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SPRING 2018

ISSUE # 82


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UPCOMING EVENTS

Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

Thursday 18 October WOSA Drinks at the Maid

CONTENTS 4

Principal’s Thoughts

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Making Caring Common Richard Weissbourd

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Learning that Matters Stephanie Andrews

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A Whole New World  mma Schwartz, Ben Manifold E

and Bess Smith

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Realise: Year 9 Camp

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Focus a Lens on the Coorong Sally Nobbs

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Meet the SRC Executive for 2019

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Faculty in Focus: English

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Cross Cultural Collaboration

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Going Global: The Benefits of Student Exchange Rosie Broderick and

Lauren Walker

Ann Rooney and Alison Short

Ann Rooney and Assunta Fusco

Caroline Rocco

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Wilderness in the Regions Rosie Broderick

26 Work Fluencies: Preparing for the Changing Nature of Work  Rosie Broderick and

Monday 12 November WOSA Golf Day

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Junior School Science Week Liz Meaker

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Emma Sleath

Girls in Property

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Raising Amazing Girls

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Annual Music Showcase

Danae Mavrakis

Anna Lenartowicz

34 Staff Wellbeing and Resilience Training Trina Cummins 36

Nepal 2018 Sally Nobbs

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Old Scholars Wildy Women Leading the Way

Old Scholars Reunions

48 Wildy Intergenerational Families 50

Wednesday 21 November Green Door Society High Tea Friday 23 November Junior School Assembly and Prize Giving Friday 7 December Junior School Christmas Concert Monday 10 December Junior School Graduation Tuesday 11 December Advent Service

43  Introducing Members of Our Governing Council:  Jacki Smith 44

Tuesday 20 November WOSA 1965 & Prior Old Scholars’ Lunch

Old Scholars’ News

56 Best Dad/Special Friend Breakfast

Wednesday 12 December Middle School Presentation Night Thursday 13 December Senior School Speech Night

REUNIONS 2018 Class of 1958 Reunion The River Cafe, North Adelaide Thursday 25 October | Lunch Class of 1978 Reunion Red House Cafe, North Adelaide Saturday 17 November | Dinner

Caroline Rocco Wilderness School has a number of social media platforms to connect with our community and discover the latest news. www.facebook.com/WildernessSchool www.linkedin.com/company/wilderness-school twitter.com/wilderness1884 vimeo.com/wildernessschool Join the Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association page on Facebook. This page is set up for Old Scholars to communicate, network and hear about upcoming alumnae events. Once you are a member you can then share with other Old Scholars in your Facebook network.


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“Global integration and international mobility have increased rapidly in the past decade. As a consequence, new and exciting opportunities for Australians are emerging. This heightens the need for global citizenship”. – Melbourne Declaration on Education Goals for Young Australians (2008 p 4)


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

PRINCIPAL’S THOUGHTS ‘Human relationships are primary in all of living. When the gusty winds blow and shake our lives, if we know that people care about us, we may bend with the wind, but we won’t break.’ - (Rogers, 2003) Over the past two years I have had the privilege of being part of a project group in the Harvard Graduate School of Education called ‘Leading Learning that Matters’. Working with researchers and a select group of experienced school leaders, our purpose is to explore and document the leadership necessary to nurture learning that matters for our contemporary world. This collaboration has resulted in innovations in classroom and leadership practices in participating schools and we hope, through sharing our experiences, to speak beyond boundaries and inspire schools around the globe. In early September I spent time at Harvard meeting and hearing from many fascinating and inspiring thought leaders and academics. In particular, I was struck by the work of Richard Weissbourd, a Harvard psychologist,

who runs the ‘Making Caring Common’ project, aimed at teaching children to be kind. Richard spoke about the changing nature of our world and the increasing pressure young people are experiencing in their daily lives. Through his research he has documented a shift in social values and those things we believe are important for our children. He cited a survey conducted by Harvard of over 10,000 young people, where 80 percent of respondents said they valued aspects of personal success such as achievement and happiness over kindness and caring for others. While most parents and teachers say that developing caring children is a top priority and rank it as more important than children’s achievements, about 80 percent of the young people surveyed


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said their parents and teachers were more concerned with their achievement or happiness than whether they cared for others. So there appears to be a gap between what parents and teachers say are their top priorities and the messages our children are receiving on a day-to-day basis. Happiness, working hard, and achievement clearly are important values. However, we know that there is a direct correlation between personal happiness and caring for others. They are not counter intuitive. Research in human development clearly shows that the seeds of empathy, caring, and compassion are present from early in life, but that to become caring, ethical people, children need adults to help them at every stage of childhood

to nurture these seeds into full development. We also know that when young people do not prioritise caring and fairness over their own happiness or success, they are at greater risk of many forms of harmful behaviour, including meanness, bullying, disrespect and dishonesty. Kindness is not a fixed trait; it can be fostered. It can be encouraged and cultivated but does take time to develop. To ensure our children become kind, caring, respectful and responsible adults we must guide and nurture these qualities in the young people in our care. As Richard says, “We should work to cultivate children’s concern for others because it’s fundamentally the right thing to do, and also because when children can empathise with and take responsibility for others, they’re likely to be happier and more successful. They’ll

have better relationships their entire lives, and strong relationships are a key ingredient of happiness. In today’s workplace, success often depends on collaborating effectively with others, and children who are empathetic and socially aware are also better collaborators.” Indeed, the World Economic Forum cites collaboration and empathy as key skills for the future. Our founders, the Misses Browns, recognised early in our School’s history the power of relationships. They spoke often of the need for unlimited kindness and the need to place respect and service to others at the heart of all we do. It is up to us to continue this wisdom. It is certainly learning that matters. Jane Danvers Principal


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

MAKING CARING COMMON

Richard Weissbourd and his colleagues suggest a number of ways we can help our children to become caring, respectful and responsible adults.

1. Make caring for others a priority. Why? Children need to learn to balance their needs with the needs of others, whether it’s passing the ball to a teammate or deciding to stand up for friend who is being treated unfairly. How? Children need to hear from parents that caring for others is a top priority. A big part of that is holding children to high ethical expectations, such as honouring their commitments, even if it makes them unhappy. For example, before quitting a sports team, band, or a friendship, we should ask them to consider their obligations to the group or the friend and encourage them to work out problems before quitting. Some suggestions: Try this: • Instead of saying to your child: “The most important thing is that you’re happy,” say “The most important thing is that you’re kind.” •

Make sure that your older children always address others respectfully, even when they’re tired, distracted, or angry.

 mphasise caring when you E interact with other key adults in your children’s lives. For example, ask teachers whether your children are good community members at school.

2. Provide opportunities for children to practice caring and gratitude. Why? It’s never too late to become a good person, but it won’t happen on its own. Children need to practice caring for others and expressing gratitude for those who care for them and contribute to others’ lives. Studies show that people who are in the habit of expressing gratitude are more likely to be helpful, generous, compassionate, and forgiving—and they’re also more likely to be happy and healthy. How? Learning to be caring is like learning to play a sport or an instrument. Daily repetition—whether it’s a helping a friend with homework, pitching in around the house, or having a classroom job—make caring second nature and develop and hone youth’s caregiving capacities. Learning gratitude similarly involves regularly practicing it. Try this: • Don’t reward your child for every act of helpfulness, such as clearing the dinner table. We should expect our children to help around the house, with siblings, and with neighbours and only reward uncommon acts of kindness. •

Talk to your child about caring and uncaring acts they see on television and about acts of justice and injustice they might witness or hear about in the news.

Make gratitude a daily ritual at dinnertime, bedtime or in the car. Express thanks for those who contribute to us and others in large and small ways.


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3. Expand your child’s circle of concern.

4. Be a strong moral role model and mentor.

5. Guide children in managing destructive feelings.

Why? Almost all children care about a small circle of their families and friends. Our challenge is help our children learn to care about someone outside that circle, such as the new student in class, someone who doesn’t speak their language, or someone who lives in a distant country.

Why? Children learn ethical values by watching the actions of adults they respect. They also learn values by thinking through ethical dilemmas with adults, e.g. “Should I invite a new neighbour to my birthday party when my best friend doesn’t like her?”

Why? Often the ability to care for others is overwhelmed by anger, shame, envy, or other negative feelings.

How? Children need to learn to zoom in, by listening closely and attending to those in their immediate circle, and to zoom out, by taking in the big picture and considering the many perspectives of the people they interact with daily, including those who are vulnerable. They also need to consider how their decisions can ripple out and harm various members of their communities. Especially in our more global world, children need to develop concern for people who live in very different cultures and communities than their own. Try this: • Make sure your children are friendly and grateful with all the people in their daily lives, such as a bus driver or a waitress. •

Encourage children to care for those who are vulnerable. Give children some simple ideas for stepping into the “caring and courage zone,” like comforting a classmate who is sad.

Use a newspaper or TV story to encourage your child to think about hardships faced by children in another country.

How? Being a moral role model and mentor means that we need to practice honesty, fairness, and caring ourselves. But it doesn’t mean being perfect all the time. For our children to respect and trust us, we need to acknowledge our mistakes and flaws. We also need to respect children’s thinking and listen to their perspectives, demonstrating to them how we want them to engage others. Try this: • Model caring for others by doing community service at least once a month. Even better, do this service with your child. •

 ive your child an ethical G dilemma at dinner or ask your child about dilemmas they’ve faced.

How? We need to teach children that all feelings are okay, but some ways of dealing with them are not helpful. Children need our help learning to cope with these feelings in productive ways. Try this: Here’s a simple way to teach your children to calm down: ask your child to stop, take a deep breath through the nose and exhale through the mouth, and count to five. Practice when your child is calm. Then, when you see her getting upset, remind her about the steps and do them with her. After a while she’ll start to do it on her own so that she can express her feelings in a helpful and appropriate way. For more information, please visit makingcaringcommon.org


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

LEARNING THAT MATTERS “The development of our Global Consciousness Framework aims to provide students with the ability to use their knowledge and skills to develop a global mindset: a way of thinking, doing and being which allows them to contribute in a meaningful and purposeful way to our global society.� It will come as no surprise to many of you when I say that the world is indeed becoming smaller; that we are living in an increasingly multicultural society. According to the UN (2016), globally, the number of international migrants grew at a rate of 3.3% in 2015, faster than the world population grew at the same time, and an increase from 2.8% in 2002. These international migrants represented 10% of the total population in Europe, North America and Oceania. We believe that these numbers will continue to increase, influencing the world that your daughters will grow up in. Thus, as the world continues to change and develop, if we want our young women to live harmoniously in these increasingly multicultural communities, to take advantage of opportunities in a changing labour

market, to use media platforms both effectively and responsibly, and to support sustainable earth initiatives, then they need a global mindset (OECD 2018). What does that mean for us as educators, preparing our students for life when they leave school towards the middle of the 21st century and beyond? The development of our Global Consciousness Framework aims to provide students with the ability to use their knowledge and skills to develop a global mindset: a way of thinking, doing and being which allows them to contribute in a meaningful and purposeful way to our global society. Through developing a world view, students are empowered to reach their full potential; they feel connected to the world and have agency to effect

change in a considered and responsible manner. By examining local, global and intercultural issues through multiple perspectives, students will develop a broader and deeper understanding of the world around them and be well placed to advocate and take informed action to support their well-being and the well-being of others, as well as support sustainable development around the world. Together with this, it is equally important that students develop the ability to communicate in a respectful, considered manner across cultures and languages. Such interactions enhance global understandings and enable our young women to take an informed and respectful stance when dealing


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with others. Further, it is important that students are able to engage in meaningful, respectful and interculturally appropriate advocacy. Through identifying and using available opportunities, our students are able to take action to effect change and contribute to development and improvement, both globally and locally, on issues of international importance. Earlier this year, I was fortunate to participate in the Think Tank on Global Education held at Harvard University. Learning together, with and from other educators of diverse backgrounds and perspectives helped to develop my own understanding of what it means to be globally conscious and impressed upon me just how important this conversation is. While we discussed many ideas, it became apparent that for Wilderness School, global consciousness needs to be integrated across and through the curriculum so that all girls can develop their individual global understanding and interculturality, and have access to extracurricular opportunities to extend

their awareness. It is also important to note that there is no end point to this learning; this is learning that will be ongoing throughout their lives. As our girls graduate from Wilderness School, we expect that they will have developed a level of global awareness and understanding that sets them up for future success and that they can build on as they continue to engage with people from diverse communities. Thus, at Wilderness, we envisage that each girl will develop their individual capacity to engage in interculturally appropriate ways both globally and locally on international issues. Through opportunities provided across the curriculum and across the schools, students will participate in ‘signature programs’ designed to build their knowledge of global issues relating to the environment, socio-economic development, global institutions, conflicts and human rights, and intercultural relations. They will continue to develop skills relating to critical, flexible thinking and respectful

intercultural communication, whilst extending their understanding of multiple perspectives. By using technology within the classroom and personal experiences from opportunities extended outside the classroom, our girls will be able to communicate with students in schools around the world; allowing them to explore different perspectives and develop intercultural understanding first hand. As is becoming increasingly evident as we move through the 21st century, “the local is becoming more global” (Reimers et al, 2016). Thus, as educators of young women it is important that we give them the skills, knowledge and understandings enabling them to contribute meaningfully to our increasingly global society throughout their lives. Stephanie Andrews Head of Languages


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

A WHOLE NEW WORLD WILDERNESS AND ST PETER’S SONY FOUNDATION CHILDREN’S HOLIDAY CAMP 2018

During the first weekend of the Term 3 school holidays, an enthusiastic group of Year 10 and 11 students from Wilderness and St Peter’s College gave up their long weekend to care for thirteen children with special needs, as part of South Australia’s first Sony Foundation Holiday Camp in almost a decade. The aim of the camp was to provide an enjoyable experience for the child as well as respite care for the families. In a number of instances, it was the first time these parents had spent any time away from their children. The children, who ranged between eight and fourteen years of age, had varying degrees of developmental challenges, some relatively mild and some more significant. The selected students from both schools completed training in the months prior to the camp but, in many respects, the reality of what our students encountered couldn’t be taught but rather relied on their pragmatism, inner strength, sound judgment and human intuition.

A number of young children being cared for were also non-verbal. This meant their companions had to adapt their own behaviours and quickly learn to decipher the unspoken but emphatic physical cues and gestures of their campers. It was an extremely challenging task for the students who gave every ounce of themselves during the days and all through the nights; washing, changing, dressing, feeding, swimming and playing with the children. There were times when it was emotionally and physically challenging for our girls, but every single one of them demonstrated a level of maturity well beyond their teenage years and pushed through the difficult moments to make sure the children were as happy and as comfortable as possible. The children had to be their first priority and they never once faltered, even when fatigue set in and their tolerance was repeatedly tested, which was admirable to watch. It was obvious how much the children enjoyed the undivided attention and devotion of their carers and many

formed strong connections with one another, holding hands wherever they went! Each Wilderness girl was paired with a boy from St Peter’s and their camper was specifically chosen for them. The experience challenged each student’s patience and resilience and gave them a far greater insight into what it is like for siblings and parents of children with special needs. They also had to help one another out, if one was struggling, the other would step-in and everyone worked extraordinarily well in their teams. Over the course of two nights and three days, the students experienced a rollercoaster ride of joys, difficulties and breakthrough moments, all synonymous with caring for a child with special needs 24 hours a day. For some children, it was the first time they had stayed away from home and the they coped remarkably with what would have been a major disruption to their routine, sleeping in a school boarding house.


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With thanks to sponsors

Some were a little unsettled in the evenings which meant our students had to tend to them and got very little sleep themselves but, impressively, they got up the next day and powered through. Officers from the Metropolitan Fire Service and South Australia Police also visited the children and provided demonstrations, much to the joy of the campers. It wasn’t until they got to use the fire hose that some of them exhibited emotion for the first time on the camp, which was heartwarming to see. The children were kept busy throughout the camp with a variety of activities including arts and crafts, a disco and indoor swimming which was enormously popular among the group. Although weary by the end, everyone was excited about the final installment of the camp - a mini carnival complete with jumping castle, face painting, petting zoo, ice cream, pop-corn and the pièce de résistance…free chopper rides thanks to Aerotech Helicopters! The lamb on the spit, kindly donated by the Cameron Family, also provided a fantastic lunch.

As soon as the parents arrived on the final day, they could immediately tell from their child’s face that, although exhausted, they’d had the most enjoyable, fulfilling and special time away.

their communities, in addition to families who generously donated goods and services to ensure the whole camp was well resourced, in particular Olga’s Fine Foods and CT Bakery for their delicious produce.

Unequivocally, it was an experience the children, as well as our students, will never forget and afforded them a whole new perspective on life.

Thank you also to the businesses that donated items for gift bags provided to families at the start of the camp which included Haigh’s chocolates, Wallis Cinema and Cibo vouchers as well as wine from Ruddenklau winery and the Rogers, Hart and Weir Families. Our own Heads of House also gave generously to the cause.

Whether the children wanted to play, dance, walk around or just sit down and be read to, the students from Wilderness and St Peter’s fulfilled their every wish and whim. The parents remarked that this was clearly evident in the feedback they received from their children. The Sony Foundation Children’s Holiday Camp was a resounding success but simply would not have been possible without the generosity of volunteer students, nurses and teachers who attended the camp from Saturday through to Tuesday. Both schools were extremely grateful for the financial assistance offered by

We’d like to thank all of the campers’ families once again for their involvement in this inaugural experience and for having faith that our students would and did take excellent care of their young ones. We are already looking forward to doing it all again next year! Emma Schwartz, Ben Manifold and Bess Smith

Be sure to take a look at our candid insight into life and learning at Wilderness. It’s called “This Girl Will” and is told through the eyes of our girls about the kinds of individuals they want to become and are becoming in life. Our girls are all unique individuals but there is a commonality that exists between them. They are all acutely aware of the importance of being kind and altruistic people. A Wilderness girl will always achieve whatever she puts her mind to, hence #thisgirlwill. You can view the full video at www.wilderness.com.au


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

REALISE YEAR 9 CAMP

“Through interactions with the Raukkan Aboriginal School students, unique and memorable bonds are formed which encourages our girls to show ‘sensitivity, curiosity and a willingness to engage with diverse perspectives.” – Global Consciousness Framework, 2018

In being true to the meaning of REALISE, the program provides a unique environment in which students have countless “opportunities to engage in real world experiences,” beyond the physical confines of their typical classroom setting. These authentic experiences are considered a signature pedagogy in building global consciousness in our students (Boix Mansilla and Chua, 2017). Students engage in identifying and discussing issues of local and global importance associated with ethical and sustainable shopping. At the start of the program they examine issues such as; fast fashion, child labour, fair trade, the effects on the natural environment and investigate different perspectives on these issues. “In a world of limited resources, a system that advocates an ever-increasing level of consumption, and equates such consumption with personal wellbeing, economic progress and social fulfilment is a recipe for ecological disaster” (Shop Ethical, 2016). Group discussions surrounding

the effects of our unethical shopping choices reveal to our students the true cost that these products have on people and the environment globally. Students are motivated to take action on different issues they are passionate about and demonstrate this on each shopping excursion; further enabling them to be an advocate within their communities. “Being an ethical shopper not only positively impacts the environment, but yourself and different people around the world. It means being more mindful about the products you are purchasing and thinking about the process particular products went through. Whether it’s choosing local produce over imported goods, fair trade so you know producers are being looked after, or just bringing your own shopping bags, every small act can lead to big changes in the world.” (Georgia Roylett, Year 9) An immediate connection to the Ngarrindjeri culture is established through a Welcome to Country from an Indigenous Elder on arrival at Crawford.

This theme of intercultural awareness of the original custodians of the area permeates through the REALISE program. Rita Lindsay and her family, who are Ngarrindjeri weavers, share an aspect of their culture in teaching an interactive and personal basket weaving workshop. Our girls also connect with members of the Raukkan community in developing their understanding of our shared history between the two cultures. Through interactions with the Raukkan Aboriginal School students, unique and memorable bonds are formed, which encourages our girls to show “sensitivity, curiosity and a willingness to engage with diverse perspectives” (Global Consciousness Framework, 2018). “Basket weaving taught us about the Ngarrindjeri culture and also intertwined the patterns of understanding and realisation around how relaxing it is to sit down and focus on creating a woven piece and the emotional connection to basket weaving within the Ngarrindjeri families” (Emily Teoh, Year 9).


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Within our year 9 cohort there are a myriad of diverse cultures that challenge each individual to be open to and understanding of various perspectives. Cabin life allows them to experience this first hand through the exchange of each other’s cultural and family practices. From choosing the meals they prepare, to accepting each other’s daily routines, they work towards forming an inclusive environment within their cabin. Weekly cabin meetings encourage robust, open and healthy conversations that help them navigate through their differences and collaborate to generate ideas for an agreed solution. Through active practice in dealing directly with differing cultural values and beliefs, our girls are able to “appreciate commonalities, bridge differences and develop an intercultural stance” (Global Consciousness Framework, 2018). “Living in cabins on REALISE opened our eyes to how different girls with diverse cultures influenced their lifestyle and we were able to incorporate and learn from each other. It let me develop an

understanding for each girl’s home life” (Trinity Hong, Year 9) As discussed on our last night, reflecting on the theme of gratitude, it is clear the girls have developed a greater appreciation of what they have access to in their daily lives. They have accepted the challenge to make ethical and sustainable living common practice. Through sincere connections with each other and their mentors during REALISE, the girls have experienced the importance of being open to perspectives different from their own. Lauren Walker Outdoor Education Coordinator

R E A L I S E

Remote Experience Authentic Learning In a Sustainable Environment


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

FOCUS A LENS ON THE COORONG Expeditionary learning is defined as ”project-based learning expeditions, where students engage in interdisciplinary, in-depth study of compelling topics, individually or in groups and in their community”. The Year 8 girls were asked to identify something they were either passionate about or deeply interested in which could relate to the Coroong, where our second campus, Crawford, is situated. They were given time at school to think of ideas, to plan and to prepare so that when they went to Crawford they could work on their project. Their project was not for assessment, so the girls were free to focus on what they were interested in, and it was amazing to see how committed, enthusiastic and dedicated each girl was. They were able to explore in depth, without connection to set subjects and curriculum. The only boundary was that when they returned to school there would be a ‘showcase’, open to other students, staff and their parents. The form of each individual showcase was open to the girls – some made models, videos, photo albums, short stories, scientific experiments, different foods, physical challenges – a myriad of subjects across a range of study areas. Some feedback from the students included:

“The week before we left we had an extra two days planning for the trip to the Coorong. We got time to prepare what mate rials we needed and how we were going to achieve the project. These two days helped us get our project ready and prepared for the trip ahead of us. These were full days of hard work to ensure our project was as ready as we could get it. – Wateen Hamdan “At school, we sit down and research on the internet about the Coorong, but when we are here we can walk around and answ er the questions ourselves whether your project is art or science or geog raphy etc. there is still a way you can learn here. Here we can walk aroun d and see the things we are researching - Where were we going to find these birds?” – Holly Goodchild The experience at the Coorong Campsite was incredible. For our project, we studied Stargazing. Our group realised that it is only when you get out of the city and away from light pollution, you start to realise how many stars are out there. We all woke up early in the morning to catch the sunrise and stayed up at night to capture the beauty of the night sky at Crawford. We already had an affinity for Astronomy and were grate ful that we were able to work on a project and subject we were passionate about. Going to the Coorong, we gained experience and knowledge that we couldn’t have gained back in Adelaide and we are grateful for this opportuni ty. Overall, we all had a fun time together. – Charlotte Ujvary, Olivia Kyriacou and Elle Mcgill-Couper Wilderness staff were equally enthusiastic abou t a very positive learning experience. “I loved having the opportunity to watch the students challenge themselves and conduct their own learning. I also loved having the opportunity to learn with them by creating my own projects that tied in with some of theirs. Some of the students and I experimented with star photography which was a new learning experience for me too!” – Laura Franklin - Photography Teacher ‘I loved the way the students guided their own

learning.’ – Elyse Purvis

‘It was great to see such rich self-guided learn ing taking place outside the constraints of a normal classroom.’ – Brad Waller


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

HANNAH KIEU SRC PRESIDENT

MEET THE SRC EXECUTIVE FOR 2019

What legacy would you like to leave Wilderness? It’s still hard for me to comprehend that I have been privileged with a position that leaves a legacy. Rather than “re-inventing the wheel” as my dad would advise against, I believe the importance of leaving a legacy is leaving a part of you. The legacy that I aspire to belongs not only to me but to the cohort I am representing. To do so, I will be required to embody the legacy of the upcoming class of 2019. As a collective, I am convinced we prioritise authenticity, acceptance, and generosity. Being true with who you are as well as being generous with this mutual ideal. Hence, throughout my time, I wish to inspire girls to challenge their limits and themselves knowing that an inclusive network is there to support them every step of the way. What does leadership mean to you? I do not define leadership to be something that requires a structured definition. There is such a vast array of ways in which leadership is carried out, the common denominator being there is cause and effect. To me, a leader is the cause, and the effect is the manner in which their leadership is responded. There is never one type of person more suited to a leadership role because, in every area, there is always someone naturally inclined to take on the role of a leader without discomfort. Yet whilst a leader may feel comfortable in certain areas, they must also be content with the idea of being uncomfortable in unfamiliar environments. Being adventurous enough to branch out of their comfort zones. To feel vulnerable and receptive, allowing for growth and knowledge through their experiences. Tell us three things that people wouldn’t know about you? I love Frank Sinatra and could listen to him on repeat. I am terrified of heights and could never go bungee jumping. I am fluent in three languages. Which three people would you invite to a dinner party and why? I would love to invite Amelia Earhart, Frank Sinatra, and Marie Curie. Amelia Earhart, the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean once said, “… I want to do it because I want to do it. Women must try to do things as men have tried.” This is something that truly resonated with me, fueling my desire to see and experience all that the world has to offer. Frank Sinatra is simply someone I am such a huge fan of and an opportunity to meet him would be incredible. Lastly, Marie Curie who stated “Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood” on her own merits, was the first person to have received two Nobel Prizes.


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MALENA MAVRAKIS SRC VICE PRESIDENT

ANGIE QIU SECRETARY

What legacy would you like to leave Wilderness? In 2019, the SRC leadership group hopes to create a more inclusive Wilderness community. We want to encourage girls to feel comfortable in their own skin and to challenge stereotypes and assumptions. Personally, I would love to leave Wilderness seeing girls question the status quo, promote inclusivity and challenge themselves to push the boundaries of their comfort zones as they grow into well-rounded young women.

What legacy would you like to leave Wilderness? We hope to leave a legacy wherein all girls are inspired to utilise their strengths in achieving their interpersonal and academic goals without fear of judgement from others. This concept of inclusivity will be emphasised within the cohort, ensuring the school environment is one where, not only are girls unafraid to voice their stance, but their voices are acknowledged and considered. We want to approach the 135th year of Wilderness not only celebrating what unites us as a school, but also celebrating the farrago of talents and personalities of each student that make up the school as it is today.

What does leadership mean to you? Leadership to me is having the courage to be resilient and persevere in the face of adversity. I believe that a strong leader is accepting of people’s differences and has the ability to harness the array of skills of a group of people and use these skills for the benefit of a greater good. Leadership is not a title but a challenge, and being a leader is an opportunity given to everyone. But above all, leadership is demonstrated through kindness, inclusivity and respectful relationships. Tell us three things that people wouldn’t know about you? I have a signed picture of Julie Andrews. When I was little, my family had a pet goat. I work at a fish factory. Which three people would you invite to a dinner party and why? I would invite Ellen Degeneres, as her character and resilience is admirable. I also idolise how she has stood up for diversity in the face of adversity whilst still having a generous heart and comedic spirit; Audrey Hepburn, as not only was she a brilliant actress who redefined femininity but she also used her voice for change and dedicated her retirement to humanitarian work with UNICEF; and Eleanor Roosevelt because she tirelessly worked on making many significant contributions to human rights campaigns, including heading the UN rights commission and helping draft the UN Declaration of Human Rights.

What does leadership mean to you? As a leader, it is my obligation to not only establish shared goals, but be responsible for the execution of these goals. Leadership, in particular that of Secretary, means spreading and promoting a strong sense of Wildy spirit and pride within the community. Values and ideas come alive when there is passion in leadership and it is undeniable that this passion in Wildy girls is also what fuels the historic success of the school. Tell us three things that people wouldn’t know about you? I’m obsessed with Golden retrievers. I watch The Office on repeat. I love having philosophical chats and D and Ms (deep and meaningful conversations). Which three people would you invite to a dinner party and why? Very often, the conversation surrounding a woman’s femininity centres around what it means to be a woman in relation to others. Although our relationships are nonetheless important, I believe it is vital that we also define ourselves as individuals. Thus, I would love to have a dinner party with Amal Clooney. Despite being in the Hollywood spotlight because of her husband, she firmly established that she will radiate on her own accord, not as someone’s wife, but an esteemed international human rights attorney. She made it clear that it is achievable for a woman to both walk the red carpet and maintain international peace. I’d also like to dine with Princess Diana. Despite being victim to the British media, she remained resilient and compassionate. Lastly, I’d dine with Frida Kahlo, an artist who channelled her femininity into timeless art. Her paintings deviated from traditional depictions of female beauty, instead, she painted the raw experiences faced by women, promoting this concept that, despite a woman’s imperfections, she is complete and wholesome. All three of these individuals broke the preconceived notions of womanhood, shaping modern femininity to suit the 21st century model of a working woman.


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

Neighbourhood Maps (l to r): Livia Podreka (Year 6), Raphaelle (Year 5), Yijie Lu (Year 5), Yildiz (Year 5)

The Wilderness School Learning Framework of ‘lifeworthy learning’ means going beyond traditional disciplines, topics and locales through to furnishing the skills and dispositions to succeed in the 21st Century. Wilderness School’s participation in the Out of Eden Learn online collaborative project is part of our Global Consciousness Framework - to understand and appreciate different perspectives and to engage in “appropriate and effective interactions with people from different cultures.” Over the past four years, the English as an Additional Language (EAL) Year 11 students have participated in the learning program, Stories of Human Migration, and this year the Year 8 English students have the opportunity of collective global discussions in Core Learning Journey 1: The Present and the Local. In addition, for the past two years Year 5 students have participated in connecting and communicating with children of a similar age from

different parts of the world. In 2018, the Year 6 cohort have maintained their involvement, taking part in Core Learning Journey 2: The Past and the Global. Out of Eden Learn is a collective learning experience initiated by Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. It has three unique curriculums called ‘Learning Journeys’ that evolve around Paul Salopek, a National Geographic Pulitzer prize winning journalist who is following ‘the ancient pathways of human migration’ in a 21,000 mile walk across Africa, India and Asia. These learning programs take inspiration from Salopek and his ‘dispatches’ as he walks to new places and meets the local people. Students engage with Salopek’s photography, videos, interviews and articles that interweave “slow journalism” with local and global storytelling, by posting on the collaborative online platform.

The Out of Eden Learn organisers at Harvard’s Project Zero connect students of similar ages from diverse geographical and socioeconomic settings on a custom-built social platform that is designed around three broad learning goals. All of the journeys combine offline activities with online interaction and invite young people to: • slow down to observe the world carefully and listen attentively to others • exchange stories and perspectives with one another • make connections between their own lives and bigger human stories. “The Out of Eden Learn platform is a unique online space that supports young people to interact, share stories and be their authentic selves in a safe environment.” The building blocks of the Wilderness School Global Consciousness Framework involve skills for


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FACULTY IN FOCUS ENGLISH

GLOBAL CONSCIOUSNESS IN THE JUNIOR, MIDDLE AND SENIOR SCHOOLS

“In this era of interconnection, disconnection, and rapid change, it is vitally important to offer young people opportunities to dialogue and build understandings with peers from different backgrounds. “ – Out of Eden Learn students to engage in respectful and meaningful dialogue online by providing opportunities to engage in real world experiences. In their online conversations, students on Out of Eden Learn to use the ‘dialogue toolkit’ which prompts them to think critically, to recognise and name perspectives and to stop and think of others with empathy, valuing human dignity and cultural diversity. Out of Eden Learn is also an active research project that examines students’ conceptions of culture, the character of their online interactions and surveys the students before and after participating in the project. Carrie James posted on the Out of Eden Blog that, ‘We’ve observed how youth leverage the toolkit’s moves – and other dialogue moves – to express their identities, to share their perspectives, and to reach for connection and understanding with youth from different backgrounds. (James 2018, Out of Eden Learn Blog) The Out of Eden Learn project goes beyond developing Global Consciousness skills, attitudes and values as it complements more traditional disciplines. At Wilderness School, the Out of Eden Learn project is seamlessly integrated into language and literacy

for the EAL Stage 1 SACE and has recently been recognized as an exciting new approach, being published as a pre-approved SACE endorsed Learning and Assessment Plan (LAP) on the Stage 1 EAL minisite. For the Year 8 English students Out of Eden Learn complements the Narrative Voice learning module. For Middle and Senior students this has consisted of students writing posts in response to the Out of Eden Learn readings and videos and responding to other students around the world as they follow Paul Salopek’s global walk. In Year 5, the experiences correlate with the Humanities and Social Sciences curriculum, exploring key concepts within the Australian Curriculum, including interconnections, place and space, perspectives and action. Among other footsteps, girls create their own personal neighbourhood map and story, which they share online with children in the program. As well, they construct a world map depicting Paul’s epic journey and the many countries he visits. The Out of Eden learn project has given our students a powerful insight into the global community, enabling them to appreciate their own and other cultural experiences.

Student comments: Eden Learn is a great way to slow down and look around you. I became aware of some things I had never come across before when I had to take photos of my neighbourhood. Eden Learn also helped me consider different viewpoints and learn more about different people’s lifestyles and what they do differently. Nessie Leathart (Year 5) When I saw other people’s maps of their neighbourhoods I got to see what their viewpoint is of where they live. It is really quite astonishing how people have migrated to all the places around the world and I think that it is great that Paul is talking to people and learning their stories. Audrey Petrucco (Year 5) At the core of this project is learning about other people and their cultures and seeing the world from another person’s perspective. I slowed down and I saw that Eden Learn has a lot to offer and I noticed that the people who have joined Eden Learn have given a lot too. Yildiz Azhar (Year 5) Ann Rooney and Alison Short


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

CROSS CULTURAL COLLABORATION ‘This global connection between Wilderness and Dana Hall Schools is very special because it distinguishes our Schools and our work in developing empathy and understanding about the world and brings in different world perspectives.’

Global collaborative projects between Wilderness School and Dana Hall School in Wellesley, Boston Massachusetts evolved after Jane Danvers met Maggie Davidov and Heather Panahi from Dana Hall at the National Coalition of Girls Schools in New York in 2016. Initially, this collaboration started as a teacher exchange program and has now grown into several student global projects across our Junior, Middle and Senior schools. The teacher exchange program involves teachers from both schools travelling to Australia and America to develop collaborative learning experiences for our students. Visiting teachers are involved in classroom observations and teacher meetings in addition to appreciating and connecting with the different school environments. This rewarding teacher exchange has benefited our students through establishing innovative practices using online platforms and

introducing new learning resources and opportunities. In 2017, the first two Dana Hall teachers, Fred Lindstrom and Alden Derr, visited Wilderness School to work with Ann Rooney and Helen Douvartzidis respectively to create projects that united their classes in English and Mathematics. Over 2018 and 2019, Ms Rooney and Mr Lindstrom have built an English as an Additional Language, Year 11 online learning platform to host student conversations on shared texts, about their culture and topics of social interest guided by their teachers. Students send videos, audio and written reflections and meet each other using Skype. Collectively this class has students from China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Mexico and Germany. The Year 8, Shared Reading Program organised by Assunta Fusco and Amelia Herring has

run for the past two years and in 2018 it has expanded to include more students. The aim of the program is to encourage the girls to share and widen their reading experiences. Through videos and written comments, students establish dialogues with each other in which they discuss the issues presented in their independent reading and become aware of other reading choices. Simultaneously, students exchange ideas about popular culture, school culture, politics and contemporary social issues and, thereby, acknowledge commonalities, recognise differences and explore the world beyond their own experiences. In the Middle School, the Dana Hall and Wilderness English departments are actively developing global projects for the girls. These include an exciting new visual storytelling project based on ‘The Moth’ audio stories for our Year 8 and Year 10 classes. This year at Dana Hall, Ann Rooney and


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Assunta Fusco discussed creating shared resources and organising community ‘Moth’ storytelling events. This global connection between Wilderness and Dana Hall is very special because it distinguishes our Schools and our work in developing empathy and understanding about the world and brings in different world perspectives. Our work with Dana Hall has also flowed through to the Wilderness teachers who attended this year’s Project Zero Classroom at Harvard University. While at Harvard, Alison Short visited Dana Hall and is now collaborating with Tamara Nikuradse on a Year 5 project and students have already posted letters to each other.

This fruitful connection with Dana Hall cultivates a global consciousness that presents students with opportunities to engage in real world experiences. It fosters an appreciation of different perspectives and an enduring understanding of diverse cultures through authentic experiences with students in other parts of the world. The projects provide an environment for genuine collaborations between students across a number of year levels. Additionally, the use of a range of media platforms provides important learning opportunities for students to become responsible and effective global digital communicators. Ann Rooney and Assunta Fusco

Projects under consideration for 2019 include the Research Project, Junior School STEM clubs and building connections with the Year 6 class between Project Zero Classroom teachers.


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

GOING GLOBAL THE BENEFITS OF STUDENT EXCHANGE

The need for our students to be globally connected, informed and active has never been greater. How can we prepare students for our complex and interdependent world? What kinds of capacities characterise globally-minded individuals—curiosity about the world beyond their immediate environments, empathy and cultural perspectives? How can we best nurture such capacities by rethinking what and how we teach?

that Matters’ and embedding the dispositions of global consciousness across our curriculum and in the lived experiences provided through the exchange programs, sister school partnerships, language immersion expeditions, the Nepal expedition and global classroom collaborations.

It is evident that in order to prepare our students to successfully participate in a time of unprecedented global interdependence, we must reconsider what matters most to teach and learn in order to develop the desired dispositions and competencies associated with global consciousness.

Dispositions are about the ‘residuals’ of learning beyond formal contexts (Ritchhart 2014); they are about the “kind of person” a student will become (Boix Mansilla & Gardner 2000). Broadly considered, global competence dispositions are; a disposition to inquire about the world, a disposition to understand multiple perspectives of their own and others, a disposition toward respectful dialogue and a disposition toward taking responsible action.

Wilderness is responding to this through a focus on ‘Learning

From our work with Ron Ritchhart we understand that dispositions are


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“Global integration and international mobility have increased rapidly in the past decade. As a consequence, new and exciting opportunities for Australians are emerging. This heightens the need for global citizenship”. – Melbourne Declaration on Education Goals for Young Australians (2008 p 4)

developed through enculturation, where the learning is purposeful and the desired forms of thinking are visibly valued and extensively practiced in a range of learning experiences and contexts. Across our classrooms teachers are re-framing and expanding the content they currently teach through the lens of meaningful global connections, even if often modest ones. In this way we are building the desired dispositions in our girls. Our teachers understand that in order to develop the growth mindsets and dispositions for global consciousness capacities in our girls, they must make them part of daily classroom learning experiences, even when the content to be taught is not, strictly speaking, global in itself. In addition to the curriculum focus, our exchange programs provide authentic opportunities for our students to

engage in real world experiences. The benefits of participating in a student exchange experience are invariably lifechanging, building students’ capacity to operate more effectively as active and informed local and global citizens. From these experiences students gain enhanced intercultural understandings, a sharpened self-awareness and improved self-confidence and develop leadership skills. Recently our Year 5 and 6 classes welcomed students from Yuying Bilingual School in Hangzhou China. The visit provided our girls with the opportunity to develop their intercultural understanding and focus on the dispositions of respectful dialogues and an awareness of other perspectives. At Wilderness we hold a belief that through the provision of purposeful curriculum, collaborative

learning experiences and exchange opportunities, students are propelled towards acceptance and understanding of different cultural and community perspectives, broadening their global awareness and better preparing them for the future. Rosie Broderick and Caroline Rocco


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

WILDERNESS IN THE REGIONS

From North to South, the Wilderness community covers some 25 degrees of latitude. In recent weeks, a number of Wilderness staff have had the pleasure of visiting some of our past, current and prospective families across this expanse. Our first event was in the low latitudes of the Northern Territory where we attended the Royal Darwin Show for several days representing the School and meeting many prospective families from the north. We also took the opportunity to host a regional dinner at ‘Pee Wees at the Point’ in Darwin, which never disappoints, and the ambience of the mild, warm conditions of the dry season are welcomed, as is the opportunity to share time with a wonderful group of people both young and young at heart from our School community. There was a broad representation from past, current and future parents as well as old scholars across various decades. At 128 degrees East, Kununurra is some 820 kms from Darwin but for a new family, commencing next year, the distance was no deterrent and they

enjoyed the opportunity to connect with other families and meet Jane Danvers, Emma Schwartz and myself. Our next expedition saw us travel to the most southern point of our regional latitudes for a gathering at Penola. Flying into Mount Gambier, it was hard to believe there were areas of our State suffering dry conditions as we were greeted with an abundance of water filling paddocks and fields. Good food and wine is the trademark of the Coonawarra region and the ‘Pipers of Penola’ restaurant certainly exceeded expectations and set the scene for an evening of convivial conversation and lots of laughs, while rekindling friendships and forging new ones. The Field days at Cleve and the Riverland also provided further opportunities for informal gatherings in those regions. Venturing out into the South Australian regions and beyond to reconnect with our boarding families and enjoy the hospitality of our country families is always a highlight of the Wilderness calendar Rosie Broderick Head of Boarding


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

WORK FLUENCIES PREPARING FOR THE CHANGING NATURE OF WORK It is undeniable that the world of work for our future graduates will vary vastly from what it is today and will continue to evolve throughout their working lives. It has been suggested that the average Australian will change employers 17 times across five different careers. With this in mind we need to constantly review and assess what the essential qualities graduates will need to possess in order to prepare them for the future world of work. Globalisation of the workplace has led to greater interaction and competition across the global marketplace. Employers are asking for “T” shaped employees; those with deep technical knowledge and broad business and people skills. Artificial intelligence and augmented technologies will change the way, the where, the how and the nature of the work we do. Research suggests the kind of occupations least susceptible to automation are those that involve creative thinking and interpersonal skills. During his recent presentation at Wilderness, Ivan Neville (Labour Market Research and Analysis Branch, Department of Jobs and Small Business, Canberra) identified growth in areas such as Cyber Security, Bioinformatics, Nursing/Health and Care Professions, Data Analysts, Drone Operators and Sports and Personal Service workers,

Construction, Education and Lifestyle Coaches. As educators we are challenged to take a strategic look at the future of teaching and adapt our approach to learning to develop the skills and dispositions needed for living and working in a rapidly changing system. At Wilderness we are re-designing the learning experiences to ensure each girl is exposed to opportunities to develop the ‘literacies of work.’

‘Today’s Year 6 students will be in their prime working years in 2030.’ While an understanding of the academic disciplines and literacy and numeracy skills will continue to hold importance at Wilderness, we also recognise there are other essential competencies and capabilities our girls will increasingly need to navigate the complex, evolving and unpredictable career landscapes. In addition to the thinking skills, students will also need to be equipped with the character skills of self-awareness, resilience, agility and optimism. Research has informed our curriculum decisions as it has identified that employers are looking for employees able to display the work fluencies of creativity, communication, collaboration and critical thinking. In the forward-facing occupations, the interpersonal capabilities will be increasingly important.

We cannot predict with any accuracy the jobs that will stay, develop and diminish but it is our responsibility to assist our students to develop the skills that will allow them to pursue meaningful and successful careers in the face of globalisation, as well as other workplace changes that are already happening and those yet to be realised. Wilderness provides authentic workplace learning through initiatives such as Year 10 Work Placement, Year 10 Girls in Property Day, Mock Interviews, and the wide offerings of VET programs. Opportunities to develop work literacies are provided through the delivery of Financial and Entrepreneurship Literacies and the STEM focus. The introduction of the ‘Subs in Schools’ Program in 2019 will continue this connection between school and the world of work. Computational thinking and digital literacies are incorporated into the junior school curriculum. What will be really important throughout their educational experiences is that students will need to remain informed and keep pace with the different skill sets required to thrive in a technology rich, globalised competitive job market. Versatility and adaptability in the face of change are the transferable skills our students will need to navigate future workplaces. Rosie Broderick and Caroline Rocco


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

JUNIOR SCHOOL SCIENCE WEEK

Women such as Marie Curie, the physicist best known for her contributions to radioactivity and Rachel Carson, the marine biologist and conservationist whose work revolutionised the global environmental movement, continue to impact upon the world as we know it today. Closer to home, Howard Florey, born and raised in Adelaide, had a key role in the discovery of penicillin, saving the lives of millions of people. Understanding the role that science and people like Marie, Rachel and Howard play in our society, is core to the purpose of National Science Week. This annual celebration takes place each August and aims to raise the profile, understanding and appreciation of science, innovation, engineering and technology and their role in improving our society, economy and environment. It also aims to encourage an interest in scientific pursuits and encourage young people to become fascinated by the world we live in. The theme of the 2018 Science Week was “Game Changers and Change Makers.” At Wilderness School, we value deeply what our involvement in Science Week can bring to the girls as we look to encourage in our students, a developing

global consciousness and competency. They learn about the societal context – how discoveries were influenced by culture, religion, war and exploration. How men and women bravely went against convention and persisted in the face of, at times, significant failure. It enables us to consider, where would we be if some of these discoveries had never been made? As different year levels researched in detail, a variety of scientists and their discoveries, they then displayed and shared their learnings. The children also looked at a timeline of significant scientific discoveries throughout history and the pioneering scientists responsible for them. These people will be remembered for their remarkable contribution to humanity – an important consideration in our modern world where people can become simply ‘famous for being famous’. Year levels also came together to work with their ‘buddy classes’ for an exciting challenge. After reviewing an array of famous and unique bridges around the world, including the designs and architectural challenges faced by their engineers, the girls were asked to design and build their own – using only straws,

card and a small amount of plasticine. And then make sure a ‘matchbox’ car could travel across it. As teachers, we relish the opportunity to present our girls with open-ended challenges such as this. It is here we see them utilising some of the skills that will be so essential as they take their place in the modern world beyond the security of the school gates. We watch as they work collaboratively, think critically and listen both intently and respectfully to their peers. We also stand aside and watch as they fail, learn and fail again. And as they pick themselves up, put their frustrations aside and persist, we share in their pride as they succeed, showing us again, that they are capable, adaptable and resilient young women. Perhaps they will be inspired to become the next Marie, Rachel or Howard. Science Week is yet another way that we promote and embrace the school values we believe in so deeply and with such conviction - in particular, Adventurous Learning, Responsible Citizenship and A True and Courageous Self. Melissa Foster and Liz Meaker


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

GIRLS IN PROPERTY

On Thursday 23 August 43 Year 10 students participated in ‘Girls in Property’, a full day program offered by the Property Council of Australia. The aim of the day was to discover, understand and explore the variety of career opportunities and encourage greater female participation in the Property Industry. The day started at school where we received our goodie bags and listened to three women discuss their careers in Civil Engineering, Structural Engineering and Architecture. They discussed what they do, how they got into their field of work and their role within the Property Industry. From school, we then travelled to the Adelaide Oval where we attended a panel session with four people working in Property as Lawyers, Project Engineers and Market Growth Consultants. We had a site tour of the oval and discussed the multifactorial considerations required when undertaking the redevelopment of Adelaide Oval. We even bumped into Port Adelaide Football Club Coach Ken Hinkley!

From the Adelaide Oval we explored the Adelaide Casino, The University of Adelaide, MOD. (Museum of Design) and SAHMRI (South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute) meeting with industry leaders who explained their roles and the unique considerations and complexities required in creating each of these iconic structures. Girls in Property allowed us to explore some of Adelaide’s newest and most exciting buildings and meet with industry leaders involved in their creation. Through our participation in the program we have increased our understanding and broadened our insights into the diverse career opportunities for women in the Property Industry. Emma Sleath (Year 10)


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RAISING AMAZING GIRLS On the 27th July and the 8th August, all Year 10, 11 and 12 girls were invited to listen to Mr Paul Dillon who spoke about the impact of alcohol and drugs. The topics addressed were well-catered to the girls, as different themes were spoken about for each year level. Paul Dillon Director and founder of DARTA (Drug and Alcohol Research and Training Australia)

The Year 10’s heard about ‘Young people, alcohol and risk taking’ and how to ‘look after their mates’ in difficult situations. The Year 11’s were spoken to about ‘Alcohol and cannabis’ and what to do if something goes wrong or an unfamiliar situation arises. The year 12 talk covered what young people need to know about alcohol and other drugs in their last year of school, especially about the laws regarding young drivers.

As students, it can sometimes be difficult to create a space where sensitive issues such as these can be spoken about in a mature and thought-provoking way. However, these much-anticipated talks were met with the girls’ enthusiasm, as all students agree that Paul is a fantastic speaker and provides listeners with great advice surrounding difficult issues. Paul also ran a parent session on ‘Drugs and Alcohol in 2018 - how to keep your daughters safe’. Both Paul’s talks to the girls and their parents were, as always, very well-received by all. Danae Mavrakis (Year 12)


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

ANNUAL SHOWCASE OF MUSIC The planning of the school’s biggest Music concert of the year begins well in advance. It took me some time in developing an understanding of the Wilderness music world around me, and after countless conversations with staff, students and parents, I decided 2018 was the right time to see change injected into this annual concert. As the world continues to change rapidly around us, so too does our school, and all the faculties within it. We need to be able to adjust to this constant movement, and with the assistance of my music staff and the wonderful student musicians I have, we were able to begin our movement of change, making an incredibly positive impact, not only on those lucky enough to have been in the audience that night, but on every performer who took part. This year the focus was to showcase the talents of our core senior ensembles - the ensembles which make up the backbone of any music department; at Wilderness this is our Senior Choir, Senior Concert Band and Senior String Orchestra. The gorgeous setting of Elder Hall was perfect to really highlight the repertoire these three ensembles presented. The Senior Choir provided a polished, energetic and highly engaging performance of Keith Hampton’s Gospel tune Praise His Holy Name. The Senior Concert Band demonstrated why they came home with a Gold Award at the recent ABODA Bands Festival with their perceptive performance of Twittering Machine - a tune based on a 1922 watercolour by Paul Klee which blends biology and machinery and brought to

life via the music of Brian Balmages. The Senior String Orchestra presented an eclectic program that finished with the famous American toe-tapping tune Blackberry Blossom. The diversity and challenging music these three ensembles presented, highlighted the exceptional talents of our senior musicians. The three performances of our core ensembles were complemented throughout the evening with tunes from our auditioned ensembles, with highlights from our esteemed Jazz Choir and Saxophone Quartet paying tribute to Whitney Houston and Freddie Mercury respectively. The sophisticated and highly infectious mambo tune Papiro performed by Big Band 1, and our Dream Girls’ rendition of the song of the year, ‘This Is Me’. In addition, a special feature from our Junior Concert Choir really captured the hearts of the audience when they took to the stage and presented Jitterbug from The Wizard of Oz. But it was the finale that really demonstrated what we are all about in the Music community at Wilderness. Over 130 musicians coming together as one, a collective of our three core ensembles, the Junior Concert Choir and members from our instrumental staff, positively showcasing the wonderful talents within our community in what really was The Greatest Show. A fitting end for a show that really was. Anna Lenartowicz Head of Music


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

STAFF WELLBEING & RESILIENCE TRAINING community, and the success and satisfaction of children and young people”(p.128).

Life worthy learning is notably for all our students and staff where individuals are empowered with the necessary tools to flourish and live a life of promise, purpose and fulfilment.

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This model focuses on students’ developing a true and courageous self through learning wellbeing skills because schools are now seen as organisations where their role extends beyond academic competence to further preparing the ‘whole child’ (Huitt, 2010). The nature of schools are changing as we raise and educate children in a complex social landscape with the residuals of a Wilderness girl being central to our learning and teaching that matters. Wilderness has a whole school evidence based approach to supporting and developing student wellbeing. Understanding the world around us, effecting change and contributing positively to society starts with a deep understanding of self which is developed by having positive skills that support personal growth and wellbeing.

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Educators’ wellbeing is a complex issue and in order to maximise the wellbeing of teachers the adoption of a holistic approach, including implementation of initiatives to complement teachers’ personal strategies, is needed (McCallam et al, 2017). Staff wellbeing is impacted by a range of factors, notably the ability to implement and use resilience skills in a range of situations with wellbeing being defined as “optimal psychological experience and functioning” (Deci & Ryan, 2008, p.1).

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Our wellbeing impacts the different areas of our lives and having strategies to manage these situations is essential for personal growth and healthy living. At Wilderness, the wellbeing of each student is central to the School’s mission, “To enable each girl to be the best that she can be throughout her life” with the School’s values being the foundation for our wellbeing model (see Figure 1).

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Figure 1: Wilderness School wellbeing model.

Our wellbeing model is also applicable to staff where individuals have a strong understanding of themselves, value and engage in relationships, are active learners immersed in deep thinking, and as citizens impact change locally and globally. McCallum & Price (2016) highlight the fact that supporting staff wellbeing is critical because there is “a clear link between teachers’ wellbeing, their role in the classroom and school

As part of implementing a strategic approach to wellbeing across the School, all staff (teaching and professional support) undertook a two day Resilience Skills training in July presented by The Wellbeing and Resilience Centre (WRC) from the South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute (SAMHRI). This all staff training had several objectives, specifically focusing on enhancing and developing the resilience of our staff. From this training, staff learned several key strategies to support their wellbeing based on Seligman’s (2011) PERMA (Positive Emotion, Engagement, Relationships, Meaning and Accomplishment) model of flourishing.


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Different resilience strategies taught included; how to grow and thrive with challenges, utilising positive coping skills to deal with stress, balancing one’s thinking, applying resilient cognitive skills, active constructive responding, cultivating gratitude and understanding events. The training also explored how to develop realistic appraisals of the source of problems, exercising mindfulness, navigating interpersonal problem solving skills, capitalising on character strengths, making meaning, utilising value based goals and strengthening social connections. From this training our staff deepened their knowledge and understanding of different resilience strategies to support their growth and development - focusing on deepening their understanding of self to enhance personal wellbeing. Sheryl Sandberg said “I think there are things that we can all do to build resilience in ourselves, but also to build resilience in each other”. As staff continue to build their resilience and the resilience of our students, we are stronger and more powerful together as a thriving learning community focused on making a difference locally and globally.

References

Deci, E.L., & Ryan, R.M. (2008). Hedonia, eudaimonia, and wellbeing: An introduction. Journal of Happiness Studies, 9, 1-11.

Above:

Resilience Skills training in July presented by The Wellbeing and Resilience Centre.

Huitt, W. (2010). A holistic view of education and schooling: Guiding students to develop capacities, acquire virtues, and provide service. Paper presented at the 12th Annual International Conference sponsored by the Athens Institute for Education and Research (ATINER), May 24-27, Athens, Greece. McCallum, F., & Price, D. (2016). Nurturing wellbeing development in education. Routledge, NY. McCallum, F., Price, D., Graham, A., & Morrison, A. (2017) Teacher Wellbeing: A review of the literature, AISNSW. Seligman, M. E. P. (2011). Flourish. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Trina Cummins Director of Wellbeing and Counselling

“I think there are things that we can all do to build resilience in ourselves, but also to build resilience in each other”. – Sheryl Sandberg


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

Want to experience a physical, emotional, spiritual and life-changing challenge? Then travel to Nepal in the company of 32 students and 4 other staff, immerse yourself in a different culture and spend 22 ever changing days in the beauty of the Himalaya while watching and being amazed at the way the girls and the other members of staff fully embrace the experience. Landing in Kathmandu (dynamic, chaotic, interesting), flying to Pokhara (past mountains over 8,000m tall), trekking for 14 days (exhausting, high mountain passes, rhododendron forests, views to die for), two days at Bahadure School (meeting the boarders, playing with the students, the ‘programme’), travel to Chitwan

(elephant back riding, canoeing past crocodiles) and finally back to Kathmandu, Singapore and then home. What an adventure!

and mental, and a huge feeling of relief and satisfaction is felt when we landed in Adelaide, with a happy, if tired group of girls.

I have been very lucky – blessed really – as I have had this experience seven times since the first trek in 1998. Each trek has been different, which is to be expected with different personnel, but it never ceases to amaze me, the effect this experience has on the students and staff who take the risk and the challenge of going to Nepal. The experience can have a profound effect on how you perceive the world, as well as how you perceive yourself.

The responsibility is made easier when you have staff of the calibre of Lauren Walker, Renee Chatterton, Chris Pahl and Cassie M. The girls and I were blessed to have such experienced, engaged, professional, life-loving and fully committed members of staff on the trip. My personal thanks to these four outstanding educators, colleagues and friends.

It is a big responsibility to take young girls away on such a challenging experience. There is always concern about the girls’ welfare, both physical

I also want to personally thank all of the 32 girls who made the 2018 Nepal trek such an outstanding experience for me. They were enthusiastic to the extreme. They were prepared to take personal risks. They embraced all


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NEPAL 2018 CONNECTED COMMUNITY aspects of the trip, with each day being a new experience. They may not be aware of how the experience has changed them, as it often takes time to reflect and appreciate all that they have lived through. Arriving back in Adelaide, tired from travel, eager to see family and friends and then coping with the reality of work, school and a social life may not be conducive to a deep understanding of what you have achieved – that may come later. The Nepal trip is one which fully encompasses adventurous learning and learning to be a true and courageous self. Sally Nobbs Teacher of Science


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

Wilderness School’s mission:

‘To enable each girl to be the best

WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY What ignited your passion to pursue a career in veterinary science? As a child, I was fortunate to grow up with a lot of pets in the household and was always the one who was keen to take responsibility for their care, and so for as long as I can remember it has been my dream is to become a vet and to spend my life saving and helping animals.

DR MARTINE VAN BOEIJEN DIRECTOR PERTH CAT HOSPITAL Class of 1993

Describe your life journey and career? I qualified as a veterinarian from Murdoch University in 1999 and shortly after graduating I moved to London where I worked in a busy 24-hour emergency hospital for three years. In 2003 I returned to Perth and commenced working at Vetcare Innovation Group where I joined as a full equity partner in 2006. I never understood why people call themselves cat or dog people, as I loved them both equally, but as a new graduate vet I began to realise some big differences between the two species. Dogs are excellent communicators, they will literally point to the bit that hurts making disease diagnosis and treatment somewhat straightforward. Now cats are a whole different story, and in fact most cats will invest much of their energy and time in ensuring that

no one knows what hurts or when they are sick. This makes our jobs as vets very challenging but also very rewarding when you learn how to get it right. As vets we must fine-tune our problem solving skills and search for even the subtlest of symptoms. A love for cats coupled with a passion for the enigma of feline medicine prompted me to further my career focusing on cats, and in 2010 I successfully sat my Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientist Membership examinations in Feline Medicine which lead to me becoming an invited member of the Feline Academy of the International Society of Feline Medicine. In February 2016, I opened the Perth Cat Hospital, Perth’s first and only cat exclusive veterinary hospital and sold out of my partnership in the Vetcare Group. Being able to provide a specialised facility designed purely just for cats now allows me and my team to be able to focus our entire careers on ensuring each patient that comes in our doors gets the very best of care. Since opening our doors, not only have we been caring for pet cats but we have made a significant foot print in the community helping provide advance


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she can be throughout her life.’ Wilderness School is proud to be able to celebrate the successes of all our past and present students and the many outstanding achievements of our Wildy women. Leading the Way offers you an insight into some of our amazing old scholars’ lives, beyond the Wilderness School gates.

medical and surgical services pro-bono for the Cat Haven charity and attending community events speaking publicly to help educate and inspire the public on topics on feline health and welfare. I mentor and train student veterinarians and in my role as Adjunct Clinical Teacher at Murdoch University Veterinary School, I provide lectures and are involved with running veterinary student workshops. More recently, I am very excited to have just received the 2018 Telstra Emerging and Energised Business Award for Western Australia. This prestigious award puts Perth Cat Hospital in the running for the national award which is announced end of September. What advice would you give to Wilderness girls in finding their career path? Pursuing my dream has been an incredible rollercoaster journey with many hurdles to get to where I am today, and I realize that dreams do not come true without blood sweat and tears. I am a strong believer in finding and following your passion and working hard to achieve your goals.

RACHEL KOCH CIVIL ENGINEER Class of 2010 What ignited your passion to pursue your career? When at school I had no idea what I wanted to pursue at University, I had randomly selected Pharmaceutical Science to eventually lead me into becoming an Orthodontist. After a year of studying Pharmaceutical Science I soon realised this was not for me and ventured back to Wilderness School to talk with Mr Ross, who made me realise my love for Maths, Physics and Art at school and to pursue something more related to this area. So I made a big swap into Civil Engineering. Describe your life journey and career? I grew up on a farm 15km out of Maitland on the Yorke Peninsula,

attending Wilderness School on the Rischbieth family scholarship from year 8 to year 12, graduating in 2010. I currently work at GHD as a Civil Engineer in the Civil Transport & Aviation team, I began my career here mid 2016 originally starting as work experience and asking to continue whilst I finished my Honours project. Once I finished Uni I continued full time, working on a wide range of projects. I always believe that keeping a good work life/social life balance is important, so I make time to see friends/family and enjoy traveling with my recent trip to Europe. The attached photo is from my recent trip seeing another Wilderness graduate, Molly Goodman (left) win gold at the World Cup for rowing in Switzerland. What advice would you give to Wilderness girls in finding their career path? My advice would be to take advantage of the work experience provided, use this time to pick a work place that is generally in the area of your interest, and use this time to talk to the people in the industry. Everyone is always willing to talk and show insight into their work. Also attending the careers nights and taking the time to talk to multiple stalls, I wish I took more advantage of these.


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY

KIRSTY CHOWN FLIGHT NURSE/MIDWIFE - RFDS Class of 2003 What ignited your passion to pursue a career in the Royal Flying Doctor Service? It was in my first year of Nursing that I discovered my passion for Flight Nursing. I was a committee member on the Rural Club at Uni and part of my job involved liaising with the Rural Doctors Workforce Agency and RFDS to organise student attachment flights. I remember thinking this was a fabulous opportunity and I couldn’t wait until my time came. It completely ignited my passion for critical care / midwifery and Flight Nursing and I knew after that to make the RFDS my career goal. It was also the variety of work that drew me. I think it is really the best job in the world as I get to look after people from rural and remote Australia in their greatest time of need. You never know what your shift will bring. I also get to use all of my skills as a Nurse and Midwife, and I love working in the sky! Describe your life journey and career? I grew up on my families farm at Narridy in the Mid North of South Australia, and at age 13 I commenced boarding at Wilderness with my twin-sister Amanda. It was tough, but also one of

the best things I could have ever done and I am so thankful to my parents for giving me the amazing opportunity. They have always supported me to chase my goals and dreams and I thank them for that. I believe watching them work hard on the farm in good times and bad taught my siblings and I resilience and a strong work ethic which has carried me through to where I am today. I also thank Wilderness for showing me, and every girl, that you can do anything if you want it enough. I had a strong interest in the medical field but also loved the country and the farm and upon leaving school I didn’t quiet know what to do. I studied Health Science initially before transferring to Nursing. I met my amazing Husband Andrew at St Ann’s University College and he has continued to encouraged me to follow my dream of working for the RFDS. I have also been lucky enough to have Amanda’s support both as a twin sister but as a fellow Emergency Nurse. After completing my attachment flight I met with the Nurse Manager at the time of RFDS Central Operations and asked what path I should take in Nursing to achieve my goal. With this advice in mind I chose emergency or rural placements as a preference for the rest of my uni placements, before going on to work at the Royal Adelaide Hospital in a variety of areas but mainly in Intensive Care and then Emergency. My husbands work took me to Launceston, Tasmania where I worked in the regional Emergency Department of the Launceston General Hospital. I also took on any course that would build my experience, and specialised in Emergency Nursing. The variety of work in Launceston was

fabulous and it was here that I helped deliver my first baby which reaffirmed my passion to be a Flight Nurse. To do so, I knew I had to add to my emergency and intensive care experience and study midwifery. In 2012 I moved back from Tasmania to be closer to family and undertake my midwifery study whilst gaining vital experience working in Paediatric Emergency at the Womens and Childrens Hospital. I was lucky enough to finally land my dream job, much earlier than I thought I would, and feel privileged and proud to work at the RFDS with the amazing and dedicated team. To me it isn’t a job because it is such a fun and interesting career, made even more special this year as we celebrate 90 years of saving lives. What advice would you give to Wilderness girls in finding their career path? The world is full of opportunities waiting to be discovered. It doesn’t matter if you don’t quiet know exactly what you want to do as long as you follow your strengths, you will find your passion and excel. Work hard and grab each and every opportunity that comes along.


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TAYLOR PFEIFFER MUSICIAN Class of 2017 Such a joy to see our girls following their dreams. Congratulations to Taylor Pfeiffer who is on a sevenweek trip around the US where she will write and perform at the renowned Bluebird Cafe and open mic sessions.Taylor will also head to North Carolina for an intensive banjo camp with legendary New Yorker, Bela Fleck. So proud of you!

CATHY BARTON DIRECTOR Class of 1968 What ignited your passion to pursue a career in clothing manufacturing? Possibly not doing dressmaking/sewing at school, where I hated tacking and would usually spill the tin of pins at the beginning of the class and spend the time picking them all up, only to take work home and sew it together [without tacking] Describe your life journey and career? My life journey and career would not have been possible without the total support and encouragement of parents, who no

matter what I tried to do, were always positive of my choices. My life learning started with my time at Wilderness, creating thoughtfulness, kindness and honesty towards oneself and others and the curiosity to ask questions. I started playing golf when 12 years of age as part of a family activity and was the first under 21 player to win a South Australian Championship in 1971. I represented our State many times as a junior and senior only reducing the amount I played to bring up a son Andrew. I worked at Silver Fleece back when they were at Tranmere and became passionate about the business and in 2003 decided to ask the owners if it was for sale. A decision based on passion is not always the best

choice but since then I have certainly kept myself busy building a small local manufacturer while battling the ever constant imported products. Was it a good decision? Given the chance I would probably do a few things differently but would still do it. My learning scale is vertical and no matter what comes of the business I know I have given 250% and that’s all I need. What advice would you give to Wilderness girls in finding their career path? No matter where your passion lay, pursue it, be patient, it may not be immediately visible but as my Father would say “you will get where you need to be.”


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY SOPHIE LOVEJOY FOUNDER, CEO AT SANT AND ABEL Class of 1999 A BIG thank you to old scholar Sophie Lovejoy for her ongoing support of all things Wildy. She has continued to provide a range of her globally successful Sant and Abel luxury sleepwear. Available for men, women and children the range was once again presented on the catwalk at our annual Boarder’s Fashion Parade. Sophie's continued support contributed to the success of the evening raising over $9,700 for the education of young Nepalese girls accommodated in our Wilderness Boarding House in Bhadure. Do yourself a favour and pop into Outdoors on the Parade, Norwood for your next pyjama purchase or jump online santandabel.com.

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The Principal had the honour of being the guest of Sharon Levy to attend her production of the Gospel of Colonos performed at the Delacorte Theatre in New York’s Central Park and presented by The Public Theater and the Onassis Foundation USA. Sharon Levy lives in New York and is the President of Dovetail Productions, founded in 1997 to develop and produce new work. Over more than two decades, she has worked in close collaboration with many directors and companies, including Lee Breuer, whose work has been lauded for expanding the boundaries of storytelling in the theatre. It is a work of great emotional beauty.

Set in the context of a black Pentecostal service, with the ground-shaking thunder of a gospel revival meeting, this Obie-winning adaptation celebrates the 2,400-year-old myth of Oedipus’ redemption with a rousing gospel and blues score. The show, which was conceived, adapted, and directed by Lee Breuer featured more than forty gospel singers including The Blind Boys of Alabama as Oedipus. The Washington Post called it “dramatically audacious” and praised the Nonesuch recording’s “powerhouse performances” and “sheer massed strength of the various gospel choirs.” The New York Times calls it “an exhilarating musical celebration and as reviewer Alexis Soloski stated “…when the organ thrums, the drums thump,

the guitars wails and the chorus lifts its voices as high, “The Gospel in Colonos” becomes something elemental, a work of glory and grace that absorbs all of us all in its soul wrenching lesson” On a drizzly night in the middle of central park it was an uplifting and exhilarating experience to see this extraordinary work come to life and with a great sense of pride to know that the powerhouse behinds its manifestation, was a Wilderness woman. A C  arolyn White in The Gospel at Colonus at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park. Photo credit: Joan Marcus. B The company of The Public Theater and the Onassis Foundation USA’s production of The Gospel at Colonus, with book, original lyrics, and direction by Lee Breuer, original music, adapted lyrics, and music direction by Bob Telson, at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park through September 9. Photo credit: Joan Marcus.


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INTRODUCING MEMBERS OF OUR GOVERNING COUNCIL: JACKI SMITH Current Roles: Owner and Director of My Name Label Pty Ltd. My Name Label is an ecommerce business operating for 20 years in Australia, with franchises established in the United Kingdom and Germany and shortly will be launched in New Zealand and Singapore. We produce personalised name labels for families who need to identify belongings – from kids to elderly parents. What is the mantra you live and lead by? I am only as rich as the people I meet. Spread my friendships wide and be open to the thoughts and experiences of others. Always try to see things through their eyes and understand their lived experience is not mine and there is a lot to learn from that. What virtue do you admire most in people? I really admire people who have clearly gone outside of their comfort zone to achieve something. Usually something they thought they could not do but then were surprised when they did it! Even more so, when I see someone take a risk that did not turn out how they wanted it to but rather than seeing it as a failure they have learnt from the experience and tried again. A willingness to take a risk, accept failure, learn from it and try again. If you could have dinner with two famous people, who would you choose? Katherine Switzer. In 1967, the American athlete Katherine Switzer, became the first woman to run the Boston Marathon. At the time, athletics officials believed women were incapable of running more than a mile and a half. After crossing the

finishing line, Switzer was disqualified. It was an experience that turned her into a campaigner for women’s sport. Her story is inspirational. Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Columbian author who is responsible for unlocking a passion for literature in my adult life. What is one piece of advice you would give our girls? Don’t listen to or be limited by, other people’s version of you. Believe in your own version of yourself and be the creator of your own destiny. What is something on your bucket list? I actually don’t have a pre planned bucket list – I have a ‘post planned’ bucket list. When opportunities present themselves I take them and then I add them to my list of things that I have experienced or achieved and never want to forget. Sometimes they are little things, sometimes big, sometimes things I had already thought of doing, sometimes things that come out of the blue. If you had to start over from scratch, knowing what you know now, what would you do differently? For me, one’s life and who you are in this life, is determined by the decisions and choices we make every day. These are influenced by so many things, some in our control and others not. To go back and do things differently would mean making different decisions to those I have already made. The life I live now would not be my life, the children I have would not be my children and I would have been shaped as a person differently by those decisions. I love this life, my

family, friends and who I am. I would not want it to be different so I guess I have to say I would not do anything differently. What’s the most important business or other discovery you’ve made in the past year? What has become clear to me is that despite our ever increasing reliance on the digital and online world, people still prefer to deal with people. My customers want to know that there is a real person at the other end of the transaction so they can be heard and responded to by a human rather than a machine. I think a lot of the issues facing big business today (as evidenced by the Banking Royal Commission) are a direct result of business forgetting that there are real people at the end of their business transactions. As an old scholar, how did being a Wilderness girl help you to succeed? At the time of the school’s founders, the Browns, being a teacher was not unusual for a woman but buying property in their own name and having the vision and dedication to establish a school to educate girls was. The determination, passion and resilience they must have had to achieve this continually amazes and inspires me.


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS REUNIONS CLASS OF 2008 REUNION On Saturday 8 September the class of 2008 met to celebrate ten years since finishing at Wildy. We arrived in a flurry of excitement, giggles and gorgeous outfits – just as we had ten years ago. The tour of the school grounds was a highlight for everyone. We marvelled at the transformation of Browns’ House into a chic administrative hub and freshened up our faces in the swanky Newman Theatre dressing rooms under the old Memorial Hall. Over excitement was rife when we were allowed access to areas that had been strictly out of bounds as school girls. From techy new learning spaces to the old Running Track - which hasn’t really changed a bit, the tour had some of us wishing we could pop on our Summer dresses once more and head to class. The reunion continued at Stone’s Throw on Norwood Parade. A welcome glass of bubbles and the evening was off to an incredible start! Thirty buzzing old friends, a few drinks and a lot to catch up on… still we were on our best Wildy behavior! It was a thrill to learn what our friends are up to. From alumni based in the USA working on cutting-edge technology projects to small business owners and mothers – the class of 2008 are living up to expectations. It was a magically nostalgic afternoon and lovely evening. A huge thank you to Kirsty Michael, Phoebe Waters and Booie Hayward for their hard work in organising the event.

A Helen Livissianos, Phoebe Waters and Coco Wong B Michelle Horne, Charlotte Boylan, Lisa Findlay and Annie Ashby C Laura Birchmore and Millie Osti D Lily Vadasz, Sarah Perkins, Shannon McKay and Nefi Pnevmatikos

E Kathleen Korossy, Skye Harvie and Lucinda Hayward F K  irsty Michael, Georgie Evans, Millie Osti and Margaux Hardy G M  aria Koukos, Georgie Evans, Danica Benni-Ridge and Lily Vadasz H Annie Ashby, Phoebe Waters and Charlotte Boylan

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CLASS OF 1968 REUNION Even the hail storm couldn’t dampen the level of conversation as twenty girls met together for only the third time in fifty years promising to never leave it that long again. We enjoyed a lovely three course lunch at the Kentish Hotel in September, looking at old photos, reminiscing, laughing a lot and finding it very hard to believe that it was fifty years since we had all left school. Some of us started with a tour of the School which was truly amazing. While we were shown the diversity of subjects offered today and the high quality of the facilities available to enable this. It was nice to see some of the old retained especially the newly created Old Scholars’ Archive Gallery. What a beautiful learning environment for the current generation of Wildy Girls!

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Unfortunately, some old girls were travelling and some we were unable to locate but please put 2021 in your diaries for our collective 70th Birthdays! Di Semmler (Shaw) Class of 1968 A B  ack row: Libby Magarey, Marilyn Webster (Hosking), Heather McKay-Thorpe, Janet Muirhead, Sarah Whitington (Howie), Judy Haskett (Rischbieth), Jane Wallace (Philipson), Susan Hopkins, Barb Nielsen, Susie Holmes (Bruce), Carolyn Dunbar (Williams) Middle: Cathy Barton (Anderson), Bronnie Jones Front: Cecily Dollman (Shepard), Sally Simpson, Helen Seears (LeMessurier), Liz Gard (Dohnt), Ginny Johnston (Jacob), Di Semmler (Shaw), Annie Haynes B Class of ‘68 School Tour

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Members of the Class of 1998 Christie Detmold, Lisa Godfrey and Rosie Jervis Kate Howse and Julia Forbes Katie Roberts, Charlotte Grigg and Emma Denny

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Photo boards at the pub captured some of the horrendous 90’s fashion from School days as well as good times on Surf Camp, by the running track and other memorable brown and blue moments. There was much laughter and excitement and for some the festivities continued into the early hours of Sunday morning. Rosie Jervis Class of 1998

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THURSDAY 18 OCTOBER | 6.00-9.00PM THE MAID HOTEL, 1 MAGILL ROAD, STEPNEY We will be joined by some of our former teachers and staff (Honorary Life Members). This is a great chance to enjoy a drink and nibbles with friends, classmates and staff from recently and many moons ago! No RSVP required, just pop in with your friends for a drink.

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2018 Old Scholars' Golf Day Monday 12 November, 2018 8.00am for 8.30am Royal Adelaide Golf Club $75 per person

(all inclusive non refundable)

Please register by Tuesday 30 October, 2018 Registrations are limited.

Individual and team Stableford Competition with longest drive and nearest the pins. Bookings and enquiries to Vicki Thwaites E: vickt@tpg.com.au M: 0438 355 673 Note: If the Adelaide Airport forecast temperature is 34° or higher, a 1 3 hole competition will be played and cards will not be counted for handicap. Players with no handicap to play off green trees and are ineligible for prizes. Barista coffee available prior to play at additional cost on the day.


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

WILDY INTERGENERATIONAL FAMILIES

BOWEN FAMILY

Mignon Bowen (Holden) 1935-1949 Prue Sidey (Bowen) 1959-1970 Rosie Jervis (Sidey) 1990-1998 Alice Kilsby (Sidey) 1995-2003 Kate Hood (Bowen) 1974-1981 Emma Hood 2016-2018 Zoe Hood 2018 – current.

Minnie and her three sisters all attended Wilderness School. Beginning Wildy life in 1935 when her family moved to Medindie, Minnie has vivid memories of the brown kindergarten double doors, the running track (which was actually an Athletic Track) playing in the olive trees along Northcote Terrace and of course the Misses Brown. Miss Mamie and Miss Winnie who were her early teachers.

In 1939 World War II had its impact with much of the garden being replaced by muddy trenches in case of the air raids. While not needed for the air raids they were an excellent play space. From the very beginning Wildy offered a sense of belonging and a strong sense of community where school spirit, shared history and lifelong friendships were fostered. Minnie’s two daughters (Prue and Kate) and four granddaughters (Rosie, Alice, Emma and Zoe) have all attended Wilderness, valuing highly the academic, sporting and social opportunities and the support and encouragement to be the best you can possibly be. All have been proud Sparaxis girls who have thrived on the house connections and comradery.

The 3 Bowen generations have experienced a vastly different and changing Wilderness while all enjoying the shared history and life long values. Minnie has continued her involvement with Wildy attending many sporting events for her grandchildren, Old Scholars’ events and enjoys seeing that strong sense of belonging and community continue with two grandchildren in the Boarding House. Now as a great grandmother there is opportunity for continued involvement at The Wilderness. Prue Sidey (Bowen)


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ROSS FAMILY

Judi Ross (Reuter) 1955 -1960 Penny Connel (Ross) 1980 - 1985 - daughter Georgie Osborn (Ross) 1982 - 1987 - daughter Amelia Osborn 2014 - 2018 currently in Year 12 - granddaughter All in Carob House

My mother Judi recalls a time when Wilderness played against St Peters College in a friendly basketball game. This was only a game for leaving and leaving honours students to participate in. She crept into the sewing room with her girlfriends on the second floor overlooking the court, on the pretence of having to ‘collect something’ when really they wanted to have a peek through the windows to watch the game as the rest of the school was strictly forbidden to watch. There was also a time when Judi was in trouble with one of her friends and they were sent to Miss Mamie and Miss Winnie’s Drawing Room for a chat about what they had done. Another friend walked past outside the window with a mop turned upside down with a very funny face stuck to the mop head, they somehow kept their wits about them so as not to burst out laughing as they knew this would have meant more time in the drawing room. My parents Judi and Peter (Ross) chose Wilderness for Penny and I because of the impressive education, the vast

sporting opportunities, the potential for great friendships and the comfort of knowing that in whatever we pursued, Wilderness would have prepared us and given us the life opportunities to face it with confidence and resilience. Wilderness seemingly has not changed in that the extensive range of subjects that the girls can now study allows them to extend themselves now and develop skills critical to their futures. My sister Penny remembers having great relationships with the boarders and learning how they lived a different life away from school, working on their farm and what they did for fun. I remember nurturing life-long and resilient friendships capable of enduring both the distance and time of close to twenty years living both interstate and overseas. Amelia is proud to be a thirdgeneration Wilderness School student and believes the close relationships between the girls, teachers and staff create a school that is not a strict education institution, but an engaging

learning environment where they are not only externally encouraged to extend themselves in and out of the classroom, but strive to within themselves. Judi believes that the fundamental Wilderness School values of respect, kindness and adventurous learning have enhanced her life and have been instilled across generations, leaving a lasting positive impact on both Wilderness School girls and those they interact with. Georgie Osborn (Ross)


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS OLD SCHOLARS’ UPDATE The second half of the year continues to be busy with social activities. In August we hosted the annual dinner at the Maid and Magpie. Thank you Lorraine, Lily and Millie for organising a wonderful night. It was well attended with approximately 50 Old Scholar joining us for a beautiful dinner. We invite you to attend the drinks night at The Maid on the Thursday 18th October. This is a casual event and perfect opportunity to reconnect with friends and this year we will have a number of the Honorary Life Members attending. In November, we will be hosting the OS Lunch in Newman Theatre on 20 November for girls class of 1965 and prior. We look forward to seeing you there. As we do once each year, the Welcome to New Old Scholars on Thursday 18th October, will be the Year 12 send off breakfast and their welcome as old scholars. Always a day of mixed emotions and celebration of a milestone in their academic learning and personal development.

A Atty Highfield, Caroline Bridgland and Felicity Krix B Deanna Oberdan, Kerrie Salagaras, Belinda Bussenschutt, Naomi Fahey Quick and Kate Fennell C Jane Lee and Millie Shinkfield D Katherine Landers, Courtney Marsh and Nefi Pnevmatikos

E L  ily Schuller, Danielle White, Pooja Newman, and Georgie Taarnby F R  ebecca Bransbury and Jenny Sever G R  hiannon Giles and Hannah McDonough H Jane Danvers and Kirsten Gormly

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For reunion questions please contact Jodie Escott, Head of Advancement on jescott@wilderness.com.au


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OLD BOYS’ COCKTAIL PARTY On Thursday 30 August our old boys joined us in the Old Scholars’ Archive Gallery for their cocktail event. They share so much love and appreciation for our School, the Brown family and the innovation we continue to integrate at Wilderness. For boys who attended Wildy between 1937 and 1948 for Reception and Year 1 – it is wonderful they share in our vision and passion. Simply a great night with the boys. Thank you for joining us.

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UK REUNION The UK Reunion was held on Sunday the 15th of July at No. 32 The Pavement, Old Town, Clapham. It was the most glorious sunny afternoon and 12 of the most glamorous girls assembled at this perfect and lovely venue. We had a lot of fun and all of the girls had so much to talk about. I was fascinated hearing all about their wonderful, clever and diverse careers. They are a bright and brave bunch of girls. We had quite a few apologies, which was a shame, but Summer is a busy time in the UK with so many travelling around Europe! Hopefully we can do it all again soon!

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1961 - 1970 MORNING TEA We welcomed back some old scholars who were students at Wilderness from 1961-1970. A lovely morning tea was served in the Old Scholars’ Association Archive Gallery with the keen and friendly assistance of our Student Foundation girls. A few of our guests had not been back to Wildy for 50 years and loved the opportunity for a Tour. It was wonderful to see so many Wildy girls together, including a few old scholars who are retired staff. Who do you recognise? Jodie Escott Head of Advancement

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D C Jane Lee and Liz Pike D Morning Tea in Archive Gallery


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

WEDDINGS

Top to bottom Left to Right Justin Kurenda and Katie Kapiris (2004) Dougal Robinson and Lily Black (2006) Scott Seymour and Angela Perkins (2005)

WILDY BABIES Left to Right - Top to bottom Natasha Bedding (Houston) (1997) – baby Max Katrina Demourtzidis (2005) – baby Teah Caitlin Chittenden (1997) – baby Raphael Louis Piccione Alexandra Smart (1999) – baby Hunter Elliot Pearson


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ANNOUNCEMENTS ENGAGEMENTS Kirsty Michael (2008) to Matthew Whittleston

OLD SCHOLARS’ COFFEE CATCH UP Left to Right - Top to bottom Booie Hayward (‘81), Barbara Stacy (nee Sadlier Class of 1941), Noel Haymann (nee Ross - Class of 1948) and Cathy Lancaster enjoying a lovely Morning Tea at Barbara’s house. Booie Hayward and Barbara Stacy (nee Sadlier, Class of 1941 ) and Hazel the Dog enjoying a wonderful Morning Tea at Barbara’s House

MARRIAGES Emily Treagus (2000) married Andrew Castiglio Lily Black (2006) married Dougal Robinson Katie Kapiris (2004) married Justin Kurenda Angela Perkins (2005) married Scott Seymour BIRTHS Natasha Bedding (Houston) (1997) – baby Max Katrina Demourtzidis (2005) – baby Teah Caitlin Chittenden (1997) – baby Raphael Louis Piccione Alexandra Smart (1999) – baby Hunter Elliot Pearson DEATHS Gael Mackenzie (Irving) (1969) Avis Smart (Price) (1929) Lorraine Tucker (Pink) (1966 & 1967) Helen Fraser (Cherry) (1966) Wendy Halls (Wollaston) (1950 & 1951) Siew Lim Bail (Lee) (1964) Elza Riesner (Norman) (1948) Susan Del Rossi (Blackburn) (1963) Ernest Gray (Old Boy attended 1939 - 1941) If you are an old scholar we would love to hear from you and share your milestones and celebrate your success. Please email your news and accompany a photo to oldscholars@wilderness.com.au

MRS AVIS GERTRUDE EDITH SMART (NEE PRICE)

Class of 1928

Died aged 106 years 6 August, 2018 We were saddened to hear Avis Smart passed away in August. As our oldest and very proud old scholar at Wilderness School, she will be missed by many in the School community. Avis was special guest at our 120 Year celebration in 2004 and cut the official cake. The first of three generations of Wilderness women, Avis will be remembered for enjoyment of life and always aware of all things Wilderness. Our thoughts and condolence to the Smart family. Always in our heart.


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

MARY ANN MATTHEWS SCHOLARSHIP 2018 The Mary Ann Matthews Scholarship is offered annually to current Year 11 or 12 students. This scholarship enables a Wilderness girl to travel anywhere across the globe and undertake a challenging project or placement to broaden her perspective of the world.

Congratulations the 2018 recipients:

Mary Ann Matthews believed in learning through a global outlook, allowing individuals an appreciation and respect for social, cultural and religious diversity, along with a sense of global citizenship.

Both girls will work in these developing countries supporting girls and women in society, assisting in access to equal opportunity and the empowerment of girls and women.

There were many applications this year and the calibre was exceptional. This made the decision process for the Principal, Jane Danvers and us challenging and we decided to offer two for this year.

This is sure to be a life-changing and extraordinary experience for both girls. We look forward to them sharing their travels with the School community in the near future.

Grace Escott – also in Year 12 will travel to Sri Lanka January 2019 with PMGY.  elarn Murphy – who is in Year 12, will travel M to India in December 2019 with GVI Australia.

Sarah Matthews and Johnathon Matthews


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BROWN SISTERS’ MEMORIAL YEAR 10 ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIP “Many things prized elsewhere count for nothing at all within its gates but the founders continue to offer their own sound currency: gaiety, courage, intellectual adventure and unlimited kindness.” – Miss Mamie Brown

Excellence in academics, sport and Arts are recognised and celebrated at Wilderness School. In honour of our Founders’ belief in the value of education for girls, the Brown Sisters Memorial Entrance Scholarship has been established. During 2013, a scholarship trust was born to raise funds to offer 100% tuition fees and consolidated fixed charge to an accomplished and high achieving girl, who owing to financial circumstance, would otherwise not have the opportunity to attend Wilderness School. Applications for this three year (Years 10 to 12 inclusive) scholarship to commence in 2020 are now open. It has been made possible by the incredible generosity of our School community philanthropically giving to the Wilderness School Foundation

Scholarships Fund over the last 5 years. For this, we sincerely thank you all. The Foundation will continue to seek donations to this Fund in the future to ensure it is perpetually endowed. Applications for the Brown Sisters’ Memorial Entrance Scholarship can be found on our website www.wilderness.com.au It is open to girls who are not currently students of Wilderness School. Jodie Escott Head of Advancement


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

BEST DAD/ SPECIAL FRIEND EVER BREAKFAST The Foundation Events Committee hosted their big breakfast for Dads/ Special Friends on Thursday 30 August from 7.15am on Memorial Lawn. Joined by just over 500 guests and a new initiative to the School – it was awesome! We were spoilt with terrific weather and an abundance of tasty food catered by the team in the Wildy Café. A highlight for the girls was the Boost mobile van and we heard that these juices were still being consumed well into the afternoon. Along with Wicked Coffee, one dollar from every sale was donated back to the Foundation. As our one and only fundraiser for 2018, we loved involving the entire School and seeing little girls from the Mamie’s through to our Year 12 girls all with their dads/special friends. The raffles were hotly contested, and we would like to congratulate Tara and Logan who each received a $200 gift voucher to a store of their choice in the Student Raffle. For our Experience Raffle, the generosity of the following companies made it all possible and enabled ‘money can’t buy’ prizes. We know you will all enjoy your prizes:

 st: Brad Jackson has a return 1 helicopter flight (thanks to Commercial & General) for 4 people to D’Arenberg for a blended tasting and then onto the Victory Hotel for lunch

With thanks to our sponsors:

 nd: Channa Fernando will head across 2 to St Hugo in the Barossa Valley for a Degustation Menu for four people  rd: Johnny Costoglou – 6 bottles of 3 St Hugo Cabernet Sauvignon from the Coonawarra The event raised $11,500 towards the Wilderness School Foundation Building Fund. These brilliant events are only possible with the dedication, energy and creativity of the Foundation Events Committee led by Jen Guest. Thank you to each and every one of you who brought this entire event to life. It is smiles all round! What’s next on the Foundation calendar? Wilderness School is 135 years old in 2019 and we will all be celebrating – SAVE THE DATE – Saturday 31 August (evening) – more details soon! Jodie Escott Head of Advancement

The philanthropy of our community built Our Roger Masters Drama Fellowship, builds the talents of our senior drama students. This is Our Community. Let’s build it together.

EST. 1858


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A. 1st prize winners - Isabel and Millie Jackson B. Amelie and Rob Kemp C. Darren and Zara Armitage D. Joe and Giuliana Maurici E. Kit Brookman, Mietta Brookman and Rob Brookman

F. 2nd prize winner - Channa Fernando G. Annabel, Ben and Sophie Manifold H. Fayek and Marie-France Tanious I. John and Olympia Condous J. Millie and Brad Jackson

K. 3rd prize winner - Johnny Costoglou L. B  rad and Alice Bonar and Michael and Georgia Cluse M. Roger and Sophie Davies N. Thiru Govindan and Akshaya Thiru O. R  avi Singh, Moushmi Chakradeo and Keira Singh


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018


THE GIFT OF GIVING GREEN DOOR SOCIETY

A legacy is an incredible gift of generosity and people from various backgrounds with different professions, incomes and passions use their wills as a way to show gratitude. A manner to make a difference and enabling others to share some of the good fortune they appreciate. We invite you to perform a considered act of kindness and join the Green Door Society by making a bequest to the Wilderness School Foundation. For a brochure and additional information about the Green Door Society, forthcoming events and how to receive your membership brooch/pin, email Jodie Escott jescott@wilderness.com.au or telephone 08 8344 6688 for a confidential conversation. To our Green Door Society Members – your invitation will soon arrive to our High Tea on Wednesday 21 November, 2.00pm. Pop the date in your diary!

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Wilderness Times | Spring 2018

30 Hawkers Road, Medindie SA 5081 Phone + 61 8 8344 6688 www.wilderness.com.au CRICOS Provider Code: 00375B

Profile for Wilderness School

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Wilderness Times - 82