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wildland

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wildland Š 2 014 Wildland. Al l r ig h t s re s e r ve d . All ma te r ia l i n t h i s m a g a z i n e m a y n ot b e reproduced, tra n s mitte d o r d is tr ib ute d in a ny fo rm w i t h o u t co n sen t .


FOUNDER & EDITOR Nathan Cleary DESIGN Nathan Cleary

CONTRIBUTORS Andri Ingvarsson Anze Osterman Cory Stevens Daniel Alford Daniel Zenker David Quinn Gavin Rutherford Ines Riegler Jan Erik Waider Julian Bialowas J端rgen Heckel Lukas Furlan Mikko Lagerstedt Tom Joy

SOCIAL facebook.com/wildlandmagazine twitter.com/wildlandmag instagram.com/wildlandmag

WI LD L A ND T WO

CONTACT US wildlandmag.co.uk hello@wildlandmag.co.uk


Editor’s Note I won’t lie; creating a printed magazine has been a bumpy ride! It’s not been an easy thing to get off the ground. Having no experience in the printing or design industry and working alone, I have had to learn everything on the job. The biggest hurdle was always going to be the funding of the project. After designing the initial layout I realised my personal funding wasn’t going to stretch to the size of magazine I’d originally envisaged. I didn’t want to cut the content down or compromise on the paper quality so the only other option I had was to cut the overall size. Taking it down to A5 felt risky but after seeing the proof I was convinced this was the way to go. Our contributors and artists have really outdone themselves and come together again to give us their interpretation of escape and I think they have done a fabulous job! Their eclectic pieces are both stunning and creative. I need to say a huge thank you to all of them for their enthusiasm, patience and of course their awesome images! I would also like to say a huge thank you to Hannah Cleary, Hannah Peedle and Steve Cleary for helping me get this issue finished. I really hope you enjoy reading this as much as I have enjoyed creating it and I hope this will inspire you to go travel, explore and find your own ‘escape’. Enjoy!

- Nathan Cleary, Founder & Editor of Wildland Magazine

WI LD L A ND T WO


ESCAP E


CONTENTS

FRONT COVER Lukas Furlan

01 ILLUSTR ATION Gavin Ruther ford

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K ARWENDEL Daniel Zenker

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INTO THE WILD Lukas Furlan

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ICICLE WALL Andri Ingvarsson

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BL ACK ICE Jan Erik Waider

84 GROSSGLOCKNER Cor y Stevens

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WINTERVIEW Mikko L agerstedt

90 SPOTLIGHT David Quinn

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AN ESCAPE Tom Joy

INSIDE RE AR COVER J端rgen Heckel

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WOODS, ICE & US Anze Osterman

RE AR COVER Anze Osterman

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SPOTLIGHT Gavin Ruther ford

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WELCOME NIGHT Julian Bialowas

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ALPINE NATURE Ines Riegler

64 WANDERLUST Daniel Alford


I NTO T H E WI L D PARCO NATUR ALE PUE Z ODLE , ITALY PHOTOGR APHY BY LUK AS FURL AN WORDS BY LUK AS FURL AN


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Early in January I decided to spend two days with a friend in the snowbound wilderness of Puez Odle, Italy. We are both fascinated by the untouched snowscapes; the mystical eerie silence of the wilderness and of course, the cold. It was our intention to photograph this natural splendor and isolation.

As we tramped through the snow we occasionally crossed the tracks of wild animals. We became aware of the clouds and the blue sky as the bright rays of sunlight briefly burst through. The cold was biting, numbing and began to interfere with the camera gear. The tripod and the camera froze. Before you took each photo you had to scrape off the thin layer of ice from the lens.

We left early in the morning and reached our starting point after almost an hour’s drive. Our backpacks were filled with food, warm clothing, camping and of course, our photography gear. We started our early morning hike through the forest as it lay shrouded in deep white snow. Our backpacks were heavy and even wearing snowshoes we were pushed deeper and deeper into the snow. The exertion caused us to excessively perspire making our clothes uncomfortable as they became damp and stuck to us. At last, having found a suitable spot to camp, we settled down to spend the night in a mysterious forest glade.

Just after nightfall we made it back to the camp and decided to warm ourselves by the fire. As we were surrounded by darkness, apart from the flickering light of the campfire we spent some time admiring the clear starry sky. We struggled out of our comfy sleeping bags in the early morning and immediately noticed that there was no sign of any improvement in the weather. Overnight the weather had deteriorated. It had closed in wrapping our tent in fog and snow. It began to fall heavier and heavier. We quickly broke camp and hurriedly packed up only waiting to have a morning hot drink. We trudged back to the car and safety.

We gathered some pine branches which we used under the tent to stop the cold and damp coming up from the ground. We collected enough firewood for the night, created a large cavity for the fire and then continued with our hike into the deserted snowy landscape. We took a light backpack loaded with minimal camera gear.

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B L ACK I CE DISKO BAY, GRE E NL AND PHOTOGR APHY BY JAN ERIK WAIDER WORDS BY JAN ERIK WAIDER

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It has always been a dream of mine that someday I would take a trip to the Arctic - especially Greenland. My impressions and experiences were totally different from when I previously visited Iceland. When I visited Greenland for the first time two years ago I was profoundly struck by the proportions of the icebergs and glaciers. Their sizes were simply overwhelming. The Jakobshavn Glacier near Ilulissat on the West-Coast of Greenland is one of the most active glaciers in the world. Icebergs that break off from the glacier are sometimes so large that they seem more like small islands - not unlike their own individual country as they slowly float into the open ocean. I walked around the glacier; took a helicopter flight to see it from above and went on boat trips between the icebergs. Every perspective was spectacular and breathtaking. I am really drawn to landscapes that transform, change or disappear. Every photograph of an iceberg shows a unique moment, a landscape which has changed and is most likely to be gone forever. These images have been captured at that specific moment on the camera. My inspiration for this series was to show how these forms and shapes are carved out of the ice in dramatic and dynamic ways.


WI NT E R V I E W: MI KKO L AG E R STE DT KE R AVA , FINL AND PHOTOGR APHY BY MIKKO L AGERSTEDT WORDS BY NATHAN CLE ARY & MIKKO L AGERSTEDT

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For anyone unfamiliar with Mikko Lagerstedt, could you tell them who you are, what you do and why you do it? I’m a fine art photographer from Finland. I love to get out into nature and enjoy the cold and beautiful views. I have this feeling inside me that I really have to go out and capture moments that excite me.

What’s your current camera gear at the moment and why? My current gear is the Nikon D800, with Samyang 14 mm f/2.8, Nikkor 16 - 35 mm f/2.8, Sigma 50 mm f/1.4, Nikkor 70 - 300 mm f/4.5 - 5.6 VR. I don’t have a particular reason why I have this setup, but somehow Ive ended up with it and It just works for me. I also have Sirui Tripod R-4203L + Sirui Ball Head K-40X. I also use neutral density filters to get longer exposures during a brighter time.

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What inspires you? Movies, nature and music. Those are my major inspiration sources. Usually the ideas come to me when I’m out shooting and experimenting.

Lastly, any advice you’d like to give to up-and-coming photographers? Experiment! What part of photography excites you the most, keep on doing it and you will find your vision.

Whats your proudest achievement to date? Nikon Photography Awards 2nd place

Page 25: Jokioinen, Finland

What are you working on at the moment? I’m currently working on a exhibition, and I still have lot’s to do before the opening night.

Page 27/1: Nokia, Finland Page 27/2: Nokia, Finland

You have been giving away your Lightroom tips and tricks recently on your blog, is this something you are planning on doing on a regular basis? I really enjoy helping people to use these great tools to their own advantage. So yes this is very possible.

Page 28-29: Nokia, Finland

If you could shoot anywhere on Earth, where would you go and why? I think I would go to Iceland. I love the images I have seen from there, the vast plains and those unique landscapes.

“In our lives, things can go so fast that we forget to enjoy these short moments - If I can make people stop and see the beauty of life, I have succeeded.” 28


A N E SCA PE CALL ANDE R , SCOTL AND PHOTOGR APHY BY TOM JOY WORDS BY TOM JOY


My girlfriend and I had an urge to escape to a remote and isolated place where we could enjoy the scenery of the forests. A wooden lodge in the Callander Forest offered us the perfect opportunity to enjoy that remoteness. It rained all over the week-end but we did not care. Despite the time of the year everything around us seemed so full of life. The mist crept out from the trees from the surrounding hills and the noise of the falling raindrops made the entire forest feel alive.

My photographs from that weekend were a simple point and shoot with little motive other than to capture the colours and vistas I had enjoyed. These photographs are very different from my usual output but gave me the opportunity to keep my creativity broad and to compliment my weaknesses and strengths. This summer I am hoping to make several trips into the wilderness. I hope that these trips will ‘feed my inner child’ and continue to develop my creativity.


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WO O D S , I CE & U S JE LOVICA FOREST, SLOVE NIA PHOTOGR APHY BY ANZE OSTERMAN WORDS BY ANZE OSTERMAN

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A wise man once said: ‘’I love not man the less but Nature more.’’

Sometimes it only needs something we do for a split second in the present, for it to resonate into the future.

From times past, every human being has the deep desire of the wanderlust. All you need to do is step outside! Become a friend with your surroundings! I live near the woods, mountains and rivers. They are my photographic playground. They are my places of escape, distraction and diversion. They do not restrict my freedom. Adventures with close friends are my real love and escape. A couple of years ago, I found a secret lake in our woods. You can feel the enchantment and magic whether you swim in it or jump into the water from the giant rocks. It is one of my favourite places to relax and kick off the cares of the world. It is a special place for me to be free. This winter the lake froze, and we came up with an idea to skate on the ice. My friend Jaka and I grabbed our backpacks and skateboards, and headed into the woods to our secluded lake. We skated, and as we skated we felt euphoric.

’I love not man the less, but Nature more.’’

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S POT L I GH T: GA V I N R U T HE RF ORD E DINBURGH, SCOTL AND ILLUSTR ATIONS FE ATURED ON PAGES 1, 49, 50 & 51 facebook.com/grillustration g.r.ruther ford@hotmail.com

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W E LCO M E NI G H T JOKULSARLON & SOLHE IMASANDUR , ICE L AND PHOTO ESSAY BY JULIAN BIALOWAS


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A L PI NE NAT U RE ZILLE RTAL , AU STRIA PHOTOGR APHY BY INES RIEGLER WORDS BY INES RIEGLER


Never do I feel more at home as when I am on my way up steep, rough paths through pristine woods heading in one direction...up! Only once did I have the experience of both solace and a sudden feeling of belonging. Again and again I find myself being pulled away to my only retreat: Alpine Nature. “True escape is found only there…” Energy Silence Consolation Art Pause Eternity Page 60: Taken near Gschlösslaste Page 62-63: Taken near Alpengasthaus Breitlahner


WA ND E R LU ST CAIRNGORMS NATIONAL PARK , SCOTL AND PHOTOGR APHY BY DANIEL ALFORD WORDS BY DANIEL ALFORD


For almost as long as I can remember I have longed to wander, explore, and find tranquility in the world. Space to think; space to appreciate my environment; and space to hear the world as it was, before the constant hum of roads, cities, and industry. I remember my first adventures as a young boy as if they were yesterday, exploring nearby hills and woodlands with my grandfather. He instilled in me a curiosity, passion, and restlessness that still often leads me to try and escape the modern world. In the British Isles however, there are few places which can still offer an individual this kind satisfaction or a true sense of wilderness. In my searching, I found myself traveling to the Cairngorms National Park in Scotland. I travelled north in a spell of mild weather before winter finally took its hold over the highlands. On arriving it wasn’t long before I was following deer paths through ancient forests, crossing freezing cold rivers, and looking out into a vast and beautiful landscape. To me, the land itself was a huge reminder of the awesome power of nature and the slow and gentle passing of geological time.


The steep ‘U shaped’ valleys and passes of the highlands were carved out during the last ice age by the flow of enormous rivers of ice and rock called glaciers. The forests here are some of the last surviving pockets of Caledonian Forest in the country and are the home of Scots pine. Unfortunately less than 1% of the original forest which once covered most of Scotland now remains. These magical forests are a remnant of a time when the ice and glaciers first retreated and trees started to recolonise the British Isles. Experiencing these impressive features transported my imagination back almost 10,000 years. On the first day, walking along the shores of Loch an Eilein, I had a brief encounter with a charismatic creature widely regarded to be a national treasure, the Red Squirrel. The Cairngorms mountain range is also the home of other ‘endangered species’ such as Golden Eagles, Scottish Wildcat, and the Capercaillie, a type of woodland grouse. I travelled on foot with a close friend through this incredible land, camping after long days, warming my feet by fires and watching the stars at night. I had an amazing time photographing this wild and beautiful place.

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K A RWE ND E L K ARWE NDE L , AU STRIA PHOTOGR APHY BY DANIEL ZENKER WORDS BY DANIEL ZENKER

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We start our tour early in the morning. Clouds hanging down like cotton wool. Those first few metres you can barely see what is in front of you. The sunlight, vague and reflecting in the snow, blinds our sight yet up ahead the path is covered in clouds. We follow the trail alongside a high cliff. The view improves, slightly, but clouds still cover the top of the mountain ridge. The slope is scattered with debris from rock falls. Giant boulders lie around; some of them have little bronze plates on them. We read the names of the deceased hikers and climbers, it gives me a slight shudder every time. After a while the sun begins to break through the clouds. You hear crackling sounds in the distance on the wall and it seems in the clouds. Small flurries of snow and ice begin falling down every time the sunshine increases. As we climb on to our right a wall of rock, to our left debris. A slight shudder! Then finally, we make a steep climb at the end of the valley onto a little plateau. The path leads us out of the field of rocks and into the woods, down the final descent, more and more sunlight, and suddenly the glorious blue sky.

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I CI CL E WA L L RE YKJAVIK , ICE L AND PHOTO ESSAY BY ANDRI INGVARSSON

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G RO S S G LO CK N E R GROS SGLOCKNE R , AU STRIA PHOTOGR APHY BY CORY STEVENS WORDS BY CORY STEVENS

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The famous Grossglockner High Alpine Road, or GroßglocknerHochalpenstraße, is a scenic drive through the dramatic Hochtor Pass in the Austrian Alps. Located in the state of Salzburg, the road connects Ferleiten and Heiligenblut – with a panoramic viewpoint of the impressive Grossglockner mountain peak itself. At nearly 3,800m, it’s the tallest peak in Austria and amongst the highest in the Eastern Alps.

Due to the weather, I was worried that the Grossglockner Road, my return route, would already be closed – or worse, that my overworked rental car would break down halfway up the pass or go sliding over the edge. But the morning was clear, the car kept it together, and the Grossglockner did not disappoint.

The road, constructed between 1930-35, at some 48km long features 36 winding, hairpin curves and climbs with an elevation of over 2,500m. Not only as a means of passage for locals and a seasonal attraction for tourists, the grueling Grossglockner Road has also been featured twice in the Giro d’Italia. Today it’s a popular destination for cyclists and motorcycle enthusiasts. This past October, just before it closed for the season, I had the opportunity to drive this infamous road. On my southern pass through the Alps I encountered horrible weather – heavy fog, high winds and freezing rain which blanketed the landscape in a frustrating sea of grey.

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S POT L I GH T: DA V I D Q U I N N MILTON KE YNES, UK PHOTOGR APHY BY DAVID QUINN WORDS BY DAVID QUINN

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I have included work from my last photographic project from September 2013 when I visited South West Iceland.

I am a musician and more recently a photographer. My work reflects my interest in landscapes. I prefer to do little or no preplanning. I often let the accidently qualities of the shot inspire and amaze me. I may miss a perfectly remarkable landscape but may just as easily find something better. In some sense it does not really matter because as I come back and take more pictures I may discover something different or unusual.

Iceland is the ‘dream’ destination for any landscape photographer. Everywhere you look you are presented with incredible, breathtaking and stimulating vistas. Your whole visit is a visual feast which can sometimes seem to overload your senses.

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Page 91: Skies over Hvalfjörður, Vesturland

Sometimes it seems that you could point your camera at anything and create a masterpiece. (Be warned – it does not really work!)

Page 92-93: The road to Þórsmörk, Suðurland

Being surrounded by all this, I wonder what Icelanders would consider as their most astonishing image?

Page 94: Buðir Church, Snæfellsnes Peninsula, Vesturland Page 95/1: A place that means “place”, Staðastaður Church, Snæfellsnes Peninsula, Vesturland Page 95/2: “Vigfús Ingimundarson last inhabitant of Strönd í Selvogi. Deserted in 1696.” Graveyard, Strandarkirkja, Suðurland Page 97: Skógafoss, Suðurland Page 98-99: Sunset over Þingvellir, Suðurland

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“WE TRAVEL NOT TO ESCAPE LIFE, BUT FOR LIFE NOT TO ESCAPE US.”


NEXT ISSUE SPRING 2014

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