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ISSUE 3, 2019


SAPSASA North Adelaide District Athletics Carnival

SAPSASA North Adelaide District Athletics Carnival On Monday 6 May Wilderness School was represented by 30 girls from Years 4-7 at the SAPSASA North Adelaide District Athletics Carnival, held at The State Athletics Stadium, Mile End. It was fantastic to see so many girls competing in both individual and team relay events during the day. Congratulations to all girls for their performance in 36 events during the day. SAPSASA District North Adelaide Athletics Representatives Congratulations to the following seven girls who have been selected in the SAPSASA North Adelaide District Team to compete at the State Metropolitan Athletics Championships on Tuesday 21 May at the SA Athletics Stadium Mile End.

Isabella Browning

1st 200 Metres, 1st 100 Metres, 1st Long Jump, 3rd Relay

Lulu Detmold Cox

1st Discus , 2nd Shot Put

Molly Dwyer

1st 200 Metres, 2nd 800 Metres, 3rd Relay

Chloe Hern

1st High Jump, 2nd Relay

Sienna Brown

2nd Long Jump, 2nd Relay, 3rd 200 Metres

Sophie Rocca

2nd Shot Put, 3rd Discus

Julia Gunther

2nd Discus

Rosie Lioulios

2nd 100 Metres, 3rd Relay

Isabel Jackson

2nd 800 Metres, 4th High Jump

Marjorie Tucker

2nd Relay

Alice Williams

2nd Relay

Portia Newton

3rd Shot Put, 3rd Relay, 4th 100 Metres

Annabel Duncan

3rd Long Jump

Madeleine Forde

3rd Relay

Rose Franze

3rd Relay

Annika Ganesh

3rd Relay

Ella Johnson

3rd Relay

Lulu Zammit-Harris

3rd Relay

Roza Page

3rd Relay

Grace Munro

3rd Relay

Poppy Ritchie

3rd Relay

Iness Leathart

4th 800 Metres

Jasmin Thirlwell

4th 800 Metres

Isabella Browning

11 Yr 100m, 200m, Long Jump, Relay

Isabel Jackson

1500m, 2nd Shot Put

Portia Newton

11 Yr Relay, 2nd 800 Metres, 3rd Relay

Molly Dwyer

12 Yr 200m, 2nd Relay

Chloe Hurn

12 Yr High Jump, 2nd Relay, 3rd 200 Metres

Lulu Detmold Cox

13 Yr Discus, 3rd Discus

Rosie Lioulios

13 Yr Relay


Farewell Helen Eldridge Ben Manifold

In employment interviews, often the question is asked ‘How would your colleagues describe you in three words?’ My response to this question for Helen would be - Dedicated, Reliable and Kind. For 37 years, Helen has been a loyal member of the Wilderness School Community and an employee whom I am sure the Brown sisters would be proud to put forward as a living version of the four values upon which our School was founded. Over nearly four decades, Helen undertook a number of roles beginning in a casual temporary role typing copy for Miss Butterworth for the School Magazine in 1982 and finished as the Personal Assistant to Head of Senior School. Her loyalty and dedication to supporting all processes in the Senior School was simply outstanding. We all miss her incredible knowledge of the timetabling process and genuine care. We all hope she enjoys her well earned retirement and spending time with her beloved grandchildren. Ben Manifold Head of Senior School


Mother’s Day Breakfast

Danielle Moir

This year’s Annie House Mother’s Day Breakfast did not disappoint. The weather on the morning didn’t dampen the special time that our beautiful mums got to spend with their daughters. The Annies and their ‘special ladies’ enjoyed a breakfast together as well as some quality time in our learning space. This year our mums got to take away a special gift hand made by the Annie’s which will help with a moment of relaxation and pampering at home. Thank you to all who took the time to attend the event. We hope all our mums had a wonderful Mother’s Day.


Anzac Day Dawn Service Emily Nguyen and Sarah Kyriacou

Anzac Day is a day when we remember the Australian soldiers who have fought in the wars in the past and present. What many do to celebrate Anzac Day is go to the Anzac Day Dawn Service. We were both very lucky to take part in the Dawn Service on the 25th of April 2019. The Anzac Day Dawn Service started at 6:15am while it was quite dark and very cold. There was an introductory speech explaining the importance of Anzac Day followed by a march with the sound of bagpipes playing in the background. Next was the Prayer of Remembrance and a speech by the mayor of Walkerville, Elizabeth Fricker. A singer sang, ‘We are Australian’ and the New Zealand Anthem. Afterwards, some important residents of Walkerville and students from different schools laid wreaths at the memorial. As representatives of Wilderness School, we lay our wreath down and paid our respects to the soldiers. We both found this not only interesting but also educational because we learnt more about Anzac Day and the importance of it. We also found out more about the history of the country we live in as well as the wars. We would like to acknowledge the soldiers who fought for all of us in the wars. Lest We Forget.


GIJ Farewell Concert Alyshia Vu – Year 12 Music Representative

The GIJ Farewell concert was an opportunity for parents to witness the repertoire the girls would perform at Generations in Jazz – the largest music event in the Southern Hemisphere. In preparation for this competition, the girls had spent the past term, some even longer, learning and perfecting their pieces. With three choirs and two bands participating in Generations in Jazz this year, the preview concert consisted of Big Bands 1 and 2, Jazz Choirs 1 and 2, and Dream Girls. The preview concert was thoroughly enjoyed by parents, staff and girls. Without the help and support of the ensemble directors, the girls would not be able to reach such a high standard of musicality. Ms Lenartowicz, Mr Newhouse, Mr Hurn, Mrs Abela and Ms Tropeano all work extremely closely with the girls, and the huge amounts of effort they put into improving our ensembles is nothing short of inspiring. The journey towards Generations in Jazz was a highly rewarding one in musical improvement, but also in the relationships formed between the girls and ensemble directors. The girls were extremely motivated to improve even further due to the inspiration the gained from watching each other. I know that the positive spirit will continue throughout the rest of the year. The journey in developing our pieces was hard work, but the thrill and excitement of being able to showcase the girls’ efforts made it all worth it.

Band Blast

Alyshia Vu – Year 12 Music Representative

Being the first major music event of the year, our musicians were thrilled to play in the Band Blast. The concert featured our large bands, smaller ensembles, and highlighted Suneli Athukorala (Year 9) and Samantha Li (Year 4) on piano. It was fitting given the purpose of the night was to begin raising money for the acquisition of a new grand piano. With this year being the inaugural Band Blast concert, the girls were excited to have an opportunity to showcase their musical development to their families and special guests. The bands blast in to the year with this new larger concert in the Gym.

Featuring • Junior & Senior Concert Bands • Saxophone Quartet • Junior & Senior Clarinet Ensembles • Junior & Senior Flute Ensembles • Big Band 1 & 2 For more information please contact the Music Office on 8343 1064.

Things started off with a bang as the Senior Concert Band performed the powerful El Arco De Los Cabos, followed by the contrasting, much softer March of the Trolls. This was then followed by Junior and Senior Clarinet Ensemble, Saxophone Quartet and Senior Flute Ensemble were able to showcase multiple pieces from their repertoires. The last portion of the concert focused on the larger ensembles. Big Band 2 performed Sack of Woe, followed by Big Band 1 who performed All of Me. The Senior Concert Band then returned to the stage and performed a much-anticipated James Bond medley. To conclude the night, Junior Concert Band joined the stage, and the two bands performed the mysterious and atmospheric Tempest, featuring images of various storms in the background. In preparation for this concert, there are many things that go unseen, such as the effort made by the music and maintenance staff in organising technology and the instrument set-up. I would like to thank them for all their work to make the night a success.


Generations in Jazz Lianna Retnaraja – Percussion Leader

After 12 weeks of intense work, countless rehearsals, sectionals and practice hours put in by the students, it finally came time to compete in the annual Generations in Jazz Festival held in Mount Gambier. From the 3rd 5th of May, the girls had the opportunity to indulge in the world of jazz and form strong relationships with each other. This year 68 girls across five ensembles travelled to Mount Gambier, making it our largest group to be involved in the festival. For many of our students, it was their first time attending a music event this large, so there was much excitement and anticipation. Wilderness achieved high results across all ensembles, placing in the top 10 in their respective divisions. Dream Girls and Big Band 2 were fortunate enough to both place 2nd in their categories, an outstanding accomplishment which we are all extremely proud of.

The festival featured American jazz vocalists, Kurt Elling and Lizz Wright, as well as organist Joey Defrancesco, pianist Julius Rodriguez and saxophonist Rickey Woodward. We were fortunate enough to also have workshops with them and learn about how to improve as musicians. While Generations in Jazz gives the girls a chance to be exposed to the jazz genre, the trip also provided them the opportunity to bond with each other over their love of music and strengthen the relationships between the students across all year levels as well as the staff. I would like to thank all the music staff, especially our ensemble directors for challenging, supporting and inspiring us to improve as musicians. Without all their tireless efforts, the Generations in Jazz experience would not have been possible.


Guest Speaker Dr. Richard Harris Richard “Harry” Harris, OAM, is an Australian anaesthetist and cave diver who played a crucial role in the Tham Luang cave rescue. He and Craig Challen were jointly awarded 2019 Australian of the Year as a result of that rescue.

that I have taken away was that Dr Harris used the skills he already had to help the boys and I think that anyone is capable of doing what he did, but they cannot be afraid.” - Tehreem Zafar

Last term several girls from Year 6 were fortunate enough to visit St Peter’s College to hear Dr Richard Harris speak about his role in this amazing rescue. These are our thoughts about the experience.

“A couple of things that I remember from Dr Harris’ talk was that when he was still a student at school, he didn’t particularly enjoy some of the activities. Because of this he would sometimes get angry and he decided to think more about the skills that the activity would give him for the future. This helped him to develop a more positive attitude. I also remember him saying that his job is being a doctor and cave diving was just one of his hobbies, but he needed both skills to help with the rescue. He said he will never forget that when he received the phone call, asking him to come and help with the rescue, he was in the middle of giving a patient an anaesthetic. An insight I have taken away from his talk is to always turn the negatives to the positives. Thank you for the amazing opportunity!” - Emily Nguyen

“Something I remember about the talk was the courage Dr Harris had. He was extremely brave and didn’t even get scared! The fact that the tunnel was 2 km long was amazing and the water was pitch black. He said that if you believe in yourself you can do almost anything.” - Holly Munro “One thing I remember from Dr Harris’ fascinating speech is that the cave water was like coffee. So, if you put your hand in front of your face you wouldn’t be able to see it. Another thing I found interesting was all of the ideas they had to rescue the boys. For example, one of them was to teach the boys to dive but they soon found out this would be practically impossible! Scuba diving was one thing, but cave diving was a whole new level of skill and they would have needed years of experience. Even if they had taught the boys to dive, they probably would have panicked and spat out their mouth piece and drowned! Which made the idea of putting them to sleep the only option. I think what I took away from hearing Dr Harris speak is that he didn’t think he was anything special and that he was just helping out but what he did actually won him Australian of the Year. His role helped to save the lives of 12 extremely lucky boys! I think what he said will help me remember that he was just like us at school and that we can all do amazing things like he did when we are older!” - Lucia Andrae “Dr Richard Harris said that he felt like there was no way of helping the 12 ‘kids’ as he calls them, who were stuck, so he used everything he already knew to problem solve and save them. An insight that I had was that Dr Harris was a very busy doctor and he travelled all the way from Australia to Thailand to participate in this rescue mission. Something

“I found Dr Richard Harris so inspiring and fascinating. I found the part about how he didn’t really know his talent until he was a teenager amazing, because he ended up being really good at it even though he didn’t find it earlier. He used his talent (diving) as a hobby, but not a profession as he is an anaesthetist now. But when the Thailand cave incident occurred his two talents were highly important. He taught me that professions and hobbies are equally as important because there is a time and place for everything. Even though he did win Australian Of The Year he was very modest, which I really valued and appreciated. Overall, I really enjoyed it and am very thankful for the opportunity.” - Georgina Karytinos “One thing that I really remember from Dr Richard Harry Harris’ talk is that to put the boys to sleep he sat them on his lap and injected their leg. I also remember that on the last day, when they thought the next day would bring heavy storms, they had to take out five boys despite only having four proper full-face masks. Four of the boys had gone out and the last boy would have to wear one of the not-sotrustworthy masks. The two not-so-trustworthy masks were not suitable, one was huge and the other one was


too flimsy. Dr Richard had been expecting a 50-kilo boy to walk down the mound of dirt, not realising that it was the smallest boy, weighing about 29 kilos. After he had given the boy his anaesthetic, he and another diver spent about 20 minutes trying to fit one of the two masks on his face. You could put your hand through the gap between the boy’s head and the bigger mask, so they tried putting foam in the gap, but the foam fell out, so that was a big no. The small mask though, fitted the boy’s head and after they ran some tests (dipping the boy’s head underwater) it didn’t fill up with water, so they decided to just go with it. The small mask ended up working and the boy made it out alive. One insight that I gained is that the divers had to swim through dark water so that you even couldn’t see your hand if it was in front of your face. As Dr Harris said, ‘..the

water was like coffee’. One thing that I have taken away from his talk is to find something that you have a passion for and keep persisting with what you enjoy doing.” - Olivia Lai “One thing I remember was that the water was so murky that they may as well just close their eyes and not bother to even use their headlights as it would make no difference. I also remember that they had to put the boys under anaesthetic, so they won’t panic and drown. I was interested that he never knew that he loved the sea and ocean until he was 13 years old when he discovered snorkeling and diving a little later. I definitely learned from him as he told us that if you’re doing something you love to do, don’t stop and keep on pursuing your dream.” - Tiara Pullinen

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A: C  ave rescue divers prepare dive equipment at Tham Luang cave. B: Thai rescue workers positioning a pipe for the pumping operation in the Tham Luang cave. C: Dr. Richard Harris with Year 6 students.

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Cross Country Carnival It was an energetic start to the Cross Country Carnival with House Captains leading their girls with enthusiasm in preparation for the 2.2 km course. The overcast weather conditions set the scene for all those who trained hard for this year’s event. All girls embraced the challenge, which resulted in a morning of fantastic achievements. Thank you to the Sports Committee members, School Staff for officiating and to all the parents who turned out to support the girls. Congratulations to the following girls: Junior School Results Year Level

1st Place

2nd Place

3rd Place

Year 3

Jemima Hicks

Isla Balestrin

Edie Lydeamore

Year 4

Margot Tembel

Zara Rocca

Bella Pasin

Year 5

Leila Thirlwell

Holly Bahr

Ella Smart

Year 6

Isabel Jackson

Iness Leathart

Indie Heywood-Smith

Duncan Cup Winner (perpetual trophy) Overall 1st Place

Isabel Jackson

Overall 2nd Place

Iness Leathart

Overall 3rd Place

Margot Tembel

House Results Placing

House

1st

Antholiza

2nd

Sparaxis

3rd

Cedar

4th

Amarayllis

5th

Carob


Middle/Senior School Results Year Level

1st Place

2nd Place

3rd Place

Year 7

Jasmin Thirlwell

Lulu Detmold Cox

Arabella Bahr

Year 8

Mia Heywood-Smith

Mia Cardone

Sienna Grech

Year 9

Sarah Muir

Mia Jersmann

Georgia Muir

Year 10

Bronte Sleath

Trinity Hong

Kate Kyros

Year 11

Emilie Muir

Emma Sleath

Jess Hawker

Year 12

Charlotte Ruddenklau

Victoria Moularadellis

Tiffany Hong

Elspeth Begg Cup Winner (perpetual trophy) Overall 1st Place

Emilie Muir

Overall 2nd Place

Charlotte Ruddenklau

Overall 3rd Place

Sarah Muir

Elspeth Begg Cup House Results Placing

House

1st

Cedar

2nd

Sparaxis

3rd

Amaryllis

4th

Antholiza

5th

Carob


World Scholar’s Cup Molly Simpson and Chelsea Downing

On Monday 6 and Tuesday 7 May, 30 middle school girls had the privilege of competing in the Adelaide regional round of the World Scholar’s Cup which took place at Scotch College. As part of the competition, girls in teams of three students competed in rounds of debating and collaborative writing, as well as individual and team quizzes. The competition runs on a different, thought-provoking theme every year with a relevant, fascinating curriculum. This year’s theme was ‘A world on the margins.’

In the Junior Division for Writing, Hannah Pheasant was awarded 4th place and Charlotte Thomas received 1st place. In the Senior Division for Writing, Olivia Tallent was the overall winner. Devika Mukherjee won the Asimov Award for the Junior Division, which is an award for the best individual scholar for the Scholars’ Challenge.

Wilderness had great success in the Junior Debating, taking out the top 5 positions. Jeevan Gilhotra in 5th place, Nuhaa Hasan in 4th place, Molly Simpson in 3rd place, Charlotte Thomas in 2nd place and Devika Mukherjee in 1st place.

Qualifying in the top five SA teams for the global round this year were: 1st Place Charlotte Thomas, Jennifer Zhao, Ashley Jones 3rd Place Chelsea Downing, Brianna Maddison, Chenuli Basnayake 5th Place Rashi Gupta, Devika Mukherjee, Hannah Pheasant

The debate topics included: • that students should be allowed to choose their classmates • that every family should have a robot to do the housework for them • that a telescope which could see back in time would be the best way to teach history.

Such a brilliant event cannot take place without the commitment, time and effort of staff. On behalf of Wilderness School girls who competed in the World Scholar’s Cup we would like to thank Alison Short, Bess Smith, Marie Beanland (Scotch College) and the senior Scotch students for making this year’s World Scholars cup a fabulous event.


CEDA Lunch Thanh Nguyen

On Monday 6 May, eight Wilderness students from years 9, 11 and 12 attended a CEDA (Committee for Economic Development of Australia) lunch to learn about, ‘Artificial Intelligence and Ethics: the future of work’. We listened to the expertise of Osmond Chiu, a Senior Policy Officer at the Community and Public Sector Union, and Dr. Jim Minifie, Principal and Melbourne off Leader of AlphaBeta, an economics and strategy company. The session was introduced by Microsoft’s National Skills Program Lead, Beth Worrall and chaired by Dr. Eva BalanVnuk. The luncheon started with the speakers talking about their respective topics. These topics were further explored in the discussion, which took place after the food was served. On the topic of ethics and AI, certain questions were raised about the development of the legal guidelines which must be followed throughout the process. On this topic, a conclusive framework, which is agreed by all on the matter, cannot be reached due to the differing perspectives and lack of common ground among global corporates and governments. The idea of AI helping with environmental and humanitarian issues were entertained, however, were not delved into due

to the lack of time available. Other than that, the discussion also revolved around the possibility of jobs, especially manual labour, being displaced due to AI development. For instance, the use of automated logistics in retail giants would result in manual labour being deemed unnecessary. Certain sources estimate that roughly 40% of jobs in Australia would be displaced, however, it is widely believed that only 9% would be displaced as other jobs in the IT industry would open up. It is likely that these jobs would be complementary to the future of computing, which would require an expert skillset and critical capabilities. The panel discussion revolved around the topics mentioned and were further supported by questions of other participants during the luncheon. Students impressed the speakers with the depth of their questions. Katniss Zhang asked the panel, ‘Would saturation of AI widen the gap between the developed and developing world’. Thanh Nguyen enquired as to how we were preparing for the ethics and legal implications of social participation programs, such as those in China. Above: Wilderness students with Equal Opportunity Commissioner, Dr Niki Vincent at May’s CEDA Conference on ‘Artificial Intelligence and Ethics: the future of work’.


Year 7 Camp Lauren Walker

It was five days of excitement, challenges and trying new things for our Year 7s on their recent Outdoor Education camp. Throughout the week the girls spent time getting to know our Crawford property better, exploring the Coorong and Lakes and visiting Robe. The hot week saw the girls cooling down often in all the aquatic based activities they were given the opportunity to try. Experiences included Sailing and Kayaking on Lake Albert, Surfing on Long Beach and stand up paddle boarding in Robe, exploring the dunes and camping out at Tea Tree Crossing on the Coorong and team building activities and tending to the Exclusion Zones at Crawford. It was fantastic to see the girls support each other through challenges and collaborate in all the activities allowing their relationships with peers and teachers to grow. “It was magnificent to walk the tea tree crossing. I loved it and the amazing view. I can’t believe that this is what the Coorong is like. It was amazing experience to go there and walk with friends.” - Gracie Dowling

“When surfing it was hard to stand up on the board, so seeing others being able to do it and have so much fun encouraged me to do the same. Even though I didn’t have the best technique, I was eventually able to do it through the encouragement and support of others in my group.” - Livia Podreka “I learnt this week that even if I think I can’t do something, I can if I have a positive attitude and give it my 100%.” - Annabel Duncan “I am very grateful for everyone who organised the camp and the Outdoor Ed staff and teachers who came and made it all possible. The camp experience was interesting and challenging which is everything it needed to be. Thank you for the great camp experience.” - Isla Marton


Year 8 Camp Mathilda Moore


Our Year 8 cohort recently travelled to Halls Gap in the Grampians, Victoria, for a six day Outdoor Education camp experience. The girls approached this experience with a mixture of excitement, trepidation and a few nerves, as the Grampians was a new and unexplored area for many! Along for the journey were teachers Ms April Bickley, Ms Elyse Purkis, Ms Cass Marosopolous, Ms Judy Thurgood, Ms Moore and six qualified outdoor education instructors, specialising in bushwalking and rock climbing. With an extra day this year, extending the camp allowed more time for each activity and for the girls to be fully immersed in their groups and activities. The girls were split into four groups, rotating through a range of activities designed to challenge individuals and groups in many different ways. The extra time allowed the overnight bushwalk to be extended to two full days, allowing for a longer, richer bushwalk in the beautiful Grampians wilderness. The other days consisted of a day rock climbing and abseiling on a natural cliff face, a short 20 minute walk away from our accommodation in Halls Gap which was followed by a series of group initiative challenges. The final day involved a visit to Brambuk Cultural Centre situated just out of Halls Gap, where the girls watched some films on the creation of the Grampians, both culturally and geographically. They participated in a bush foods tour, studying and practicing some traditional painting. In the afternoon, the students

under the supervision of Judy Thurgood, had the important role of being on Duty group; cooking dinner for the whole group and recess for the following day. From physical tasks – bushwalking with a rucksack for two days and rock climbing, to mental and emotional challenges as well as learning about cultural understandings, the girls were challenged in a variety of settings. Armed with the school values of kindness, and not to mention an adventurous spirit, the girls rose to each occasion, having fun and strengthening relationships along the way! “I had to conquer so many fears on camp, things that I thought I couldn’t do, but with the support of those around me, I found I could do them! Coming back to school, knowing I was able to overcome those challenges on camp – it’s helped me to change my mindset, and change the way I approach challenges in a more positive way.” – Alessia Charman “I really enjoyed Year 8 camp because we spent a lot of time in our groups together overcoming a range of challenges, that it strengthened my friendships and relationships with the other girls and meant we had so much fun together.” - Millie Gosse


Realise Camp 1 Martha Beasley

R: resilience E: endurance A: ambition L: learning I: involved S: strength E: enjoyment

These are all things that we experienced at the Coorong for REALISE. In the last 3 weeks of Term 1, the first group of year 9s set off for REALISE. This 3-week camp was packed with countless activities. From surfing to camping to painting, this camp had it all. We had to cook and clean for ourselves, which some found more challenging than others! This camp allowed us to connect with our peers but also gave us the opportunity to strive for things individually. One of the many highlights was surfing. We went to Robe for the day and learned with Charlie’s

Surf School. Although hard at first, it is an amazing feeling when you ride your first wave in! Overall, REALISE taught us so many skills that we can bring to our everyday lives. Parent Reflection REALISE lets your girls explore their own personalities, make new friends, be independent, challenge themselves physically and mentally, and most importantly, make mistakes. What a wonderful experience!


Wildy Football Chris Pahl

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The Wilderness Football teams have started the season in style with resounding opening round wins over Walford. Both the Senior A team, coached by Mr Pahl, and the Middle A team, coached by Mr Hawkins, held their opponents scoreless while scoring 72 and 48 points respectively. There has been huge growth in the number of students playing football this year, allowing Wilderness to enter two teams in each of the Senior and Middle competitions. All four teams have already shown great improvement in contests and understanding of the game. Photos: A: Senior A Team B: Middle A Team


Lawn Bowls State Championships Georgie Wilson

The Stage 2 physical education girls, have been learning and practising the skills of lawn bowls as required as part of their assessment. On Friday 1Â May, the girls visited the Lockley bowling club to compete in the state championships. The girls went out feeling anxious and excited, with four triple teams and one singles being entered into the competition. Wilderness came home feeling enthusiastic and pleasantly surprised, collecting both gold and silver medals in the triples rounds.


U/18 National Lacrosse Hannah Gough, Penny Casson and Eliza Fenton

Four months ago Eliza, Penny and I were selected as three of the 16 girls to be part of the U18 South Australian Lacrosse Team. After three months of training we were excited to finally fly to Perth for the Australian Lacrosse Association Under 18 Boys and Girls National Championships. We arrived Wednesday April 17th and spent the day sightseeing and settling in. The next morning, we played our first game against Waikato from New Zealand who we defeated by 23 goals. This exciting first win gave us the confidence we needed heading into the tougher games. Victoria, the defending champions, were our next opponent. The nerves subsided helping us achieve a sensational three-goal win. On Saturday, we played a nail-biter against Western Australia, unfortunately losing by one goal in over-time, however the small margin qualified us for a place in the grand final. Sunday was an extremely nerve-racking but exciting day, with both the South Australian girls and boys teams playing in their respective grand finals. The SA boys played first, resulting in a 17-goal loss. Witnessing this made us all the more determined. We continued to work together as a team and kept striving to play our best lacrosse all game. We were all overwhelmed to finish the game victorious and be crowned National Champions! We are the second SA girls team to win the championship in the past 15 years. This journey has been an incredible experience that we will remember and cherish for the rest of our lives. The bonds that strengthened between us and our teammates were also a highlight of the trip.


Cyber Safety Presentation Selin Cinar

When Peter, a policeman for monitoring cyber safety, came to Wilderness School, we learnt about cyber bullying which is bullying online. We also learnt that if it ever happens to you then you should either tell an older sibling, a teacher, or a trusted adult. We learnt about what is considered to be inappropriate things to do and say online and about stranger danger. The importance of keeping our passwords safe and not telling other people was important for our safety online. If we felt we could not talk to a teacher or another adult then we learnt that we could use the ‘Kids Helpline.’ I really enjoyed the Cyber Presentation because I learnt how to protect myself and others online.


Maths Excursion Inika Weber

At the end of last term, five girls participated in the ‘ChooseMaths – women in STEM’ excursion. We went to the Mawson Lakes campus of UniSA, where we listened to two wonderful speakers, Dr Lisa Schultz and Dr Bronwyn Hajek. We engaged in a range of activities, showing where we use maths in our everyday lives. These activities included, undoing a knot using maths to find the formula of rotations and twists; working out the fraction of a triangle out of an origami flower; as well as working out the way computers use code and algorithms to store information. In the first activity we had to work as a team to knot and unknot a rope. At first glance this might not seem very mathematical, but we knew that a twist was +1 and the starting point was 0, so we had to work out the value of a rotation. By testing our equations with different amounts of twists and rotations, we discovered that a rotation was equal to the negative of the reciprocal. In the second activity we made origami. We made a box and then a flower. Similarly, this may not seem very mathematical, but we looked at the implications of things being able to fold like this using an example of the space industry. There is not very much room on board a spacecraft, so they have to make things such as

solar panels as compact as possible. However, to run satellites and space stations you need solar power and therefore large solar panels are vital, this is where the skill of origami comes in. If the panel can fold to be as compact as possible when it is inside the spacecraft and as large as possible to gain power outside, maximising the potential and minimising the constraint. During this activity we also looked at how to work out the fraction of the smallest triangle in the flower. There were many different methods and answers found to this, making us notice how many different ways you can find a result. Some of the answers were also slightly different, due to the imperfections of our flowers. The final activity was looking at how computers store information and specifically pictures. We looked into the importance of binary code and learnt different methods of how computers compress images to take up less space. We learnt about how there are algorithms to shorten the binary code so that something may become 4, 2 instead of 1,1,1,1,0,0. We then tried to do this ourselves, with worksheets where we had to find out what the picture was as well as identify the error in one line in the code. Overall, I really enjoyed this experience because it made me think more about how maths is subconsciously used in our everyday lives.


D&R Discover and Return Jodie Escott

Left: Mrs Olsson with some of our D&R Foundation girls

Our Year 6 Student Foundation girls have many responsibilities at Wilderness. Their energy and savvy organisation is very impressive. The student foundation in 2019 includes: Tiara Pullinen Gia Rinaldi Raphaelle Vasilikiotis Holly Munro Audrey Petrucco Olivia Lai Zoe Koerber Yana Shah They have prepared a schedule that enables each of the girls to clear the Lost Property areas in the School each week. Any name labelled clothing is returned to the girls. If clothing is not named, the Year 6 Student Foundation girls bring the items to Mrs Olsson in the Uniform Shop to be sold as Second Hand Clothing. Some of the

students recently visited the Uniform Shop to learn the importance of labelling clothes and the cost of replacing jumpers, hats and blazers. Thank you to our Year 6 Student Foundation for the incredible difference you are making to the entire School maintaining the D&R. I know there are some grateful families too - seeing their lost items returned! If you have misplaced any uniform pieces, you are welcome to check the following Lost Property areas: • • •

Cupboards near the bike rack (cnr of Health Centre) Shelf near bathrooms at Main Entrance to Gymnasium Box in room near lifts of the Junior School


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HAWKERS RD, MEDINDIE SUPPER + DRINKS + GLASSES + GOLD COINS + CREDIT CARDS

INCREDIBLE AUCTION AND SILENT AUCTION ITEMS AVAILABLE ON THE NIGHT


An evening rumble in the

G A L A

D I N N E R

Saturday 31 August 2019 | 7.00pm – 12.00am Tickets are limited. Book now at www.trybooking.com/476523 Published Arthouse, 110 Franklin Street Adelaide $175pp early bird* | $190pp standard | Dress: Cocktail

THANK YOU TO OUR SUPPORTING PARTNERS

*Early bird registration closes Monday 22 July, 2019. Bookings close Tuesday 20 August, 2019

Jungle


UPCOMING EVENTS EXEAT weekend 17 May

WOSA Annual General Meeting Tuesday 4 June

New South Wales Reunion Friday 17 May

Queen’s Birthday Public Holiday 10 June

Realise Camp - Core Group 2 (Crawford Campus) 19 May– 7 June

Boarders’ Fashion Parade 21 June, 6:30pm

Founders Day 20 May WOSA Quiz Night 31 May

Tasmania Reunion Saturday 22 June Winter Choral Evening 25 June, 6:30pm Term 2 concludes 28 June

STUDENT SUCCESS Congratulations to Victoria Phan, who performed recently at Royal Albert Hall, London on Sir Elton John’s red grand piano to great acclaim.


ELC – YEAR 12 PARTY All Students are invited to celebrate Wildy’s 135 birthday th

When: Monday 20th May (week 4) Time: Lunchtime Where: Memorial Lawn Cost: $5 entry fee includes playing as many games as you can!

What to expect: Fun filled birthday games, Golden North ice cream for purchase and lots more!


Music Calendar 2019 TERM 2 Tuesday 30 April Fri 3 - Sun 5 May Monday 20 May Wed 22 May

1

GIJ Farewell Concert

1

8

Generations in Jazz Jazz Choir, Dream Girls, Big Bands, Jazz Combo Founders Day Assembly Jazz Choir Div 2, Symphonic Band Walkerville Council Volunteer Awards Jazz Choir Year 2 Strings / Year 4 Band Night curriculum ensembles + Junior Orchestra and Junior Concert Band Combined Band Workshop with PAC Senior Concert Band Festival of Strings

9

Winter Choral Evening

4 4 7

Tuesday 11 June Sunday 16 June Thursday 20 June Tuesday 25 June

8

29 June - 16 July

All String Ensembles + Selected Soloists

All Choral Ensembles + Selected Soloists

6:00pm

Hender Hall

All Day

Mt Gambier

10.00am

Gym

12.15pm

Walkerville Town Hall

6.00pm 7.00pm

Hender Hall

1:30pm

Michell Music Centre

6.00pm

Hender Hall

6:30pm

Wesley Church Kent Town

Music Tour with St Peters Boys

Europe

TERM 3 Mon 5 - Tues 6 August Wednesday 7 August Wed 14-Thurs 15 Aug Wednesday 18 September Friday 20 September

3 3 4 9 9

Musician in Residence

All Day

Michell Music Centre

6:30pm

Elder Hall

TBC

Westminster School

6:00pm

Governor Hindmarsh

6.00pm

Anzac Hall, PAC

Instrumental Concerts

6.00pm

Michell Music Centre

Gwen Robinson Piano Competition

6.00pm

Michell Music Centre

6.00pm

Memorial Lawn

6.00pm

St Peters Cathedral

6:00pm

Gym

Annual Showcase of Music Selected Senior Ensembles + Junior Ensemble feature - TBC ABODA Bands/Orchestra Festival Concert Bands/String Orchestras Wildy Windup @ the Gov Jazz Choirs, Dream Girls, Big Bands, Combos PAC Sesquicentenary Concert Jazz Choir & String orchestra

TERM 4 Mon 11 - Wed 13 November Wed 13 November Wed 20 November Mon 9 December Tues 10 December

5 5 6 9 9 9

Wed 11 December

Twilight Concert JS/MS Ensembles Advent Service All Choirs, Senior String Orch, Selected instrumentalists Speech Night Jazz Choir R-2 Christmas Concert 3-6 Christmas Concert Junior Concert Band, Junior Concert Choir, Junior Wind Ensembles, Junior Strings

6.00pm 7.30pm

Gym


Life in the Wilderness - Issue 7 2018

Road Safety Parking restrictions surrounding the school are for the safety of your children Walkerville Council impose a variety of parking restrictions around the school to achieve a safer environment for your children.

No Stopping Zones

You must not stop your vehicle in a no stopping zone or on a solid yellow line, not even for a few seconds

No Parking Zones

You may stop in a No Parking zone to immediately pick up or set down your daughter and drive o as soon as possible. No parking zones are to ensure a quick and smooth turnover of vehicles. You must not leave your vehicle parked or unattended.

Double Parking

Double parking is illegal and creates a danger to motorists and pedestrians.

Bus Zones

A vehicle must not park in a bus zone during the times stated on the sign.

Private Road - Myrtle Court

This is a private road and must not be used for anyone other than residents. This private road cannot be used as a parking bay or a turning circle.

A friendly reminder to parents that when your daughter is absent or has an appointment and is going to be late, please remember to email absentee@wilderness.com.au


30 Hawkers Road, Medindie SA 5081 Phone + 61 8 8344 6688 www.wilderness.com.au CRICOS Provider Code: 00375B

Profile for Wilderness School

LITW - Issue 3 2019