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FIELD Notes

New Plant on the Block The saga of an uncommon morning-glory by Sheryl Smith-Rodgers AS A TEX AS MASTER NATUR ALIST, I HAVE A KEEN EYE FOR NATIVE PLANTS. So when a tiny flower caught my attention last November, I stooped down for a closer look. Little did I know that my curiosity would set a botanic ball into motion and ultimately help to preserve a little-known native plant. Flowers bloom every spring in a vacant lot adjacent to Trinity Lutheran Church in Blanco, Texas, where I live. When I heard the lot was targeted to be paved over, I asked Pastor Dayna Leggett if we could dig up plants, specifically non-native grape hyacinth (Muscari botryoides). I knew they grew there because I’d seen their blue bunch-flowers the previous spring. Before we met up, I scouted the lot for any native plants we might rescue too. My survey turned up prairie verbena (Glandularia bipinnatifida), littleleaf sensitive briar (Mimosa microphylla), buffalo bur (Solanum rostratum) and a mystery vine with pea-sized white blooms.

Flowers and seed capsules of Edwards Plateau crestrib morning-glory (Ipomoea costellata var. edwardsensis) PHOTOS Minnette Marr

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Profile for Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Wildflower Magazine 2019 | Volume 36, No. 1  

Flower-dwelling predators, love letters to native plants, how to bring nature play home, discovering a rare morning-glory, remembering an in...

Wildflower Magazine 2019 | Volume 36, No. 1  

Flower-dwelling predators, love letters to native plants, how to bring nature play home, discovering a rare morning-glory, remembering an in...

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