Page 1

SUMMER 2017

ISSUE # 75


Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

UPCOMING EVENTS

CONTENTS 3

Principal’s Thoughts

7

Valedictory Address Hannah Kerr

11

Speech Night Guest Speaker Isobel Bishop

15

Year 12 Results 2016 Success

17

Rites of Passage Liz Meaker

33

Old Scholars Wildy Women Leading the Way

36

Old Scholar Dates for the Calendar

39

Old Scholars Reunions

41 42

P&F Bulletin

Tuesday 21 - Saturday 25 February WOSA Presents ‘Jailbirds’ Fringe Performances Thursday 9 March Welcome to New Old Scholars Tuesday 14 March WOSA Annual General Meeting Thursday 16 March WOSA Drinks at the Maid

Old Scholars’ News

19 Wellbeing & Positive Education Why Character Matters 21

Faculty in Focus Art

23 25

Lifeworthy Learning & Building Cultures of Thinking At Wilderness

27

A New Tradition at Wilderness

29

Did You Know? The Brown Family Gravesite

31

Rededication of Honour Rolls

Tuesday 11 April Raising Amazing Girls with Ron Ritchhart Friday 19 May Pre 1948 - 56 Morning Tea & Founders’ Day

2016 Building & Scholarship Fund Donations

Wilderness School has a number of social media platforms to connect with our community and discover the latest news. www.facebook.com/WildernessSchool www.linkedin.com/company/wilderness-school twitter.com/wilderness1884

S OL D S H

A

SS

N

OL A RS ’

WI LDER

ES

C

N

vimeo.com/wildernessschool

O C I AT IO

Join the Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association page on Facebook. This page is set up for Old Scholars to communicate, network and hear about upcoming alumnae events. Once you are a member you can then share with other Old Scholars in your Facebook network.


“...collectively we have the power to change the world for the better, whether that be within the confines of our homes or conquering feats such as Mount Everest; whatever we set our hearts and minds on we will be incredibly successful and for that we have Wilderness and the people around us to thank.�- Hannah Kerr, 2016 SRC President


3

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

PRINCIPAL’S THOUGHTS SPEECH NIGHT ADDRESS Mr Williams, Ms Isobel Bishop, members of the Council of Governors, special guests, staff, parents and girls. Tonight we come together to recognise the achievements of our Senior School students, to acknowledge the hard work and commitment of our staff, to thank the community for their tireless support and most importantly to farewell our 2016 graduating class. As we reflect on the year that has been, we recognize that there have been great accomplishments and some challenges. We witnessed the coming together of athletes at the Rio Olympics and we are delighted to welcome one of three Wilderness Old Scholars, who represented their

country at those games, as our guest speaker tonight. We are all very proud of you Isobel. Throughout the year, the international political stage was dominated by Brexit and the US elections and the questions raised during these global debates made us think deeply about our values, the nature of leadership and the kind of world we want our children to grow up in. In recent days, there has been much press about the decline in performance of the Australian education system in mathematics, science and reading. While PISA is just one of many tests, and tests are not all there is to learning, it is one of the most influential research reports in education. As a leading school, and one that bucks the national trend, we have a responsibility to contribute to the national conversation about

education, to join in the debate to offer our vision of how education should respond and to consider deeply how governments, employers and students will need to adapt to keep pace with the bewildering array of possibilities that will shape all our futures. It is clear, from the evidence of OECD Reports that the world is undergoing a new renaissance, a time of unparalled change. A time that many are proclaiming as the fourth industrial revolution. A time characterised by a dynamic economic landscape, global interconnectivity and complexity. What we teach our children and how we teach them will impact almost every aspect of our society. By 2040, many of the children born this year will be joining the workforce. The world they find will be very different from today. It is estimated that up to 70% of jobs


GIRL FO C USS ED

4

will become automated over the next 2 decades and that 65% of the workforce will be employed in occupations that don’t yet exist. Our students’ adult lives will be shaped by artificial intelligence, autonomous vehicles, synthetic biology and many other emerging technologies. It is true that our children must be equipped with strong foundations in literacy, numeracy and the sciences. Indeed, these are the bedrocks upon which the careers of the future will be built. However, it is also increasingly clear we need to provide the next generation with the aptitudes and behaviours that will best place them to make the most of the exciting opportunities ahead. The World Economic Forum in its ‘Future of Jobs’ report outlined precisely the kind of dispositions that we know the world needs: those transversal skills of complex problem solving, critical thinking, creativity

and those social competencies necessary to work with others, manage teams and be emotionally and culturally aware. We need young people who are cognitively flexible and emotionally intelligent. The great Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky stated, ‘Children grow into the intellectual life around them.’ How school looks today is radically different from the experience of the current generation of parents and teachers. This is a world that demands of its citizens an unprecedented understanding of global issues. A world where digital technology continues to develop at a phenomenal rate offering hope and possibility but also presenting huge challenges. A world where ethical leadership is all the more important. So, as educators, we need to continue to challenge the conventional and prepare our

students to be agile and adaptable, sceptical and curious. To be aspirational for a better world and a better future. We are a proudly academic school and justifiably ambitious for our girls. We all know that exams, Naplan rankings and PISA reports matter. But they are only a small part of the picture. They only matter in so much as the they create opportunity. The most outstanding grade means little unless it is accompanied by those skills and dispositions that will have currency in the future. Indeed,I am confident that the reason our girls do so well in exams and tests is because we pay attention to those very transversal skills necessary for a dynamic and changing environment. I am proud that our staff continue to globalize their classrooms and enable our students to participate in socially responsible collaborations (Continued on next page)


5

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

with other teachers and students around the world. There is no question that our girls are moved by real human connections and that the authentic partnerships we are building with universities, academics, and sister schools around the world will accelerate their preparedness for life and work in the coming decades It is also increasingly evident that it is the strength of our relationships, the ties that bind us, which make all the difference; the knowledge that we as a community know what we stand for and who we are. Each day we come back to our values. It is easy to think that we have heard it before but our School values help to create a culture where our students and staff feel supported, appreciated, respected and inspired to be successful for themselves, for each other and for Wilderness. This is essential if we are to fulfil our strategic ambitions and if the School community is to provide an environment that enables students and staff to succeed. So we are committed to an innovative and rigorous education for an uncertain future. We are very clear that this is the educational ethos that will continue to drive us and inform the choices we make for our girls. I thank our teaching staff for the deep thinking and commitment they give to this endeavour every day, in every classroom. They care deeply about each girls’ learning and the success

of our School can be firmly ascribed to their dedication and expertise. So much of the daily work of the School is carried out behind the scenes by our nonteaching staff who support the work of our teachers. They truly are the engine room of the School. The long summer holiday that beckons for some of us is often the busiest time for them. We thank them for their hard work and efforts all the way through the year. I offer my wholehearted gratitude for the continued commitment of my Senior Leadership Team. I am extremely lucky to work with such talented and professional colleagues who share the responsibility of leading our wonderful school. I thank you for your loyalty and dedication. I make special mention of Mrs Libby Worrell who leaves us after serving so well to share her expertise with the Association of Independent Schools as their new Early Learning consultant. Libby, we will miss your passion and dedication. This occasion also provides me with an opportunity to thank our parents, Old Scholars and Governors for the faith they place in the Wilderness and the constant support they give to the community. The Old Scholars Association has worked hard to continue building our alumni networks. I thank Dr Pooja

Newman and her committee for their dedication and commitment to ensuring that we remain in active contact with recent generations of leavers and build on the successes of past. Our appreciation must also be expressed to the Foundation Board under the leadership of Dr Sarah Matthews and to the Foundation Events Subcommittee who provide powerful support to our Manager of Development and Community in raising funds to improve our facilities. The beautiful donor art works for the Newman Theatre and Browns’ House acknowledge the generosity of so many and reflect the culture of philanthropy that now permeates our School. The Parents and Friends Association, led so ably by Mrs Karen Gough, continues to connect our community and build important friendships between our families by sponsoring those events in the School that inspire and interest the School’s parent body. We thank Mr Ian Denbigh who retires from the P&F after serving as President, founding the Friends of Music and being such an active and generous participant in the life of our School. I would also like to thank our Board of Governors for their invaluable advice and support. Their commitment to Wilderness and their


GIRL FO C USS ED

6

one era of your life and the beginning of something new. Each of you now has the opportunity to enter your next stage with confidence and purpose. As you do so, you will remember many of the lessons learned at School, and some you will forget. Each of you, however, leaves with a deeper understanding about the world, the disciplines you have studied and the skills and capabilities you have applied to your learning.

wide-ranging skills and expertise ensure that the School is stewarded with acumen and wisdom. On a personal front, I would like to express my thanks to our Chair Mr Ken Williams who is always there to provide astute counsel and perceptive and strategic insight. Our many other committees, including the Rowing and Lacrosse clubs, add to the life and richness of our school. All of you give willingly and voluntarily of your time to support Wilderness and to take us confidently into the future. I thank too all our senior students for their enthusiasm, their love of learning and the openness with which they take on the different opportunities they are afforded at school. And finally, to our Year 12s. Tonight is a night of celebration. A night to celebrate all the hard work that led you to this moment. Tonight is a night of thanks. A night to thank those who helped you get here — nurtured you, taught you, spurred you on, dried your tears when things went wrong and shared with you your successes. Tonight is a night of reflection. Because tonight marks the end of

It is how you manifest these in your lives that will determine the kind of young women you will become. I take this opportunity to once again remind you that the most important thing you take with you when you leave us is not your ATAR, nor your awards, braids or prizes but the relationships you have formed and the values you have acquired along the way. In your life after Wilderness you will decide not just what you want to’do’ in the world, but who you want to ‘be.’ You will ‘do’ many things. But in every circumstance, you will be asked to choose what kind of spirit you will bring to your life and to your work. Carl Jung said, ‘The privilege of a lifetime is to become who you truly are.’ Most central to this privilege is your call to be Always True. You have heard me speak about our motto Semper Verus many times. Not only does a motto encapsulate the spirit of an institution but it also acts as a guiding principle for its community. When the Brown sisters selected Semper Verus they gifted us with a clear principle to guide and support our endeavours. This is true for every girl who graduates from our School. Being always true starts with knowing who you are and accepting yourself; knowing your strengths, your passions and your imperfections. It is about making choices about how you want to live

and being faithful to these. Being true is about acting in ways that align with your deepest beliefs and highest aspirations. To be Always True is to live authentically, with integrity. It is about doing the right thing even when no one is watching. To be true to yourself takes courage. We are living in an age of vast abundance with access to information, innovation and opportunity on a scale never before seen. This new level of intensity can open many doors to almost anyone who wants to accomplish anything and it can be easy at times to lose our way. So, when your inner voice warns, listen. If you are doing something out of alignment with your own truth, know that you are compromising yourself. To be always true requires you to be introspective, sincere, openminded and fair. It means that you will not let others define you or make decisions for you that you should make for yourself. So walk away from situations where you are asked to be less than who you are. Because you know to do otherwise is to compromise too much. Most importantly, when you’re true to yourself you’re also true to other people. You allow your individuality and uniqueness to shine through. That is the inseparable dance of ethics. EE Cumming said, ‘It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are.’ So now is your moment. You are all, each one of you, capable of great things. Though your destination is not yet clear, you can trust that deep within you lies all you need to live authentically, joyfully and generously. You have been well prepared. And in the words of the greatest poet, remember as you leave us ‘This above all, to thine own self be true.’ Jane Danvers Principal


7

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

VALEDICTORY ADDRESS FROM HANNAH KERR SRC, PRESIDENT 2016

“I am incredibly privileged to stand before you as a representative of this cohort, full of diversely talented individuals who will go on to become the next generation of scientists, musicians, actors, lawyers or journalists. The possibilities are endless... “

Mrs Danvers, Mr Williams, Ms Isobel Bishop, Members of the Council of Governors, Special Guests, Staff, Parents and Girls. Putting on my crisp white Year 12 jumper for the very first time, I knew, prayed, hoped and believed 2016 was going to be special. A year full of immense happiness, joy, laughter, and occasional tears, tears that were to be overpowered by the strong friendships not only of the tightly bound Year 12 cohort, but also throughout the wider Wilderness community. Friendships which would undoubtedly last for a lifetime. Unsurprisingly my prediction on the first day of our senior year proved true, a year I am incredibly proud of and remorsefully have to say goodbye to, as we end our schooling journey and now embark on the next chapter in our lives. As I began to write this speech for this evening, I was overcome by one particularly fond memory that I, along with 83 other Year 12 girls and every girl in this room has experienced. My first day at Wilderness. I remember walking in the Junior School gates,

white socks pulled up over my knees and proudly wearing my summer dress that nearly touched the floor because like every other Year 5 girl our mothers told us ‘You will grow into it don’t worry’. So, drowning in endless piles of cotton and wheelie bag at the ready it wasn’t long before I was immediately greeted by the existing girls. Nervous yet incredibly excited I walked into the classroom and could see the happiness on the faces of all the girls. It was at this very moment I knew that my journey as a Wilderness girl had just begun. Today it is memories like these that I reflect on with utmost pride and gratitude that I can say I am a Wilderness woman and the values that are held dearly by the School are likewise dear to my heart. Philosopher Joshua J Marine once said, ‘Challenges are what make

life interesting, overcoming them is what makes life meaningful.’ As a cohort I think

it is fair to say we have endured hardships throughout our stressful year, with the very definition of stressed not becoming a reality until


GIRL FO C USS ED

8

you have 3 assignments, a test and Netflix has just uploaded the new season of Suits all on the same day. However, through these hardships, it is how we respond that is in its own right a unique testament to our core values as a school, with the power of resilience shining the light for our successes and a sheer respect for others that radiates from Wilderness girls and allows us to go forth in the world and take on challenges wherever they are present. As a year level we have provided outstanding academic achievements, countless sporting trophies, fun filled charity days and plenty of laughter. Despite all of this outer success, the most important successes of the class of 2016 are internal. The genuine relationships formed between girls and their respective teachers have created a foundation for growth and development and likewise with any relationship, the importance of respect has proved more significant than ever.

A dedicated and integrated team can produce results far greater than any individual.

To use a sporting analogy, Lionel Messi wouldn’t be the soccer player he is today and wouldn’t be of use to any team if he stood by the goals and no one could get the ball down to him. It is often said that you are only as strong as your weakest link, but when you are as strongly bound as the community at Wilderness, there is no opportunity for weakness to conspire, as sure enough, there will be a team of people at the ready, waiting to assist and develop any individual to achieve their dreams. Collectively we aimed to promote positive action and gratitude amongst the School and wider community. This would not have been possible without a strong foundation to assist and guide us on our individual journeys. Individuality is incredibly important. After all, we cannot all be the next BeyoncÊ or thankfully the next Donald Trump, and it is this individuality that gives rise to success in all of its forms, something fostered by Wilderness and embodied by the class of 2016. I am incredibly privileged to stand before you as a

representative of this cohort, full of diversely talented individuals who will go on to become the next generation of scientists, musicians, actors, lawyers or journalists. The possibilities are endless and this diversity has allowed us to create some amazing memories such as showcasing our musically gifted in Glee performances and cheering on our sporting prodigies on Athletics Day, coming together and producing an incredible fairytale Big Lunch involving contribution by all girls when the rain clouded our lunch and our entire set up was moved into the gym. This teamwork furthermore reiterated the strong bond of the class. To the class of 2016. We sit here tonight for the last time all together and for the last time wearing our Wilderness uniforms. Whilst it is incredibly exciting to see what the future brings it is extremely important that we thank those who have in some way or another made us the women we are today; our parents and the amazing staff at this school. I know that there were 84 girls enrolled for Year 12 (Continued on next page)


9

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

in 2016 but that number may as well have been tripled, as I know my parents felt as if they were going through yYear 12 as well, always sharing a tub of Ben and Jerry’s ice-cream with me when it was all getting too much. As for the outstanding teachers; after this year I know all the parents and girls in this room have greatly enhanced respect for all the work you do as after all you are repeating Year 12 every year. As one of my teachers said, ‘Teaching you all is like dragging soggy paper through wet cement, but I would do it all again in a heartbeat.’ I would like to take this opportunity to thank Mrs Danvers and Mr Manifold. Your leadership and support have been truly inspirational throughout our individual journeys at the School, and you have always had your doors open to anyone who needed assistance. Your encouragement and patience when it came to potential SRC plans were deeply appreciated and the independence bestowed on us has allowed us to grow as individuals. On a personal note thank you for being incredible mentors to me throughout my final year, I have gained qualities never possible without your guidance, support and friendship so thank you from the bottom of my heart.

I would like to thank the class of 2016 for electing me as their representative for this year. It has been an unbelievable year full of successes and of course hardships but I am profoundly appreciative of the opportunity that was presented, allowing me to develop not only as a leader but also as an individual. Not that any of you amazing girls need it, but I would like to wish you all the best of luck for the future. You will all be incredibly successful if you stay true to yourselves and follow your hearts. On that nerve racking 20 December at 8:30am when we are all eager to find out our results,

I encourage you to remember that whatever number appears on your screen does not in any way define you, what is far more important is the person that you are and the person you will become, because that determines your future success, not a number. No

matter if you were part of the SRC this year, a House Captain in Year 6 or part of any committee, the leadership skills we all display are a testament to the legacy we shall leave on this School. At the end of every year we say goodbye and good luck to the senior class, but it isn’t until you’re in your final year that the legacy you pass on to the students,

teachers and School becomes profoundly important. You want to leave your mark on the school and add your piece to the ever-growing puzzle of Wilderness successes. So, reflecting on what I believe was our legacy for the year, I am incredibly proud to say we provided a school environment full of happiness, laughter, encouragement, positivity, gratitude and most importantly we cohesively brought girls from every age together, offering a warm smile and hello to people we passed, creating a school environment that resembled one large happy family and for that I am extremely proud. Although I think I can speak on behalf of the year 12s and say the Year 12 stairs in the English building can remain separate from all that unity. Lastly, I would like all students in this room to know that collectively we have the power to change the world for the better, whether that be within the confines of our homes or conquering feats such as Mount Everest; whatever we set our hearts and minds on we will be incredibly successful and for that we have Wilderness and the people around us to thank. Hannah Kerr SRC, President 2016


GIRL FO C USS ED

10

A

B Above A. 2016 Year 12 Cohort on Leavers Day B. 2016 SRC Executive - Courtney Marks, Hannah Kerr and Annabel Clarnette


11

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

SPEECH NIGHT GUEST SPEAKER ISOBEL BISHOP

“When you chase your dreams you put everything you have into it, it becomes you, so there is a high risk and reward scenario. ”

Playing Water Polo has hands down been the best decision I have ever made in my life. It has given me more than I could ever dreamt of. I am excited to come back to where it all started and be able to tell you about it. I was once sitting where you are, listening to James Tomkins, a decorated Australian Rower speak about his career, the Olympics and offer us advice. At the time, that dream was unattainable, I never thought I could be like James Tomkins or even go to the Olympics. But after years of hard work and dedication I achieved my dream and I learnt valuable lessons along the way. Those include being yourself, chasing your dreams and treasuring your relationships. I learnt that everything that makes you different makes you valuable. I will come back to that, but for the time being let me just say that I didn’t realize at the

time how helpful that talk by James Tomkins was, and it was only one of many helpful talks provided by Wildy. Water Polo became a staple in my life from fairly early on. I started playing for the Wildy team in Year 7. It taught time management, organisation, determination and how to set goals. Over the years it has challenged me and forced me to grow and adapt to difficult situations, but above all it taught me to be strong. Of course, physically I had to be strong and fit to play, but more importantly it taught me to be mentally tough, to fight for what I believe in and to never give up. The Water Polo trips and tours provided me with wonderful opportunities to travel the world, play in pool after pool across Europe, China, North America, South America, New Zealand and Australia. I have met people from all walks of life and all corners


GIRL FO C USS ED

12

Above Governing Council Chair: Ken Williams, Isobel Bishop & Principal: Jane Danvers

of the earth, some of whom have become life long friends. I had some funny experiences like being given a stove top as a prize at the end of one tournament in Russia, which let me tell you was a step up from second prize, which was a BB gun... perfect for international travel… I have some of the funniest and scariest memories created from these trips. Another one includes constant police watch as they walk you to the supermarket with their machine guns. Let me tell you that certainly makes you think twice about how much you really need that chocolate. All these memories become staples in your friendship with your teammates who in reality become more like family. The more you go through together the closer you become. You learn to rely on them when things go pear shaped, and I can guarantee things in elite sport go wrong more times then they go right.

So how did I finally make it into the Rio team? I have been playing in the National team for around 8 years, and one of the most difficult times I faced was when I was dropped from the team less than a year before the Olympics. I had been pushed and pulled in so many different directions over the last 8 years. I was asked to be like this person and like that person. To behave a certain way, and completely change at times, and I did it. Always, without question I constantly did what was asked of me and in the end that actually wasn’t good enough, it didn’t get me where I wanted to be. We had always been told that if you didn’t make the respective team the year before then chances were slim to none that you will be selected for the Olympics. I wasn’t fighting back from injury as I had done many times before; I was simply cut because the coach didn’t believe I was the

right person for my position. After everything I had done in 8 years prior, it wasn’t enough. Thousands of hours of training, years of dedication and doing everything that was asked of me, I fell short. I was ready to walk away, I didn’t love it anymore, it felt like work. At that time, I decided to go to the World Uni Games. I wanted my last tournament of my career to be enjoyable, I wanted to take it back to the basics of sport. It was at the tournament I learnt the most about myself. I left World Uni Games with a gold medal, but even more with a sense of pride. I had gotten back my love for the sport, my creativity and the freedom in my playing style. I finally knew who I was and what I wanted and I wasn’t going to change myself anymore to get it. This was a huge realisation for me. I went back to Australia and decided to try and make the Olympics. I had 8 months to do what I was told was (Continued on next page)


13

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

impossible. During the 8 months I decided the most important thing I could offer my team was maintaining who I was, what I stood for and how I wanted to treat other people. I had learnt that it was not just what you did, but how you did things. As Michael Jordon once said ‘Obstacles don’t have to stop you. If you run into a wall, don’t turn around and give up. Figure out how to climb it, go through it, or work around it.’ We had one last selection tournament in China in June, then after that we would receive a phone call letting us know our fate. My journey came down to a 10 minute phone call. A phone call that I will never forget, not because I was finally told that I had been selected but because at that point I realised that regardless of the outcome, one team, one medal didn’t define me as a person. I knew that I had to be whole and happy no matter the outcome, because if I wasn’t whole without the Olympics, I wouldn’t be whole with it. I have been taught resilience, strength, self belief, perseverance and how to smile when all you want to do is cry. I will be completely honest with you, there are times

when all I want to do walk away from my dream, give up, find something else to do. But in those times, I found the best thing to do is look around you, look at your friends your family, everyone that has supported you and trust that they will pick you up when you fall down. This community will support you in any and everything that you want to do, as long as you are doing the best possible job you can. If you put everything you have into what you love, you can’t fail, because in the end it’s not about the end result, it’s about your journey and what you learn about yourself when you fully commit to a dream. So how did we go at the Olympics? Leading into the Olympics Australia was one of the favourites. We were the only team to have consistently beaten the eventual Gold Medal winning USA team in the last four years. We played our round games, and found ourselves matched against Hungary in the quarter final, a strong team who play with risky tactics. The quarter final is the most important game of the Olympics, it can either guarantee you a medal opportunity or completely knock you out of the competition. Unfortunately we lost that game in a penalty shoot out. Suddenly, it felt like all the work we

had done was gone in an instant, it was like a bad dream we couldn’t wake up from. We felt like we had let our country down, our family and friends down, we had let ourselves down. After the game none of us wanted to walk out and see our family, we were so disappointed in the result that we didn’t want to face our greatest supporters and let them down again. But of course, your greatest supporters love you regardless of the outcome, they support you no matter the result and I never realised that more then seeing the look on my family’s faces as I walked towards them after that game. I know that my family had never been more proud of me than in that moment. When you chase your dreams you put everything you have into it, it becomes you, so there is a high risk and reward scenario. Its not going to be easy, but it will be worth it, even when you don’t achieve what you set out to. You learn about yourself on the journey, so even if you fail you will have gained more than if you never tried. In every set back, loss or failure there is a lesson and even if you can’t see it at the time eventually you will learn from it. You adapt, you


GIRL FO C USS ED

14

grow and you will become stronger. Throughout these years and the tough times, I leant on my support crew immensely; I can’t recommend this enough to you all. Seek help when you need it, you have endless support here at Wildy. This school, my family and friends have provided me with that support and guidance throughout my years, creating a path for me to be strong and independent. These skills have been utilised in all areas of my life, not just Water Polo. What I learnt at Wildy has helped me navigate through jobs, university and relationships. In hindsight this wasn’t a lesson I learnt only in class, but through the community provided here. There are great role models around you, your teachers, your friends, your community and old scholars. Everyone in your life can teach you something, so utilise them, soak up your environment, live in each moment. So I’m here to tell you that no matter the dreams you hold whether you want to be an Olympian, a doctor, an entrepreneur, a mother, a lawyer, a musician or an artist, whatever it is you want to do, always do it in the right way. By that I mean, stay true to yourself and be the person you want to be, because at the end of the

day if you’re not happy and whole without the thing you’re trying to achieve, you won’t be whole with it. Success doesn’t define you, it isn’t all of you, it just adds to you. So find what you love, chase it with all of your heart, utilise everyone and everything around you and take every opportunity you can. Even if you don’t remember what I am saying until years later, like I did with James Tomkins, all I can do is urge each and every one of you to be a good person, leave nothing on the table, stick to your morals and regardless of the outcome, you will be proud of yourself. As I Googled hundreds of inspirational quotes to tell you, to help guide you through the next few years of your life I realised the best advice I could give you is this. Be YOU, offer YOU, act as YOU, you are special, you are unique and you are strong. So go forward, chase your dreams, support each other and be fearless. Isobel Bishop (2009) Australian Olympic Water Polo Team Member


15

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

YEAR 12 RESULTS 2016 SUCCESS

62% WERE PLACED IN THE TOP

10% OF YEAR 12 STUDENTS NATIONALLY

44% WERE PLACED IN THE TOP 5% OF YEAR 12 STUDENTS NATIONALLY

There were 78 girls who applied for the ATAR this year. Of the cohort 62% were placed in the top 10%, with 44% in the top 5% and 15% in the top 1% of Year 12 students. The position of Dux is shared by three outstanding students who each achieved an ATAR of 99.85: Hannah Bransbury, Kathryn Jannes and Rachel Neef. Hannah Bransbury received five subject merits and has, therefore, been selected for the highest accolade of the SACE, The Governor of South Australia SACE Award, which recognises overall excellence in the SACE. We are also delighted that Ashleigh Bradford has been awarded a Governor of South Australia Commendation which recognises students’ exceptional achievements whilst undertaking the SACE, an outstanding accomplishment.

Hannah Bransbury

15%

WERE PLACED IN THE

TOP

1%

Rachel Neef

Kathryn Jannes

The Governor of South Australia will present Hannah and Ashleigh’s awards on the stage as part of the formal SACE Merit Ceremony on 7 February 2017. Hannah Bransbury, Annabel Clarnette, Annabel Denbigh, Brooke Hoffmann, Kathryn Jannes, Claire Morphett, Rachel Neef, Niki Panayiaris, Sarah Rocca, Claudia Santin, Kathryn Sheridan and Jade Yeung all gained an ATAR above 99.

Annabel Clarnette

Annabel Denbigh

Brooke Hoffmann

Claire Morphett

Niki Panayiaris

Sarah Rocca

Claudia Santin

Kathryn Sheridan

OF YEAR 12 STUDENTS NATIONALLY

Ashleigh Bradford

Jade Yeung


GIRL FO C USS ED

16

Harmony Craig

Reshma Berggren

Sarah Bradbrook

Hannah Bransbury Alyssa Capriotti

Molly Chapman

Annabel Clarnette Amelia Craig

Chloe Davidson

Sarah Dinh

Olivia Duncan

Sian Hardie

Olivia Hardy

Kathryn Jannes

Celena Le

Hannah Lehmann

Amanda Lu

Courtney Marks

Simone Milford

Rachel Neef

Sophia Nery

Niki Panayiaris

Eleanor Rackley

Eugenia Raptis

Nicola Ricci

Sarah Rocca

Claudia Santin

Kathryn Sheridan

Karen Siu

Lowell So

Violetta TwycrossPajevic

Laura Vu

Alison Xin

Lyna Yue

Jade Yeung

Kelly Zhou

Eleanor Walmsley- Mathilde Warne Pace

BIOLOGY Hannah Bransbury Niki Panayiaris Chloe Davidson

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE Lowell So

BUSINESS AND ENTERPRISE Eleanor Rackley Karen Siu

LEGAL STUDIES Rachel Neef Claudia Santin

CHINESE (CONTINUERS) Lyna Yue

MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS Claudia Santin Olivia Hardy

DRAMA Claudia Santin Sarah Rocca Mathilde Warne ENGLISH COMMUNICATIONS Hannah Bransbury Olivia Duncan Kathryn Jannes Sarah Rocca Alyssa Capriotti Kathryn Sheridan Violetta Twycross-Pajevic Jade Yeung

HEALTH Simone Milford

Rachel Neef Nicola Ricci Eleanor Walmsley-Pace

MATHEMATICAL STUDIES Annabel Clarnette

RESEARCH PROJECT Sarah Bradbrook Molly Chapman Amelia Craig Harmony Craig Celena Le Hannah Lehmann Amanda Lu Simone Milford Eugenia Raptis Laura Vu Kelly Zhou

PERFORMANCE SPECIAL STUDY Kathryn Jannes

VISUAL ARTS STUDIES Alison Xin

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Reshma Berggren Amelia Craig Olivia Duncan Sian Hardie Hannah Lehmann Courtney Marks

VIETNAMESE (BACKGROUND SPEAKERS) Sarah Dinh

MATHEMATICAL METHODS Rachel Neef

WORK PLACE PRACTICES Sarah Bradbrook Sophia Nery Lowell So


17

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

RITES OF PASSAGE

As we begin a new school year, we have in our minds those new parents who will be joining the Wilderness community for the first time in 2017. Starting in an educational setting for the first time, whether it be in Early Learning or Reception, for a young child and her parents is a time of excitement, poignancy and perhaps some nerves. New influences, friends and significant adults enter the child’s life and new found independence is fostered. The growth, emotionally and in terms of new knowledge, in these early years of education is enormous and incredible to observe and parents often speak of their daughter sharing her new learning and understanding at home and being amazed at what this little girl, their ‘baby’, is able to articulate. Very quickly, these early years pass and there is again a sense of anticipation and joy at the next step but also a sense of sadness for what is being left behind. It is important to acknowledge and celebrate these occasions, marking them as we do with graduation ceremonies, the presentation of certificates of achievement and capturing the time that has been in special photo and video presentations. As the parent of

a child entering into the next stage of her educational journey with their daughter, there can be a sense of urgency; a pressure to ensure that their daughter is picking up the fundamentals, that she is reading, writing and becoming numerate at a rate comparable to or better than her peers; almost a sense of needing to rush. ‘Childhood is not a race to see how quickly a child can read, write and count. Childhood is a small window of time to learn and develop at the pace which is right for each individual child. Earlier is not better’. (Magda Gerber, Educare, Early Childhood Educator). One of the cherished aspects of taking the time to acknowledge the rites of passage in our girls’ learning journeys is the opportunity it provides for reflection; on how far each girl has come in terms of her maturity, learning and connectedness to her learning spaces, peers and teachers. This ‘taking stock’ can provide a much needed sense that there is, indeed, time for each individual girl to progress at her own rate. When speaking to parents at our Year 6 graduation and hearing their reflections upon their daughters’ journey through the ELC and Junior School, there is always a great

sense of joy but also remembering the worries they had for their little girls, the sense of urgency to tick off achievements and ensure their milestones were met. Overwhelmingly, parents shared that they wish they hadn’t worried, that what they would tell themselves as a parent of a child entering school is that there will be time, that their daughters will truly progress at their own wonderful rate and that this is a good thing. As the girls move through the Junior School, there are significant milestones in development and learning along the way. As they enter Years 3, 4 and 5, friendships and play take on greater sophistication, with many girls perhaps finding themselves in conflict with their peers as they each develop their empathy, understanding and ability to respond to the needs of others at varied rates. This can be distressing for both girls and their parents. However, it is also developmentally normal and the way in which we support and guide our girls’ learning as parents and educators is invaluable in assisting them to develop the strategies to navigate social relationships with kindness and personal integrity. Learning


GIRL FO C USS ED

18

in the Middle Primary years is a wonderful mix of consolidation and construction of new knowledge, as girls become proficient and often prolific readers and writers and inquiring scientists. The movement developmentally from concrete to abstract thought allows enormous gains to be made in the application and transference of mathematical understandings and knowledge and an increase in fine and gross motor skills allows the girls to participate in a wider range of sports and creative arts. These are exciting times, filled with the wonder of discovering new information, powerful thinking and making connections between new and existing knowledge. Girls attend overnight camps for the first time, building their independence and personal responsibility. This breeds a wonderful sense of accomplishment and, in turn, an inner confidence based on feeling capable. Parents play an integral role in celebrating and supporting this as they encourage their daughters to try new experiences and learn new things. Moving into Year 6 in the Junior School brings with it a much anticipated foray into formal leadership, with each girl holding a

specific area of responsibility. The girls truly lead the Junior School by their actions, words and the example they set. They enter adolescence and the many complexities that arrive with this stage of development and the partnership between home and school is more important than ever in supporting each girl to be the best she can be. The Year 6 girls travel to Canberra for four nights, their first interstate trip away from their families, with a great deal of time spent on preparing them for the positives and potential challenges this can bring. Before we know it, our girls reach the end of Year 6 and they are once again on stage being celebrated and presented with a certificate of graduation, this time from the Junior School. As parents witness their daughters crossing the stage and watch the presentation video of their time so far at Wilderness, it is obvious they reflect upon and reminisce about how far their little girls have come, from that first day of Early Learning or Reception when her school bag was almost as big as her, learning to read, losing teeth, Christmas Concerts, birthdays, sporting matches and performing arts events, through to watching their daughters, now young ladies, ready to embark

on the next stage of their educational journey and beyond. While the journey seems to have only so recently begun, in no time at all, just a blink of an eye, these same girls will be crossing the stage at their Year 12 graduation, ready to step out into the world as strong, capable, kind and spirited young women. On reflection, we know that these tiny girls who enter Wildy at the beginning will become Year 1s, Year 3s, Year 6s and eventually, Year 12s! Time will take care of this. What we as the key adults in our girls’ lives can take care of is the way in which they reach these milestones. We can allow them to develop and grow, wonder at their wonder, capture their thinking so as to understand them better and provide rich experiences to enhance and deepen their learning in all areas of their lives. In doing so, we can ensure that their rites of passage are as joyous, enriched and meaningful as possible. Childhood is, after all, a journey, not a race. There is time. Take the time. Liz Meaker Head of Junior School & Early Years


19

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

WELLBEING & POSITIVE EDUCATION WHY CHARACTER MATTERS One of the special aspects of a Wilderness education is teaching girls positive ways to develop their character in conjunction with achieving academic growth. Living a life of achieving one’s goals and fulfilling personal potential with optimal flourishing is based on the development of good character. As Aristotle said, ‘Educating the mind without educating our heart is no education at all’. We believe that educating a girl’s sense of who she is with her character is of equal importance as her academic growth and achievement. The Browns built our school on the premise of unlimited kindness and respectful relationships where the uniqueness of each girl with her character is embraced and celebrated. Teaching girls the necessary skills to grow and develop their character is a key priority in the School’s Strategic Plan where ‘we will empower

each girl with the necessary tools to flourish and live a life of promise, purpose and fulfillment’. Educating girls about their character enables them to grow into resilient, courageous and confident young women, developing the ability to have flexible thinking and dealing with the different demands in an ever changing world.

Character strengths have been found to be substantially related to children’s and adolescents’ wellbeing (Wagner & Ruch, 2015) with evidence suggesting that character strengths matter for school success (Weber & Ruch, 2012). Our positive education focus is to teach our girls how to develop and apply their character in a range of situations so they have strategies to navigate life in

a successful and empowered way. Character can be defined as a set of personal traits or dispositions that produce specific moral emotions, inform motivation and guide conduct where character education is an umbrella term for all explicit and implicit education activities that help young people develop positive personal strengths called virtues (The Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues). The wellbeing (character development) and academic growth of each student is central to the School’s mission, ‘To enable each girl to be the best that she can be throughout her life’ with this focus being the basis for our Wilderness DNA model (see Figure 1). This model advocates that wellbeing and learning are intrinsically linked. A girl’s sense of who she is the basis for everything she does. Schools are now seen as institutions whose

Figure 1: Wilderness DNA Model.

role extends beyond academic competence to further preparing the ‘whole child’ (Huitt, 2010). The most important question that we can ask ourselves as educators is: Who are our students becoming in their true self as a result of their time with us? How our girls develop, grow and nurture their character (guiding their values and integrity) is the basis for our positive education curriculum so that we enable our girls to learn a range of skills and strategies to have positive personal growth/wellbeing where they are able to deal with the many challenges of life that they will face. As part of our positive education program, character strengths are taught because there is substantial evidence from well-controlled studies that skills which increase resilience, positive emotions, engagement and meaning can be taught to school children (Seligman, Ernst et al, 2009). Arguably, developing one’s character


GIRL FO C USS ED

20

can help develop a girl’s sense of her ‘true self’ so she can ‘flourish without limits’. There is a growing body of research which supports the premise that the development of one’s character matters and can even predict future success (Duckman & Seligman, 2005). In the Middle School girls study character strengths as part of the positive education curriculum in Character & Wellbeing (CWB) classes. Students in Year 9 complete the VIA character strengths questionnaire (http://www. viacharacter.org/www/) to learn about their composition of unique strengths (Peterson & Seligman, 2004). Girls also study role models who exhibit specific character strengths, for example Malala Yousafzai. Peterson & Seligman’s (2004) VIA classification describes 24 character strengths that are organized under six virtues (Wagner & Ruch, 2015). A Mindfulness-Based Strength Program (MBSP) has also been implemented to teach girls how to combine mindfulness and character strengths in an effective way. Through this targeted group program intervention, MBSP skills are taught to Year 10 students so girls can develop and apply these strategies to deal with school/life pressures in the Senior School. Furthermore, building on students’ prior knowledge from learning wellbeing concepts in the Middle School CWB classes, it was beneficial to extend their understanding and application of these concepts. Dr Niemiec (2014) states that being mindful in how you use character strengths is a recipe for flourishing – for greater

engagement in work, higher sense of meaning and purpose, higher physical and psychological wellbeing, and improved relationships. Student feedback about the program included: ‘In the MBSP course we had time to evaluate things in life that I wouldn’t usually think about like my strengths and areas to grow. It was valuable because it helped me to apply my strengths in school work. For example, being mindful of my character strengths and how I used them in class to concentrate and be more engaged in my work.’ Laura Montague, Year 12 student

‘Learning about the Golden Mean and how to not overuse or underuse my character strengths in a mindful way helped me when working on a team, especially in sports. In volleyball when playing I am more mindful of when I overuse my humour strength and when I need to be my best possible self in being fully engaged.’ Emily Yull, Year 12 student As we continue the Browns’ legacy to teach girls about positive ways to develop their character in conjunction with academic growth, it is our focus to give guidance in who our girls are becoming so that they can have a positive impact for the greater good of society, having a lasting impact for generations to come.

‘Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education’ Martin Luther King Jr. Trina Cummins Director of Wellbeing and Positive Education

References Duckworth, A. L., and Seligman, M. E. P. (2005). Self-discipline outdoes IQ in predicting academic performance in adolescents. Psychol. Sci. 16, 939–944. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2005.01641.x Huitt, W. (2010). A holistic view of education and schooling: Guiding students to develop capacities, acquire virtues, and provide service. Paper presented at the 12th Annual International Conference sponsored by the Athens Institute for Education and Research (ATINER), May 24-27, Athens, Greece. The Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues, University of Birmingham – Framework for Character Education in Schools http://jubileecentre. ac.uk/userfiles/jubileecentre/pdf/ charactereducation/Framework%20 for%20Character%20Education.pdf Niemiec, R (2014) Mindfulness and Character Strengths A Practical Guide to Flourishing. Hogrefe Publishing, USA. Peterson, C., Seligman, M.E.P. (2004). Character Strengths and Virtues: A handbook and classification. New York: Oxford University Press. Seligman, M., Ernst, R., Gillham, J., Reivish, K., & Linkin, M. (2009), Positive Education: Positive Psychology and Classroom Interventions, Oxford Review of Education, 35, 293-311. Wagner, L., & Ruch, W. (2015). Good character at school: Positive classroom behavior mediates the link between character strengths and school achievement. Frontiers in Psychology. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00610 Weber, M., and Ruch, W. (2012). The role of a good character in 12-year-old school children: do character strengths matter in the classroom? Child Indic. Res. 5, 317–334. doi: 10.1007/s12187011- 9128-0


21

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

FACULTY IN FOCUS ART I have often been asked if I think 21st Century Australians are visually literate. That is, if they have the ability to interpret, negotiate, and make meaning from information presented in the form of an image. Emojis and emoticons, the visual symbols frequently used in contemporary textural intercourse are designed to communicate a message simply and efficiently, but being able to correctly identify a smiley face is very different from being able to perceive meaning in the complex and multi-layered work of contemporary Australian artists such as Fiona Hall, Patricia Piccinini or Gordon Bennett. Through analysing artworks, while having an awareness of the historical context and social and cultural milieu relating to the work, we teach our students to ‘read’ art. A work of art can have multiple subtle interpretations depending on the viewer’s prior experience. Ideally we are teaching students to ‘peel back the layers’ and approach their art understanding from multiple viewpoints. I often tell students that whether they ‘like’ an artwork is not really relevant. I prefer them to appreciate what it is the artist is saying – a much more difficult endeavour. The nature of Art education has evolved considerably in recent years. There is an emphasis on synthesising concepts on a deep and personal level. Students’ capacity to make connections while thinking creatively and laterally is paramount. In 2016, Year 12 Visual Art student Alison

Xin received a Merit. For the theory component of the course, she chose to focus on the influence of Eastern Art on Western Art and vice versa, from Renaissance times to the present day. Her illustrated study is highly insightful, personalised and aesthetically strong. It is a wonderful investigation, full of fascinating intercultural connections that teachers can use as a starting point for discussions about cultural understanding and global citizenship with younger students. It supports ACARA, the Australian National Curriculum and was undoubtedly far more valuable to the student than sitting an Art History exam at the end of the year. Steve Seidel, who led the Harvard Project Zero research, ‘The Qualities of Quality – Understanding Excellence in Arts Education’, talks about the clear distinction between viewing a work of art that is itself of a high quality and the overall quality of how this encounter has taken place, or the act of experiencing that artwork. Our Artist in Residence program, which has been an integral part of the Wilderness Art Curriculum since 1989, allows for meaningful conversations with artists about ideas, processes and techniques and authentic, first hand encounters with original resolved artworks. Students’ curiosity is sparked and the interaction becomes an important transformative experience for a young artist searching for ways to help them develop their own unique visual language. Through inviting guest artists into the comfortable and


GIRL FO C USS ED

22

familiar space that is the Art Centre, we are providing students with a creative interchange of high quality, a deep arts learning experience. Last year, ten Year 12 students studied Visual Art and eight of those young artists received an A grade. A visually arresting painted portrait by Tilley Wigney was selected for inclusion in the 2017 SACE Exhibition. In Sir Ken Robinson’s TED talk, ‘Do Schools Kill creativity?’ he states that creativity, or the process of having original ideas that have value, is as important as literacy in education. He says that if a student isn’t prepared to be wrong they will never come up with anything original. Young children have the lovely capacity for originality before they become frightened of being wrong. As part of her 2016 Professional Development, Junior School Specialist Art Teacher Jo Porrovecchio focused on developing the growth mindset of students by encouraging them to take educational risks in order to enable growth that translates across the curriculum to all areas. Cindy Foley in her TEDx talk, ‘Teaching art or teaching to think like an artist?’ speaks about comfort with ambiguity, idea generation and transdisciplinary research as artistic habits necessary for creativity. Through her research, Jo learnt that a child in our digital world is inundated with 10,000 visual images a day which can leave them open to manipulation. Teachers need to help them develop ‘filters’ to enable them to determine the important from the visual detritus. Last year Art teacher, Brooke Porter

and I successfully incorporated concepts around Wellbeing and Character Strengths, based on the VIA Institute on Character, into the Year 10 Art Curriculum. There is strong evidence for the importance of Mindfulness, or an awareness of being in the moment, in an educational setting. Mindfulness is very much akin to art processes – to create requires full tilt presence. At Wilderness, the drive for excellence is passionate and

persistent. One of the great powers of Art is that it has always been a restless force for change. Day to day Art Faculty conversations about what constitutes a quality Art education and how to achieve it are not only a catalyst for quality but also an indicator of quality. Jane Kuchel Head of Art

A

B

C A Pages from the Visual Study of 2016 Year 12, Alison Xin B ‘Untitled’ Water mixable oil paint on paper by 2016 Year 12, Tilley Wigney C Character Strengths on canvas board Maggie Combe, Danae Mavrakis and Annabel Sandow


23

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

‘LIFEWORTHY’ LEARNING & BUILDING CULTURES OF THINKING AT WILDERNESS The question of what is worth learning has occupied educators’ minds since ancient times. According to Harvard University Professor David Perkins (2014), what is worth learning in our society today can be defined as ‘lifeworthy’, or that which is ‘likely to matter in the lives learners are likely to have’ (p. 8). This idea resonates strongly here at Wilderness. In order to fulfil the School’s mission to enable each girl to be the best she can be throughout her life, we believe we need to do more than help our girls to maximise their opportunities for academic and personal growth and achievement. We also need to support our students to prepare for their futures by assisting them to develop the capacities they will need to thrive in all aspects of their lives in our rapidly changing and complex world. Put another way, we need to ‘prepare our children for the tests of life, not a life of tests’ (Elias, 2001). This is no mean feat, particularly as it is unclear what the future might look like. Despite this, there is considerable agreement in contemporary educational thinking about what this ‘lifeworthy’ learning, or preparation for our students’ futures, might involve. Things such as critical and creative thinking, collaboration, resilience,

making links, reasoning with evidence, noticing, reflectiveness, self-evaluation, resourcefulness, empathy, distilling, transferability and flexibility feature on most lists. To focus on developing students’ thinking, and dispositions and attitudes to thinking and learning, does not mean that we ignore the development of their mastery of academic subject content matter or their performance on tests and exams. Like many other leading international thinkers in education, such as Guy Claxton, Lee Crockett, Patrick Griffin, David Perkins, Ron Ritchhart, Tony Wagner and Yong Zhao, we believe that the two are not incompatible. In fact, they are fundamentally complementary. Moreover, research suggests that students who have well developed thinking skills and the dispositions to ‘transfer’ those skills to novel contexts actually perform even better in academic ‘tests’ (Ritchhart, 2015). Whilst for several decades we have explicitly taught thinking skills at Wilderness in our Thinking and Learning curriculum, we believe that to prepare our students for their futures and enhance their capacity for growth and achievement, another approach is needed. For these reasons the School has established a partnership with international expert, Ron Ritchhart.


C E NTRE O F E XC E LLE NC E AND INNOVATION

24

A Senior Research Associate at Harvard University’s Project Zero, Ritchhart has authored several books and articles, including ‘Making Thinking Visible’ and ‘Creating cultures of thinking’. His current research focuses on developing intellectual character, making thinking visible and enhancing school and classroom culture to promote deep learning. Ritchhart is renowned internationally for his work in a range of schools extending from Australia to the Netherlands and the United States as part of the Worldwide Cultures of Thinking Project. Our formal partnership with Ron Ritchhart began at the start of Term 3, 2016, with two days of professional learning for the entire teaching staff. During this time Ritchhart introduced his theory about cultures of thinking, as well as the eight cultural forces which need to be leveraged to create such a culture. As Ritchhart says, By paying attention to how these eight forces send messages about what learning is, what kind of thinking is valued, and what it means to be smart, educators can reshape schools and classrooms into powerful learning environments in which students can achieve at the highest levels. Ritchhart returned in Term 4 to work intensively with small groups of teachers. The feedback was

overwhelmingly positive, with most teachers immediately beginning to apply what they had learnt in their classrooms with promising results. Drawing on the ideas of the great Russian educational psychologist, Lev Vygotsky, Ritchhart claims that ‘children grow into the intellectual life around them’. The school, home and community are all critical partners in the intentional pursuit of a culture of thinking and ‘lifeworthy’ learning. Drawing on the ideas of the great Russian educational psychologist, Lev Vygotsky, Ritchhart claims that ‘children grow into the intellectual life around them’. The school, home and community are, therefore, all critical partners in the intentional pursuit of a culture of thinking and lifeworthy learning. Ritchhart gave a compelling presentation about how parents and families can support their daughters to develop these important skills and dispositions, at the recent Raising Amazing Girls evening (Wednesday, February 22). We are looking forward to further visits during Terms 2 and 3 this year. Heather De Blasio Director of Learning and Teaching Excellence

Reference List Claxton, G. (2008). What’s The Point of School? London, UK: One World. Claxton, G. (2011). Building the Learning Powered School. Bristol, UK: TLO. Elias, M. J. (2001). Prepare children for the tests of life, not a life of tests. Education Week 21, p. 40. Perkins, D.N. (2014). Future wise. Preparing our Children for a Changing World. San Franciso, CA: Jossey Bass. Crockett, L., Jukes, I. & Churches, A. (2011). Literacy is Not Enough. Corwin Press. Griffin, P., McGaw, B. & Care. E. (eds). (2012). Assessment and Teaching of 21st Century Skills. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer. Ritchhart, R. (2015). Creating cultures of thinking. San Franciso, CA: Jossey Bass. Wagner, T. (2012). Creating Innovators. New York, NY: Scribner. Zhao, Y. (2012). World Class Learners. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.


25

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

2016 BUILDING & SCHOLARSHIP FUND DONATIONS Thank you to the following who generously donated in 2016 to the Foundation’s Voluntary Building and Scholarship Funds.

SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Mr Mark Britten-Jones & Ms Lucy Gill Ms Deborah Mallard Dr Juliette Milbank Dr Tim & Assoc Prof Susanna Proudman Dr Kerrie Salagaras Dr Paul Hoadley & Dr Susie Saloniklis

FOUNDATION BUILDING FUND

Mr Will & Mrs Sara Abel Smith Mrs Christina Alexander Mrs Janet Angas Mr John & Mrs Jane Ayers Dr Adrian & Mrs Kerry Balestrin Mrs Candy Bennett Mr Tim & Mrs Jane Binks Mr Andrew Brown Mr Chris Brown Mr Richard & Mrs Lena Cavill Mr John Charlton & Ms Jane Lewis Mr Chris & Mrs Elma Christopher Dr Richard & Dr Susie Clarnette Ms Nikita Cluse Mrs Rebecca Crawford Mrs Jane Danvers Mr James Darling Mr Andrew & Mrs Elaine Davies Ms Margaret Doman Mr Kristian Downing & Dr Kirsten Gormly Mr Jock & Mrs Rose Duncan Ms Rosie Egan Mr Luke Eliseo & Mrs Shanti Berggren Dr Stephen & Mrs Kay English Mr Peter & Mrs Jodie Escott Mr Scott Fahey & Mrs Naomi Quick Ms Elizabeth Fricker

Mr Richard & Mrs Jan Frolich Dr Colin & Dr Sian Goodson Mrs Lorraine Gormly Ms Janet Gracey Ms Jenni Guest Mr Gary Harper Mr Jason & Mrs Gia Haseldine Mr Peter & Mrs Sandy Hayes Ms Booie Hayward Mrs Chris Heard Mrs Ann Hennessy Mr Patrick & Mrs Atty Highfield Dr Paul Hoadley & Dr Susie Saloniklis Mr David & Mrs Nat Hodgson Miss Juliet Horrocks Ms Alicia Hosking Mr Tony Hsi & Thanh Nguyen Mr Jian Jin Mrs Janne Johnson Ms Paula Jolly Dr A Samy Kafagy & Mrs Dora Anter Mrs Marg Keane Dr Steve & Dr Sally Knox Mr Bruce & Mrs Ann Marsden Mrs Helen McBryde Mr Jim & Mrs Bubbles McConnel Dr Tom & Mrs Kate McCurdie Mr Richard & Mrs Emma McFarlane Mr Peter & Mrs Susan Morgan Dr Graeme & Mrs Catriona Newcombe Dr Matthew & Dr Pooja Newman Mr Tony & Mrs Sue Newman Mr Julian & Mrs Alice Newton Mr Hai & Mrs Betty Nguyen Mr Richard & Mrs Edwina Nitschke Mr Bill & Mrs Georgina Panayiaris

The Peggy Charitable Foundation Mr Andrew Pegler & Miss Mary Killeen Dr Michael & Mrs Rebecca Petrucco Mr John & Ms Sonia Podreka Mr Dick & Mrs Caroline Potter Mrs Ann Price Mrs Anne Prior Mr Scott Rackley & Ms Jenny Mildred Rev. David & Ms Margie Richardson Mr Bruce & Mrs Margot Rosser Mr T Allen & Mrs Coralie Sampson Mr Andy & Mrs Natasha Sampson-Ly Mrs Mary Ann Santin Mr Andrew & Mrs Kendall Seaton Mrs Mary Shierlaw Estate of Christine Mary Strath Mr Christopher & Mrs Karen Tallent Mr Ashley & Mrs Judy Webster Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association Inc Wilderness Parents & Friends Association Inc Mrs Margi Wood Mr Mark Woodall & Mrs Rhoda Downie Mrs Pam Yule

SCHOOL BUILDING FUND Mr W & Mrs S Abel Smith Mr J and Mrs K Adams Dr A Raza and Dr F Ahmad Mrs C Alexander Dr W & Mrs N Alkhazrajy Mr T and Mrs L Alvaro Dr A & Dr S Anand Mr M & Mrs T Andrewartha Dr A Kafagy & Mrs H Anter Mr M & Mrs T Ashby Mr A & Mrs E Baggio Dr G & Mrs K Bain Mr J & Mrs W Bakurski Dr Z & Mrs K Baran Mr M & Mrs S Barnes Mr A and Ms S Barrett Dr A & Mrs S Beinssen Mr K & Ms L Beswick Mr M & Mrs A Beveridge Dr V & Dr N Bhatia Mr T & Dr J Binks Mr C Langsford & Ms E Bowen Mr I & Mrs S Bradbrook Mr E & Mrs M Bresson Mr D Tran & Mrs T Bui Dr D and Dr N Bursill Mr A Curtis and Ms E Butler Ms L Cai Mr M & Mrs S Callus Mr A & Mrs S Capriotti Mr A & Mrs S Cavill Mr S Cavill Ms P Chan Prof I Chapman & Dr B True Dr H Hamza & Dr S Chaudry Mr M Yang and Mrs Y Chen Mr H Hao Ms H Hao Mr L and Mrs F Chen Drs R & S Clarnette Mr T & Mrs B Cleland Ms J Coates Ms R Cocchiaro & Dr A Cocchiar Dr D Pringle & Ms J Coles Mr B Kroker and Ms L Collins Mr D Colovic & Dr M Thomas


STE WARD S HIP

26

Mr P and Mrs I Combe Dr J Copley Dr J Craig & Dr S Matthews Dr W & Mrs A Crompton Mr C & Mrs A Crozier Mr S Madike & Mrs S Cugati Mr Z Shi and Ms Y Dai Mr G Georgiou & Ms A Dalli Mr S Smart & Ms S David Mr S & Mrs E Davidson Mr A & Mrs J Day Mr A & Mrs K De Silva Mr J Hillier & Ms S Deering Mr C & Mrs S DeVito Mr A & Mrs J DeVito Mr M Woodall & Ms R Downie Dr G and Mrs C Drogemuller Mr Z Zhao and Mrs W Du Mr W & Mrs G Duncan Mr W & Mrs K Dunn Mr M Dyer Mr R & Mrs H Equid Dr D & Mrs L Evans Mr G and Mrs E Ewing Mr M Crocker and Ms P Eylward Mr G Zappia & Ms K Eyre Mr S Falland Mr G Rocca & Dr I Faranda Mr P Milford & Mrs C Fenlon Dr A & Mrs C Fergusson Mr D and Mrs C Foulis Mr C & Mrs F Fulcher Mr A Yang and Mrs C Gao Mr G & Mrs S George Dr G Chacko & Dr P Georgy Mr M Britten-Jones & Ms L Gill Mr J & Mrs K Gough Dr S Gouskos & Ms M Spathis Go Dr T Wiadrowski & Dr L Gower Mr T & Ms N Greco Mr D & Mrs A Greenslade Dr B & Mrs M Gunther Mr G Kong & Mrs F Guo Mr C & Mrs S Hahn Mr L & Mrs R Hampshire Mr S & Mrs M Hardy Mr S Kinloch and Ms B Harris Mr W Miller and Mrs A Hart Mr S & Mrs A Harvey Mr S Vasilikiotis & Ms D Hatzi Mr R & Dr R Hayward Mr M Hender Mr T & Mrs E Hicks Mr W & Dr S Hodgkinson Mr T & Mrs T Hoffmann Mr C & J Mrs Holloway Dr E and Mrs G Holloway Mr G & Mrs J Holzer Mr C & Mrs P Honan Mr W & Mrs S Hood Mr M & Mrs C Hood Mr A Hsi & Ms T Nguyen Dr L Zhang & Ms Y Hu Mr D & Mrs L Hua Dr A & Mrs N Hubczenko Mr A Sinan and Mrs A Ibrahim Assoc Prof J & Mrs M Jannes Mr S and Mrs G Jayakody Dr P Mamillapalli and Mrs N Je Drs D & S Jesudason Mr H Jiang and Mrs L Jin Mr J Jin Ms A Johns Mr P & Mrs R Johnson

Mr B & Mrs R Jones Families SA - Attn: Megan, Cra Dr S Ganesh and Ms D Kandiah Dr C & Ms E Karapetis Mr J & Mrs D Karytinos Mr I & Mrs S Kennedy Dr D & Ms A Kershaw Mr C & Mrs E Koch Dr R Mukherjee & Dr S Kuah Ms J Guest Mr D & Mrs H Kyros Dr J Landers Mr A & Mrs M Lane Mr D Zhou & Ms C Lao Mr H and Mrs B Nguyen Dr C and Mrs C Lee Mr C & Mrs R Lehmann Mr H Hu and Mrs S Li Mr Y Wang and Ms Y Lian Mr G Emmett & Ms J Light Dr T Likos and Mrs D Novianti Mr F Gao & Mrs Q Lin Mr N & Mrs P Lippett Mr Q Ren and Mrs H Liu Mr W Sha and Mrs J Liu Mr Y Liang and Mrs X Liu Mr W Yang and Ms S Liu Mr T & Mrs A Lo Mr J Anderson & Ms J Lovatt Mr S & Mrs V Mavrakis Mr M & Mrs L McAskill Mr T & Mrs M McAuliffe Mr D & Ms C McConnel Mr J & Mrs P McConnel Mr J Masters and Ms A McPhee Mr C & Mrs A Mestrov Mr P & Mrs T Michell Mr S Rackley & Ms J Mildred Mr G & Mrs R Miles Dr A Zacest and Dr G Milosevic Mr R & Mrs S Mintz Mr R Moffatt Mr L & Mrs A Morphett Mr B & Mrs I Moularadellis Dr J & Mrs M Moutos Mr D Nery & Mrs V Schultz-Nery Mr J & Mrs A Newton Mr D Tran and Mrs K Ngo Mr V & Mrs T Nguyen Mr T Vu & Mrs P Nguyen Mr D Yeo & Ms S Oei Mr D & Mrs L Oldfield Dr E Fong & Dr J Ong Mr M Guyot & Prof M Oppenheimer Mr M Robertson & Ms J Osborne Mr G & Mrs L Paikos Mr B & Mrs G Panayiaris Mr D and Mrs R Patel Dr D Walsh & Dr M Lea Mr D Armitage Dr A Ashraf and Mrs Z Pervaiz Dr M Siaw & Ms L Petrov Dr M & Mrs R Petrucco Ms L Phan Mr J & Mrs C Pheasant Mr M Pickard Mr J & Ms S Podreka Mr S & Mrs A Pointon Dr T & Mrs K Porter Dr A Kemp Mr J Karykis and Mrs H Potter Dr N Pratt Mr R & Mrs M Price Mr S & Mrs N Quick

Dr M & Mrs B Raeside Dr R Govindaraj & Dr T Ramkuma Mr J & Ms F Raptis Dr J Bakopanos & Ms L Reljic Dr T & Mrs S Ricci Mr G Rischbieth Drs B & P Ritchie Mr S & Mrs J Roberts Mr L and Mrs M Rositano Mr G & Mrs V Rowan Dr E KoKo Aung & Ms C Rowlands Mr S Sakar & Mrs A Sakthi-Sure Dr K Salagaras Dr P Hoadley & Dr S Saloniklis Mr A & Mrs N Sampson-Ly Mr N and Mrs R Sangha Mr L & Mrs M Sarris Mr P & Mrs C Satchell Mr R & Mrs L Scamoni Mr S Kelly and Ms J Schueler Mr D & Mrs L Scinto Mr A & Mrs K Seaton Mr R & Mrs K Shah Mr G and Mrs R Shanahan Mr D Cripps & Ms H Sheppard Dr T & Mrs A Sheridan Dr A and Dr H Siddiqi Mr A & Mrs M Smart Dr R Casson & Dr C Smith Mr M & Mrs A Snell Mr N & Mrs L Sterenberg Mr M & Mrs W Stewart Mr L & Mrs J Stone Mr M Reu & Ms G Taarnby Mr K & Mrs M Tait Mr C & Mrs K Tallent Mr K Chan and Ms S Tam Dr V Chandura & Dr M Thambooko Mr S & Mrs H Thomas Mr I & Mrs A Thomas Mr A & Mrs S Tiller Mr S Ting & Dr D Toh Mr M & Mrs O Trim Dr D Pajevic Dr P Janardanan & Mrs S Viswam Mr M Vollebregt Prof R Nairn & Ms H von Bernew Mr S Trinh & Mrs T Vu Dr D Walsh & Dr M Lea Mr M & Mrs F Ward Mr S & Mrs A Warne Mr W Waterhouse Mr S and Mrs A Webb Mr A & Mrs L Weigall Dr C Wheeler & Mrs L Haller Dr S Sooriyabandara & Mrs V Wi Mr K & Ms P Williams Mr M & Mrs R Willson Dr J & Dr L Wilson Mr B & Mrs J Wilson Mr C Leung and Ms O Wong Ms J Collins Mr L Wang and Ms L Xu Mr Y Zhang and Mrs Y Ye Mr W Teoh & Mrs S Yew Mr X Zheng and Mrs G You Mr B and Mrs M Young Mr Z Wang and Mrs L Zhang Mr W Xu & Ms L Zhou Mr L Xu & Mrs S Zhu Mr J and Mrs E Zikos


27

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

OUR VERY OWN CHRISTMAS TREE A NEW TRADITION AT WILDERNESS

We are so excited that a new annual tradition has come to life in 2016 at Wilderness School. During the second week of November, the most beautiful real Christmas Tree arrived. This magnificent tree was delivered in an old Bedford truck from the Christmas Tree Farm. It was their first tree for 2016 and has taken 15 years to grow to its 4 metre height. We decorated it with a star on top and adorned it with 2000 LED lights. The origin of Christmas Trees began in Australia during the 1850s, when English settlers created their own traditions in their new country. Christmas was a festival celebrating family values and childhood focusing on outdoors and recreation.

We sincerely thank the Petrucco family for this initiative. This new tradition would not be possible without the Petrucco’s generosity and kindness. In addition, we thank the Ahrens family for engineering and building the base to hold a Christmas Tree for many years to come. It is a beautiful addition to admire during the many events at Wilderness during November and December and truly adds to the spirit of Christmas. Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community


STE WARD S HIP

28

THANK YOU, CAROLYN! GREEN DOOR SOCIETY Carolyn Grantskalns is an old scholar (class of 1970) and also a former Principal of Wilderness School (19902005). She is the leading advocate of our Bequest Program who has chosen to include a gift in her will making her a member of the Green Door Society.

A legacy can be an incredible gift of generosity and people from various backgrounds with different professions, incomes and passions use their wills as a way of showing gratitude, of making a difference and of enabling others to share some of the good fortune they appreciate.

‘I want to be part of making sure great things keep happening for our girls at Wilderness. Even more, as Miss Mamie said, I hope there will always be a Wilderness and this decision is a practical way of doing what I can to ensure that happens’.

We invite you to perform a considered, as opposed to a random, act of kindness and join the Green Door Society by making a bequest to the Wilderness School Foundation.

We value and are truly grateful for Carolyn’s support.

For a brochure and additional information about the Green Door Society, email Jodie Escott jescott@ wilderness.com.au or telephone 08 8344 6688 for a confidential conversation.


29

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

DID YOU KNOW? THE BROWN FAMILY GRAVESITE

Prior to the recent Foundation Board meeting, members were invited to view the Brown Family gravesite in Nailsworth. We are so fortunate that Phoenix Kuchta (Year 7) and Saskia Kuchta (Year 1) have wholeheartedly taken the responsibility of caring for the gravesite on behalf of the Wilderness School and community. The girls regularly visit the grave and ensure it is neat and tidy and pay their respects. It is a wonderful gift that they are giving. On behalf of everyone, I would like to thank them for this respect, responsibility and dedication of time. The North Road Cemetery is walking distance from Wilderness School and you are welcome to wander through and view the grave youself. Above Phoenix (Year 7) & Saskia Kuchta (Year 1) presenting to Foundation Board members

Phoenix prepared an outstanding presentation for the Board Members, which I would like to share with you. It is truly fascinating.

THE BROWN FAMILY GRAVESITE The Browns’ grave was situated in the North Road cemetery, Nailsworth in 1853. This cemetery was established by South Australia’s first Anglican bishop, Augustus Short on land which he owned. The cemetery is still maintained by the Anglican Diocese of Adelaide. The cemetery is 18 acres in size and holds more than 24,000 graves. The original licence was taken out by James Brown on 11 March 1891 on the death of his daughter Kate Cormack Brown who was buried on 12 March 1891. The original licence was for the two plots, as it presently stands. Given the complete list of names mentioned on the headstone, it was erected after the death of Mary Home (Mamie) BROWN in December 1968. From the style of the lettering, it would appear to have been erected in the 1970s. As the granite border around the grave matches the headstone, it is possibly fair to assume that both were done at the same time. We have no written or photographic record of any memorials which may have been present on the site before this time. The persons buried in these plots are:


STE WARD S HIP

30

Kate Cormack BROWN, buried 12/3/1891 aged 30 James BROWN, buried 15/1/1917 aged 86 Mary Home BROWN, buried 30/7/1934 aged 99 James Watson BROWN, buried 6/6/1935 aged 62 Margaret Hamilton BROWN, buried 9/12/1952 aged 94 Annie Home BROWN, buried 28/7/1953 aged 84 Ethlwyn Mary BROWN, buried 15/6/1965 aged 94 Mary Home BROWN, buried 5/12/1968 aged 90 Robert Home BROWN and Harry Wheeler BROWN (who are mentioned on the headstone) are not buried here.

Above Mrs Mary Home Brown & Mr James Brown

The original (99 year) licence on these plots expired on 11 March 1990, and is still held in the name of James BROWN. On 24 February of this year, the licence was extended for a further 50 years by Wilderness School. It now expires on 24 February 2066. If we were to take a walk around this cemetery we would come across a number of South Australian historical figures. - Daisy Bates, journalist, welfare worker and protector of Aborigines - Harriett Stirling OBE, joint founder of the School of Mothers and Mareeba Babies’ hospital. And some well known males include, - Ross Macpherson Smith –

Australian Aviator and flight pioneer - Edward Charles Stirling – Founder of the University of Adelaide’s medical school - Edmund Wright – Former Lord Mayor of Adelaide - Alexander Poynton – Former Treasurer and Federal Parliament politician

Above Left to Right Miss Margaret Hamilton Brown, Miss Mary (Mamie) Home Brown, Miss Ethlwn Mary (Wynnie) Brown & Miss Annie Home Brown

Above Captain Harry Wheeler Brown

The cemetery also contains the war graves of 27 Commonwealth service personnel 16 from World War 1 and 11 from World War 2. Phoenix Kuchta (Year 7)


31

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

REDEDICATION OF WORLD WAR I AND WORLD WAR II HONOUR ROLLS

It was an absolute pleasure on 11 November, 2016 to welcome old scholars, Cedric and Marion Wells whose names are both inscribed on our World War II Honour Roll. It was fitting to conduct a rededication ceremony on Remembrance Day - allowing us to honour the many who represented our country during WWI and WWII while acknowledging the importance of our Honour Rolls that are now placed respectfully at the entrance of Newman Theatre (formerly Memorial Hall). Marion and Cedric attended our Remembrance Day ceremony followed by the rededication. Marion Morgan attended Wilderness School from 1936 to 1940. She joined the Women’s Royal Australian Naval Service on 1 September 1944 in Adelaide (HMAS Torrens). She conducted her initial training at HMAS Harman in Canberra and was then transferred to Molonglo

Naval Wireless Station to become a Signaller Automatic Morse until separating from the Royal Australian Navy on 16 April 1946. For our ceremony, Marion proudly wore the following war medals: - War Medal 1939-1945 - Australian Service Medal 19391945 Marion Morgan married Cedric Wells in 1951. Cedric Wells had his 6th birthday in 1932 and was required by law to attend school. Living at 5 Hawkers Road, it seemed the obvious choice to attend Wilderness School. In the words of Cedric ‘to a little boy, this school looked and felt like wilderness – but a very kind ‘big’ girl took care of him’. In the 2nd World War, at the end of Leaving Honours, Cedric followed his cousins joining the RAN. On 4 December 1944 at the Flinders Naval


STE WARD S HIP

32

B

A

C

Depot, Cedric graduated as Ordinary Signalman. He was one of the very few to fortunately be posted to fleet destroyer, HMAS Nizam (rather than a shore establishment). Cedric served on both Nizam and HMAS Quadrant as part of the British Pacific Fleet for the remainder of the war. The HMAS Nizam was the first ship of the Australian Squadron of the British Pacific Fleet to enter Tokyo Bay on 19 August 1945, after the Cessation of Hostilities. Cedric’s medals are a reflection of his service: - Signalman for British Pacific Fleet - 1st Australian Armoured Regiment, Royal Australian Armoured Corps, Major - Lieutenant Colonel and Commanding Officer with the Efficiency Decoration in 1964 and Honorary Colonel 1977-1983 - 1st Battalion of Hertfordshire Regiment - Medal of the Order of Australia in

the 2005 Queen’s Birthday Honours Ben Manifold, Head of Senior School presented a warm and respectful ceremony. Cedric and Marion took enormous pride in cutting the ribbon and sharing stories of the many old scholars whom they recall from our Honour Rolls. Morning Tea followed in the Drawing Room where we were joined by Ben Manifold, Roger Masters and 2017 SRC students: Reshma Berggren, Georgia Honan, Neve Curtis and Isabelle Greco. We are a School steeped in history and cherished this proud opportunity to rededicate our Honour Rolls. Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community Above A. 2017 SRC Executive, Roger Masters, Marion & Cedric Wells with students at the ceremony B. Cedric & Marion Wells standing proudly at the WWII Honour Roll C. Morning Tea with special guests in the Drawing Room


33

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY Wilderness School is proud to be able to celebrate the successes of all our past and present students and the many outstanding achievements of our Wildy women. Leading the Way offers you an insight into some of our amazing old scholars’ lives, beyond the Wilderness School gates.

ANNABEL MATHESON (2010) ACTOR

Annabel graduated from Flinders University Drama Centre (Acting) with First Class Honours and a University Medal in 2014. During her studies, she worked with directors and teachers such as Tom Healey, Rosalba Clemente, Gale Edwards, David Mealor, and in 2012, she completed an intensive Pochinko Clown workshop with Hew Parham. She is also the co-founder of Ladylike Theatre Collective, a feminist production company, bridging the gap between Adelaide and Sydney. Annabel also works with Wilderness School as an acting coach and assistant director for Year 12 SACE drama students, and will perform in the School’s Old Scholars Association production of Jailbirds in the 2017 Adelaide Fringe.


TH RIV ING AND C O NNE CTE D C O M M UNIT Y

34

Do you have a mantra / philosophy?

Life is short. Even though it’s a ridiculous cliche, I think remembering that life is so short helps me to take the plunge and say yes to things that scare me, and to shake myself out of bad feelings. Life is too short to feel bored or stuck, or to hold grudges, or to not love and help the people around us. You can be gone in the blink of an eye so you might as well live your life as best you can.

What did you think you would be pursuing when you left school?

I honestly didn’t think I would get into acting school but had no idea what else I would be doing. The Drama Centre at Flinders Uni was the only acting school I auditioned for, and, luckily enough for me, I got in, and it was the perfect fit for me. I don’t think there was really another option once I had set my mind to it, and I truly can’t imagine doing anything else. Share how being a Wildy girl helped you towards your chosen career. The Drama department at Wildy is awesome. Its a family. From the moment I stepped through the doors of the (then) Memorial Hall, I knew I had found my home at School. I spent hours and hours in there, through tears, sweat and triumph. The incredible encouragement I received from Roger and Melissa definitely helped me push myself forward to do better and better things at School, and beyond. Their combined expertise of theatre provided me with an integral knowledge base which helped me take the leap from school into university. To this day, both of them never miss any of my shows. Ever since leaving School, I have been hopelessly devoted to giving back to the Drama department, and have worked on the School productions every year for the past six years. I’ve always believed that being able to teach something is integral to knowing it yourself, and teaching at Wildy has helped me hone my craft and solidify my skills.

Tell us about your journey from leaving school? As school was ending for me in 2010, I asked Roger to help me prepare for my Drama Centre audition. I did the auditions, I got in, and my life shot off like a rocket from there. I spent four intensive years at acting school, growing up, moving house with my friends every year and learning so much about what it is to be human, which is the basis of what acting is. I met incredible friends and mentors and thrived within the walls of such a creative and eye opening world. I had no idea how hard it would be - I was pushed out of my comfort zone while also learning all about the fickle nature of the industry I was about to enter. I walked into the Drama Centre an eighteen-year-old kid, with big dreams and a head somewhat in the clouds, and I left four years later a twenty-two-year-old woman, with even bigger dreams, but with a head firmly screwed on, a First Class Honours degree in Creative Arts and a University Medal under my belt and more determination to create meaningful art than ever before. I had been auditioning for shows at State Theatre Company SA since third year of my course and, in 2015 I was thrilled to be cast in their production of Summer of the Seventeenth Doll. Everything got moving from there: I worked with small Adelaide-based company Foul Play on the titular role in Eurydice, and this year I worked with State again, and Sydney Theatre Company on Machu Picchu by Sue Smith, and launched my own company, Ladylike Theatre Collective, producing our first show in the Sydney Fringe this past September, with much more to come in the future. Watch this space. What have been some key defining moments? See that big paragraph of stuff up there? They are all my defining moments. I’m amazed that I am where I am today, doing what I love. The Adelaide theatre industry is small, but its a tight knit community full of incredibly talented artists and the relationships I have made with people that I’ve been lucky enough to work with are incredibly meaningful for me. I guess what has defined me, and what continues to define

me, isn’t necessarily how much work I make or how ‘successful’ it is, but the way in which I work. I strive to create work through a process of equal amounts of hard work and a strong knowledge base, experimentation, innovation and play, and gentleness and empathy. This is a constant learning process. What advice would you give to aspiring actors? Three things: 1. TRAINING TRAINING TRAINING! In my humble opinion, the best step you can take is training yourself. Brain, heart, body, voice, empathy. If you can, I’d recommend training full time at an institution like the Drama Centre. I think immersing yourself in learning about acting and theatre is the best start to having a career that has longevity. It also helps you grow up and learn about life, which is an integral part of being an actor. 2. Try. Just try. Its so hard to not be self conscious and full of self doubt, but if you try, you might surprise yourself, and the next time you put yourself out there it will get easier and easier. Don’t wait at the door for opportunity, because it may never come knocking. You have to go out there and get it yourself. 3. It’s important to remember that, sometimes (and sometimes more often than sometimes), it really isn’t about you. If someone gets the part and you don’t, you have to know that it has nothing to do with who you are as a person or even your talent. Sometimes you can’t control it. The industry is fickle, but it also has a funny way of giving you what you need at the right time. Trust that sometimes you’re not ready for the things you think you are, and that something exciting is always, ALWAYS just around the corner.

Annabel Matheson is starring with many other old scholars in the Festival Fringe performances of Jail Birds from 21-25 February in Newman Theatre. Jail Birds is written and directed by Wilderness old scholar Melissa Sheldon and is proudly brought to you by the Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association – get your tickets today: https://www.adelaidefringe.com. au/fringetix/jail-birds


35

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY

SOPHIE LOVEJOY (1999) FOUNDER OF SANT & ABEL

Sophie Lovejoy has always been a risk taker. Whether it was running a booming lemonade stand at seven or breaking into the cutthroat TV producer game in New York, the ambitious South Australian never backed down from a challenge. After spending 10 years in the TV industry, Sophie launched a luxury sleepwear company, Sant and Abel. What began as an online store on the side whilst working in TV, soon became her full time job and a household name in Australia. Within two years of launching, Sophie moved her HQ to LA to take on the much bigger American market. With few contacts in the US, Sophie kept persevering and is now stocked at the top boutiques and hotels all over the US. Most recently she created a 17-piece collection exclusively for the Beverly Hills Hotel in their iconic Martinique print, which, within moments of launching, was endorsed by the Kardashians and subsequently many other celebrities. Sophie is also a guest lecturer each term to the Entrepreneur students at UCLA’s Anderson Business School.

SARAH RYDING (NEE DOBIE, 1998) OWNER OF i4 DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

Starting and operating a shopfitting company, delivering superior retail and residential fit-outs and custom joinery through Australia and New Zealand (and shortly, Singapore) Sarah offers golden advice; surround yourself with the RIGHT experts to move you forward – in the right direction – the first time. Some of her clients include Country Road, Eco D., Seed, Nine West, French Connection and Bed Bath N’ Table. Interviewed by Business Chicks, Sarah believes walking the walk and talking the talk is one of the traits that has helped her to develop her business as well as giving credit where it’s due and encouraging a continued job well done. Credit: Latte, Business Chicks 2016


TH RIV ING AND C O NNE CTE D C O M M UNIT Y

36

FRIENDS FOR LIFE A review of the website of any school with boarders will undoubtedly include some reference to that old adage ‘friends for life’. The dialogue will tell how growing up in a communal setting will forge enduring friendships of a nature difficult to cultivate in any other environment. The reason why this is such a common catch phrase in all boarding School is because it is true. It is not a notion that has been dreamt up to entice young people to leave home and attend a boarding school but a story that is told and retold so many times by past boarders when recounting their experiences. Old scholars, Felicity Fulcher (nee Day) ‘86 and Kate Facy (nee Charlton) ‘86 are two such friends. Felicity now lives at the top end of the Northern Territory and Kate lives near Mount Gambier, about as far away as they could get from each other, and still be both living in Australia. Felicity and Kate were bridesmaids for each other and are godmothers to each other’s daughters. On a recent catch up they reenacted a photo taken when they were boarders in Year 9 at Wilderness. There is one notable addition to the more recent photo as they celebrated their ongoing life long friendship!

Now & Then Felicity Fulcher (nee Day) on the piano and Kate Facy (nee Charlton) on the keys.

Rosie Broderick Head of Boarding

OLD SCHOLAR DATES FOR THE 2017 CALENDAR TERM 1

February 21-25 Festival Fringe – Jailbirds Newman Theatre Wednesday 8 March Year 9 IWD Birthing Kits Hender Hall Wednesday 8 March Year 12 IWD Afternoon Tea Newman Theatre Thursday 9 March Welcome to New Old Scholars Wildy Café

Thursday 16 March Drinks at The Maid

TERM 2

Wednesday 3 May Casual Day for Quiz Night Donations Tuesday 16 May Coffee Morning for OS with daughters @ Wilderness Friday 26 May Quiz Night Gymnasium

TERM 3

Thursday 28 September Annual Event with Cocktails and Fun The Maid

TERM 4

Wednesday 18 October Coffee Morning for OS with daughters @ Wilderness Monday (tba) November Golf Day Thursday 2 November OS Lunch Boarders’ Dining Room


37

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS

DRINKS @ THE MAID The Old Scholars’ Association held their third drinks event at The Maid on Thursday 25 October. Oh! What fun!!! There was great attendance for our final drinks in 2016. The Association provided a delicious array of nibbles. We had girls from 2014 back to 1961. There is just something about Wildy girls coming together and great times.

A

B

C

D

There will be more casual drinks at The Maid in 2017. Look out for your calendar of events.

A Caroline Bridgland, Kirsty Davies, Atty Highfield & Felicity Krix B Anna Colley, Annie Taylor & Meredith Olsson C Georgie Taarnby & Pooja Newman D Kate Smith & Booie Hayward E Jenny Sever & Annabel Duncan

Jodie Escott Manager of Development and Community E

WILDY OS COFFEE MORNING

GOLF DAY

The Old Scholars’ Association has two coffee mornings at the Wilderness Café each year. These coffee mornings are for old scholars who currently have a daughter at Wilderness School. On Friday 18 November, some Wilderness OS gathered on the Café Plaza to soak up the sunshine over a coffee and some of Olivia’s famous muesli slice. It was a stunning way to start things off and there were lots of smiles as we headed off to take on the day.

The golf day was once again held at Royal Adelaide Golf Club – a terrific total of 34 Wildy Old Scholars participated with a field totalling in excess of 120 including our friendly rivals from Seymour, Annesley, Woodlands and Girton.

Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community

This year we were treated to beautiful weather as everyone competed for


N

WI LDER

N

N

WI LDER Beautiful roses adorned each table, thanks to Anna Colley (Class of 82). Liz Meaker, Head of Junior School, welcomed our old scholars and introduced the Year 6 girls who performed a piece from ‘Annie the Musical’ to a standing ovation.

S’

A

O C I AT IO

1963 & PRIOR OLD SCHOLARS’ LUNCH Judy Webster (Class of 62) could not have written it better. ‘I thoroughly enjoyed meeting up with old school friends over a meal and glass of wine. We were envious of the boarders who obviously enjoy high quality meals – such a change from Vegemite crusts handed out at recess time way back when…!!...the day was a great success and the Grade 6 ‘orphans’ were fabulous. Well done…’

O

OL A RS ’

O C I AT IO

SS

More than 63 old scholars joined us in the Boarders’ Dining Room for lunch on Tuesday 25 October.

B

Thank you to Olivia Stoeckel and her talented team in the Café for catering and the maintenance team for assisting with the set up, Pooja Newman, President and the WOSA Committee members who assisted along with the Foundation girls. I think we could all still be there chatting!

C

Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community D A Marion Wells & Georgina Wells B Sue Brennan, Pamela Yule, Marg Whittle C Ann Marsden & Helen McBryde D Jane Noble, Judy Berry, Sarah Crawford, Penny Rowe, Prue Walsh & Judi Ross

A

the inaugural Ingrid Esau Trophy for best individual school performance – this year proudly won by Wilderness! Individual Wildy winners for 2016 were Anne Arnfield (best individual stableford score), Mirrie Waters (runner-up individual stableford) and best team result going to Annie Lovejoy, Helen Ingram, Lesley Gosse and Carol Buik. B

Vicki Thwaites (1975) A

S

H

H

A

SS

S

38

C

S ES

OL D

SS LD OE

C

N

TH RIV ING AND C O NNE CTE D C O M M UNIT Y

A Anne Arnfield, Amelia Esau & Vicki Thwaites B Anne Arnfield, Alice “Boo” Lange (wearing her 1972 blazer), Helen McBryde & Barbara Fargher


39

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS REUNIONS CLASS OF 1966 REUNION Imagine coming back to school after 50 years. This is just what happened for a number of the Class of 1966 who enjoyed a school tour on 5 November.

Lesley Bills (based in ACT) was integral in planning and implementing the Reunion. Thank you for being so organized. Almost half of the girls came from interstate, half from SA plus Naomi Cohen from the US especially for the 50 year celebration.

‘It was wonderful to see the changes to the school over the last 50 years - it has always been a truly amazing school and fantastic to see that tradition continues to go from strength to strength’ Michele House (nee Lewis) In the evening, the group enjoyed a fantastic dinner at The British.

B A School Tour with some of the Class of 1966 Back Row: Virginia Stokes, Carol Holmes, Margaret Richardson 3rd Row: Gael Blake, Margot Rosser, Meredith Brown 2nd Row: Diana Serelis, Michele House Front Row: Anne Barson, Lesley Bills B Class of 1966 at The British

A

CLASS OF 1996 REUNION Saturday 5 November was a popular date for Reunions! The Class of 1996 celebrated 20 years since leaving school with a tour and then headed to The Lion for a brilliant night of canapes and drinks in the Melbourne Room. They were amazed and impressed at the many additions and changes at the School in a relatively short period of time. A big thank you to Alice Spiers and Rhiannon Giles who did a fantastic job of organising the Reunion. We hear that it was a GREAT catch up.

For reunion questions please contact Jodie Escott, Manager of Development and Community on jescott@wilderness.com.au

A

C

B A School Tour with some of the Class of 1996 - Jackie Jackman, Miranda Bennett, Amy Holt, Hilary Mitchell, Alice Spiers Front Row: Emma Bateman, Amy McDonald, Rhiannon Giles, Alicia Taylor, Caroline Honner, Catherine Kelly B Heather Browning, Emma Bateman, Amy McDonald, Rhiannon Giles, Heather Cameron C Emma Sangster, Amy Holt, Miranda Bennett, Jackie Jackman, Prue Hurburgh, Hilary Mitchell, Sophie Rayner, Alice Spiers


N

WI LDER

S’

N

A

N

WI LDER

O

OL A RS ’

O C I AT IO

SS

O C I AT IO

CLASS OF 1986 REUNION On Saturday 15 October a number of girls from the Class of 1986 enjoyed a tour of Wilderness School. This was immediately followed by a gathering of more than 35 girls for a fun evening of canapes and catch ups at The British Hotel. It is fantastic to see so many girls attend these events from far and wide. It is a lot of work to get in touch with so many girls and bring them together. Thank you to Kate Kain, who not only assisted in the planning of this 30 year reunion, but also prepared a Powerpoint presentation of school days for everyone to enjoy. A simply awesome event.

A CHRISTMAS CATCH UP WITH SOME OF THE GIRLS FROM THE CLASS OF 1999, COMING TOGETHER FROM AROUND THE GLOBE! Left to Right Annie Mitchell (née Hammer),Stella Morris (Prescott), Priya Parasuramar, Emma Bishop (Gurling), Victoria Martin (Hillier), Ceci Jeffries (Bennett), Lara Byrne (Harrop), Alice Van Kempen (Skipper), Sophie Lovejoy, Sally Trodd (McDougall), Kate Eagle (White), Skye Steed (Donoghue) & Tess Jones (Kapiris)

A

C

S

H

H

A

SS

S

40

C

S ES

OL D

SS LD OE

C

N

TH RIV ING AND C O NNE CTE D C O M M UNIT Y

B

D

E

F

A 1986 Tour Reunion Back: Nicole Le Maistre, Julia Roberts, Kate Mitchell-Innes 2nd row: Jane Williams, Sadie Gomer, Sophie McAdam Front: Georgie Rasmussen, Kat Copping, Mandi Wicks, Kate Kain B Shannon Magasdi, Kate Kain & Kate Bickford

C Pip Martin, Sophie McAdam, Kate Hayward & Tammy Morrison D Nicole Le Maistre & Karyn Verity E Holly Gardner, Georgie Rasmussen, Kate Kain F Jacqui Hillyer, Kate Mitchell-Innes & Felicity Fulcher


41

Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

PARENTS & FRIENDS

Wilderness School is a special place. To quote one of the School’s founders, Miss Margaret Brown, ‘We founded this school with the strong belief in the need for unlimited kindness in relationships, joy in learning and academic adventure, a spirit of humility and the balance between seeking individual excellence and success and generous service to the community’. From this comes the strong desire to value and nurture respectful relationships with each other. It is to continue to celebrate the life of our school by providing meaningful connections between our past and present community, instilling a sense of belonging, responsibility and united purpose. Committed to achieving the Browns’ mission, the School established a group of parent volunteers to form the Wilderness Parents’ and

Friends’ Association (P&F). The objective of this group was to foster a sense of belonging for all families joining Wilderness School, from confirmation of acceptance into the school, throughout their daughter’s academic journey to graduation, and beyond through the ‘Still True Past Parents Association’. Parents and carers of our daughters, we share their learning journey through life – the challenges of growing up both physical and emotional, as well as maintaining an understanding of the ever changing world they live in. The P&F is proud to support our community by sponsoring the Raising Amazing Girls program. The School is able to attract presenters, internationally recognised as leaders in their field, to raise awareness and educate us about issues that affect not only our daughters but our families and

HELEN MCBRYDE (NEE LINES) CLASS OF 1947 8.6.1930 – 28.1.2017

wider community. We are delighted this year to bring Ron Ritchhart discussing Cultures of Thinking, Susan McLean on Cyber Safety and Paul Dillon on Teenagers, alcohol and other drugs: How much influence do parents really have? A past President of the P&F, the late Richard Newman, was a passionate leader who was committed to ensuring the P&F were seen as a grounded, fun loving group keen to embrace everyone in the Wilderness community. He encouraged all P&F members to wear Hawaiian shirts to the parent Welcome Drinks hosted by the P&F at the start of the year. In respect to Richard, and in keeping with this sense of fun, this tradition continues to this day. Karen Gough P&F President 2017

Helen was a truly loyal member and ambassador of Wilderness. As an old scholar, she graciously supported the School, frequenting events and rallying her fellow Wildy girls for regular lunches and golf days. She will certainly be missed at the annual Old Scholars’ lunch with an endless number of ladies requesting to join her table, evidently a wonderful and well respected friend to so many! Her philanthropy and 21st century vision was constant, generous and appreciated.


TH RIV ING AND C O NNE CTE D C O M M UNIT Y

42

WEDDINGS ANNOUNCEMENTS ENGAGEMENTS Shelley Dawes (2003) to Luke Crouch

Above Olivia Thomas, Katie Wheeldon (bride), Sarah Mitchell (also a Wilderness old scholar from 2003) and Ali Uppill Left Aisha Dow (2004) to Charles Gaylard

WILDY BABIES Peta St Clair (2000) – Lucy Sophia Dawes

MARRIAGES Katie Saville (2003) to Brett Wheeldon Aisha Dow (2004) to Charles Gaylard BIRTHS Peta St Clair (2000) – Lucy Sophia Dawes DEATHS Helen McBryde (nee Lines) (1947) Joan Creswell (1948) Fiona Luckett (1948) Roslyn Judson (1961) Joan Teagle – former staff member

If you are an old scholar we would love to hear from you and share your milestones and celebrate your success. Please email your news and accompany

a photo to communications@wilderness.com.au

During 2015, Helen appeared alongside current Wilderness students in an unscripted Foundation film encompassing our School values. “At Wilderness there’s a loyalty, a passing on. Learning is made precious”. Just one of the many sincere comments made by Helen for the film. It is a beautiful reflection of an incredible woman and shows how she was ‘Always True’ and always a Wilderness girl.

grandchildren. Her daughters were Wilderness students and her granddaughters Ellen (Class of 2009) and Layla, currently in Year 5 continue the tradition attending Wilderness. Helen’s brothers George and David Lines both attended Wilderness and are proud old boys. There are many cherished generations of the McBryde’s all recognised as family to the Wilderness community.

A mother to Elaine, Robin, Ian and Jim and adored ‘Granna’ of nine grandchildren and two great

Helen McBryde will always be remembered. In our hearts forever.


Wilderness Times | Summer 2017

30 Hawkers Road, Medindie SA 5081 Phone + 61 8 8344 6688 www.wilderness.com.au CRICOS Provider Code: 00375B

WILDERNESS TIMES - ISSUE 75  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you