland find his way out of a ‘dark place’ following College was pushed into Paralympian the death of his mother after her six-year sports by his parents. He didn’t like it, “I had no idea if I could be battle with bowel cancer. and especially didn’t like the ‘disabled’ fast or not. I just worked at “I needed to get out of that, give tag, but he gave it a determined go. it six days a week, twice a myself some skills to do something and to Inferior prosthetic wooden legs often day for three years.” also change my external environment.” broke and he suffered the taunts of LIAM MALONE So he looked around at things he could other students. Because he hated do – and settled on running, with the aim running, he preferred rugby and of becoming a Paralympian. Here’s the cricket (“I was pretty crap.”) and tried funny part of that – he was pushed into sports by his parents triathlon – where he was beaten by future star Paralympian but hated running and was taunted by bullies at school. So did swimmer Sophie Pascoe – snowboarding, mountain biking and he have some natural talent for athletics back then? skydiving. “No, not really. I just realised that if I worked really, really At Canterbury University, struggling for a way out of his hard there was probably an okay chance of success.” And he depression, Liam rediscovered running. He harnessed the certainly wasn’t fit. Student life at Canterbury University media to help. Generous New Zealanders donated $20,000 to featured lots of drinking and late nights. buy him a set of carbon-fibre blades. The gutsy teenager had Liam, however, possesses a practical, methodical and no way to back out now – he had to justify the faith the public totally organised side to his personality. “I didn’t get into it had shown. because, like, running will be fun. I got into it because it would Liam’s determination shines through when you talk to provide a platform for opportunities. I had no idea if I could be him. His confidence heading to Rio was high – even though he fast nor not. I just worked at it six days a week, twice a day for wasn’t touted as a likely podium finisher. He’d finished fifth three years.” and sixth in world championship events the year before, so did By this time, he had shifted to Wellington to attend he feel he was a realistic medal chance in the three Rio sprints? Victoria University. He is about to graduate with a Bachelor “Absolutely. I would have won world champs as well of Business degree, majoring in marketing and international but I went there with broken blades. The carbon fibres had business. His tutors are no doubt proud of his business-like essentially sprung apart and frayed and when that happens the approach to turning himself into an athlete. The first task was energy return is much lower.” to become supremely fit. Liam calls that phase ‘building the At Rio he had upgraded to the same high-performance gas tank’. blades as other athletes, and it showed. “Then it was really just this year that we put the Liam came from nowhere to finish second in the 100m – accelerator on and just focused on speed. It was a really, really the day of his mother’s birthday – and then went on to win tough three years and for two of them I was in Wellington by gold in the 200 and the 400 in a heart-stopping finish. myself, training by myself, facing innumerable problems with His raised arms, head nods and steely eyes before the 23


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Biking proved no obstacle, playing rugby from a young age, clowning around, supporters at Rio OPPOSITE PAGE: The elation of winning (photo: Getty Images)

races marked him out as supremely confident. But forget any stereotypes of machine-like arrogance. Post-event interviews revealed Liam’s warm, funny side. In fact, he thinks running is a slightly ridiculous occupation. “I don’t hype myself up. I realise I’m just one evolutionary pedestal above monkeys, essentially, and I run round in circles for a living. I’m just a normal guy.” Such deadpan humour and a straight-forward personality helped to make him a huge Rio favourite. Has his new-found success and popularity changed him? “Not that much,” says Liam, who was straight back into study at Victoria after the Games. “People think all of a sudden there’s been this massive transition and then you have a whole new life, but it’s just not how it is. I’ve just been carrying on with what I did before – training and uni.” Life is a little easier now and he won’t have to rely on handouts from his greatest supporter, dad Murray. On the back of his Rio success, Liam now receives a $60,000 salary from High Performance Sport New Zealand, and sponsorships are looming. “Progress is slow on that but there are cogs turning.” Liam has taken on Nick Cowan, the manager of Valerie 24

Adams and others, as his personal manager to help realise some commercial revenue – $60k doesn’t go far in Auckland, he says. His diary is filling with engagements as a speaker at conferences, school award nights and more. He had a speaker’s gig at the Vodafone Music Awards. Liam wants to start his own businesses but is also keen to get into media work, acting and stand-up comedy. When you look at his Rio and post-Rio performances, he should be a natural at stand-up and has some gigs lined up in Britain next year when he goes there for the world athletic championships. So where does he sees himself in five or 10 years? “Ten years I’d be 32 – that’s a long way out. I’d say two or three kids, obviously a wife, and hopefully have started multiple companies and done stand-up. If I’ve done most of those things, I’d say I’d be pretty happy.” With his university marketing training, Liam realises he can leverage his profile to motivate other amputees. Running is one activity he’ll highlight. “It’s a very good first step to building self-confidence – realising you are capable of way more than you previously thought. You stop making excuses for things. “The most important thing about sport is that you build a


“I’m not saving lives. I’m not running an innovative company. I don’t have employees relying on me. I just try to put one leg in front of the other real quick …” LIAM MALONE

“Sophie (Pascoe) is an absolute beast of an athlete. She throws a lot of chat at me about how she’s still better than me, and she, you know, stabs a few holes in the heart and brings back some bad memories, but she’s awesome.” LIAM MALONE

skillset that you can take into other parts of life. Athletes tend to have the ability to transition quite well into careers and business, provided they’re academic as well.” Although now based in Auckland, Liam relishes his Nelson roots. He was home briefly for a hero’s welcome in early October, fighting back the tears during an emotional civic ceremony. Gifted the key to Nelson City in front of hundreds of fans – young and old alike – he then took the time to write autographs, pose for selfies and chat with his fans. Thanking Nelson, he says no other city gave him the funding that his hometown did. “These medals are just as much yours as they are mine and I think that you should all take pride in how you have backed me,” he told the crowd at the civic ceremony.

A more relaxing return trip home followed in December for a couple of weeks, heading to Abel Tasman National Park, getting out fishing on the bay and doing some hiking. “Nelson Lakes is my favourite place in the world. If I’m ever really stressed that’s where I go. It’s where we had a family bach until I was in my teens, and that’s my happy place.” Nelson also means being home with his father and friends. “I’ve been fortunate in having good family around me. My dad pretty much backs me in everything. I decide what I want to do and then my family and friends basically just say, ‘Go for it’. Liam also says his mother’s long battle with cancer and her fortitude in dealing with it ‘inspires me every day’. After his Nelson Christmas time-out, it’s back to training in Auckland, preparing for the national track-and -field champs in Hamilton in March. Liam has a fearless prediction for that event. “I’ll break the 400 metres New Zealand record.” That’s the able-bodied record he’s talking about. He ran 46.2s to break the Paralympic record in Rio, and the NZ open record is tantalisingly close at 46.09s. He’s training hard to beat it. You can’t help feeling that if Liam Malone is determined to achieve a goal, he will reach it. 25


Biking

TWO WHEELS ON FIRE

26


The humble bicycle is now the stylish way to travel in Nelson and Marlborough as recreational and sporting riders crank up their notso-humble machines. Phil Barnes surveys the wave. PHOTOGRAPHY BY SVEN MARTIN

C

ycling is booming across Nelson and Marlborough. Riders of all ages are cruising on urban cycleways, climbing into the hills, commuting to work and school, or testing themselves in the growing number of cycling events and races. The numbers speak for themselves: More than 208,000 cyclists were recorded on Tasman Great Taste Trail counters in 2015, up 10 per cent on the previous year, and 2016 will surpass that. An average of 10,000 riders a year used the Dun Mountain Track in Nelson over the last five years. The Nelson Mountain Bike Club has doubled its membership in the last two years. The tally stands at more than 1800 and is expected to reach 2500 soon. Cycling events such as Marlborough’s Grape Ride, which takes place on March 4, have become so popular that it is now limited to 2500 competitors. Marlborough’s Santa Cruz NZ Enduro in March has attracted competitors from 15 countries, many of them elite professionals. Last December the inaugural Abel Tasman Cycle Challenge attracted 600 entrants. A new $2 million velodrome at Saxton Field in Nelson should be open by late summer. Daniel Duknjak, of Avanti Plus in Blenheim, also reports strong growth in demand for electric bikes. Retired or semiretired people are interested in buying e-bikes for leisure, but people also want to use them to commute, he says. “We also get many rental requests from visitors wanting to use them to tour round the vineyards.” Daniel says there are now many cycling events in Marlborough. The biggest is the Grape Ride, which follows a 101km course starting in Renwick, passing by Blenheim and Picton and through 35km of the Marlborough Sounds along Queen Charlotte Drive before finishing back at Renwick. Brent Ackroyd, of Bikefit Marlborough, has seen substantial growth in customer demand since he started operating five years ago. Visitors from all over want to hire bikes, ‘and the (Marlborough District) council is putting in more and more trails, cycleways and cycle lanes, which is also helping create the growth’. So why has cycling become so popular? Elizabeth Bean, trustee of the Nelson Tasman Cycle Trails Trust, says it is partly to do with the wonderful facilities in the region – high-quality mountain bike park tracks such as Codgers, Sharlands, the Hira

“It goes through fern-clad beech forest and it’s unlike anything most people have ever raced before.” – S V E N M A RT I N , N Z E N D U R O ­C O - O R G A N I S E R

Forest, Silvan Forest, Kaiteriteri and soon, world-class facilities at Wairoa Gorge. The Top of the South’s Great Taste Trail, Dun Mountain Track and Queen Charlotte Track are three of just 22 trails designated as Great Rides nationally. Elizabeth says 108km of the planned 175km Great Taste Trail circuit is now complete, including the coastal section between Nelson and Kaiteriteri. The trail is ideal for family riding as it is on gentle Grade One and Two tracks. Ongoing issues with landowners and funding make a completion date uncertain, but it should be finished by 2020. The Fringed Hill gondola proposal, which is currently at the feasibility study stage, would give riders easy access to the summit of the 800m hill just outside Nelson, and would further enhance the area’s attraction. Meanwhile, the Saxton Velodrome, a joint project between the Nelson City and Tasman District Councils along with the Saxton Velodrome Trust, is nearing completion. Trustee Rob Ford says the 333m banked outdoor track should be finished this summer. There will also be an inner warm-up track and learn-to-ride area. The velodrome will be available for recreational use as well as club training and regional and national competitions. 27


Anka Martin reaching the West Coast on the Heaphy Track that stretches from Golden Bay to the West Coast through the Kahurangi National Park

MOUNTAIN BIKING DRAWS TOURISTS

Alex Mackenzie who works at Nelson outdoor sports store Torpedo 7, says Nelson is a ‘hidden gem’ for mountain bikers. Along with Queenstown and Rotorua, Nelson has become one of the main areas that visitors head to when they come to New Zealand. Nelson is only one of six places worldwide to have been given a gold rating from the International Mountain Biking Association and Alex says this is bound to attract a lot of enthusiasts as they research New Zealand riding options on the Internet. The biking boom is also boosted by the huge hours of work building trails by voluntary organisations such as the Nelson Mountain Bike Club. Secretary Paul Jennings says the club maintains about 100km of tracks and has built four new trails this year. It has 200 active volunteers who do this work but he says maintaining so many tracks as well as building new ones is not sustainable as a voluntary effort. The club has taken out a one-year lease through the company RHL NZ on the privately-built mountain bike park at Wairoa Gorge near Brightwater. Once health and safety regulations are worked through, the park should be open in January. “It comprises 70km of beautiful handmade tracks so it is pretty unique globally,” Paul says. “The run from the top to the bottom descends for more than 1000 metres through native bush, with a beautiful rushing clear river at the bottom. I don’t know anywhere else in the world with that kind of topography and high-quality trails.” Building and maintaining the tracks has cost big money, so using this world-class facility isn’t cheap. People will need to join the club, then pay a $45 membership upgrade fee, plus $95

28

each day they use the park. Paul says 95 per cent of the club’s members are local but people are now joining from Wellington, Auckland and Christchurch because they want to access riding at the gorge. The growing number of cycling events in the region is another major drawcard for visitors. The mountain bike club organises about 40 events a year, including the annual midwinter, six-hour Rabbit Island race, which attracts more than 400 riders, and the Coppermine race held each February over the Dun Mountain Track, which draws 200-400 competitors.

RACING DOWN PRISTINE TRACKS

NZ Enduro organisers Sven and Anka Martin say demand for their March 10-12 event is so heavy that most people have to enter by lottery. About 30 places have been reserved for professional riders, out of a capped muster of 140 riders. “We wanted to have a mix of amateurs rubbing shoulders with the pros and this is what makes it so special,” Sven says. The event is unusual as it is held on Department of Conservation land in three venues around Marlborough: Whites Bay, the Nydia Track and the Wakamarina Track. “It’s not like you are doing all your runs down the same hill,” says Sven. “It’s a real adventure and on some of the best pristine trails in the world. They are riding through single tracks in native forest, not on specially-built mountain bike tracks. That’s unique and a huge drawcard to the rest of the world.” On the final day competitors are shuttled by helicopter to the top of the Wakamarina Track. They then take part in a threestage race on ‘an iconic Kiwi track’ down to the valley. “It goes through fern-clad beech forest and it’s unlike anything most people have ever raced before. It’s something that is a quintessential Kiwi experience.”


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ABOVE: Riders leave Nydia Bay in the distance on the Nydia Track BELOW: Suspension bridge crossing on the Heaphy Track

PATHWAYS ROLLING OUT

So is there sufficient infrastructure in place to cope with this surge in cycling? Robin Dunn, Marlborough District Council reserves and amenities officer, says New Zealand Transport Agency funding is helping the council with three urban cycle developments. These include a proposed shared cycle/pedestrian pathway close to the railway line between Picton and Blenheim. The section between Spring Grove and Blenheim is already complete, with the remainder in the assessment stage. Other projects involve an extension, widening and upgrade from gravel to concrete of the Taylor River track. A plan for a further cycleway or cycle lanes connecting two busy roads between schools in central Blenheim is also underway. Off-road projects include upgrading the Queen Charlotte Track to reduce the steep sections and make it more user-friendly. Another major project is the Link Passway between Havelock and Picton. The 40km trail will mainly follow Queen Charlotte Drive but will be higher up on the dry north-facing slopes that offer spectacular views. The track, some of which follows a 150-year-old bridle path, is half-completed and should be finished in 2020. Robin says the Marlborough Mountain Bike Club is working on tracks in Wither Hills Farm Park and Victoria Domain in Picton. “They work in conjunction with the council as it is on council land, so we help with design and planning, signage and track maintenance.” In the Nelson region, however, Bicycle Nelson Bays coordinator John-Paul Pochin says that while progress has been made in urban infrastructure, it hasn’t kept pace with the increased demand. “This has put strain on the infrastructure we 30


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ABOVE: Leaving Nelson on the great taste trail during the Tour Aotearoa BELOW: Visitors enjoying a break on the Queen Charlotte Track, Marlborough Sounds BOTTOM: The iconic fern clad corners of Wakamarina Track, part of the NZ Enduro three day race

“Unless we have fit-for-purpose cycleways that are well-connected to key destination points, the uptake of cycling is going to be suppressed.” – J O H N - PAU L P O C H I N , B I C YC L E N E L S O N BAY S

have and created tension on some of our shared paths. Unless we have fit-for-purpose cycleways that are well-connected to key destination points, the uptake of cycling is going to be suppressed.” John-Paul says cycling has become very politicised within the council, partly due to arguments over the proposed Southern Link road down the Railway Reserve, but also by a car culture that sees every car park space as sacred. “We’re seeing projects stalled because of this. We need the council to explain the rationale behind better cycling facilities and respond effectively to a vocal anti-cycling project lobby.” John-Paul says some people resent the attention that cycling is getting, and what they see as a threat to their use of cars posed by claims from cyclists for their share of roading and infrastructure funds. “Increases in cycling and walking, and some poor planning around facility use, also feeds conflict between walkers and cyclists.” These issues can result in a kind of ‘bike-lash’, he says. “So there’s a question here about how the council can show leadership and work more actively with its community to deenergise that cycle of conflict and tension.” 32


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CYCLING IN TASMAN

Great tracks, great weather, great experience! We have tracks suitable for everyone, from beginners to experts. Check out Tasman’s Great Taste Trail, Moturoa/Rabbit Island, Richmond Hills and many more. All maps, info and links at www.tasman.govt.nz

33


Biking

So many trails to ride

B Y LY N D A PA P E S C H PHOTOGRAPHY BY SVEN MARTIN

As

the numbers of bikers increase, so too does the hunt for new trails and cycle adventure. Throughout the Top of the South, there are many spectacular cycle ways, both on and off-road, making biking a great way to see the country. One of those is Spooner’s Tunnel in the Tasman District, which re-opened in December for cyclists and also walkers. The tunnel was temporarily closed while engineering assessments and remedial work was done by Tasman District Council to ensure its stability. Chair of the Nelson Tasman Cycle Trust Gill Wratt says they’re delighted that the work has now been completed and the tunnel is open for the busy summer period. The Spooner’s Tunnel is the Southern Hemisphere’s longest tunnel used exclusively by walkers and cyclists and was opened as part of the Great Taste Trail in April. The tunnel was temporarily closed for assessment and repairs after a movement in a small crack at the tunnel’s northern entrance was identified during a routine inspection in August. Another popular cycle path is Marlborough’s Queen Charlotte Track which is open to mountain bikes from March until November. Covering 71km of amazing scenic landscapes – coastal and bush – the Queen Charlotte Track is for intermediate to experienced mountain bike riders, and it’s well worth the two to three-day ride. A more leisurely ride may be enjoyed along Tasman’s Great Taste Trail. Starting at Nelson Airport, or the Nelson i-SITE, the trail is a combination of grades, with something for all levels of riders, and 34

to delight all tastes. From panoramic coastal and mountain views over Tasman Bay, the Waimea Estuary and the Western Ranges, it offers plenty of stops for food and relaxation along the way from Nelson, to Richmond, to Mapua, to Motueka and on to Kaiteriteri. Others sections include the Motueka Valley and Wakefield.

BY BOAT AND BIKE

Nelson has the Abel Tasman and Kahurangi National Parks for outdoor enthusiasts, while Marlborough has its Sounds. The latter comprises three main bodies of water – Queen Charlotte, Kenepuru and Pelorus Sounds – and each provides its own spectacular adventure playground. Dotted throughout the Sounds are a myriad of sheltered bays, bush walks and lots of rugged mountain bike terrain. In many instances locations are accessible by boat only, but luckily there are numerous water taxi-style transport operators catering to that need. Alternatively there is also helicopter access. Just hook the bikes on below and off you go! One of the longest established services is the Pelorus Mail Boat, which has just started a new cruise to serve the Kenepuru Sound and the lodges and also to allow access to the newly opened Link Pathway. Making a great day out, the cruise is a loop from Havelock and back via Te Mahia, the Queen Charlotte Track and the Link Pathway which equates to a two-hour cruise and a three-hour mountain bike ride. For the less active, options include a one-hour walk or no walking at all; just relaxing at Raetihi Lodge for two hours. Skipper Jim Baillie is the ninth owner since the Mail Boat


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“Now, with the new Link Pathway open from Anakiwa to Havelock and the Mail Boat connecting to Te Mahia, you can do a brilliant loop from Havelock.” J I M BA I L L I E , M A I L B OAT OW N E R

began in 1918, and is happy to share his knowledge of the Sounds and their history, especially with the increasing number of visitors. “We see all sorts, especially in summer,” he says. “We transport residents, woofers, lodge staff, guests, trampers, mountain bikers with bikes and kayakers with their kayaks.” Jim adds that there has been a slow but steady increase of people accessing quieter and more remote locations. “The Nydia Track is the most popular but we also transfer people who want to get out to d’Urville Island from and to Bulwer. Now, with the new Link Pathway open from Anakiwa to Havelock and the Mail Boat connecting to Te Mahia, you can do a brilliant loop from Havelock.”

CHECK THE CYCLE GRADE

Various cycle trails and tracks in New Zealand carry gradings which easily enable biking enthusiasts to see if it is their level of expertise, or not! The NZCT’s grading system aligns with the approach taken by Mountain Biking New Zealand and the Department of Conservation. The grading system has also been adapted for on-road cycle touring routes. Grade 1: The easiest type of trail. Suitable for novice cyclists, families and others seeking a very easy cycling experience. Any bike is suitable for riding Grade 1 cycle trails, including touring bikes, single speed bikes and children’s bikes. The Tasman Great Taste Trail from Nelson to Wakefield and Mapua is Grade 1. Grade 2: Easy. Suitable for beginners, occasional cyclists and families who have limited cycling experience. A multi-geared bike with medium to wide tyres is recommended, such as a comfort bike, touring bike or mountain bike. Grade 3: Intermediate. Suitable for regular, experienced cyclists with a good level of fitness and over 12 years of age. Children should be accompanied by an adult and a mountain bike is recommended for off-road trails. Grade 3 local trails include Dun Mountain from Nelson to the Coppermine Saddle, and various on-road sections of the Tasman Great Taste Trail. Grade 4: Advanced. Suitable for fit and experienced cyclists with good on-road and/or off-road skills, a high level of fitness and over 12 years of age. Children should be accompanied by an adult. A quality mountain bike is recommended for off-road trails. Local Grade 4 trails include Dun Mountain Trail from the Coppermine Saddle to the Maitai, and Old Ghost Road. Grade 5: Expert. Suitable for highly experienced cyclists with excellent on-road and/or off-road skills and a high level of fitness. For those who relish technical challenges and are comfortable riding in traffic. Not suitable for children under 12 years of age. A quality mountain bike is essential for off-road trails. Full suspension is recommended. 36


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Glamping We’ve all done it – hunkered down in a leaking tent or slept on a damp mattress in a musty caravan. No power, no hot water and definitely no gourmet meals. Times are changing. Glamping is the new camping and it’s taking off in the Top of the South, as Brenda Webb discovers.

Both photos: Camp Kekerengu

38


A glamping we will go F

orget roughing it. Many tourists coming to the Nelson ‘glamping-style’, time was money and she and her husband were and Marlborough regions these days want a little more prepared to spend a little more to save themselves any hassle. sophistication in their holiday than what their parents Being on the receiving end of such pampering was a wonderful might have enjoyed. So it’s ‘no’ to saggy camp beds, warm beer way to spend a holiday with friends. and instant noodles, and ‘yes please’ to high thread-count sheets, “It was the best thing we’ve ever done,” says the North a chilled glass of wine and three-course gourmet meals. A hot Canterbury woman. “We are all busy people and none of us shower or deep bath to wash away aches and pains is a must, and had the time, or frankly the energy, to organise booking huts or a duck-down pillow to rest weary heads on is commonplace, even getting the equipment together that was needed. “We booked in the most remote spots. through Ultimate Hikes and arrived in Queenstown and it was Tourists are a discerning lot, and their ready cash and desire all done for us.” for comfort have spurred the advent of ‘glamping’ – glamorous The group carried light daypacks and stayed at upmarket camping – the outdoor equivalent of flashpacking. Those wanting lodges, arriving each evening to the luxury of hot showers, to experience the great outdoors can still do so from a tent (or a comfortable beds and drying rooms where their wet clothes and caravan, lodge or bach) but with a touch of class. damp boots could be rejuvenated. Tourism operators in the Top of the South are responding “The food was amazing – three-course meals and a cooked quickly to that need. Wally Bruce, the ultimate action man, has breakfast and lots of extra touches like chocolates,” says Jane. spent more than 30 years in the tourism industry – he pioneered “The pure ease of being able to turn up at the lodges and have adventure tourism in the Top of the South. The colourful a wee glass of wine made it all worthwhile. I would never character is pretty happy roughing it in the great outdoors, but have carried a bottle in my pack.” Mapua couple Adele Smith admits not everyone feels the same way. “Demand is for more and and Roger Waddell have taken the glamping concept a step more services and people definitely want more comfort,” he says. further with their lovingly restored classic caravans Ruby and As a response, Wally’s Abel Tasman Guide company Pearl. At their Kissing Gate glamping site they offer various introduced glamping. “What we propose is assisted-service accommodation options and added the caravans and a quaint camping. We put up the tents, people sleep on beds with sheets, settler’s cottage for this summer, realising that with an upsurge in pillows and a duvet,” he says. “It’s essentially a canvas hotel. tourism they needed a point of difference. The camp assistant meets “We’re targeting quite a different the guests with a cold beer demographic,” says Adele. “We’re or hot cup of tea, gives them offering a romantic luxury camping “The pure ease of being able to turn up nibbles with evening drinks experience for couples. It’s something at the lodges and have a wee glass of and makes them a gourmet that appeals not only to tourists but also wine made it all worthwhile.” dinner. In the morning, he to locals – we had a Nelson couple arrive makes them coffee and by bike a few weekends ago on the Great – JA N E T H O M P S O N , G L A M P I N G C O N V E RT breakfast.” Taste Trail.” Wally says the increase Ruby and Pearl are named after in demand for sophisticated Adele’s twin great aunts. Pearl offers tramping options can be partly attributed to the Government dining and living areas with a 1960s milk-bar theme complete promoting New Zealand’s Great Walks and upgrading the DOC with retro Kiwiana pieces. Ruby oozes glitz and glamour in a huts. “Our Government wants more tourists here, and there is a sumptuous setting, with the added bonus of modern luxuries. huge demand all over the country from people wanting to spend As is par for the course with glamping, the caravans feature a few more dollars and do things in comfort and style.” top-quality beds and linen, while the adjacent settler’s cottage Wally certainly grew up in an era where camping was far offers a luxurious bathroom, kitchen, dining and lounge area on a less glamorous, but he doesn’t believe glamping is a bad thing. semi-enclosed deck. “Everything is changing. Nothing is like the 1950s anymore...it’s Adele and Roger have high hopes for their new venture. all progress,” he says. “People are becoming more particular in “We feel people are ready for this. It’s a camping experience with their holiday tastes and want luxury, and there is nothing wrong all the home comforts and plenty of luxury as well,” says Adele. with that.” “Visitors love it – they are wanting more and more luxury.” The last two years have seen a marked increase in demand In Blenheim, meanwhile, Heather Jameson describes the for custom tents, from individuals, families and glamping quirky accommodation options in her and husband Peter’s exponents. Motueka-based Tasman Canvas partners Rowan backyard as ‘poor man’s glamping’. It’s definitely camping Boot and Monique Patterson have been custom making glamping but with a touch of class thanks to Peter’s carpentry skills and tents ranging from 10 to 100 square metres. “Some are huge” Heather’s artistic finishing touches. says Rowan, adding that the company has just completed a When the duo thought about creating Abby’s Shabby Shack, new custom design especially for a glamping company based their inspiration was recycled, reclaimed and sustainable. They in Southland. were also motivated by the tiny house movement, and at less For Jane Thompson, who walked the Routeburn Track than 10sq.m. their shack is certainly that. 39


Abby’s Shabby Shack (photos: Warren Burmaz)

“It’s mostly about sustainability, utilising reclaimed, recycled and refurbished items, sharing our unique environment and meeting interesting people,” says Heather. Naturally creative with a flair for decorating, she set about collecting an eclectic range of goods including windows, old crockery and linen, and making floral curtains and tablecloths from beautiful fabrics. “We went to Christchurch after the earthquake and there were all these beautiful objects,” she says. “I couldn’t help myself.” Peter was tasked with making the idea a reality. A glider trailer was used as the base but needed extensive work before the walls could be framed. Heather’s painstakingly-sourced windows were then put in place. Abby’s Shabby Shack, named after their daughter Abby, comes complete with a snug upstairs sleeping loft accessed by ladder. Once up there, the surprises continue with cleverly constructed opening windows, set into the roof. Just a few metres away sits The White Wabbit, an even more compact caravan. The double bed fills the entire interior and at the back is a mini-fridge and tea and coffee-making facilities. The projects were a wonderfully cathartic experience for Peter and Heather after they lost their daughter Pippa. “We just wanted out of the mainstream, really. We needed to create our own reality,” Heather says. The people who stay are mostly overseas visitors looking for something different, she adds. “It’s whimsical, quirky and for people who want an experience.” Today’s astute tourists are certainly seeking out those different experiences. 40


2016 OFPANZ awards for excellence

COVERS TRAMPS & TARPS • SHADE SAlLS & SCREENS GENERAL REPAIRS • TENTS & CAMPING GEAR AUTO & MARINE COVERS • AWNINGS & CANOPIES

info@tasmancanvas.co.nz 78 High Street, Motueka Phone 03 528 4640

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JOIN TRIBE and belong to a collection of inspired women who join forces to Collaborate, Celebrate & Support one another in building stronger businesses organically and to connect with our community.

AT TRIBE you are immediately connected to new friends and clients and you do not need to be in business. We welcome any positive or inspiring women in the Nelson region and offer an abundance of support and connection.

Visit www.yourtribe.net | Hook up with us on FB | Call Caron 021 1457 162 or email the team info@yourtribe.net Check out some of our members below

41


“Most people just want to chill out and enjoy the views and the peacefulness.” P I P TO D H U N T E R , CAMP KEKERENGU

Camp Kekerengu

Rattled but unbowed November’s earthquake may have seriously shaken Marlborough’s eastern coast, but at Camp Kekerengu it’s glamping business as usual. Owners Simon and Pip Todhunter had a stressful few weeks after the 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck the region, damaging their farm, houses and outbuildings. Amazingly, their exquisite glamping site came through unscathed, yet the couple were still forced to shut up shop temporarily – because of road closures in the region. The glamping site overlooks the stunning east coast – which buckled in the massive quake. Landslides closed State Highway 1 north and south of Kaikoura, while the road around Kekerengu was littered with cracks and off limits to all but essential traffic. Simon and Pip had to cancel bookings and endure a frustrating wait until the highway reopened. Farmers are a resilient bunch, however, and they took the setback in their stride. The couple set up Camp Kekerengu in 2015 under the Canopy Camping Escapes network. Having studied tourism, Pip saw potential in Ngaio Downs, a farm that has been in the Todhunter family for three generations. The spectacular sheep and beef property is right on the tourism scenic route to Kaikoura. 42

The hillside above their home, with panoramic views of ocean and farmland, provided inspiration for glamping and so the venture was born. “When I saw the views from where we lived I knew we had to share them with others,” Pip says. Glamping was also a way of diversifying their income, and provided an outlet for Pip’s creativity. She sought out the best-quality beds and linen, in keeping with Canopy Camping’s upmarket philosophy, and furnished the three luxury tents with a jaunty nautical theme, including one with single beds and bunks for children. Besides the tents, which are on raised decks with their own sun porches, the site has a fully equipped kitchen decorated in rustic country style. Unobstructed views take in the everchanging Pacific Ocean and a magnificent rural landscape. Pip believes people who enjoy glamping want to take their holiday to the next level. “We’ve had all sorts but often they tend to be people who want to get out of the city and take time out and enjoy the rural environment.” Ngaio Downs has also hosted honeymooners. Pip and Simon offer walks on their farm – the Clarence River runs behind it – but most people are happy being left to their own devices. “They seem to just want to chill out and enjoy the views and the peacefulness.”


SUMMERTIME

MUSIC & THEATRE

For further information please visit www.fairfieldnelson.org.nz or

www.itson.co.nz

NEW ZEALAND WINE

Richter City Rebels Courtyard Concert

7 pm Thursday 5 Jan 2017 $20

Marie NiChathasaigh & Chris Newman Ballroom Concert

7.30 pm Sunday 8 January 2017 $20

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

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Outdoor theatre in the Meadow 6.30 pm each evening - Tues 10 to Wed 18 Jan 2017 Decide your price

London Klezmer Quartet Courtyard Concert

7.30 pm Thursday 26 Jan 2017 $20

Pipes in the Park Concert in the Meadow

4 pm Sunday 29 Jan 2017 $10

Order now to capture the taste of summer! www.blackenbrook.co.nz

Call in to Kaimira Winery in Brightwater where you can sit down and enjoy a taste of our wines and drink in the view at the same time ... Tastings of certified organic wine from our extensive selection. Open now until the end of March Mon to Sat 11am to 4pm. Other times by arrangement.

FEATURED ART EXHIBITION DURING JANUARY:

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Seafolly bikini from Little Boutique Elisa Cavaletti dress from Karen Jordan Style Rusty hat from Hogeys Surf Lindi Kingi bracelets from Thomas’s

CHIC GLAMPING STYLE S T Y L I N G A N D H A I R B Y K E L LY V E R C O E P HO T O G R A P H Y BY I S H NA JAC OB S MAKE-UP BY MICHELLE NALDER MODEL DANIELLE ASHDOWN L O C AT I O N : M C K E E M E M O R I A L R E S E R V E , R U B Y B AY


Seafolly bikini from Little Boutique Long Lost dress from Amazon Surf Pia Rossini hat from Shine Kanna shoes from Taylors‌We Love Shoes Citta Globe velour facecloth, towels and Hecho en Mexico basin, all from Darby & Joan


Tigerlily kaftan from Thomas’s Sass top from Trouble and Fox FV necklace from Shine Nunui shorts from Amazon Surf Lindberg sunglasses from Kuske


Arielle Mermin dress from Trouble and Fox FV necklaces from Shine


Ruby shorts and cami, both Trouble and Fox Rusty denim shirt and Seafolly bag, Hogeys Surf Elk bracelets from Shine Converse sneakers from Taylors‌We Love Shoes Throw from Little Boutique

Sabine be sunglasses from Kuske Bell tent, Tasman Canvas Broste handwoven leather rug, Dash & Albert striped rug, both Darby & Joan


Paula Ryan swimsuit and throws from Little Boutique Brixton hat from Trouble and Fox Lee denim shorts and Le Specs sunglasses from Thomas’s Elk bracelets from Shine Bell tent, Tasman Canvas Maytime relax chair and footstool, willow wicker picnic basket, all from Darby & Joan


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STYLE FILE

MEN’S

STYLE JANUARY 2017

Now that it’s a new year, it’s also an opportune time to take a look at what you’re wearing. Chuck out anything you haven’t worn in two years (or maybe make that 12 months). Unless of course it is potential retro, in which case pack it away somewhere. In the meantime, summer’s here so it’s shorts and tees, jandals and hats all the way. The rule of thumb is not to buy an item unless it can be matched with several pieces that you already have to make up three different looks.

Bags of style

W

hen heading to the beach, a barbeque or away overnight then you need a stylish carry bag such as this contemporary Status Anxiety duffel. Lightweight, versatile and smart looking, it will easily double as travel luggage, take the place of a day pack or even carry your sweaty gym gear. If you only have room for one bag, this is the one.

Hats off to summer

B

aseball caps, also known as dad hats, have been around forever but now they’re back big time for young and old alike. It’s all about making a statement with the logo or the adornment, so choose carefully. People will judge you by your hat. As an accessory they are great. Small and easily portable, there’s no reason why you can’t have half a dozen of them in your favourite colours.

Available at Sidecar, Nelson

You to a tee

R

ock street style this summer with a graphic tee such as this quacking design from Duck and Cover. Designers have been quick to stamp their mark on tees, ranging from simple signatures to company logos, quirky photographs and popular cartoon characters. Wear them with your favourite jeans, shorts or chinos and make a statement. Available at Nelson Tailors Menswear, Nelson

Available at Hogeys Surf, Nelson


Short shorts on trend

G

one are the days of mid-calf cargo shorts. This summer it’s all about short shorts (but not too short!). Don’t be scared to go for faded colour (yes, men do wear pink and teal), and also look out for stripes and even sweat shorts in addition to the classic flat front chino shorts. If you like daring, then opt for bold colour.

Located within Thomas’s department store. Serving beautiful seasonal food from our in-store chef Marcia Chang Hong with coffee by Atomic.

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Available at Thomas’s, Blenheim

54 Market Street Blenheim | 0800 88 24 88 enquiries@thomass.co.nz | www.thomass.co.nz

Comfort & Style

J

andals are not what they used to be, now being an accepted form of casual and beach footwear. Combining ergonomic soles with leather straps creates a modern jandal that pairs nicely with shorts, jeans and even swimwear. They’re easy to slip on (and off ), don’t take up much room in the beach bag, and are washable! What’s not to like? Available at Taylors...We Love Shoes

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MY HOME

B Y M A R I N E A PA P

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P H O T O G R A P H Y A N A G A L L O WAY

REBORN FOR THE VIEWS 3


MY HOME

4

1. 2.

APL Architectural Series exterior sliding doors open up the dining area to the deck Entrance way with hand-made cedar doors and an American copper light

A

couple fell in love at first sight when they inspected an old house nestled in the hills facing Nelson’s iconic lighthouse – and then promptly bowled the house. “It was a grey, rainy day,” says the owner. “We were looking for a house to buy in Nelson, and decided to have a quick look at this charming old house, recommended by friends, and we immediately fell in love with the view.” The original project was a renovation, but “we ended up building a brand new house and only kept the wooden floor from the old house.” The owners have added a beautiful extension that includes two bedrooms and an en-suite bathroom, both well separated from the living spaces. After 14 years spent overseas – Middle East and Thailand – “we got used to very warm climates and were very much concerned about the warmth, but the house has exceeded expectations,” the owner says. Facing northeast, the property is protected from the wind as it doesn’t project out from the hillside. The new layout opens up the view, providing a series of lovely seascapes. The total rebuild took more than eight months. “We retained quite a lot of the charm of the old house by keeping a ‘bungalow style’ that allowed the architects of Arthouse (Rachel Dodd and David Wallace) to design a very modern house with intimate interconnecting rooms.” As a result, the house feels spacious and has a great flow.

3. 4.

A deck with views across the seascape The kitchen/dining with recycled rimu and an American vintage table and chairs from Edito

The couple feel ‘very happy with the general look of the house’, even though they had to downsize, shedding furniture and accessories collected over the years. “I had to have a really good clear-out, coming from a big house with lots of storage, full of double-cupboards and triple closets,” says the owner. “We had a lot of big, heavy and old colonial furniture that just did not work with this new modern and lighter-looking house.” The bathrooms have ‘really lovely little finishes’, she says, but her favourite space is ‘the blue room’. “I like the moody sort of darkness and feel of ‘cave’ of that room. It’s got a lovely view of the palm. You can see the boats going through the trees ...” The whole house has a subtle ethnic touch and a pretty, yet eclectic, style created by the art pieces and furniture. The couple brought back a lot of prints and original pieces that reminded them of New Zealand, and also collected pieces from the countries they lived in and visited. “We also have friends who are very interested in art and interior design who brought us a lot of inspiration. For example, the kitchen was designed with some friends over a series of dinners.” She concludes: “We felt really lucky in Nelson, with a great choice of suppliers and professionals when it came to renovating and furnishing our house.” A solid team, including Arthouse and builder Chris Andrews, supported the couple throughout the project: “Chris made us feel completely safe and secure. We never worried about the building – never.” 55


MY HOME

6 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Original rimu floors throughout the house The owners' candle stick collection and Christine Boswijk platters Light and spacious with lots of windows in the white sitting room Part of an extensive collection of books Modern furniture helps create a spacious feel Open plan flow from kitchen/dining into the lounge

5 7

9

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10

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12 John Wesley Lane, Richmond (off Queen St, behind Avanti Plus)

Phone: 03 544 1515

www.moxini.co.nz

HÖGLUND GLASSBLOWING STUDIO

KITCHENS TIMBER WINDOWS & DOORS BATHROOMS LAUNDRIES WARDROBES OFFICE FURNITURE SHELVING ENTERTAINMENT UNITS STORAGE SOLUTIONS STAIRS

Locally made by glass artists Ola and Marie Höglund and their family. Makers of New Zealand art glass and glass jewellery since 1982.

VISITORS WELCOME – OPEN DAILY 10 TO 5 The glassblowing schedule is always subject to change - please ring us to find out when you can watch glassblowing in action. (closed Christmas & Boxing Day and 1st January)

52 Lansdowne Road, Appleby, Richmond Ph 03 544 6500

www.hoglundartglass.com

Flexibility to suit any design or style, and the use of a range of materials to make any customer’s vision a reality.

119 Pascoe St, Nelson 03 547 4724 021 156 4358 nic@mantisjoinery.co.nz

www.mantisjoinery.co.nz 57


MY HOME

12

11

13 11, 12, 13. 14, 15. 16, 17.

17

14

15 16

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The owners’ favourite blue room; moody darkness with a cave feel to it Lovely little finishes in the bathroom include a recyced rimu vanity made by Nick Smith; tiles from Tile and Slate and a basin from surfacedesign Light airy touches in the bedroom, which features a hand- painted wall mural by Jo Tyson


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Visit us at the Sea Chest – 4 Boyces Road, on the corner of Rapaura Road, RD3 Blenheim

• Rhinoplasty (nose surgery) • Crow’s feet treatment • Frown line treatment • Liquid facelift • Dermal fillers • Cosmetic/Medical tattooing, eyeliner,

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Visit nelsonplasticsurgery.co.nz for more information

Secured business and personal loans www.fico.co.nz 59


MY GARDEN

Take a holiday from gardening B Y LY N D A PA P E S C H

A

mong the first tasks many people tackle when they arrive at their holiday home/bach/crib is taming the great outdoors that makes up their personal paradise. Out will come the mowers, the clippers and weed trimmers – so the start of the holiday turns into a hive of activity instead of the relaxation many of us would prefer. The trick to having a laid-back home away from home is to make it low-maintenance, easy-care and don’t go overboard on the landscaping. Holiday homes are often in rustic settings – by a lake, in the bush or at the beach. That means gardens can also be more casual. One of the simplest ways to landscape is to borrow ideas from the surrounding environment and replicate en-masse. If, for instance, your bach is at the seaside, there’s no reason that your gardens can’t be sand, shells, grasses and even a boardwalk or two. Plants with grey/ green leaves – such as the Marlborough daisy and rengarenga lily – thrive in drier environments. The latter is clump-forming with masses of starry white flowers in late spring, and it tolerates sun and shade as well as dry and exposed conditions. Better yet, it is a native, a.k.a. the New Zealand rock lily. The Marlborough ‘rock’ daisy is another hardy native that enjoys the sun and makes itself at home both at the beach and in sub-alpine environments. Hebes are great value and come in all shapes, sizes and colours. Like both the above species, they too look great in massed plantings. Keep the landscaping simple and remember to group plants in ones, three or fives. Better yet, just select three species and plant all of them in massed groupings. Of course, if you want herbs, veges etc then think about an automated watering 60

Marlborough daisy

system to keep them irrigated between visits. Naturally you’ll find the weeds as high as the cilantro when you make a return visit, or the local birds and furry critters will have had a free meal. Still, it’s easy to take a few seedlings from home and grow them in containers while on holiday. Then again, it’s easier still to visit the nearest village and buy seasonal fruit and veges. A fruit tree or two wouldn’t go amiss, providing they get off to a good start, and it’s worth considering the heritage varieties of apples, peaches, plums and pears. They’re hardy, they’ve stood the test of time, and they’re delicious picked straight from the tree.

Finally, if you decide a working bee is still in order, do it towards the end of the holiday rather than at the beginning. Everyone will be more relaxed, more inclined to help and the results will last longer.


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61


MELROSE CAFE

Open 7 days 9am-5pm

(03) 548 9179 www.melrosecafe.co.nz

Seafood & Cocktails 300 Trafalgar Street NELSON NZ

www.codandlobsterbrasserie.com 62


BUSINESS PROFILE

Experts in transforming space BY SADIE BECKMAN P H O T O A N A G A L L O WAY

T

hinking new kitchen, laundry, entertainment unit or even a commercial project? The Sellers Room is the place to visit to be inspired about your interior project. The Sellers Room, based in Stoke, welcomes you to visit their leading-edge interactive showroom, where their design team is available to assist potential clients to see, feel and try the many different products on offer, including lacquering and Corian. The Sellers Room are sought-after for residential developments across the top of the South Island and consistently engaged for commercial projects around New Zealand. They offer a full service, from design to manufacture, and to installation, co-ordinating other sub trades to ensure that the process does not become too overwhelming. Owners Myles and Margarette Sellers work closely with their team of experienced designers, manufacturers and installers. A combined experience of 50 years designing projects around New Zealand has made them proud of what they offer. The design process is where the dream of having a new kitchen suddenly

starts to become reality. Time spent at the initial appointment, either on-site for a renovation or at the showroom for a new project, is crucial. This is an opportunity for clients to input their own ideas and needs through either discussion, articles or pictures they have collected. Combined with the designers’ knowledge, this will make sure the project is not only aesthetically pleasing but also a highly desirable and functional space for many years to come. The use of technology allows not only viewing of plans on a 3D program where you can see a virtual image of what your kitchen will look like, but it also allows for the manufacturing process to be driven with purpose as this same technology is what our experienced detailer/IT specialist will use to make the project. Clients are welcome to visit their project while it is being made – the factory is housed in the same premises as the showroom in Stoke. This is a great experience that allows for clients to be involved as much as they wish. The Sellers Room not only offers a design service but also the use of products that support functionality, innovative and creative design

specialising in the use of Blum hardware, lacquer finishes, Corian benchtops and a wide range of Laminex products. Along with this focus on longevity and quality comes a commitment to sustainability. The company works closely with leading national and international suppliers who share their commitment to the environment and who produce their quality products through innovative design and ecologically sensitive processes. “Our measure of success is our ability to consistently deliver on core competencies,” says Margarette. “From experience, we know that all else flows from them. “We specialise in designing and building the perfect space for your needs. We absolutely love what we do, and we value your decision to consider our expertise for your project.”

Contact thesellersroom.co.nz Phone: 03 547 7144

63


MY KITCHEN

Strawberry & peach galette B Y N I C O L A G A L L O WAY

When the first berries and stone-fruit arrive at the markets, summer is truly here. This freeform galette tart is incredibly easy to make, with no fiddly tart case to line or blind baking. Simply roll, top with fruit, gather the edges and bake. Happy summertime! Serves 8 Ingredients: 1 1/2 cups white flour 1/2 cup ground walnuts or almonds 2 tablespoons raw sugar, plus extra for sprinkling Pinch of salt 150g cold butter, cubed Zest of half a lemon 1 free-range egg Handful of fine polenta for sprinkling 4 peaches 250g ripe strawberries Directions: Put the flour, nuts, sugar and salt into a food processor bowl and pulse to combine. Add the cubed butter and process into a coarse breadcrumb-like texture. Add the lemon zest and egg and pulse half a dozen times until the pastry comes together into a ball. Tip onto the bench and quickly shape into a flat disc. Place in a lidded container and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 180C. Cut the peaches into wedges and halve the strawberries. Remove the pastry from the fridge and roll out on a lightly floured bench to make a 30cm-diameter circle about 4mm thick. Place onto a lined baking tray and sprinkle the middle of the circle (about 25cm) with fine polenta – this will soak up the fruit juices as the pie cooks. Arrange the peaches evenly onto the circle of polenta and top with strawberries. Now rustically gather up the edges of the pastry, gently folding together to create a free-form edge to hold in the fruit while still leaving fruit visible in the middle. Sprinkle lightly with extra sugar. Bake for 30-40 minutes until the pastry is golden and the fruit is tender. Serve warm with yogurt.

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DINE OUT

Quality food in fine surroundings

BY MAXWELL FLINT

M

ahana Kitchen, the restaurant attached to Mahana Wines, has recently started to open for evening dining on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Mrs F and I have had lunch at Mahana Kitchen before, but there has since been a change of chef and a new evening menu. The dining room is modern and beautiful, with ridiculously entrancing views. Mahana Kitchen (and winery) is rapidly becoming a sought-after venue for all manner of celebrations and when we arrived the extensive parking was practically full, so it was a surprise to find that apart from us, only one other table was booked. The parked cars were for a wedding taking place downstairs in the winery. Seemingly desperate for conversation, the only other table shouted to us as we entered that we had to try the lamb. A quiet

restaurant, with only your wife to entertain you, is a desperate situation indeed. The menu is small but inventive and each course comes with a suggested wine match from Mahana’s cellars. Mrs F started with the intriguing sounding Mahana Riesling Cheesecake with Cranky Goats Cheese, parsley sponge, beetroot carpaccio and sesame praline ($18). This beautifully presented savoury cheesecake had what looked like a green parsley roulade, with crunchy sesame praline. Great colours and texture contrasts here. An excellent dish. My smoked duck breast, with confit duck spring-rolls, mango chutney puree, puffed rice, liquorice powder, radish and apple salad ($21) was a close second to Mrs F’s starter. Just the right amount of smoking of the small duck breasts, and the small spring-rolls were good enough to realise you needed more. The salad gave the whole dish a fresh back-note. Again,

Summer Essentials

top marks here. My choice of main was roasted pork belly with Mahana honey, fennel, wakame seaweed salad with smoked almond and red cabbage puree ($32). Parts of this dish worked, others didn’t. While the pork was tender, there was a slight stringiness to the meat and a distinct lack of oomph in terms of flavour. The skin wasn’t crispy, which may have been intentional, but if so, a mistake. The seaweed salad added a crisp saltiness and the smoked almond puree injected a nice flavour note. Mrs F’s lamb was, on the other hand, almost perfect. Poached and seared southern lamb loin with green chermoula sauce and smoked goats cheese mash ($33) was a really good combo. The Moroccan flavourings in the chermoula worked well here and complemented the perfectly cooked lamb. I noted there seemed to be a lot of smoking of ingredients going on in the kitchen. I like the smoked taste, as long as it is done with subtlety, which it is here. We chose to have one dessert to share – the Earl Grey panna cotta with strawberry meringue and rosemary shortbread ($14). The panna cotta was covered with strawberries and meringue and it looked and tasted like an Eton mess, without the enormous amount of cream. We liked it, but I have to say the Earl Grey tea influence was undetectable, as was the rosemary in the shortbread. I am surprised that the restaurant was not well-patronised because it certainly deserves to be. This was a quality meal in quality surroundings.

Mahana Kitchen Cost: $136 for two (with 2 glasses of wine) Value for money: Food: Atmosphere: Service:

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WINE

Passionate and pants-less B Y P H I L L I P R E AY

I

have talked with a number of winemakers and the majority of them, especially the good ones, exhibit similar traits. Firstly, they are all passionate. So passionate in fact that anything not concerning wine is somewhat of an aside. I’m sure it’s not unusual for a winemaker to find himself or herself working in the winery in their underwear as they’ve forgotten to put their trousers on. This happened to Brian Bicknell of Mahi Wines when he rushed in to his winery to check on damage after the recent quakes. Granted this was an exceptional circumstance, but he did have to drive to the winery so there was time to realise he was ‘sans clothing’. Winemakers generally have an excellent sense of humour. When I tagged along with a group of Danish visitors at a tasting at Mahi winery, the same Mr Bicknell compared the Danish race to pinot noir. That is, being ‘genetically unstable’. Luckily they all laughed. The good winemakers all seem to have a very low ‘bullshit’ quota,

Brian Bicknell

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are plain-speaking and, at times, disarmingly honest. This is, of course, in direct contrast to wine critics, who have a very high BS quota and are so immune to BS they have trouble recognising it. Brian Bicknell seems to have been around forever. This hugely respected Marlborough winemaker built an excellent reputation as chief winemaker at Seresin Estate before he bought the former Daniel Le Brun winery in 2006 to concentrate on his own Mahi label. Mahi grows a small parcel of grapes in front of the winery but sources most of its supply from contract growers. This allows it to select fruit from seven sites, each with its own terroir, and therefore distinct flavours. For me this celebration of distinct terroirs is the strength and brilliance of the wine and winemaker. Mahi produces a Marlborough blend of its grape varietals but also produces singlevineyard examples of sauvignon blanc, pinot gris, chardonnay, gewürztraminer and pinot noir. As I said before, I tagged along with

“ I liked all the wines, even the pinot noir rose, which I normally find boring. However, the Mahi wine had a real depth and character.” 13 genetically unstable Danish tourists, so had a chance to taste most of Mahi’s offerings. I liked all the wines, even the pinot noir rose, which I normally find boring. However, the Mahi wine had a real depth and character. I like the minimal interventionist winemaking style. In the case of Mahi’s Boundary Farm Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc, the grapes are hand-picked, sorted and whole-bunch pressed. The juice goes straight into the barrel and everyone decamps for a cup of tea. The fermentation starts with natural yeasts and the length and temperature of the ferment is monitored until the winemaker feels that it is ready. The wine is then worked in the tank to create a sauvignon blanc that has weight and texture, improves with age and is fantastic with food. They are all wonderful wines that express time and place, and made by a master craftsman. The 2014 Boundary Rd Sauvignon Blanc, the 2013 Alchemy Chardonnay and the Ward Farm Pinot Gris are all wines I could easily commit a crime for.


BEER

A year of 365 brews BY MARK PREECE

If

you want to slake your thirst for beer knowledge this summer, Alice Galletly’s How to Have a Beer is a good place to start. A New Year’s resolution in 2004 saw me and a group of friends complete a push-up for every day of the year, a total of 66,795 push-ups for the year – no more, no less. That pales in comparison with the challenge Alice set herself, consuming and blogging about a different beer on every day of the year. That marathon culminated in a Liberty Brewing imperial red ale called 365, made specifically for Alice’s final day. The journalist was initially planning to write a blog about offal, but according to her book, “while standing in the beer aisle in front of all those mysterious bottles, I realised I had a more compelling subject. There and then I made the decision. An ‘offally’ good one looking back.” Alice takes the reader on a whirlwind tour, as far afield as California in search of ‘the best beer in America’ – which turned out to be Pliny the Elder, a double IPA made by the Russian River Brewing Company. And she navigates the reader through the challenges of a year of beer tasting covering temperature, the type of vessel to drink from and the smell. She also manages to describe a hair-of-the-dog experience after a big night out. The book is extremely readable, hard to put down and smattered with humour. There’s a great chapter on the history of beer, like the German Reinheitsgebot, or ‘Purity Order’, of 1516, which restricted the ingredients of beer-making to water, barley and hops in order to protect bakers from

Alice Galletly

shortages of wheat and rye (yeast wasn’t added until its role was discovered in the 19th century). The result of the 500-year Reinheitsgebot was to define what the world would call beer. Recently there has been a period of rapid innovation and creativity that has formed the craft beer industry as we know it. There’s a chapter devoted to beer terms. For those who enjoy a beer at Nelson’s Freehouse, you’ll learn that this means the pub has no contractual ties to a brewery, ‘and so has the freedom to serve whichever delicious or terrible beers they like’. My favourite beer term was a ‘drain pour’. It’s a beer so bad that no one will drink it – and as an ex-student, I’m yet to find one. The last word to finish the chapter, ‘zymurgy’, the science of brewing

and fermentation. And if you think you knew a bit about home-brew, here’s a recipe from 1727 quoted in Alice’s book: ‘Take 10 gallons of ale and a large cock, the older the better. Parboil the cock, flay him and stamp him in a stone mortar until his bones are broken (you must draw and gut him when you flay him). Then put the cock into two quarts of sack, and put to it five pounds of raisins of the sun – stoned; some blades of mace and a few cloves. Put all these into a canvas bag, and a little before you find the ale has been working, put the bag and ale together in a vessel. In a week or nine days bottle it up. Fill the bottle just above the neck and give it the same time to ripen as other ale.’

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T R AV E L

Wild, friendly and majestic TEXT AND IMAGES BY ALEX GRADEEN

T

he city of Calgary, Canada, marks a break between two worlds. In the east, the endless yellow and green fields of the prairies spread so flat and empty that you can distinguish the slight tilt of the Earth. In the west, forested foothills shrink in comparison with the jagged peaks of the impressive Canadian Rockies, a UNESCO World Heritage site. An hour’s drive puts you among blue lakes and rivers, towering mountaintops, and pine forest that disappears only when it hits the snow line. I was lucky to grow up in Western Canada. Glossy photos in travel magazines often depict the glacial blue waters of Lake Louise and Moraine Lake; the curious grizzly bears and moose that stroll Canada’s countryside; or the vibrant downtown

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lifestyle in Vancouver. I would equate Western Canada to NZ’s South Island. The landscapes are as diverse and unpredictable as they are awe-inspiring and picturesque. Western Canada is a veritable kaleidoscope of scenery, activities and attractions. Adrenalin junkies find their fix mountain-biking or climbing in Banff National Park or Whistler. Foodies congregate in Victoria’s many legendary seafood restaurants, or perhaps in the wineries and orchards of the Okanagan Valley. Outdoor enthusiasts need only do a quick Google search to find Canada’s best surf in Tofino, best canyoning in Squamish, and best skiing in the Rockies. Reminiscent of the Old West, country music and a laidback lifestyle are often found in the prairies (which include Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba). Small-town hospitality lives down every turn off the unusually straight highways. If you’re lucky enough to travel to Canada in the blissful summertime, it’s certainly worth checking out any of the wonderful food and music festivals. Drop by the Calgary Stampede, an annual 10-day rodeo celebrating Canada’s western heritage, cultures and community spirit. There is a lot of land and a little of something for everyone. Travelling around Western Canada is similar to travel around New Zealand. Domestic flights can be overpriced, but Greyhound buses make a nice alternative. The Rocky Mountaineer is a popular luxury tourist train, and travelling one of its many routes is a unique way to experience the Canadian Rockies. The best option is to rent a campervan and make a few


I would equate Western Canada to NZ’s South Island. The landscapes are as diverse and unpredictable as they are awe-inspiring and picturesque.

unscheduled stops on the way to your destination. You may find yourself driving along the Bow Valley Parkway in Alberta, where you are almost guaranteed to see wildlife (though beware of the squirrels, which, like the kea, shamelessly attempt to steal your food). Alternatively, it may be worth making a quick stop in friendly Winnipeg, or in Canada’s very own Nelson, British Columbia. Western Canada is best enjoyed slowly and thoroughly, like an especially flavourful red wine. The budget for a holiday in Western Canada can be as diverse as desired. Accommodation ranges from tent camping and hostel living, to luxury grand hotels and rustic Airbnbs in mountain chalets. You can choose to eat at any number of spectacular steakhouses in Saskatchewan, or enjoy a simple meal at Canada’s favourite local hotspot, Tim Horton’s. The options are as endless as the scenery, so take your time exploring them. For those with a penchant for adventure, this local Canadian believes that the true beauty of Western Canada lies off the beaten track. As far off the beaten track as you can go, actually...I’ve done many wilderness excursions in Western Canada, including a five-day backcountry trekking trip along the West Coast Trail, and a 10-day canoe trip in Northern Saskatchewan. On these trips, I discovered the essence of what makes Western Canada so magically beautiful. It is the wilderness and wildness, the friendly and hospitable locals, and the plentiful wildlife that make this part of the world so unique and fantastic.

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A DV E N T U R E

Z

ac Bromhead was seven or eight and living in Liverpool when he first tried sailing – and hated it. The second time was no better, but the third, when he was given the tiller and told to navigate the course, he ‘fell in love’, besotted with the independence, freedom and responsibility of captaining his own craft. Zac – the new coach of the Queen Charlotte Yacht Club (QCYC) – immediately stopped playing football and rugby, abandoned horse-riding, and devoted his free hours to sailing, eventually heading to domestic and international regattas, including seven years’ racing for the British sailing team. Since then, he has successfully raced and coached round the world, making lifelong friends along the way. But it was one of his oldest sailing buddies who led the 24-year-old instructor to Picton earlier this year. Zac and Sam Robinson, who is a coach at Nelson Water Sports, have been best friends since they started sailing together as kids. When Sam told him there was an opening at Picton, Zac gave up his coaching job in the United States, chased the summer and set off for a new corner of the globe. Now he teaches young sailors in Optimists, Lasers, Starlings and Europes from a tiny yacht club at the edge of Picton harbour, ‘to hopefully inspire them to love it as much as I do.’ Zac says sailing requires intelligence, concentration and a sense of responsibility from the students because they are out on the boat alone and have to make decisions under pressure. “It’s a life skill as well,” he says. “It’s sellable and tradeable if you get good enough at it.”

Tom Barson learns to sail with the Queen Charlotte Yacht Club

Life skills for young sailors BY SOPHIE PREECE

QCYC coaching co-ordinator Dave Lane says the skills learned by a nineyear-old in a small boat on a big sea go well beyond sailing and knot-tying. “Your child is making a heap of decisions all by themselves and if something goes wrong they have to sort it out. It’s a very, very steep learning curve that’s teaching them independence and resilience. These are

Ben Preece capsizes his Optimist as part of his sailing training

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transferable skills they can always use.” Dave says the club has hired professional sailing coaches for the past seven or eight years, and punches above its weight with the number of top-quality sailors it turns out, including national and world champions. That’s thanks to the coaches, to the support of the club and its community, and also to the challenging conditions in their training ground. “If you can sail in the Sounds, you can sail anywhere in the world,” he laughs. His kids Maggie and Fergus have been sailing with the club for the past three years, and on his keeler for much longer, and he’s loving the opportunity to pass on his passion for the sport. “I blame Toad from Toad Hall, because ‘there’s nothing like mucking around in boats’.”

The Queen Charlotte Yacht Club sails in Picton Harbour or Queen Charlotte Sound each Saturday during the summer season, from September to April. It also runs four three-day Learn to Sail courses in the school holidays. For more information go to qcyc.org.nz.


B OAT I N G

Breeze in the bay BY STEVE THOMAS

N

ot many of us have fond memories of our chemistry teacher, but Sail Nelson’s Chris Roff sure does. Since he was a baby, Chris’s family always owned sailing boats, albeit small dinghies and trailer yachts to begin with. His childhood summer holidays were mostly spent in Scotland and this gave him a strong taste for wilderness adventures and rugged landscapes. Chris met his lovely wife Katy in 1996 and quickly introduced her to sailing. Unfortunately, northern European waters aren’t the most enticing. A surprise honeymoon sailing amid Australia’s Whitsunday islands helped to fix that. Katy was hooked. In 2001 they bought a 35ft ketch and by 2004 Chris and Katy had sailed her all the way to New Zealand, but that’s another story. Chris says he owes it all to his enthusiastic chemistry teacher, John Gill. He developed Chris’s passion for navigation and boat-handling skills – sailing in waters with a tidal range of up to 10 metres. (Never mind Nelson’s ‘big’ 5-metre tides.) As Chris tells it, John couldn’t convince the school to invest in any boats to get kids out on the water so he bought three Laser II trapeze dinghies with his own money. John was also the proud owner of a 28ft Dufour-designed yacht called Breeze. As a teenager Chris was fortunate to be able to cross the

English Channel several times and visit the Channel Islands aboard Breeze. Fast-forward to 2014. Chris and Katy have ‘discovered’ Nelson. They have two young kids, Ben and Sally. Katy is working as a doctor and Chris is an outstanding house-husband. Then he spots an opportunity – a local sailing school, Sail Nelson, is advertised for sale. Established by Pic Picot and John and Woodi Moore, Sail Nelson teaches all abilities, from complete novice sailors to commercially endorsed Yachtmaster Offshore qualifications. The company is fairly uncommon within NZ. It offers five-day live-aboard sail cruising courses for sailors of all skill levels and issues internationally recognised certificates at the end of the week. However, the idea of being away from the family four nights a week isn’t entirely appealing to someone who’s

been a house-husband at home with the kids for nearly 10 years. The solution lay in employing another instructor to do the bulk of the sailing tuition, allowing Chris to do enough instruction to keep his skills fresh. They buy the business and don’t look back. But I will. Back to Breeze and the chemistry teacher, that is. Sad to say, soon after Chris left school John died of leukaemia. To everyone’s surprise he left his lovely yacht to Chris and his brother. They kept the yacht for a season and used her as much as possible, but the ongoing expense of keelboat ownership overtook them and she had to be sold. Back in the present. Sail Nelson has just upgraded its fleet, buying a Frenchdesigned Jeanneau 37ft yacht. When it came to choosing a name for the new boat … you guessed it: Breeze. Seems a fitting tribute, don’t you think?

When a disability makes even everyday activities a struggle, imagine how it must feel to sail off in a little yacht. For people with disabilities, sailing with Sailability Nelson provides a unique sense of freedom and movement – life’s daily frustrations are forgotten. From the Nelson Yacht Club, we sail two person Hansa yachts set up for any disability

and any age. Each yacht has an experienced sailor helper and each sail is around 30 minutes. Our sailing season commences in October and we will sail every second Sunday until mid-March. Come on down and have a sail.

For this coming season we need help. If you would like to become a Sailability Nelson volunteer, helper sailor, sponsor, or donor please contact John MacDuff, 0274 245 112 macduff@tasman.net

Join us to help disabled Nelsonians experience the freedom and joy of sailing. sailabilitynelson.org.nz

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MOTORING

Trucks rule, ok BY GEOFF MOFFETT

U

tes are the new SUVs. First ‘sports utility vehicles’ consigned the family sedan and wagon to the dusty pages of auto history. Now it’s the ute – or ‘truck’ as everyone calls them these days – shaking up the market. Mum, dad and the kids ride around in a double-cab Ford Ranger, Toyota Hilux, Nissan Navara et al – and, of course, the new Holden Colorado. How extraordinary that what used to be a knockabout work vehicle could transform into the country’s most popular wheels. But in 2015 Ford Ranger edged out the Toyota Corolla to become New Zealand’s top-selling new vehicle with a whopping 6818 sales, and the trend continued last year. Sure, the ride and internal comforts have come a long way from the ute that bounced and jiggled along rutted farm tracks and took its owner on a knobbly ride down to the country pub on a Friday night. But these things are still utes, or 72

utilitarian vehicles, designed to carry a tray full of fence posts up a muddy hill and drag around a heavy trailer. Or are they? The horse-and-dray ride is a thing of the past, for sure, and the new Colorado is a case in point. Yes, you still have to climb up into the cab using a grab handle, but once inside it’s all Bluetooth, touchscreen entertainment and optional heated leather seats. In fact, the Colorado packs in a lot more than that. Try lane departure warning and forward collision alert (LTZ models), remote start feature (handy on winter mornings) and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto for extras. Armed with such allure, Colorado is aiming to improve on its 3500 sales in 2015. Its mid-cycle facelift gives it a newlook interior, a quieter ride and handling aided by electric power steering. Is the ride car-like? Not quite, but it’s getting there. The revamped Colorado has stepped up with revised suspension

settings, a larger front stabiliser bar and changed front and rear spring rates. The whole city and highway experience has also been helped by wind-noise improvements and new acoustics to cut power-train noise. Certainly, you wouldn’t think twice about a trip down to Christchurch with the family. There’s great space up front and good legroom in the back, and although the back seats are a little on the upright side, it’s a big improvement on the bolt-upright sitting position of yesteryear utes. You’ll cruise at lazy revs, with that torquey diesel lump making overtaking and hill climbs a breeze. In town, it’s fine and surprisingly easy to wield through roundabouts and in traffic, although the steering needs more pulls on the wheel than a car or SUV, and tight-spot parking makes the camera and sensors essential to avoid wheel scrapes. The Colorado’s descent control system will be a boon off-road but even around town it’s a beauty, changing down gears for you and even blipping the throttle on the way. For those who want a vehicle with 3.5-tonne towing power (and there’s an anti-trailer-sway device for this) and more heavy-duty use but also with family comforts, the Colorado will appeal and good deals are available.

Tech spec

Model reviewed: Colorado LTZ Price: From $39,990 rrp (4x2 single-cab), $44,490 (4x2 crew-cab) $50,990 (4x4 space-cab LS), $52,490 (4x4 crew-cab LS), $55,490 (4x4 crew-cab pickup), $56,990 (4x4 crew-cab LT), $60,990 (4x4 crew-cab LTZ), $61,490 (4x4 spacecab LTZ), $64,990 (4x4 Z71 crew-cab). Power: 2.8-litre Duramax diesel turbo 4-cylinder with 6-speed manual or automatic transmission. 147kw @ 3600rpm, 500Nm @ 2000rpm Fuel economy: 8.1 l/100km combined Vehicle courtesy of Holden New Zealand


BUSINESS PROFILE

Gaining confidence and style to improve your image BY SADIE BECKMAN P HO T O I S H NA JAC OB S

We

all want to put our best foot forward in life, but sometimes we’re not quite sure how to do it. This is exactly where some objective expertise and advice in the friendly form of Lynn Crossland can help. Lynn owns Renaissance Style Coaching, a professional image consultancy business that can guide you into presenting yourself to your absolute best advantage, expressing your highest potential and boosting your confidence and self-esteem. But what exactly is ‘style coaching’? Defined as a combination of personal styling advice, motivational techniques and image consultancy all rolled into one, it’s a way to take the doubt and uncertainty out of making your mark in life. Certified Style Coach™ Lynn says the methods help her clients become effortlessly stylish and confident and to have a frustration-free wardrobe, creating a fabulous new image in the mirror and a beautiful new persona on the inside too, because, after all, it’s what is on the inside that shines out. Lynn first became interested in the field of style coaching 12 years ago, later pursuing her passion through study and qualifications to become accredited.

“It is amazing how people can feel happier in life and achieve more when they are feeling confident.”

“I have always been very interested in the way people put their outfits together, and why some look fabulous on some body types, whereas others don’t,” she says. “I was very interested to find out what makes an outfit stand out above the rest, and how to achieve that polished, stylish look. “Wearing the right styles and colours, having good posture and body language and being well-groomed can have a huge impact on confidence and self-esteem. Knowing what your style personality is

and dressing appropriately for the right occasion can make you not only look great but feel really confident as well.” Lynn provides coaching, which consists of daily confidence-boosting exercises and goal setting as well as support, to help with low self-esteem, and she says the results can be significant. The style coaching sessions are carried out on a one-to-one basis or in group workshops, which is a lot of fun, with refreshments and nibbles provided. It is then explained which garments suit the different body types and techniques revealed how to create different optical illusions with style, pattern and colour. “It is amazing how people can feel happier in life and achieve more when they are feeling confident,” she explains. “I am very passionate about style coaching because of the holistic approach it involves. It is incredible what you can disguise or enhance through dressing with some creative styling, and as everyone is different it is always interesting as well as rewarding to see someone feeling confident and looking fabulous.” While many of her clients are women, Lynn also coaches men, with younger

as well as older men gaining confidence and self-respect through presenting themselves in a stylish yet effortless way. “I recently did a wardrobe sort-out for a young guy who, having now finished his studies and entering the world of work, was very keen to know how to revamp his wardrobe and discover what styles would give him a professional look,” she says. “He was really pleased with the results and felt he could go out into the world showing his best face.” Recently a client was thrilled with her organised wardrobe who found it a pleasure in the mornings to decide what to wear knowing that everything in her wardrobe fitted and made a her look amazing. Funnily enough though, Lynn’s top tip is when you have the right style clothes for your body shape and the right colours, to complete the look, wear it with a smile.

Contact lynncrossland.co.nz Mobile: 022 411 4727

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ARTS

Following the calling

B Y LY N D A PA P E S C H P HO T O G R A P H Y BY I S H NA JAC OB S

For

more than a decade, artist and Kereru Gallery co-owner Karen Walters has embraced her calling – to create art that strongly reflects the vitality of nature and her connection to it. Karen sculpts primarily out of native timber, with an interest in reflecting the energy and essence of life-forms and lines within the New Zealand landscape. Her latest pieces form part of a trio exhibition entitled Call of the Sea, on until January 10 at Kereru Galley in Mapua. Call of the Sea also includes works by painter Timothy Jones and printmaker Josh Bashford. All three exhibitors show a deep and energetic connection to the liquid landscape. Timothy paints with lusciously thick and confident brushstrokes, Josh creates precise and contrasting woodcut print work with hidden images, while Karen brings volume and depth to the walls with her mounted curving timber forms. Her latest four are all wall-works. She carves them out of very thick timber slabs and then mounts them 4cm out from the wall, ‘‬bringing depth and dimension and an ever-changing play on light and 74

Karen Walters

shadow to an otherwise flat and lifeless surface’. Featured within this collection is Karen’s largest wall-work to date, carved out of one giant slab of beautifully seasoned macrocarpa and measuring 2m x 1.5m. Aptly named The Force of the Flow, it depicts the artist’s unique interpretation of the continual power and ever-changing movement of the ocean. Karen states: “As well as (this artwork) being a respectful depiction of the ocean’s powerful life-force, it is a metaphor for the strength and irregularity of life, and the act of embracing the powerful unknown.” She also says the medium has a message: “I enjoy the process of carving timber. It has its own life-force and individuality. It seems to expose itself the more you sculpt it, and the closer to refining and finishing you get, you see the consistency of the grain flowing through the work. The nature of this shows its spirit and complements the energy and ideas underpinning my work.”‬ In addition to her timber wallworks, Karen has turned her sculpting hand to other materials in Call of the Sea, producing a limited edition of seainspired jewellery pieces. “‬When I make

jewellery I sculpt on a miniature level out of a special hard wax. The technique is traditionally known as ‘lost wax casting’. A mould gets formed around my carved wax pieces. The wax then gets melted out and replaced with precious metal. My husband Mike (a trained jeweller) then polishes them up beautifully for me.”‬ Running concurrently at Kereru is a second exhibition, Lush, also on until January 10. A solo show by abstract artist Gaye Jurisich, it features a dynamic new collection of works that are large, bold and far from boring. Gaye layers her large canvases with lush and lavish confidence.‬ But it doesn’t stop there. Starting January 14 and running until February 7 is an exhibition by Robin Slow titled Nga Kaiwaewae. The popular Golden Bay artist is a regular exhibitor at Kereru Gallery. Robin’s latest exhibition features a solo collection of new works inspired by ‘Nga aitanga kapakapa a Tane’ (The wing flapping children of Tane). The displays are constantly changing at Kereru, showcasing some of the region’s and New Zealand’s finest artistic talent.‬


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7.

Emma Bass, Delphiniums, Photograph on Watercolour paper, framed, Red Gallery, Nelson, redartgallery.com Custom made ring from Benjamin Black Goldsmiths, Nelson 03 546 9137, benjaminblack.co.nz Russel Papworth, Recycled Metal Fish, Forest Fusion, Mapua Wharf 03 540 2961, $540 Jane Smith, Jaz Counting Bees, digital portrait, Chocolate Dog Studio, Mapua 03 540 2007, $240 Roz Speirs, First Growth, Fused Glass Platter, Art@203, Nelson 027 500 5528, $110 Marilyn Andrews, From Harris Hill Marybank Toward Nelson, Acrylic on Canvas, 120cm x 90cm, Marilyn Andrews Gallery, Nelson 03 548 9400, $5,000 Bill Burke, The Tight Five, oil, 120 cm x 60 cm, Bill Burke Gallery, Nelson 03 546 6793

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MUSIC

“We all face uncertain times in many ways. Music, as always, plays a part in providing answers to world unrest. It is truly a peaceful international language.”

Starving our arts BY PETE RAINEY

T

his may well be the last time I comment on the fact that the arts get a disproportionately smaller slice of the recreational spend from Nelson City Council compared with sport. This is nothing new – it’s been like that for many council terms. What is apparent now is that a certain group of sports codes soak up the lion’s share of council expenditure, at the expense of other sporting and recreational activities. So, while we have a mayor, deputy mayor and other councillors with extremely close ties to those codes, we can expect to see this situation continue for the foreseeable future, which is regrettable. The kind of investment we have seen for cricket and rugby World Cup hosting in Nelson city would 76

have even greater results if applied to mountain biking, Nelson’s fastest-growing recreational pursuit. Some of those who put my role as chair of Community Services to question in the latter parts of the last term of council, including the mayor, labelled me as being too ‘arty’ and demonstrating a lack of governance oversight in matters regarding sport. At the time, I found this puzzling when you consider that in the decade of my council involvement, sport in Nelson has arguably never had it so good. Two World Cup forays and a host of stunning new facilities rolled out for rugby, cricket, basketball and lots more. Well, now that the election is doneand-dusted, I accept that the sporting fraternity, albeit those in Nelson’s small

cabal of politically motivated sport nuts, will always want to win at all cost. This is nothing new to society, and ‘post-truth’ political machinations are fast becoming the norm worldwide. That doesn’t mean we have to accept the situation. We should cherish and support the arts and creativity equally alongside sport in our lives. At its heart, sport is combat. It’s about conflict – winners and losers, and getting a result, and not necessarily a true reflection of life’s journey. Much of the sports news we are fed by our media channels is no longer about Joe Average having a go – it’s about professional elite athletes performing at a level unattainable to most. The language is all about smash, thrash, annihilate, destroy and conquer. Not everyone is wired to get out there and smash their opponents, to get a winning result at all cost. Some want to work collaboratively to achieve a result harmoniously. The journey is the important bit, not the destination. Just like creating and performing music, when you play in a band or orchestra or sing in a choir, you work with others to create something bigger than the sum of its parts, and that draws to a natural conclusion. You engage in a creative process with other humans. We all face uncertain times in many ways. Music, as always, plays a part in providing answers to world unrest. It is truly a peaceful international language. Musical education extends students’ creativity in all areas. I do fear for the future of our planet. I do wonder what is in store for our kids. I am still concerned about the future of our city, region and country, and I ask you to think deeply about the arts in our community and the support they need.


MARLBOROUGH ART SOCIETY 2017 SUMMER-AUTUMN

WORKSHOPS PROGRAMME RICHARD ADAMS ABSTRACT PAINTING WORKSHOP AT MARISCO VINEYARD $200

25 - 26 February SHEYNE TUFFERY’S WOODCUT PRINTMAKING WORKSHOP $200

18 - 19 March BRIAN BADCOCK’S BACK TO BASICS PAINTING WORKSHOP $180

25 - 26 March email workshops@marlboroughartsociety.com to register your interest or phone Helen Ballinger on 021 0267 8711

Funded by Creative Communities NZ Local Arts Funding 2016-2017

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QUIZ

Crossword

Across 01. Pulling sharply 04. Stretch (for) 07. Hungarian spice 08. Tennis score 09. Risk 12. Rescued disaster victims 15. Gaining knowledge 17. Radio interference 18. Roves 21. Tetanus ailment 22. Stacked 23. Monotony

Sudoku

Every number from 1 to 9 must appear in: Each of the nine horizontal rows Each of the nine vertical columns Each of the nine 3x3 boxes

Down 01. Young in appearance 02. Australian marsupials 03. Clench (teeth) 04. Street 05. Adopts (identity) 06. Fine-tune (skills) 10. Cotton fabric 11. Sudden pains 13. Rainbow’s band of hues 14. Sun shield 16. Japanese martial art 18. Hindquarters 19. Sleigh 20. Sore crust

Wordfind V R Y S H R D D R C Q V O

Last month’s solutions CROSSWORD

Remember no number can occur more than once in any row, column or box.

SUDOKU

C R E A T E V E E O D J B

L M K C C G T L B G E S C

B S E I A A I I M I T V O

T E D D N L R B E T A W Z

T E L I I E L E M A M Y P

O C M I S T G R E T I O I

L U E O E N A A R E N J M

R P L P L V U T S D A E A

T V P M X Y E E E I E C G

E N O S A E R R X D V T I

T C E L F E R R D Z E N N

G W B R A I N P O W E R E

ANIMATED BELIEVE BRAINPOWER COGITATE CREATE DECIDE DEEM DELIBERATE ENVISAGE EXPECT IMAGINE MEDITATE PONDER REASON RECALL REFLECT REMEMBER RESOLVE RUMINATE

Find all the words listed hidden in the grid of letters. They can be found in straight lines up, down, forwards, backwards or diagonally. Theme: Thinking

Anagram WORDFIND ANAGRAM Anniversary, Thanksgiving, Birthday, Engagement, Graduation Mystery word: Easter

Z P Q R D C C S H E J H R

B M O H J R A T D U C E H

G A N W Y I A R M G I Y P

J R E X D B E P S F H L T

Y P P A N E S L I E A W H

G T T Z C U R C T Y A E I

U O T E I A A Y P T L T G

R Y I T N P P E U D O E H

Y S X X V I N S A G L B C

N P H O T O S R U S R B H

N R L W A R C S O L L O A

U L U L L A B Y A M E X I

B S T R O L L E R B P Z R

Unscramble the letters of the phrases to make five words relating to the theme, each starting with the given letter. The letters in the shaded squares will spell out another word relating to the theme. This is the mystery keyword. COS OR PI A GUITAR SITS CAIRN CROP A RISE USA RUT

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S S C A T

Theme: STAR SIGNS


FILM

Paterson Drama Directed & written by Jim Jarmusch Starring Adam Driver, Golshifteh Farahani 1h 53min, Rating R BY EDDIE ALLNUTT

2017

Paterson W

atching Paterson could be compared to sipping brandy – both have a warming after-effect and make you reflect on life. But the glow you get from Jim Jarmusch’s latest film serves as a pain-relieving antidote against the genres of high-octane action and kitsch comedy that are all too synonymous with Hollywood these days. Paterson (Adam Driver) is a modest man who isn’t perturbed by much. He has a daily routine that you’ll know as well as he does by the time the credits roll. He’s a bus driver who eavesdrops on his commuters’ conversations and then uses what he has heard as a catalyst for his passion – poetry. As he jots down lines in his notebook, they materialise on screen, and although he’s not quite the calibre of Walt Whitman, he does compose verses that are easy on the ear. Iranian actress Golshifteh Farahani plays Paterson’s effervescent wife Laura. She has unbounded enthusiasm for fame and fortune, however, you may wonder about her naivety as she juggles and starts new endeavours. The couple’s differences, along with the acceptance of them, make for a harmonious, yinyang type of relationship. Paterson is a proud Patersonian. That’s right, the film is set in this New Jersey cosmopolitan metropolis. It comes across as a humdrum sort of destination, apart from the iconic Great Falls. Over the years Paterson has had its fair share of racial tension, including riots and the infamous triple-murder that spawned Bob Dylan’s 1975 protest song, Hurricane. Driver acts his part with a sedative smoothness. On odd occasions you can see some inner frustration simmering, but it never comes close to boiling point. He receives apt support from Farahani and, surprisingly, a recidivist bulldog named Marvin, whose subtle canine nuances help to embellish the movie’s lighthearted humour. Once again Jarmusch has ingeniously directed a minimalistic film with measured idiosyncrasies that focus more on feelings and characters rather than a strong narrative. It’s poetic in more ways than one as the film’s chronology seems to epitomise stanzas and various repetitive patterns to create a metaphor of life. Long-time Paterson resident, doctor and epoch-making poet William Carlos Williams is Jarmusch’s underlying point of reference, so I’d like to leave you with a few lines from his eponymously-titled epic poem about the city, after which the film and its protagonist are named: Say it, no ideas but in things – nothing but the blank faces of the houses and cylindrical trees bent, forked by preconception and accident – split, furrowed, creased, mottled, stained – secret – into the body of the light!

29 December – February 6 NINA (M) Jan 4, 15, 16, 28, 30

EMBRACE (M) Jan 6, 9, 14, 22, 23

WAR ON EVERYONE (R16) Dec 29, 31 Jan 5, 16, 27, 30

SNOWDEN (M) Feb 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Biopic of one of the century’s most extraordinary talents, Nina Simone – SINGER, ACTIVIST, SURVIVOR, LEGEND

Doco from body image activist Taryn Brumfitt where she explores the global issue of body loathing

Two corrupt cops in Mexico set out to blackmail and frame criminals who cross their paths

Academy award winning director Oliver Stone tackles the previously untold Snowden personal story

Go to our website for more information

www.statecinemas.co.nz Ph: 03 548 3885 - 91 Trafalgar St, Nelson

79


D I R E C T O RY

graphic design motion graphics & art direction

Ball Season Beauty Hair + Makeup + Nail packages available. 03 545 74 25 | hello@glitterandblush.co.nz www.glitterandblush.co.nz Based at Hair In The City, Nelson

THE NEW BLAK HAIRSTYLIST | MAKE UP ARTIST | FASHION STYLIST kelly.v@hotmail.co.nz | 0279625126

118 Bridge Street, Nelson cardells.co.nz • 03 548 1505

Nelson-Tasman 104.8 • Nelson Central City 107.2 Takaka 95.0 • Blenheim 88.9

You’re the Boss-

Fresh FM Podcasts

WHAT YOU WANT, WHEN YOU WANT IT most of our shows are yours to download – either from our website or through iTunes

www.freshfm.net

Phone 03 54 69 891 80

Fresh fruit and veggies and real fruit ice creams PYO strawberries, raspberries and boysenberries Gift shop and fun park 03 544 2099 | 108 Appleby Hwy, Appleby, Richmond

Fine wines, great food, craft beers OPEN DAILY | MAPUA WHARF | P 03 540 2580


D I R E C T O RY

Anything but

ordinary

12 John Wesley Lane, Richmond (off Queen St, behind Avanti Plus)

Phone: 03 544 1515

32 New Street, Nelson | 03 548 2995 | liquorland.co.nz

The New Ford Escape HERE NOW

www.moxini.co.nz

LoveNelson.NZ Locals supporting locals. The quick and easy way to purchase local goods and services, directly from your computer or smartphone.

MS Ford

157 Haven Road, Nelson 0800 10 34 34 | msford.co.nz

The Floral Experience

31 Trafalgar Street, Nelson | 03 545 7939 | willowfloraldesign.co.nz

Lydia’s Cafe Sonya Leusink Sladen. Photography by Ishna Jacobs

31 Trafalgar Street, Nelson, 7010 | 03 545 7939 | willowfloraldesign.co.nz

Happy & healthy New Year from us all at Lydia’s Cafe. Open from 6am Mon - Fri, serving excellent food and coffee. 265 Queen St, Richmond | Phone 544 1020 81


M Y E D U C AT I O N

How has the course been so far? Are you enjoying it? It’s an awesome course. I’m doing what I love. We’ve just spent the last three weeks in Arthurs Pass skiing and rock-climbing. There’s not a lot of written stuff. It’s mainly practical, which I enjoy.

Why did you decide to do your Adventure Tourism course at NMIT? I’ve always dreamt of doing it and had a friend who’d just completed the course. I applied and they squeezed me in with just two days’ notice. The location’s great too – everything is close by – and they have been in operation for a long time.

Do you have any idols or inspirational figures you look up to in life? There’s this South African guy called Mike Horn. He’s a world explorer. Horn swam the length of the Amazon River using a hydrospeed, and is about to do the Pole-to-Pole. I aspire to live like him in the next five to 10 years. It’s one of the hardest things to go on an unknown adventure.

What is the most important requirement for someone entering the adventure tourism industry today? Definitely attitude. You must be passionate about the outdoors because you probably won’t make a lot of money. It’s more about lifestyle and being around like-minded people.

What’s your ambition after completing this course? A world explorer is what I want to be – to explore untouched places and to motivate others. I like the social media side of all this as well, and want to convince people to seek adventure.

‘Wildboy’ upskills BY STEPHEN BERG

P H O T O G R A P H Y A N A G A L L O WAY

Do you have any advice for others wanting to do this course? Yes – do it. Even if you are only thinking about it, just do it. The other students on this course with me range from 15 to 45 years old so there is a good mix.

Have you ever thought about doing another course at NMIT? I think upskilling is important and I always want to be learning and experiencing. I’m more into the practical side of things but I’ve done a lot of public speaking so I can see myself teaching others in the future too. Instagram: Wildboy_adventures Facebook: Wildboy adventures Brando Yelavich wildboyadventures.com

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Three years ago, aged 19, Brando Yelavich set off to circumnavigate New Zealand’s coastline. Six hundred days later he accomplished his goal and became a legend. He then co-authored a book, Wildboy, published by Penguin to acclaim last year. It describes this epic trek in detail and why he did it. Life is all about adventure, he says, and enrolling in the NMIT two-year Certificate and Diploma in Adventure Tourism programmes was the natural thing to do.


Hairdressing graduate Check out Kim’s classroom

You’ll be so glad you did

Te Ha-para (Diploma in Ma-ori Studies), Certificate in Te Rito o Te Reo Check out Kapohau’s classroom

APPLY NOW

FOR FEB 2017

nmit.ac.nz/applynow

0800 788 391

Programmes available in: Aquaculture, Aviation Engineering, Conservation, Maritime, Viticulture and Winemaking, Adventure Tourism, Business, Information Technology, Arts and Design, Nursing, Health, Fitness, Ma-ori Studies, Automotive, Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Construction, Social Work, Counselling, Supervision, Cookery, Hospitality, Business Administration, Interior Design, Retail, Writing, Music, Hairdressing, Beauty and Body Therapy, English Language, Horticulture, Vocational Skills. Or take a Bridging Programme to help you into your future study.

Certificate in Superyacht Crewing Check out Zach’s classroom

Trainee Ranger Certificate Check out Zealand’s classroom


We are proud to welcome Sarah Quickfall to the Nelson team. Consistently raising the bar, Sarah is always looking for new ways to enhance the real estate experience for her clients.

Sarah Quickfall M +64 27 544 9677 sarah.quickfall@sothebysrealty.com Shop 1, 295 Trafalgar Street, Nelson nzsothebysrealty.com

Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Browns Real Estate Limited (licensed under the REAA 2008) MREINZ.

Wild Tomato January 2017  

WildTomato is Nelson & Marlborough's magazine. We focus on inspiring journalism, stunning photography and beautiful design. www.wildtomato.c...