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wildland N AT U R A L CO NNECT IO N


wildland

Š 2013 W i l d l a nd . All r ig h t s re s e r ve d . All material in th is magazin e may n ot be repro d uced , t ra n s m it te d o r d is t r ib u te d in any fo rm with o ut co n s en t.


FOUNDER & EDITOR Nathan Cleary DESIGN Nathan Cleary

CONTRIBUTORS Anze Osterman Daniel Harðarson Jan Wunderlich Jérôme Rouchon Joe Harper Jürgen Heckel Kathrin Loges Monica Raduta Natalia Rajszyz Rhi Ellis Roma May Daly Roo Lewis Taylor McCutchan

WILDL AND ONE

CONTACT US wildlandmag.co.uk hello@wildlandmag.co.uk SOCIAL facebook.com/wildlandmagazine twitter.com/wildlandmag instagram.com/wildlandmag


Editors Note Creating a digital publication from scratch has definitely had it’s trials. The endless revisions, the sleepless nights and of course the hundreds of emails, I’m finally done! I’m delighted to present the very first issue. Welcome to Wildland. This has taken me on a huge journey. Falling in love with places all around the world, meeting photographers and artists alike with the same passion. The aim of Wildland is to explore the natural connection we have with the wild. This can be anything from landscapes, forests and national parks, also camping in the rockys or even fishing, all of these things keep us connected with the wildland. Our contributors and artists have really come together to give us their interpretation and I think they have done a fabulous job! I need to say a huge thanks to all of the artists and contributors for their enthusiasm, patience and of-course their awesome images. I would also like to thank the people following, liking, re-posting and supporting my blog. You guys are brilliant! I really hope you enjoy this as much as I have creating it and I hope this will inspire you to grab your camera, wherever that may be and go and shoot, create, capture and freeze that moment. Enjoy!

- Nathan Cleary, Founder & Editor of Wildland Magazine

WILDL AND ONE


NATUR AL CONNECTION


CONTE NT S COVER Rhi Ellis 02 ILLUSTR ATION Roma May Daly 07 THE SOUND OF MULL Roo Lewis 15 REGENER ATION Kathrin Loges & Jan Wunderlich 21 INNER L ANDSCAPE Jürgen Heckel 27 ILLUSTR ATION Roma May Daly 29 CAMPAGNE(S) Jérôme Rouchon 35 THE RIVER IS HOME Anze Osterman 45 OCTOBER RUST Monica Raduta 51 REFLECTIONS Natalia Rajsz ys 57 DR AGONL ANDS Joe Harper 65 HE ADING NORTH Taylor McCutchan 77 HAMSKIPTI Daniel Harðarson COVER Kathrin Loges & Jan Wunderlich


T HE S O U ND O F M ULL I SLE OF M ULL , SC OTL A ND PHOTOGR APH Y BY ROO LEWIS WORDS BY M AT T COLLIN S

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There is a seasonal lucidity adrift in the coastal islands of the Western Scottish highlands that often gets overlooked. Sometime around late Autumn the colours begin to change up there. They don’t drain, as would the colours from hedgerows of the southern counties, or the stretching fields of Suffolk farmland, but they deepen and fix. By winter you can be sure of a distinct pallet, infallible in its reoccurrence each year. The birch trees that line the roadside and woodland glades redden like bracken, exposed and brittle. Summer greens of the bog grass and hillside tussocks alike burn a deep yellow, shimmering white at the tips in the low, cold sunshine. Mountain stone shale adds tones of grey and purple, and dotted along the slopes are pockets of deep, dark green; stands of coniferous plantation where all but the larch hold firm their damp leaves. The sea beyond, the ever present anchor in the landscape, is a deep grey hue, sending across gale force winds and horizontal rain. When it’s almost too cold and when even the enormous highland cattle, with their heavy orange coats and fiercely protective armory, turn from the wind and shelter by aging stone walls; this, for me, is the time to see it. There’s no British terrain as wide, open and dramatic as this in winter; loomed over by a quiet and attractive desolation.


When I first found myself in one of these places, eyes out to the coastline, hands biting in the bitter wind, it was for a job interview. I had travelled alone on the sleeper train from London Euston, waking around 6am to a snowy and feral world outside my cabin window, as the track wound through steep hillsides and dark, expansive lakes to Fort William. The post was for Head Gardener at Glenborrodale castle; charged with re-designing and developing the vast adjoining grounds set within the Ardnumurchan estate peninsular; the most Westerly point of mainland Britain. The interview process took place in early March, giving me my first experience of the west coast still in the throws of winter, and although the job was not for me, the landscape at that time of year left a lasting print in my mind. It exuded a captivating silence within its sparseness; forming a kind of stripped and foundational backdrop in which creativity could be explored. And this is the reason I’ve been coming back to the Highlands and Islands so regularly since.

Some friends and I visited the Isle of Mull last winter, one of the larger Islands off the west coast, home to eagles and adders, the famous Iona crossing and Tobermory whiskey. Making the most of the ‘dead’ season in the tourism calendar, we rented cheaply a small farm cottage on the east side of the island, taking cameras and sound equipment, heavy coats and boots, cheese and wine. We made trips up into the hills above the house, peered through dishevelled barns and jumped fences into long-neglected and overgrown forestry.


R EG E N E R ATI ON BAVARI AN FOREST, GE RMA NY PHOTOGR APH Y BY K AT HRIN LOG ES & JAN WUN DERLICH WORDS BY K AT HRIN LOGES & JAN WUN DERLICH

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Deep in the Bavarian Woods, the cool waters of a half-forgotten pond are waiting to refresh weary hikers. Its origins can be traced back to the 1950s, when a minor landslide blocked the spoil dump of a now derelict coal mine. From 1968, that depression has been used as a garbage dump. But September 28th , 1984 the dam threatened to break and thus release highly poisonous leakage water into the environment and surrounding waters. Only the dedicated efforts of local fire fighters could stop the imminent catastrophe. The following modernisation allowed the garbage dump to continue operating until 2005, when new laws forced its abandonment, thus opening the way to creating this beautiful cool pool beneath the trees: “The Loidlsee�


IN N E R L A N D SCAPE M AI SACH, GE RMA NY PHOTOGR APH Y BY J U RG EN H EC KEL WO RDS BY T HOMA S BERN H ARD

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“I really only write about inner landscapes and most people don’t see them, because they see practically nothing within, because they think that because it’s inside, it’s dark, and so they don’t see anything. I don’t think I’ve ever yet, in any of my books, described a landscape. There’s really nothing of the kind in any of them. I only ever write concepts. And so I’m always referring to “mountains” or “a city” or “streets.” But as to how they look: I’ve never produced a description of a landscape. That’s never even interested me.” Thomas Bernhard from “Monologe auf Mallorca” Interview - 1981


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RO M A M AY DALY PO RT SMOU TH, U K I LLUST R AT IONS FE ATURED ON PAGES 2 & 28 fa ceb o o k. co m/ romamayde sign r o m a . m a y@h otmail.com

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CA M P AG NE ( S) CH ARE N T E -M A RITIME , FR A NC E PHOTO ESSAY BY J E ROME ROUCH ON

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T HE R IV E R I S H O M E SLOV E NIA PHOTO ESSAY BY A NZE OSTERMAN


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O C TO B E R RU ST BUCH AREST, ROMA NIA PHOTO ESSAY BY M ONICA R ADUTA

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R E F L E CTI ON S POL A ND PHOTO ESSAY BY NATA LIA R AJSZ YS

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DR AGO NL AN D S BRE CON BE AC ONS, U K PHOTOGR APH Y BY J OE H ARPER WORDS BY J OE H ARPER


After a long hectic period of commercial photography I decided to have a breakaway from my apartment in London, fashion, models and stylists. I spent my summer travelling throughout Central and Eastern Europe with my brother, Max. The freedom this gave us inspired me to work on a few projects that had been sitting in the back of my mind, this escape being one of them. My brother is leaving for an indefinite period of time, first to Asia and then on to Australia. We wanted one last trip together and planned to get out for a long weekend in the wild. I hope you find what you’re looking for and have a rad time Max.


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H E A D ING N O RT H WASH I N G TON & OREGON, U SA PHOTO ESSAY BY TAY LOR MCC UTC H AN

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H AM SK I PTI H VALFJO RDU R , IC E L A ND PHOTOGR APH Y BY DA NIE L H AR ARSON WO RDS BY DA NIE L H AR ARSON

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These photographs were taken in the South-West of Iceland in Hvalfjörður. The idea was to photograph the transition from Autumn to Winter where the colours start to fade and the crossover begins. You can see the Snow is starting to creep down the mountains, it’s incredible. I’ve been documenting this using a long lens in 1x1 format.


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We would like to thank everyone who has taken interest, shown support and submitted photos to Wildland Magazine. We are excited to be starting work on the next issue as you are reading this. Submit your photographs/stories and artwork to submission@wildlandmag.co.uk #wildlandmag

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NEXT ISSUE WINTER 2014

wildland


wildland AUT UMN

Autumn  

Natural Connection

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