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2018 - 19

Fall /Winter Guide L A DY BIR D JOHNSON WILDFLOWER CENTER


For me, wildflowers are joy-giving. They have enriched my life and fed my soul and given beautiful memories to sustain me. L A DY BI R D JOH NSON

PHOTO Eryngo (Eryngium leavenworthii), Wildflower Center


W E LC OM E , Y ’ALL

THE LADY BIRD JOHNSON WILDFLOWER

Center is dedicated to inspiring the conservation of native plants. All of our gardens feature plants native to Texas, from the mountains in the West to the Gulf Coast. Our practices focus on conserving resources, providing wildlife habitat, protecting native plants and creating a sense of place. We are the botanic garden of The University of Texas at Austin and the official botanic garden and arboretum of Texas. We hope you will find inspiration, solitude, joy and time for play during your visit.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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In the Gardens Center News Events Map Classes and Programs Extra Credit


IN THE GAR DENS

Such Great Heights 2 FALL/WINTER 2018 - 19


THER E’S SOMETHING A BOUT A PEX ES. PEOPLE H AV E LONG BEEN

PHOTOS (opposite page) Wildflower Center; (this page) Joanna Wojtkowiak

drawn to the challenge of climbing high peaks, fascinated by the view from the top. It may not be Mount Everest, but the Wildflower Center’s Observation Tower is legendary in its own right. Its brown sandstone was sourced from nearby Lampasas, reflecting our dedication to championing local materials. (In fact, all stones used in Center architecture came from the Hill Country or elsewhere in Texas.) And the Tower is representative of our state’s architectural history, taking its style from the watchtowers of Spanish missions. A recognizable landmark of the Center, the Tower offers guests spectacular views of the grounds (and beyond) throughout the seasons. And it serves another very important role as a 5,000-gallon rainwater cistern. Climb the spiral stairway all the way to the top to get a bird’s-eye view of the area from 45 feet up. And don’t forget to breathe deep and feel a sense of accomplishment once you’re there. After all, you just summited the Center.

original design. According to architect Rick Archer of Overland Partners, the posts were used to support scaffolding during construction but were intended to be removed. In the end, people loved their look so much that they stayed.

TOWER TRIVIA › Along with other on-site cisterns, the Tower is filled with rainwater via a network of rooftops and aqueducts across the Center. In all, our rainwater collection system is capable of storing 68,500 gallons.

› A family of black-bellied whistling ducks (complete with adorable ducklings) once nested near the Tower’s top; when they were ready to descend, Center staff helped shepherd them to safety in our Wetland Pond.

› The characteristic wooden posts fanning out of the Tower’s side weren’t part of its

› What's that to the north? It's downtown Austin peeking over the horizon.

› The Tower's midlevel is home to Robb’s Roost, a seating and observation area with a green roof. The roof features SkySystem™, a growing medium formulated by Center researchers specifically for green roofs in hot climates. It’s a great place for a break or a picnic on the way up. › The uppermost viewing area is home to a quaint cactus garden, and the tiptop features Texas beargrass (Nolina texana) spilling romantically over the edge and a spineless prickly pear (Opuntia ellisiana).

IN THE GARDENS 3


What Grows Here? NATUR ALLY AMBITIOUS VIRGINIA creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) will grow as tall and wide as whatever it happens to be growing on. So it’s a great option for decorating large facades that might otherwise have a harsh appearance. A bonus of this deciduous climber is that it attaches via adhesive discs at the end of reaching tendrils (rather than penetrating rootlets), so it can be less damaging to fences and buildings than other vines. Find Virginia creeper growing on the north side of the Observation Tower and across from it on the Library. It’s particularly gorgeous in early fall, when its palmate leaves (which have five leaflets) turn bright reddish purple.

KEEP ON CREEPIN’ ON › Virginia creeper may be part of the grape family (Vitaceae), but do not eat those blueblack berries! They are extremely toxic and can be fatal to humans if consumed.

Who Lives Here? < VIRGINIA CREEPER

SPHINX MOTHS (Darapsa myron) rely on their namesake vine (as well as grapevines, Vitis spp., and peppervine, Nekemias arborea) to survive. Caterpillars sporting a “horn” on their posteriors — a telltale characteristic of sphinx moth larvae — munch on the leaves of those species before transforming into

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PHOTOS (top) Wildflower Center, (bottom) Melinda Fawver / Shutterstock

› Birds, however, can eat them, and plenty do, from chickadees and nuthatches to mockingbirds, warblers and more.


› Insects are down with the creeper, too. The vine’s nectar and pollen attract leaf-cutting bees, which also use leaf matter for nest building. And beetles, moths, wood-boring insects, aphids, wasps, treehoppers and more eat this plant’s foliage (or drink its sap) as larvae or adults. › The seven-leaflet species endemic to Central Texas, known as sevenleaf creeper (Parthenocissus heptaphylla), can also be found growing in our natural areas and in the Woodland Garden. › Need more vines? Check out the coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) on Robb’s Roost (midway up the Tower), or venture to the Theme Gardens for a pergola-load of mustang grape (Vitis mustangensis).

beautiful, olive-brown adult moths with pale orange on their hindwings. The adults are important pollinators that seek nectar from night-blooming flowers and can be found in woodland and bushy areas through most of the eastern U.S., from southern Maine to Florida and west as far as North Dakota and New Mexico.

MORE MOTH MATES Virginia creeper is a larval host for these sphinx moths as well: • White-lined Sphinx Moth (Hyles lineata)

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PHOTOS (from top) Wildflower Center, Joanna Wojtkowiak, wizardofwonders / Shutterstock, CHD Photo / Shutterstock

PRO TIP Even though this perennial is a climber, it can also work as an attractive groundcover in shady areas. If you’re having trouble growing plants under a tree canopy, for instance, consider Virginia creeper — a vigorous, unfussy grower that even has fall color.

• Pandora Sphinx Moth < (Eumorpha pandorus) • Abbott's Sphinx Moth (Sphecodina abbottii) IN THE GARDENS 5


CENTER NEWS

d ee ) i l k w r ata M e st Prost rat pro ( A sc le pi a s

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< NEEDFUL THINGS

PHOTOS (opposite page) Anna Strong / TPWD

Texas hosts well over 1,300 plant and animal species known as “Species of Greatest Conservation Need.” These include federal- and state-listed species, as well as those that were never listed due to lack of information. As a recipient of one of Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s Conservation License Plate Grants, the Wildflower Center is updating conservation ranks for these species — which will help prioritize and improve conservation efforts moving forward. Plant Conservationist Minnette Marr (left) began reviewing ranks for 15 of these plant species last winter, updating information about their known occurrences and considering such factors as species range, abundance and threats. She and Land Steward Dick Davis also took two field trips to South Texas to scout for additional populations; in cases where imminent threats from construction or non-native pests exist, efforts will be made to collect seeds from SGCN for the Center’s seed bank. Marr is developing training materials for seed collecting in tandem with these efforts, and the Center will eventually host two seed-conservation workshops based on their fieldwork. Marr says useful conservation data “involves monitoring known occurrences and scouting additional occurrences so that the numbers put into the ranking calculator are as current as possible.” The results will be incorporated into TPWD’s Texas Natural Diversity Database and increase knowledge of these imperiled populations. Greater understanding may help keep these species off endangered and threatened lists and can aid in collaborations with land owners and developers. When it comes to conservation, accurate data is power.

LOVE WINS Wildflower Center Ecologist Michelle Bertelsen and Landscape Architect Adam Barbe recently crafted a concept package for a new, nature-focused playscape at Triumphant Love Lutheran Church’s Child Development Center. Bertelsen says the “play nodes” are designed to facilitate open-ended, cooperative nature play while also offering isolated (but visible) areas for children who need a peaceful refuge. Nature is subtly enhanced with a focus on

sensory experiences and priority given to natural materials over plastic. Bertelsen calls it a “light touch” — in other words, it’s “designed to look not designed.” Native plants play a large part in the North Austin preschool’s landscape plan, from butterfly-magnet Gregg’s mistflower to low-maintenance native grasses and shade-loving Turkscap. Once constructed, TLLC attendees will get to explore a dry creek, walk on stump pathways and gather in small outdoor classrooms. Can we go back in time and enroll?

ART(IST) HOUSE The Wildflower Center and Department of Art and Art History are pleased to welcome artist Katy McCarthy as the first recipient of UT's St. Elmo Arts Residency, which offers an artist studio and living space for one academic year. McCarthy will have a solo exhibition at the Center and teach classes at both the university’s main campus and at the Center. She earned her MFA in combined media at Hunter College in New York City. Conceptualizing her projects as “video time travel,” McCarthy immerses herself in research and has a particular interest in historical female figures, including first ladies. “The Wildflower Center is a focal point of Mrs. Johnson’s environmental legacy,” says Executive Director Patrick Newman, “and we are excited to see McCarthy’s creativity and passion shed further light on Mrs. Johnson’s vision and our increasingly important mission.” Check out McCarthy's upcoming class on page 18. HONORARY OAKS The Wildflower Center is proud to announce the official naming of our Cathedral of Oaks in honor of Elisabeth Maxine Scholes. This beloved area of swings under stately live oaks in the Texas Arboretum — now known as Elisabeth Maxine’s Cathedral of Oaks — is where Elisabeth spent many of her brief 373 days relaxing with her family. She loved feeling the breeze and watching sunlight peekaboo through the kaleidoscope of leaves overhead while her big brothers sailed around on the nearby rope swings. We are honored to remember her in this popular place of serene natural beauty that inspires childlike wonder and playfulness in all who visit. CENTER NEWS 7


EVENTS

Events are subject to change. For updated listings, visit wildflower.org. 8 FALL/WINTER 2018 - 19


SEPTEMBER

15 & 16

D O G DAYS O F FA L L We can’t accommodate pups at the Center on a regular basis, but we promise we love them as much as you do! So we’ve carved out a weekend for fur + flowers. Grab your best friend and head our way for fun, four-leg-friendly activities. Saturday & Sunday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Humans: regular admission (members get in free) Dogs: $5 per pup (for both members and non-members)

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AU S TI N M U S EU M DAY Join us for a day of exploring Texas’ natural heritage. Watch a short film on Lady Bird Johnson, play giant lawn games, explore with a scavenger hunt, take a hike on our trails, and swing in the Texas Arboretum. Sunday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. FREE

OCTOBER

12 & 13

FA L L N ATIV E P L A N T SA L E

PHOTOS (opposite page) Joanna Wojtkowiak; (this page) Wildflower Center

Our Fall Native Plant Sale will feature hundreds of species of Texas natives to help you conserve water, provide habitat for wildlife, protect the soil, and use less fertilizer and pesticides. Autumn is the best time to plant! Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Members only, FREE Saturday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Open to the public, regular admission applies

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M OV I E S I N TH E WI L D: CO CO Alamo Drafthouse Cinema and the Wildflower Center transform the Family Garden Play Lawn into an outdoor theater for one fun-filled night to bring you “Coco,” an animated film inspired by the Mexican Day of the Dead tradition. Wednesday, doors at 6 p.m., movie at sunset $12 per person, $8 for members EVENTS 9


DECEMBER

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LU M I N ATI O N S Experience the Center guided by countless luminarias and dazzling light displays throughout the gardens. Festive bites and beverages and plentiful music make this Austin’s most magical winter tradition. Thursday - Sunday, 6 - 9 p.m. $15 per person, $10 for members Additional details to be announced

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H O L LY DAYS Join us for special promotions on nature-inspired gifts, as well as book signings, demos, food sampling, artisans, and more in the Gift Store. Thursday - Sunday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. All activities free with admission

JANUARY

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WI N T ER T R EE FE S T Celebrate Texas trees in the Arboretum with family-friendly tree climbing, walks and talks, s’more roasting, fort building, a native tree and shrub sale, and more. Saturday, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. All activities free with admission

FEBRUARY

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C H I L D R EN ’ S B O O K FA I R A literary adventure featuring children’s authors and illustrators from Texas, favorite characters, story time, and bookworm-friendly activities. Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. All activities free with admission

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AU S TI N C AV E FE S TIVA L Come explore all things underground with hands-on activities, cave tours, simulations and festivities. Saturday, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. FREE 10 FALL/WINTER 2018 - 19


AITS U T AW O E D I ET H SECR YO U R September 29, 2018 - February 24, 2019



WILDFLOWER .ORG/FORTL AN DIA

JOIN TODAY

Join a community that’s committed to conserving native plants, improving and beautifying our world, and advancing the environmental legacy of Lady Bird Johnson.

MEMBER BENEFITS › Free Admission

PHOTOS (both pages) Wildflower Center

› Discounts on Programs › Member-only Plant Sales › Reciprocal Privileges at 300+ Gardens › Wildflower Magazine › Savings in Our Gift Store

OUR MOST POPULAR MEMBERSHIP LEVELS INDIVIDUAL $ 50 DUAL $ 65 FAMILY $85 SUPPORTER $135 Senior prices are available for those 65 and over. Memberships are partially tax-deductible.

Purchase, renew or give a membership to someone special today. Visit wildflower.org/join or drop by the Admissions Kiosk or Gift Store to purchase. IN THE GARDENS 11


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C E N T R A L C OM PL E X 1 Admissions Kiosk

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ARBORETUM

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Hall of Texas Heroes

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Nature Build

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Cathedral of Oaks

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Metamorphosis Maze

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Dinosaur Creek

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Restoration Research Trail

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Savanna Meadow Trail

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Woodland Trail Intermittent Creek

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› Please do not leave valuables in your vehicle. › Picnic in designated areas; leave no trace. › Beware of rattlesnakes and other wild animals. › No smoking or e-cigarettes allowed. › No bicycles allowed beyond the parking lot. › Please do not walk in garden beds.

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WHAT’S IN SEA SON

CLASSES & PROGR AMS

PHOTOS Wildflower Center except gulf muhly, James Garland Holmes; shrubby boneset, Ray Mathews; Indiangrass, Terri M. Siegenthaler; dwarf palmetto, David Dunatchik

FALL

Maximilian sunflower Helianthus maximiliani

Gulf muhly Muhlenbergia capillaris

Prairie goldenrod Solidago nemoralis

Gayfeather Liatris punctata var. mucronata

Shrubby boneset Ageratina havanensis

Fall aster Symphyotrichum oblongifolium

Indiangrass Sorghastrum nutans

Mexican buckeye Ungnadia speciosa

WINTER

Yaupon Ilex vomitoria

OU R E RS MEMB

1 0% E V A S ON CL A S

Bushy bluestem Andropogon glomeratus

Dwarf palmetto Sabal minor

Possumhaw Ilex decidua

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S E S!

Registration is required for classes and programs unless otherwise noted; visit wildflower.org/learn.


Garden Tours

INSTALLATION Learn site preparation, irrigation, planting best practices and mulch application for a healthy garden. Saturday, September 15 1 - 4 p.m.

Learn about what’s in season and the Center’s architecture and history from our stellar volunteer docents. This is a memorable experience for guests, and there’s always something new to see and learn. Every Wednesday Saturday, 10 a.m. - 11 a.m., through September; 11 a.m. - noon beginning October 3 Registration not required (inquire at the entrance) FREE with admission

Native Plant Gardening Series Enroll in individual classes or the whole series (with choice of large- or smallscale landscape design). $45 per class, $243 for series (six classes) SMALL-LOT LANDSCAPE DESIGN Design for your backyard or other small spaces.  Saturday, September 8 9 a.m. - noon

PHOTOS (opposite page) Anjoli Fry; (this page, left) Anjoli Fry, (right) Wildflower Center

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Sprouts Parents accompany their little ones for this onsite preschool program tailored to children ages 3 to 5. A trained guide leads sensory activities, story time, nature walks and playtime. A new theme is featured each week. Sprouts goes on holiday break from November 17 to January 1, 2019. Wednesdays & Fridays 10 - 11 a.m. Registration not required FREE with admission

PLANTS I Learn about plants native to Central Texas, including unique growing characteristics and plant selection for gardens. Saturday, September 8 1 - 4 p.m. LARGE-SCALE LANDSCAPE DESIGN Get guidance planning for large-scale spaces that can otherwise feel overwhelming. Sunday, September 9 1 - 4 p.m.  PLANTS II Dig deeper into the topic of Texas flora. Plants I is recommended prior to this class. Saturday, September 15 9 a.m. - noon 

MAINTENANCE Maintaining a native garden requires knowledge of plant physiology, gardening tools, watering guidelines and other best practices. Learn it all in this essential class. Saturday, September 22 9 a.m. - noon INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT Identify common beneficial and harmful insects in your garden landscape. This class also covers pest management, treatment and safety practices. Saturday, September 22 1 - 4 p.m. 

Fire & Water Walk On this tour of the gardens and natural areas, discover how fire and water are used in managing plants and landscapes at the Wildflower Center and learn about our rain catchment system. Tuesdays, September 11 and October 9, 10 - 11 a.m. Tuesday, November 13 11 a.m. - noon  FREE with admission

Creating With Alcohol Inks Learn to create eyecatching wildflower ceramic tiles with alcohol inks! Take CLASSES & PROGRAMS 15


The Plants That Shaped Texas

home charming ceramic creations and a new skill. Beginner: Saturday, September 15, 1 - 4 p.m. Intermediate: Sunday, September 16, noon - 3 p.m. $50 per session

Plant ID Walk

Always meeting neat native plants and wishing you knew their names? An expert botanist will lead this combination class and walk with tips for identifying an array of flora. Saturdays, September 15 and October 20 1 - 4 p.m. $35 per session

such as prickly pear and Texas persimmon, on this identifying and harvesting tour with an expert guide. Saturdays, September 22, October 20 and November 17 9 a.m. - noon $25 per session

Gardening for Newcomers

Wild Night We’re inviting our awesome neighbors to an exclusive fall preview. Residents of nearby ’hoods (and current Wildflower Center members) are welcome to enjoy demonstrations of classes such as aerial yoga and get festive for fall with face painting, lawn games, geocaching and more. Sunday, September 16 5 - 7 p.m. FREE (members and neighbors only)

Foraging for Native Edibles Discover the native plants that are safe for your plate, 16 FALL/WINTER 2018 - 19

New to Texas or just new to gardening with native plants? Come on down to the official state botanic garden and arboretum to learn about everything from cacti to coneflowers. An experienced gardener will help students identify native plants suited to their space and share tips for keeping them healthy. Sunday, September 23 1 - 4 p.m. $45

Texas landscapes range from lush and fruitful to rough and tumbling, and native plants have shaped life in the Lone Star State from the past to the present. Learn more on this tour with one of our expert horticulturists. Saturday, September 29 10 a.m. - noon $25 FAMILY

Nature Creations: Bracelets Nature is full of treasures and gems — why not wear a wildflower watch or a berry-bead bracelet? Go on a discovery walk; observe the shapes, colors and textures of the season; and create a fun craft. Saturday, September 29 10 a.m. - noon FREE with admission

Moonlight Hikes See the beauty of the gardens and Texas Arboretum by moonlight. Participants may bring red-light flashlights. Monday, September 24, and Wednesday, October 24, 8 - 10 p.m. Tuesday, February 19 7 - 9 p.m. Ages 16 and up $15

Native Bees of Texas This class is creating a lot of buzz and rightly so — native bees are diverse, fascinating and vital to our landscapes. Learn about bee ecosystems, morphology, behavior and society, nesting habits, diets, and how to tell bees from wannabees (mimics).


25% OFF

We’ll talk conservation too! Saturday, October 6 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. $45

PHOTOS (opposite page, left) Bill J. Boyd, (middle) courtesy of Eric Knight, (right) Laurel Treviño; (this page, left) Joanna Wojtkowiak, (middle) courtesy of Vista Brewing

Landscape Design Studio I & II This course takes principles from our Landscape Design courses (September 8 and 9) into a studio environment. In Part I, students work through designs with individual guidance from the instructor. Part II features peer design sharing and in-studio design time. No prior drawing or drafting skills necessary. Sundays, October 14 & 21 Noon - 4 p.m. $125 per person for both sessions

Bees, Brews & Beyond Cheers to pollinators! Grab your smartphone or camera and carpool to Vista Brewing. Their wildflower fields and thoughtfully designed grounds are a perfect place to snap beneficial fauna in action and share to Instagram or iNaturalist for the 2018 Texas Pollinator BioBlitz. Experts will be on site to talk about and toast to pollinators over brews and bites. Activities all day.  Saturday, October 20 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Registration not required FREE (off-site)

your entire purchase in our Gift Store Good for in-store purchases and regular-price items only; no other discounts apply. EXPIRES 12.30.2018

FAMILY

Texas Arboretum Tours Get your steps in while exploring the wonders of native trees (plus shrubs, grasses, flowers and more) in our Texas Arboretum. Walks will focus on native flora and Texas history, and you’ll likely see feathered friends along the way. Sundays, October 14 & 28, November 11, and December 2 & 16, 1 - 2 p.m. And for Texas Arbor Day on Saturday, November 3 Noon, 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. FREE with admission

Pollinator Blitz! Learn about, document and celebrate pollinators. Be a citizen scientist and see how many of these valuable critters you can find, photograph and share.  Saturday, October 20 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. FREE with admission

Kokedama: Art Meets Botany in Japan Journey to a land of soil and moss (Japan!), where the art of Kokedama originates. This ornamental plant sculpture CLASSES & PROGRAMS 17


is a style of bonsai, where plants’ roots are bound into a spherical form. Guest lecturer Young Choe will explain how Kokedama and Kusamono (similar potted arrangements) are created and teach about their cultural history and significance. Stay for a workshop to create your own Kokedama.  Saturday, October 27 Lecture: 11 a.m. - noon $15 Workshop: 1 - 4 p.m.  $75 (includes materials)

Are You Strong Enough to Be My Plant?

Come on back, y’all!

$5 off return admission for up to two adults Already a member? Give this coupon to your favorite friend or neighbor! Cannot be combined with other offers. EXPIRES 6.30.2019 18 FALL/WINTER 2018 - 19

Foot traffic, children at play, dog zoomies and hot, dry summers — what’s a yard to do? Find out which plants are tough enough from our Family Garden horticulturist. We’ll point out low-maintenance plants that can survive and thrive in lived-in Texas landscapes. Saturday, October 27 1 - 3 p.m. $25

Landscape Management for Homeowners Tailored to students managing 5 to 50 acres of land, this workshop will cover a lot of ground. From seeds to weeds and pollinatorfriendly to deer-resistant, Wildflower Center experts will explain how to establish and nurture healthy ecosystems with thriving native flora and fauna.  Saturday, November 3 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. $125 (includes lunch and snacks)

Seasons in (Stop) Motion Join UT Austin and Wildflower Center Artist-inResidence Katy McCarthy for a stop-motion video workshop. Students will gather seeds, flowers and other natural treasures on a nature walk, learn stop-motion techniques, and produce their own works of video art. Also see page 7. Saturday, November 10 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.  Ages 12 to 15 must be accompanied by an adult $75

Botany X-Files: Unlocking the Mysteries of Food & Drug Plants Investigate what plants end up on plates and in pills and explore the ancient arts and sciences of potions, aphrodisiacs, perfumes and medical plants in this two-part series. Saturdays, November 10 & 17 Noon - 4 p.m. $45 per session or $81 for both


FAMILY

Birding Tour There are many feathered friends to be found at the Wildflower Center if you look for them winging or listen for singing. Bring (or borrow) some binoculars and take a guided walk to learn about birds. Saturday, November 17 8 - 10 a.m. $12 per adult, $6 per child FREE for Wildflower Center and Travis Audubon Members

PHOTOS (opposite page) Katy McCarthy; (this page, left) Bill J. Boyd, (right) Brian Fitzsimmons

MEMBERS ONLY

Fortlandia by Flashlight Sneak out after dark, throw a pebble at your best friend’s window, and don’t forget your flashlight. Join us for a members-only night hike to explore the forts of our special Texas Arboretum exhibit, Fortlandia. We’ll play lawn games and roast marshmallows around a campfire. (Psst — the password is “awesome.”) Also see page 11. Monday, November 19 5 – 7 p.m. FREE (members only)

ART CLASSES WITH THE CONTEMPOR ARY The Wildflower Center is excited to announce a partnership with The Contemporary Austin Art School. Drawing and watercolor classes will be taught by skilled Contemporary instructors and held in our McDermott Learning Center, a beautifully restored 19th-century carriage house nestled in the gardens. Draw inspiration from native plants! 

Botanical Illustration

Wednesdays, September 12 - October 24 or October 31 - December 12 (no class November 21) 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. $199 per session, $179 for Wildflower Center or Contemporary members Prior drawing instruction is recommended.

Drawing I: Short Form

Tuesdays, September 11 - October 23 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. $199 per session, $179 for Wildflower Center or Contemporary members + $35 supply fee

Nature & Abstract Drawing

Tuesdays, October 30 - December 11 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. $199 per session, $179 for Wildflower Center or Contemporary members

Watercolor: Basics & Beyond

Thursdays, September 13 - October 25 or November 1 - December 13 (no class November 22) 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. $199 per session, $179 for Wildflower Center or Contemporary members

Continued on page 20 IN THE GARDENS 19


Bring nature home for the holidays. In this hands-on workshop, create a festive wreath or table centerpiece using native plants along with traditional holiday decorations. Each participant will take home their own unique creation. Saturday, December 1 9 - 11:30 a.m. or 12:30 - 3 p.m. $45 per session (includes materials)

Winter Care for Native Plants

For every tree there’s a tool, and for every tool there’s a technique. Trees give us so much — learn how to keep them happy and healthy with proper pruning practices.  Saturday, January 5 9 - 11 a.m.  $30

This workshop will introduce tips and tricks for keeping Texas plants healthy through whatever weather winter brings. Saturday, January 19 9 a.m. - noon $45

Tending Native Fruit Trees Money may not grow on trees, but fruit does, and a healthy native fruit tree is truly priceless. Learn about fruit trees of Texas, species selection, harvesting and other tips for caring for your fruiting flora.  Saturday, January 12 9 - 11 a.m.  $30

FAMILY

FAMILY

Make tree-inspired holiday ornaments using acorns and ball moss and craft greeting cards with outdoorsy designs. Saturday, December 1 1 - 3 p.m. FREE with admission

Learn to scope out a scene, investigate for signs of wildlife, use a field guide, and even get the scoop on poop with a lesson on (synthetic) scat. Saturday, January 12 1 - 3 p.m. FREE with admission

Nature Creations: Festive Winter Treasures

Who’s Been Here? Tracks, Scats & Signs

FAMILY

Nature Creations: Wild Valentines Nothing says love like flowers and handmade valentines. Make a card for someone special using wildflower seeds. Saturday, February 9 1 - 3 p.m. FREE with admission

GROW WITH US wildflower.org/volunteer 20 FALL/WINTER 2018 - 19

PHOTOS (top left) Julie Graham, (right) Enlightened Media / Shutterstock

Native Festive Wreath Workshop

Tree-pruning Workshop


Make Our Space Yours

The Wildflower Center is perfect for symposiums, conferences, retreats, receptions and more.  Inquire today! wildflower.org/rentals

Texas White House & Boyhood Home Tours and Special Events in Johnson City & Stonewall

• Movies Under the Stars September 22 • Night Skies at the LBJ Ranch November 10 • Christmas Events November 24 & December 1, 8, 15

IN THE GARDENS 21


Native WildfloWers & Prairie Grasses

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EXTR A CR EDIT GRASSES CAN BE SOME OF THE TOUGHEST PLANTS TO TELL APART, even for plant nerds. But native grasses are worth getting familiar with because they are vital to healthy landscapes: They prevent erosion, absorb rainwater, improve air quality, anchor soil, mitigate flooding and look neat too. Michelle Bertelsen, a Wildflower Center ecologist and grass expert, says these four warm-season Texas grasses are common on roadsides and trails — and can even be identified from a car once you get to know them.

STAY GR ASSY

PURPLE THREEAWN (Aristida purpurea)

SIDEOATS GRAMA (Bouteloua curtipendula) Sideoats grama's oatlike spikelets actually grow on both sides, but stalks bend over as they age, and the spikelets often droop to one side. This stunning perennial, which blooms from June through November, is Texas’ state grass.

ILLUSTRATIONS © 2018, Samantha N. Peters

This grass has three "awns," or bristlelike appendages, reaching out of each seed like a trio of propellers. The awns stiffen and pale in fall, but they cast a purple haze on landscapes from April through July.

SILVER BLUESTEM (Bothriochloa laguroides)

TEXAS GRAMA (Bouteloua rigidiseta) Texas grama's spikelets turn from purplish to wheat colored as they dry; when grouped on one side of a stem, the whole affair resembles a toothbrush. Plants reach about 15 inches tall and bloom from April through November.

1 CM

If grasses were magical (and ecologically they pretty much are), silver bluestem would be your best pick for a wand. Its inflorescences burst forth in downy silver from May through November and are particularly beautiful backlit by sunlight. EXTRA CREDIT 25


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2018-19 Fall/Winter Guide  

Discover the Center's Observation Tower, learn about native grasses and sphinx moths, get updated on Center news, and browse upcoming classe...

2018-19 Fall/Winter Guide  

Discover the Center's Observation Tower, learn about native grasses and sphinx moths, get updated on Center news, and browse upcoming classe...

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