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WINTER 2018

ISSUE # 81


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

UPCOMING EVENTS

CONTENTS 4

Principal’s Thoughts

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Reggio Emilia Twilight Visit Kate Brennan

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Meet Halwyn Bruce Head of Performing and Creative Arts

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Senior Drama Production - Dinkum Assorted Melissa Sheldon

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Faculty in Focus Sport

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Farewell Judy Thurgood Brad Snell

46 P&F Welcome Jen Guest

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Artist in Residence Dan Withey

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18 Getting to know the Science Department Science & Geography Teachers 28 30 32

Wilderness Nepal Trip 2018 Reema Madike

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Critical and Creative Thinking in Middle School Geography April Bickley

Music Moment Generations in Jazz Musician in Residence & Jazz at the Gov

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Languages Week Stephanie Andrews & Elisa Savio

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Founders’ Day 2018

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Sophie Davies heads to NIDA Sophie Davies

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Introducing Members of the Governing Council Bill Waterhouse

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Green Door Society

Wednesday 8 August South East Dinner Friday 10 August WOSA Annual Dinner All Welcome Saturday 25 August Sports Night Wednesday 29 August Annual Showcase of Music Saturday 8 September Class of 2008 Reunion Saturday 15 September Class of 1998 Reunion

Sony Children’s Summer Camp

48 Wildy Intergenerational Families O’Grady Family Taylor Family 50

Old Scholars Wildy Women Leading the Way

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Old Scholars

Weekend of 15/16 September Class of 1968 Reunion Tuesday 23 October Class of 1958 Reunion Saturday 17 November Class of 1978 Reunion

Environmental Week Heather Davis

Wilderness School has a number of social media platforms to connect with our community and discover the latest news. www.facebook.com/WildernessSchool www.linkedin.com/company/wilderness-school twitter.com/wilderness1884

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Join the Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association page on Facebook. This page is set up for Old Scholars to communicate, network and hear about upcoming alumnae events. Once you are a member you can then share with other Old Scholars in your Facebook network.


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As parents we all want our daughters to experience the best childhood within our power to give them. We read stories, plan birthday parties, organise play dates, watch sports matches, attend concerts and try to nurture our children’s interests and talents as they grow. We care deeply. Yet how do we know when we care too much? Is caring too much even possible? - Jane Danvers, Principal


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

PRINCIPAL’S THOUGHTS As parents we all want our daughters to experience the best childhood within our power to give them. We read stories, plan birthday parties, organise play dates, watch sports matches, attend concerts and try to nurture our children’s interests and talents as they grow. We care deeply. Yet how do we know when we care too much? Is caring too much even possible?

A recent study by the Australian Council for Educational Research identified an increasing number of young people experiencing high levels of anxiety and demonstrating a lack of resilience when facing challenges. There is no doubt when our children are upset or hurting, we feel it tenfold and our love for them means we want to step in and solve their problems or take the pain away. While our intention is to protect and shelter our children, the research shows that, counter intuitively, frequent intervention into children’s lives when they face adversity increases their levels of anxiety and diminishes their capacity to build self-regulatory behaviour and resilience. The challenge for loving parents is to know when to step back and to let our daughters work through issues on their own. Professor Michael Bernard, an


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educational psychologist from Melbourne University, contends that young people are being overparented. He describes a situation where very concerned parents are trying to do everything for their children, taking on too much. When things go wrong at school, our immediate response is to step in and make it better. But we do our girls a great disservice if we don’t allow them to spend a little time in the learning pit. It’s important to recognise that not everything works out as planned and experiences day to day aren’t always fair or smooth. Today’s children are committed to a stream of activities and the associated expectations have created a hothouse for children where they feel they have to excel in everything they do. This has the potential to be exacerbated by our own school culture which has a reputation for outstanding academic excellence.

Dr Judith Locke names this the Bonsai child syndrome where every aspect of the child’s daily life is planned, engineered and shaped. As members of the school community, we need to be aware and monitor the number of activities our girls are involved in. They are ambitious and enthusiastic. They put their hands up for a myriad of activities. Yet it is important to have time and make time to be still. While it is important to celebrate success, it is equally important to celebrate the journey and to recognise that challenges and the occasional failure are what makes great thinkers, innovators and creators. Parental involvement in children’s lives is fundamental. Loving and warm boundaries are important. Parents think deeply about their parenting and the impact it will have on their children. Helping our children take appropriate

risks and to stick at it when something is difficult, builds the dispositions and capacities that will best serve them in the future. We need to remind ourselves to step back and give our daughters the space to face the trips and falls of everyday life and to build the resilience to handle challenging situations independently. On a recent visit into the Year 5 classroom I found the girls discussing ‘grit.’ When I asked them to tell me about what they were learning, they said they were looking at ways people kept going, even when things were really tough. As I listened to their earnest and enthusiastic discussion, I was reminded of a recent t-shirt one girl wore to casual day. The slogan read, “This little princess can rescue herself!” Jane Danvers Principal


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

REGGIO EMILIA TWILIGHT VISIT The Wilderness Early Learning Centre fosters a sense of adventure and wonder in all areas of learning. Girls are supported to interact collaboratively with others and be persistent and open to new challenges and discoveries. There is a committed approach to lifelong learning, not just for the girls but for all those within our community. In keeping with this philosophy, the Annie Brown and Mamie Brown staff recently opened their doors for a Reggio Emilia Twilight tour, allowing other educators to visit our centre to experience different learning environments, view documentation, meet with fellow teaching professionals and engage in dialogue. It was organised by the ‘Reggio Emilia Australia Information Exchange’, which is organisation for facilitating the exchange of information between Australia and the educators in the city of Reggio Emilia. The night proved to be a wonderful opportunity to showcase our spaces, our own learning and that

of our girls and allowed us to share our journey within the educational project of Reggio Emilia. The evening saw us host over forty educators from a variety of settings, from all over South Australia. Centres with a Reggio Emilia approach demonstrate, by making children’s learning visible, that children can devise creative ways of knowing, understanding and making connections and meaning. There is particular focus on the role of the environment, both social and physical. In the Reggio Emilia approach, the environment is regarded as the third teacher and is a place that is always welcoming, aesthetically pleasing and representative of community. The importance of carefully choosing materials, a sense of beauty and natural light are all highly valued, together with the setting up of provocations as invitations to learning. One visitor observed, “The unique setting of the old house with its spacious, light filled rooms, has a very serene quality that must be a joy

for the children and educators to work together in each day”. A valuable benefit of educators coming together is to provide the opportunity for rich dialogue between each other and our staff. Many comments and conversations were shared during the visit which allowed us to reflect on our own journey as well. While exploring our spaces the visitors were encouraged to think about the following questions; What is the school’s image of the child? How is this image of the child expressed in the environment? How are the children’s voices made visible? How is respect conveyed in the environment? How are different relationships expressed? In Reggio Emilia, it is said that ‘asking questions leads to more questions’ and this was certainly the case that evening. Much of the discussion was centred around the documentation and written programs that were visible in each space highlighting the girls’ creative learning. It was noted that the projects and documentation show co-operative, competent and capable learners with a sense of adventure and wonder, as was evident in such projects as The Wonder of Me and The Rubbish Trucks. Many also remarked on how the


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spaces display clear references to the possibilities for STEM learning and how you are “able to see beyond shelves of blocks to the wealth of possibilities for creativity and development of STEM skills.” The evening was certainly worthwhile and the staff felt a sense of pride when greeting the visitors. Many comments were noted during the visit that made mention of the beauty and layout of our environment and how welcoming it was; how it openly promotes relationships, communication, collaboration and exploration and how the development and outcomes of our girls’ learning is visible and valued. Kate Brennan Assistant Head of Junior School ‑ Early Years

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A & B The beautiful Mamie and Annie Houses at twilight C, D & E ELC Co-Educators from around Australia enjoying the spaces in the Wilderness ELC


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

MEET HALWYN BRUCE HEAD OF PERFORMING AND CREATIVE ARTS What led or inspired you to a leadership role in education? I have a firm belief that the Arts is vital to a student’s education and this drew me to advocating for it as a leader. I also yearn to inspire students to reach great heights in their creative pursuits and to experience success. I have seen some great leaders evolve and shape a prosperous program in the Arts that has had a significant impact on students and that inspires me to draw from their example and my personal ingenuity to create a program that reflects the essence of the current educational environment. Like many educators, I aspire to make a difference. Leading a highly talented and effective team, to mentor the students to reach their potential in the creation of music, media and theatre, is how I believe I can have a positive impact.

What is your vision for Performing Arts at Wilderness? The Performing Arts has a fundamental role in shaping and responding to culture and society and it is very important that we offer a program that mirrors this at Wilderness School. The Creative and Performing Arts curriculum offers an incredible opportunity for students to develop self-expression and creative passions. Simultaneously, the Arts domain teaches language and communication skills, allowing them to become effective team leaders, communicators, problem solvers and collaborators, whilst also prospering as creative individuals. The Creative and Performing Arts develops skills and aptitudes that the modern workforce demands of graduates. Continuing to give students the performance and creative opportunities to develop their creative identity in a global and cultural context remains highly important. Together as a team, I envision strengthening the faculty’s connections with universities and integral industry bodies and experts, providing students with the greatest opportunities to ensure advancement with optimal learning outcomes.

What keeps you coming back to the classroom day after day? Undoubtedly the students and the collaboration with other professionals keeps me coming back. While each day brings new challenges, one constant is that the students will always inspire me. They teach me, too, about their different cultures, abilities and perspectives. The students are constantly making new discoveries about themselves and their environment. Witnessing them unlocking their abilities through the creation of artistic products is truly amazing. The products themselves are often impressive and these have ranged from short films that have won awards at festivals, to performances in musicals that have made audiences roar with thunderous applause, to students creating truly believable characters that make you laugh or cry. Teaching is certainly never dull, and those moments when students come to a point of realisation, of true understanding, that they’re stronger and more resilient than before, is very powerful, and chasing those moments brings me back each day.


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What is your fondest memory from your days as an actor/musician? I would probably say the standing ovation at the end of Wagner’s Ring Cycle or performing on the Space theatre stage. But, in all honesty, some of my fondest memories are those that involved me learning the craft. Playing Scott Hastings in ‘Strictly Ballroom’ in my first production as a senior school student was a powerful moment for me, cementing my passion for performing. Having to learn ballroom dancing and portray such a wonderful character was very challenging but also highly rewarding, and I thank my amazing teacher for that. At university, a moment I will never forget was when I had a point of realisation, a true understanding as a performer. In a devised piece, I played an artist oppressed under the Stalinist regime and it was in this performance that I truly understood the concept of ‘being’ the character, completely transforming. I value these moments preciously as they are milestones in my development as a performer.

Tell us something about yourself that people don’t already know. I have a great passion for cultural awareness, respect and understanding. It extends to the importance of reconciliation and sharing stories to break down barriers of cultural difference. This passion stems from an upbringing which offered a strong connection with central Australian Indigenous people. My mother worked closely with them as an Ethnomusicologist and this also resulted in Aboriginal people living with my family, sharing their stories, ceremonies and culture with us to great extent. This has given me a deeper awareness and enabled me to reflect on the importance of understanding and finding meaning in cultural values, beliefs and perceptions especially through the Arts.


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

SENIOR DRAMA PRODUCTION DINKUM ASSORTED Set against the backdrop of World War Two, the play explored the lives of nine women living in the remote country town of Warrabadanga. In a time of world conflict, the women confronted their fear of loss, as they battled to keep the biscuits baking at the ‘Dinkum Biscuit Factory’. In an effort to save the factory from being sold off for steel, the women banded together to get the old coke fired oven (affectionately named Lola) working again, in order to bake the “army protein biscuits.” To “cover” this daring biscuit baking plot, they organised a troupe concert for the American Airmen stationed in the town. 1940s songs and dances were scattered throughout the production as they busily rehearsed their acts. This plan helped them find a refuge from the world seemingly falling apart around them. The audience was lifted out of the dull factory setting and taken to a place where the Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy could jam with company B.

Although focused on the salvation of the biscuit factory, Dinkum Assorted was essentially a play about men going to war and the women they left behind. Our production began with Robert Menzies’ announcement that war had broken, and the women listened, frozen in fear. Silhouetted, with faces unseen, they stood together to represent the many wives, mothers and daughters whose lives would be changed forever. They turned to sing “We’ll Meet Again,” highlighting their determination to remain positive. Throughout the production the threat of loss hung in the air, underlined when Father McEvoy visited the factory to deliver news they dared not think about. Each moment they were just “marking time…” (pg38) distracting themselves with biscuits, concerts and Air Raid Warden business. The final moments of the play bookended the beginning, with a much more sombre tone. Once again, the women were dimly lit as the sounds of war were amplified, cutting the glitz

and frivolity of the final dance number. Amongst the darkened stage they walked to their positions. They turned to sing “I’ll be Seeing you”, but this time fear and anguish has consumed optimism. Bella Bradford was the very definition of an Aussie battler, in her powerful portrayal of Grace. Imogen Lesicar was passionate and energetic as Pearl in her efforts to keep the Factory alive. The youthful effervescence of Eliza Waterhouse and Stephanie Farrell’s best friend duo, Vi and Rosie was infectiously endearing. Sophie Davies’ forceful Connie was the perfect antagonist, but softened the audience with her gesture of friendship to outsider Joan. Catherine Hickey’s subtle and well-crafted Joan was an elegant contrast to Veronica Pomeroy’s mesmerising performance as the tragic country girl Millie. The heart-warming comic antics of Millie Goutl’s Ethel worked in harmony with her younger


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“That’s our War, pretending things are normal. That’s our war”. Commissioned by the Sydney Theatre Company to promote women in theatre, Linda Aronson’s Dinkum Assorted celebrates the strength of women to overcome adversity. It discusses thought provoking issues about women striving for personal and professional freedom in the 1940s.

perky sidekick Gladdy. Lily De-Caux’s Gladdy drew sorrow from the audience when the devastating loss of her husband was revealed. The production highlighted the tenacity and adaptability of women at this time, as well as human struggle and the amazing capacity we have for resilience. Between 1941 and 1945 approximately 27,000 women took up the mantle, entering the defence and civilian workforce as their sons, brothers and husbands were forced to abandon their lives to fight on the front lines. Entire towns were emptied, and the women became the caretakers of their society, embodying the spirit of ‘keep calm and carry on’. However, they were paid significantly less than their male counterparts to do the same work, and lived in the constant shadow the war cast over their lives, terrified they may never see ‘their boys’ again. Leadership and the workplace were denied to women until necessity demanded

it. However, when status quo was restored, they were sent back to their roles as mothers and wives as though nothing had changed. Yet for many women, everything had changed. It is important that we look back at the women who came before us and appreciate the role they played in paving the way for the plethora of choices we have today. It is in their

fighting spirit and desire for more that inspires us not to give up when faced with the hurdles that still lay ahead for the women’s movement. Through moments of both sadness and joy, Dinkum Assorted is a celebration of women’s strength, and a window into a different era, capturing a unique slice of Australian social history. Melissa Sheldon Head of Drama


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

FACULTY IN FOCUS SPORT When you think of sport what comes to mind? Is it that junior premiership way back when, or maybe those chilly early starts on a Saturday morning in winter? In any case, sport represents many different things to all of us, but here at Wilderness it represents learning that matters. Sport shouldn’t be thought of purely as an accessory to girls’ education, but rather a must. We believe it is a place where the residuals of a Wilderness girl are not only challenged, but also developed over her journey. Our academic literacies are integral, but physical literacy and the lessons learnt through it, are often missed by many. It is crucial that our girls understand how their involvement in sport will impact on much of what they do. For high school girls, both physical activity and participating in sport correlate with higher academic performance (Barr-Anderson & Wall, 2010). This research is not necessarily groundbreaking but is a friendly reminder of how integral physical activity is. Academic performance is what our girls are striving for, but is it everything? What about those residuals we hope to equip them with as they leave our gates? Resilience, adaptability, and flexibility are examples of a few. These words are common language among teachers, but when we use these terms in context within the sports department, we talk about GRIT. Researcher Angela Duckworth (2018) explains that grit can be related to how much you can inspire yourself, access your passion, and sustain

your motivation. But, why does grit matter? One way to think about grit is to consider what grit isn’t. Duckworth (2018) describes that grit isn’t talent, it isn’t luck, it isn’t how intensely in the moment you want something, but rather it is about having a goal you care about so much that it organises and gives meaning to almost everything you do. So how do we develop grit? Part of it lies in failure. Girls need to truly extend themselves and branch out of their comfort zones to reach their full potential. However, the key for our girls is to understand that their ability to learn is not fixed and that they are not defined by their failures, but rather how they respond to them. Research Psychologist, Carol Dweck (2015), states that the ability to learn can change with effort and that the brain adapts and grows in response to challenges. Researchers identify this as neuroplasticity. Hotting & Roder (2013) suggest physical exercise may be one such trigger that facilitates the connections between new and existing neurons, enhancing a student’s ability to respond to new demands. In essence, exercise changes the brain’s anatomy, physiology and function when challenged. Our sports program is built on diversification and a belief that all girls have the right to participate in sport and are encouraged to play. Exercise is a powerful medium. Dr Wendy Suzuki, Professor of Neural Science, details the immediate response of exercise including: increased mood, energy, memory and


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attention. The exciting part is that it only takes one exercise session to gain these benefits. At this stage researchers do not know what the optimum amount of exercise is for cognitive benefit, but we do know at least three to four aerobic sessions a week for extended periods brings about permanent change and results in growing new neurons. Built on a foundation of research, the ‘Wildy Way’ is Wilderness School’s sports philosophy. It provides all girls with an equal opportunity to develop individually and as a team member in an inclusive and encouraging sports program. Whilst the girls may show particular skills and talent in a specific sport, it is important they continue to diversify, and develop holistically and experience a range of physical, psychological, and social benefits through participation in a range of sports. To provide each student this opportunity, we negotiate choice and participation through the Wildy Individual Sporting Plan (WISP). WISPs apply to any girl with conflicting trainings or games. The Widy Way is not represented anywhere better than Intercol. It is an

event which epitomises the true spirit and grit of a Wildy girl. It demonstrates that sport is not about the singularity of a person on the field but is a combination of many individuals - from the girls cheering on and off the field, to the parents and friends, coaches and teachers encouraging from the sidelines. Sport is about inclusion and diversity and we encourage you to join us in supporting Intercol (Term 3 – Week 5). The final event for the week will be Sports Night to be held on 25th of August where we celebrate the girls’ commitment to sport and look back over the year. Further information will be out soon. Shane Hill Head of Sport

REFERENCES Barr-Anderson, D & Wall, M 2010, “Physical activity and sports team participation: Associations with academic outcomes in middle school and high school students, Journal of School Health, vol. 80, pp. 31-37. Duckworth, A 2018, “Character lab”, viewed 20 June 2018, http://angeladuckworth.com/about-angela/ about-character-lab/ Hotting, K & Roder, B 2013, “Beneficial effects of physical exercise on neuroplasticity and cognition “, Neuroscience Biobehavioural Review, vol. 37, pp. 2243-57. Suzuki, W. (2017, November). Wendy Suzuki: The brain changing benefits of exercise [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/wendy_suzuki_the_ brain_changing_benefits_of_exercise YouTube. (2015). Carol Dweck: The effect of praise on mindsets. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=TTXrV0_3UjY [Accessed 1 Mar. 2015].


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

1988

Judy and old scholars Erica Toogood and Alex Lahey being presented with an award by the Heart Foundation.

1993

The Wilderness Sports Department from left to right - Jodi Svetlichny, Vicki Zadow, Judy Thurgood and Pam Head.

1997

The Wilderness Lacrosse Team and with coach Judy.

2015

Under 15 Lacrosse Team who won the Inaugural U/15 IGSSA competition and the Judy Thurgood Trophy, finishing the season undefeated with a 13-2 victory against Walford.

2017

Mike Slattery, Australian Lacrosse Association (ALA) President, presenting Judy with her ALA Life Membership certificate at the ALA 7th Annual Recognition Dinner, to recognise the many years of contributions which Judy has made to the sport of lacrosse at National, State and Club levels.

2018

Judy’s last day at Wilderness with the Sport and PE Department from back to front left to right - Shane Hill, Amy Bailey, Judy Thurgood, Brad Snell, Lisa Stenta, Renee Chatterton, Lauren Walker, Emma Grant and Chris Pahl.


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FAREWELL TO JUDY THURGOOD 1981 - 2018 Judy Thurgood joined Wilderness School in 1981 (first year out of University) to teach Primary School Physical Education and Year 8 Geography. At the time, Judy was employed specifically to implement Daily Fitness into the Primary School and Sport programs for Year 6 and 7 girls. Having taught every year level from ELC to the senior years at some point throughout her 38 years, Judy has left a meaningful impact on thousands of young women who have come into her care. Judy has been a Form Teacher of Year 8 Amaryllis for 25 Years and was Acting Head of Amaryllis House for a short time. She thoroughly enjoyed being part of Amaryllis house and has had the pleasure of getting to know a generation of ‘Amy girls’. Judy was an outstanding athlete in her own right, representing South Australia in Lacrosse and Athletics (200m Hurdles and 400m Hurdles SA State Champion). She also played Lacrosse for Australia during an era when Australia dominated world Lacrosse. Judy’s sporting prowess, coupled with her passion for education, enabled her significant impression on the Wilderness PE & Sport Faculty since 1981. The majority of Judy’s PE teaching was within the junior school, where she has shaped the physical education journey of thousands of young Wilderness girls. As well as her PE teaching, Judy has been involved with a range of extracurricular programs at Wilderness including; Lacrosse, Hockey, Softball/ Tee-Ball, Swimming, Netball, Athletics & Cross Country. Her involvement with school sport led to Judy being awarded Life Membership of the Independent Girls Schools Sports Association. Judy was also the Wilderness School Jump

Rope for Heart Coordinator for 25 years, helping to raise $67,000 for Heart research during that time. One of Judy’s most significant contributions to the Wilderness community has been the Wilderness Lacrosse Club. Judy was the co-founder of the Wilderness Lacrosse Club, which was incorporated in 2002. This has been a highlight for Judy and something she is immensely proud of. The club has allowed thousands of girls to play Lacrosse, with a number of Wilderness players going on to represent South Australia and Australia. For 15 years, Judy was a member of the Wilderness Lacrosse Club committee, an Office of Recreation and Sport Member Protection Information Officer for Lacrosse SA and a Lacrosse SA Junior Competition Committee member. When reflecting on her time at Wilderness, Judy stated,

“Going away on camps has been a highlight of my time at Wilderness. Education is definitely about more than just being in the classroom. I am grateful to have had the opportunity to see some wonderful places and experience some amazing things whilst supporting the girls as they faced the challenges set by our brilliant Outdoor Education Staff. I could provide dozens of examples but these four came to mind immediately. •

At the end of REALISE in 2017, we experienced a 5 hour cruise on the Coorong down to the mouth of the Murray and Goolwa. So beautiful! I was in my element from a Geography teachers’ perspective.

Spending 5 days on the Falie that included a memorable, magical moment of stretching out on the trampoline net watching the dolphins ‘surf’ underneath and alongside the ship.

Getting dirty, digging soil profiles with the Year 12 Geography students and testing endless water samples for salinity levels.

Twice to Port Lincoln to revegetate the properties of farmers who lost everything, including family members, in the fires. These trips were life changing for all involved.”

Judy’s impact on the Wilderness community is one that is not easy to put in words. Judy has committed almost 38 years of her life to shaping the lives of Wilderness girls and helping develop confident, young women. During this time, Judy has also been a supportive colleague, mentor and friend to Wilderness staff members for 3 decades. We wish Judy all the best in the next chapter of her life and we know her impact on our community will not be forgotten. Brad Snell Head of Physical Education, Health & Sport


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE DAN WITHEY As teachers immersed in a culture of thinking we craft the vehicles for learning. Our annual Artist in Residence program, which enables students to interact personally with an artist, nurtures creative thinking, guiding and shaping opportunities to learn on a profound level. In Term 2, Adelaide based artist, Dan Withey, inspired all art students and teachers through his engaging and thought provoking talks, an exhibition of his work in the Art Centre gallery and ongoing practical work in the studio. Dan’s rich and unique acrylic paintings on canvas are inspired by popular culture and raise questions around contemporary issues such as the relationship between humans and nature, the digital age and masculinity. The artist, students and teachers all view a residency through their own lens depending on life experience and art knowledge. In reflecting on his residency Dan commented that working in the studio is very insular so he can’t really gauge the effect his work has on other people. The positive comments he received during his time at Wilderness were a welcome

affirmation. Dan said that as a natural extrovert, making art can be a lonely process. As the Artist in Residence, he relished the opportunity to talk about his work, especially with students who are dyslexic like him.

‘As a Junior School Art teacher, having Dan as our Artist in Residence was a refreshing and positive experience. Dan personified the human side of being an artist. The resounding message that resonated with the younger Art students was the grit and tenacity to follow his dreams, despite the naysayers and critics. As a father of two young children Dan related well to the students mainly due to his affable nature and his uncanny ability as a story teller to unpack the varying layers of meaning in his work.’ Jo Porrovecchio, Art teacher

‘Like many artists, be they musicians or visual artists, Dan makes work which has multiple layers. He is not trying to change the world, or be the prophet but subtly he wants his work to shift people’s thinking. The messages are disguised through the flat and bright planes of colour which are playful and could be likened to


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animated illustrations. Dan emerges as a complex thinker who is attempting to find answers for himself; as we are all searching for paths to walk whether we are artists or creatives in any field.’ Miranda Harris, Art teacher ‘Dan’s openness about having dyslexia sent a particularly powerful message to the students who, like him, also find reading and writing difficult. It became evident that although Dan struggled with written expression he excelled at communicating through his own unique visual language. His rising success despite the challenging Australian art market can be credited to his self-determination and strength of character.’ Fiona Roberts, Art teacher ‘We saw lots of different birds in his paintings and discovered that they were a symbol of freedom. We loved the personal story behind his painting of himself with a ‘Daddy Pig’ hat on. Dan told us that he painted it to remind himself to keep trying to be a better dad, just like the daddy pig from one of our favourite cartoons, Peppa Pig.’ Year 5 students ‘Rather than using shadows, tone and blending, Dan Withey interestingly

utilises dots and patterns on order to create depth in his paintings.’ Dieu-Vy Tran Year 9 ‘Dan’s use of vibrant colour gives his work an immediate appeal, even to younger people.’ Jasmine Meldrum year 9 ‘Dan Withey has an existential and questioning view on the real world and its issues, many relating to him personally. He finds ways to incorporate these ideas and questions into his work and made the viewer wonder the work’s meaning.’ Melanie Crouch, Year 9 Year 12 students expressed interest in the fact that Dan holds strong societal and political views and the messages behind his work have contemporary relevance. As young women, they were appreciative of the ‘modern’ male perspectives seen in his work, like shared parenting roles. Some students have used Dan as an important reference artist in their Folio where performance standards ask them to explore a range of artworks in order to support and connect cohesively to their own topic focus. Jane Kuchel Head of Art

REFERENCES SACE Stage 2 Visual Arts Subject outline https://www.sace.sa.edu.au/web/visual-arts/ overview Ritchhart, R (2015) ‘Creating Cultures of Thinking’, Jossey-Bass


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

GETTING TO KNOW THE

SCIENCE & GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT

SIMONE BURZACOTT-GORMAN HEAD OF SCIENCE & GEOGRAPHY TEACHER OF MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE & SENIOR SCHOOL BIOLOGY When did you commence your teaching at Wilderness? I began teaching at Wilderness in 2013. What is your education background and what was it that drew you to study and ultimately teach Science? I completed an undergraduate degree with a double major in Biological Science and Environmental Studies at Uni SA. Following the completion of my undergraduate degree, I applied to attend ‘The Mawson Graduate School of Environmental Studies’, Uni of Adelaide where I completed a Graduate Diploma in Environmental Studies, which I later surrendered to undertake a Masters by Research in marine toxicology. My Masters dissertation sought to shed light on the bio accumulative potential of polychlorinated biphenyls in the local dolphin population Tursiops truncatus (Bottle-nosed dolphins) and environs. While working in marine science, I worked aboard the tall ship, AK Falie, providing marine interpretative talks to school students. My role aboard Falie lit a flame in me. I chose to move away from field biology to pursue teaching, as I felt my voice would meet a more important audience inside classrooms. I

often wonder how to ignite imagination that will encourage girls to fall in love with learning and poignantly believe that the single most important charge of our profession, is to keep the light on in as many students for as long as possible. In your opinion, in what way does science impact the lives of young women and what is its importance in today’s society? At Wilderness we make no apology for looking at girls’ education through a feminist lens. We believe that for girls it is important that they can ‘imagine themselves in the narrative of a scientist or geographer’. If we can introduce girls to the stories of women in science and geography as early as possible, and provide strong role models for them, then we can help them to imagine themselves in these fields in their future. It’s about providing the critical ingredient to see a paradigm shift, from a paucity of women in science and geography to one where women will routinely hold positive and empowering positions.

Biology, Geography and Science for that matter is about life, so we are fortunate that we are invested in a subject matter that all people can connect with. For me personally, it is important that we help our girls to fall in love with these subjects, because if we can do that, they will take the baton from us and forge into the future, inspiring girls for generations to come. I believe I am a role model for our girls, particularly those wishing to pursue the sciences, having worked in the field, in both Australia and abroad. I routinely share tacit links with girls from NGOs, Government and Universities through projects I have been a part of including, field biology; mapping barchan dunes in the Strzelecki desert; taxidermy at the South Australian Museum and most recently hydrographic mapping of the ocean floor with CSIRO aboard RV Investigator. These shared stories help to bind us together, investing in the girls what it means to be a scientist. What is your vision for Middle School Science and STEM at Wilderness and what do you hope the girls will take away with them when they leave? I aim to infect girls with a love of Science and Geography and to understand that the intersection of Science, Technology and a rapidly changing globally connected world is a fun place to play. But how do you measure success? I believe we are successful every time a girl reflects on her time at school and says ‘remember in Science when…’ To leave a lasting impression on her life that is cherished and shared is just as important to me as the vast number of girls that leave Wilderness school in pursuit of Science and Geography at a tertiary level.


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APRIL BICKLEY TEACHER OF GEOGRAPHY

When did you commence your teaching at Wilderness? I began teaching at Wilderness in January of 2016. What is your education background and what was it that drew you to study and ultimately teach geography? I studied International Relations and Media at the University of Adelaide, majoring in International Politics and Geography. I then completed my Masters of Teaching (Secondary) majoring in Geography and minoring in History at the University of South Australia. I have been passionate about Geography since my own time in school. I was fascinated by the diversity and changing nature of geography, its relevance to the world I saw all around me and the way it really impacted and shaped the human experience of people around the world. These are still the same aspects of Geography that engage me now. Entrepreneurial humanist Eric Berridge sums it up perfectly, explaining that whilst science teaches us how to build things, it’s the humanities that teach us what to build and why. I firmly believe that this is an essential aspect of a student’s education, a core capability for them to truly flourish in our society today. And it’s the reason why I am so passionate about teaching Geography.

In your opinion, in what way does geography impact the lives of young women and what is its importance in today’s society? Understanding geography, both human and physical, is fundamental to the lives of all young people, both now and into the future. It is essential if students are going to be able to grasp the complexities of the societies that they may live in. Geography teaches Wilderness girls the value of culture, it fosters a commitment to social justice, shines a light on the importance of equality and it gives our students a context for understanding both the world around them and the reasons behind local, national and global events. Geography impacts the lives of young women by enabling them to become informed, curious and collaborative global citizens. It can lead our young women to become the architects of lasting change.

What is your vision for geography at Wilderness and what do you hope the girls will take away with them when they leave? My vision for Geography at Wilderness is to enable generations of students to be actively engaged citizens, who never cease questioning and who strive resolutely in their pursuit of knowledge. I hope that each and every Wilderness Girl leaves our school understanding that they have a strong voice within the global community. Furthermore, I want them to have the confidence and capacity to use that voice so they can grasp their potential to truly make a difference. I hope they take away a sense of empathy, the skills to think critically and creatively and a desire to explore and understand the world around them. In an increasingly complex and changing world, it is individuals with these skills, abilities and ways of thinking that are most likely to succeed in making the most of their opportunities. This is what I want for our Geographers here at Wilderness.


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

DANIELLE KEMP TEACHER OF MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE & STEM

When did you commence your teaching at Wilderness? I began teaching at Wilderness in 2012, the same year my daughter started Reception. It was very special to start our Wildy adventure together. What is your education background and what was it that drew you to study and ultimately teach Science? I have a Science Degree in Marine and Environmental Biology, I originally planned to save dolphins or sea turtles. However, when I realised I am partial to seasickness and would probably end up looking at phytoplankton for a living (which although very important, is no way near as exciting as dolphins), I decided a change in direction was needed. This led me to undertake a Bachelor of Education in Secondary Science, specialising in Biology. It seemed a natural transition, as all through my teens and in my early twenties I had either coached netball or taught swimming and always loved helping others; what could be better than teaching something I loved!

In your opinion, in what way does science impact the lives of young women and what is its importance in today’s society? I teach Middle School Science and STEM. I think my role is to help students fall in love with Science, to provide lots of rich and engaging experiences that hopefully allow them to develop a sense of wonder and a strong desire to better understand the world around them through the lens of science. In Year 7 we start the year exploring the ‘Art of Science’ as a creative pursuit and the role Science has played in shaping and improving our lives. We encourage them to see themselves as scientists and imagine the contributions they can make in the future. This is a constant theme throughout Middle School Science and STEM.

What is your vision for Middle School Science and STEM at Wilderness and what do you hope the girls will take away with them when they leave? I sincerely hope they finish Middle School with a passion for Science and exposure to a range of careers in STEM and Science. We aim to instill a better understanding of themselves and the world around them and the wisdom to help our girls make ethical and informed decisions about their lives and the impact this has on humanity.


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DAVID PYMAN TEACHER OF MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE, STEM & PHYSICS

When did you commence your teaching at Wilderness? After teaching at St. Peter’s boys for 17 years, 2018 is my first year at Wilderness. What is your education background and what was it that drew you to study and ultimately teach science? I initially completed a Bachelor of Science and Diploma in Education, before beginning my teaching career at St. Paul’s College. More recently I completed a Master in Education (Leadership & Management) where my major research paper focussed on the strategic implementation of Positive Psychology at St. Peter’s College. I have vivid memories of an overnight school excursion that culminated in the viewing of Halley’s Comet in 1986. The blurry light in the sky sparked many questions – What was it made of? Where did it come from? Where did it go in the years we couldn’t see it? From then on, I had a real interest in science and absorbed as much information as I could find.

In your opinion, in what way does physics impact the lives of young women and what is its importance in today’s society? For me science is the search for truth and understanding. It doesn’t matter what your background is, what your religion is or what your beliefs are, scientific method can be used to separate fact from fiction. This is an incredibly powerful tool and in today’s world of fake news is more important than ever. Physics in particular has a critical role in helping humanity develop our understanding of the Universe and our role within it. Whether it be the search for fundamental particles that make up matter, the development of propulsion systems to let us travel across the vastness of space, our search for life beyond Earth or the challenge of understanding relativity, Physics offers something of interest for everyone who loves to think deeply about the world around us. At a time when there appears to be an increasing separation between people of the Earth, Science offers on opportunity to make discoveries that are able to unite us all. Throughout history, there have been many exceptional women who have made major advances in scientific discovery, but to our disadvantage, society has

largely placed barriers in front of them. In today’s modern world, women continue to contribute to and lead scientific discourse in a manner that is recognised and promoted. It is an exciting time for all of humanity, as we all advance our understanding of the Universe. What is your vision for Physics at Wilderness and what do you hope the girls will take away with them when they leave? In my first lessons at Wilderness I told my class that there had only ever been one Astronaut from South Australia and no female astronauts from Australia at all. I challenged the girls to have Wilderness produce Australia’s first female astronaut. From what I have seen so far this could happen sooner than I had anticipated, with a number of girls attending HASSE space school in Houston later this year! When girls leave Wilderness, I hope that they will take away with them a curious mind, a love of science and the knowledge that they have the ability and right to lead humanity to a bright future.


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

MARIA CRIARIS TEACHER OF MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE & CHEMISTRY

When did you commence your teaching at Wilderness? I have been a teacher for 27 years, beginning at Wilderness in 2014. What is your education background and what was it that drew you to study and ultimately teach science? I have held various teaching and leadership positions, but my passion lies in teaching Middle School Science and Senior Chemistry. Growing up, I loved learning, and found my passion for Science in High School. I fell in love with Science, not only because it explained different phenomena but because it could change the future. As I progressed into Senior School, I believed I was a ‘pioneer’, as I was one of only two girls who studied Chemistry in Year 12. I was determined to show that I could study Chemistry in a male orientated class and this became my path as I entered my tertiary education.

In your opinion, in what way does Chemistry impact the lives of young women and what is its importance in today’s society? At Wilderness we deliver innovative curriculum to inspire our girls to develop a love of Science, a sense of passion for the future and a desire to change the world with the knowledge that Science is a major influence in future developments. What is your vision for biology at Wilderness and what do you hope the girls will take away with them when they leave? To be a Science teacher that encourages girls to love Science and study it further, to make a difference in the world in which we live.


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TOBIA TRENTIN TEACHER OF MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE, STEM & BIOLOGY When did you commence your teaching at Wilderness? I began at Wilderness in January 2017. What is your education background and what was it that drew you to study and ultimately teach science? After completing a Bachelor of Education majoring in Italian, I found I wasn’t really stimulated with the prospects of working in that industry. Although I believe learning a language is crucial for expanding horizons, I always felt compelled and intrigued by the world of Science. And since one of my passions is the ocean, I decided studying Marine Biology would be very interesting. Towards the end of my degree, having never been inspired by my teachers in high school, I felt called to at least try and motivate and instil in students the same passion that I felt. Seven years on, I have not regretted my decision. What draws me to teach Science at Wilderness is the constant drive and motivation I get from seeing the interest that the girls have in the topic and the fact that I’m constantly pushed to learn more and more from the questions they pose.

In your opinion, in what way does biology impact the lives of young women and what is its importance in today’s society? I feel that Biology impacts the lives of young women by developing a deeper knowledge of the way the human body works and through the emphasis of the importance of conserving the environment. These are both crucial aspects needed to help drive the understanding of what is needed to fight disease and ameliorate human life, and to help analyse our interactions with other living beings to try and minimise the impact on our environment.

What is your vision for biology at Wilderness and what do you hope the girls will take away with them when they leave? My vision for Biology is for it to be at the forefront of research and development, keeping up to date with real-world practices. I want the girls to understand that the cooperation and collaboration between the many disciplines of Science, not just Biology, is the driving force behind the development of solutions and new discoveries. By looking at how the influence of this knowledge can be applied will give the girls the creative success to hit the ground running once they enter into society.


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

DEB SKELLY TEACHER OF MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE & PSYCHOLOGY

When did you commence your teaching at Wilderness? I am in my 16th year at Wilderness, starting in 2002. What is your education background and what was it that drew you to study and ultimately teach science? I was raised and educated in country NSW where amazing teachers were my inspirators to see a world far beyond the wheat fields and sheep. After matriculating to Sydney University, I joined the Airforce instead and spent three incredible years facing the rigors of military life which included the excitement of working on an operational base. Following this, I then enrolled in a Bachelor of Science (completing a double major in Histology and Microbiology) at Sydney University. I was fortunate to be offered a research position in my final year of study, which led me into the field of Electron Microscopy. I then conducted research in the Haematology Dept of St Vincent’s Hospital for the Bone Marrow Association. The corporate world then enticed me to ‘Scientific Sales’ with all the benefits

but I soon realised this was not for me. I applied for, and obtained, a science teacher’s position at an inner city catholic school for boys where all of the students were from non-English speaking backgrounds. I then moved on to Loreto Kirribilli and it was here that my love of teaching girls was realised. After taking some time out for parenting and some laboratory work in Brisbane and Melbourne, I moved to Adelaide where I accepted a casual role teaching science at Walkerville primary. This experience reignited my desire to be back in the classroom. From here it was a short trip across the road to Wilderness as a teacher of Biology and the newly offered Psychology course. Weekend and late night study, along with every possible role at SACE, enabled my knowledge and love of Psychology to equal that of Biology.

In your opinion, in what way does Psychology impact the lives of young women and what is its importance in today’s society? The study of Psychology has taught me (and I hope my students) about the workings of the mind that subsequently helps us to understand ourselves and others, develop compassion for our differences and foster valuable social skills. What is your vision for Psychology at Wilderness and what do you hope the girls will take away with them when they leave? As I look back on my journey I recognise the rewards of life-long learning. My greatest accomplishment would be to inspire students to develop their own passions and pathways in any Science which provides an opportunity for them to become critical thinkers, who can add to the social capital of their community. I believe all students can succeed in an environment where thoughtful lessons and positive relationships with teachers, enable them to feel secure enough to take the academic risks to challenge and surprise themselves.


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DR SALLY NOBBS TEACHER OF MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE & CHEMISTRY

When did you commence your teaching at Wilderness? I was persuaded to apply for a part time position at Wilderness School (actually my mother applied for the position without my knowledge or consent!). That was in 1993 and I have been teaching at Wilderness ever since. What is your education background and what was it that drew you to study and ultimately teach science? Having matriculated from Methodist Ladies College in 1973, I trained as a PE and Outdoor Ed teacher, and started my teaching career at Elizabeth Boys Tech, Clare High School and a number of other schools. In 1987 I decided I needed a break from teaching and went traveling throughout Australia and overseas. I experienced a range of different occupations, such as being a marine biologist based in Cairns, a park ranger at Uluru and even delivering lambs on a farm in Scotland.

Freedom, no responsibility, adventure, no set time lines or due dates - I was never going to teach again. However, this endless freedom became aimless, and I then realised that I needed a personal challenge and in 1990 I began a Science degree, which turned into a PhD at the University of Adelaide in Natural Products Chemistry. I had forgotten that my favourite subject at school was Chemistry and that my favourite teacher was my Chemistry teacher! I soon realised that teaching was, and is, my true vocation – that it is what I do best, that it is what makes me who I am. I need the mental stimulation of a complex, interesting and ever-changing subject as well as the social and, dare I say, spiritual need to be involved in helping young women reach their full potential.

In your opinion, in what way does Chemistry impact the lives of young women and what is its importance in today’s society? There is a logic and a beauty embedded in Chemistry and Science that has always fascinated and challenged me. Chemistry is a vehicle through which life’s deeper meanings can be explored. It is not just information about the world and how it works. It delves into mysteries beyond imaginings.


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

DANIEL MARKEY TEACHER OF MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE & CHEMISTRY

When did you commence your teaching at Wilderness? After a teaching placement at wilderness last year, I began as an official teacher at the beginning of this year- taking on the primary role as a science and chemistry teacher. What is your education background and what was it that drew you to study and ultimately teach Science? For me, there was only ever two possibilities for my future job: a doctor or a science teacher. I am fascinated by the world around me, particularly the interplay of matter from an atomic level to a universal level- and I loved to watch others grow in their understandings of the world they live in. So naturally I was drawn to careers that allowed me to do both. After completing high-school I studied Medicine at UNSW but changed into teaching at Adelaide University after two years. Within those two years I learnt much about the human body, which fit in nicely with the science degree I would go on to study. I majored in Biochemistry, undertaking research in cancer related fields, and Chemistry, with a focus on quantum phenomena.

In your opinion, in what way does science impact the lives of young women and what is its importance in today’s society? There is a wonderful relationship between science and young womenthey can both offer so much to each other. Science supplies answers to questions we never thought to askparticularly things so commonly used in our day-to-day life.

What is your vision for science at Wilderness and what do you hope the girls will take away with them when they leave? It is so important that the students push themselves to expand their knowledge, to never accept things at face value and to constantly ask “but why?”. As such, the fresh perspectives and inquisitive nature of the young women we teach will be absolutely vital in the scientific development of the future. It is also wonderful to see more and more girls considering STEM related fields as careers and breaking down those false previous stereotypes of researchers in science


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ELISE WALKER TEACHER OF GEOGRAPHY

When did you commence your teaching at Wilderness? It was Semester 2, 2013 when I commenced at Wilderness as a fulltime Geography Teacher. What is your education background and what was it that drew you to study and ultimately teach science? I studied at Flinders University and completed a double degree in Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Education (Secondary). I majored in both Geography and Biology with minors in Earth Science and Marine Science. I was drawn to Geography as it teaches us how to interpret the world we live in. Geography helps us to understand how people interact with the physical environment and the social, economic and environmental impacts that result.

In your opinion, in what way does geography impact the lives of young women and what is its importance in today’s society? The world in which we live is constantly changing. People can communicate and travel faster than ever before. Geography is essential in teaching our students how to unpack complex issues such as population change, sustainability and global inequalities. It shows young women the impacts that our ways of living have on the world. It also teaches students to interpret unfamiliar maps, graphs and diagrams and to make sense of issues in a spatial context.

What is your vision for Geography at Wilderness and what do you hope the girls will take away with them when they leave? My vision for Geography is for girls to take away the skills and knowledge to interpret local, national and global issues. I would hope that they can evaluate the social, environmental, political and economic factors to form balanced opinions and decisions when discussing such issues in informal and formal settings.


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Wilderness Times | Summer Winter 2018 2018

WILDERNESS NEPAL TRIP 2018


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The 2018 Nepal trek was a once-in-alifetime opportunity for the girls who took up the challenge of the 14-day trek in the Annapurna region. Some of the highlights of the trip included the trekking, the picturesque views that felt surreal, the hot spring, riding an elephant, interacting with the locals and building relationships with the Sherpa guides, our trek leaders and each other. We were able to experience the impact that the Wilderness community has had on both the Bhadure school and the entire community with our own eyes. At school, we frequently hear about Nepal fundraising events, yet the effect of these donations can only be fully understood by going to the school. It was humbling to see how grateful the students at the Bhadure school were to our community for providing them with

a quality education, as evident by the warm welcomes and smiles that were directed towards us. In particular, it was exciting to see that the donations from Wilderness has allowed the boarding girls to have somewhere to stay that is in close proximity to the school, rather than walking long distances to attend classes. This trip also greatly impacted our own lives, as it taught us many life lessons and gave us a new perspective on people’s lives in different countries. On the first day of trekking when it poured down with rain, it was the first of many challenges to come that we had to overcome and persist through. This taught us to persevere because we are capable of much more than we think and that the end result is worth it. We

also learnt many other lifelong skills and gained a great appreciation for our lives in Australia. We are now all so grateful for the little things in our daily life that are often overlooked, such as, being able to have hot showers, having comfortable homes, having access to technology and more. Furthermore, we became global citizens through appreciating the culture in Nepal and not being afraid to step out of our comfort zones and to be more adventurous. Lastly, we would like to thank Ms Walker, Dr Nobbs, Mr Pahl, Ms Chatterton, Ms Marousopoulos and everyone else who made this trip possible, including our parents. Reema Madike Year 11


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

MUSIC MOMENT GENERATIONS IN JAZZ The annual Generations in Jazz festival is, for many Wilderness students, a highlight of our music calendar. Taking place over three days, the weekend provides the chance for students around Australia to immerse themselves in jazz music, and to compete against one another at the highest level. This year, Wilderness received some highly encouraging and welldeserved results. Big Band 1 and 2 and our Jazz Combo 1 placed highly in their respective divisions, and Jazz Choir placed equal third in Division 1 - an incredible result and honour.

This year over 5000 students were in attendance, with bands and choirs from every state in the country, and even from overseas. Additionally, we were fortunate enough to attend performances from the best of Australian and international talent. This included American jazz legend Patti Austen, as well as the Australian jazz-fusion band The Cat Empire, to supplement the annual performances from James Morrison and students from the James Morrison Academy of Music. It is an inspiration to see the feats of musicianship that can be performed by those who have made it their life’s work, but also from the upand-coming musicians that are our peers. The festival provides ample opportunity for students who would never ordinarily interact to

watch, listen, and learn from each other, and to be inspired to pursue our best while still at school. The culture of Jazz is one that innately encourages experimentation, risktaking and enthusiastic support of our fellow musicians, all of which are invaluable in both music and our daily lives. This process would be impossible without the support, belief, and hard work of our ensemble directors and music staff. On behalf of all the student body, I extend my sincere thanks for looking after us over the weekend, and for the encouragement to be our best. Sophie Davies Year 12 SRC Music Representative


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MUSICIAN IN RESIDENCE & JAZZ AT THE GOV Our recent Musician in Residence week featured Adelaide born, New York based vocalist Jo Lawry who has made a name for herself over recent years as a backing singer for numerous international artists including Sting, Paul Simon and Peter Gabriel. In addition to touring the world with some amazing musicians, Jo is an incredible jazz vocalist and gifted songwriter in her own right. She spent time during her week at Wilderness inspiring and motivating various ensembles who rehearsed some challenging original material, that culminated in some fabulous performances at our annual Jazz At The Gov concert on May 23. The girls in the Jazz Choir and Brass Ensemble were tasked with playing in the adventurous time signature of 7/4 and, under Jo’s mentorship and guidance, performed her piece ‘Bathtub and the Sea’ effortlessly, becoming a real highlight of the evening.

The evening featured over 110 of our young musicians from years 6 - 12 who all crowded onto the stage, floor and even into parts of the audience for the final number, taken from Sting’s Symphonicities album and featuring our full Studio Orchestra with the Senior Choir. ‘Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic’ was without a doubt a wonderful way to end a fitting week of music. A big thankyou and congratulations to all girls and staff involved in the week. Anna Lenartowicz Head of Music


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

ENVIRONMENTAL WEEK THE FUTURE IS IN OUR HANDS When re-examining the Year 6 Biology Curriculum, we decided to create a learning experience with a more interdisciplinary approach based on one of the design principles of Expeditionary Learning (EL). One of the core values of EL learning is the natural world, where ‘Students learn to become stewards of the earth and of future generations.” (Hahn, 2018) How could we inspire our girls to become ‘stewards of the earth?’ As a spring board for our learning we decided to look at the wildlife unique to Australia, some of which are in dire need of our attention. “Over thirty million years of geographical isolation has created animal species unique to our continent. However, this rich biological diversity has seriously declined since European settlement. Some 29 Australian mammals have become extinct over the past 200 years. Sadly, other taxonomic groups have fared little better” (WWF, 2018). Once the girls had chosen an animal, they began using their inquiry skills, identifying, exploring and organising information and ideas. This was well supported by a LibGuide (Library Guide) built and curated by Head of Library and Information Services, Emma Phillips in conjunction with the Year 6 teachers. Through the LibGuide, girls were able to access online, hand-picked, age related resources appropriate to the topic to guide their learning and performance. To make an assessment of their thinking and learning, the girls’

performance task was based on a wellloved book called Windows, written by Jeanie Baker. Windows is a wordless picture book with the central image of a window on each page and each image shows the view outside the same window, reflecting the view of the expanding community over time. The trees and birds gradually disappear, to be replaced by houses, roads and supermarkets. “What I’m hoping is that readers will feel a responsibility, that the way each one of us lives our lives, counts,” says Jeanie Baker. The girls used their scientific understanding and creative inspiration to express their learning by creating their own windows or dioramas for us to look through. Their first creation was an annotated representation of their animal in its flourishing environment and the second, an annotated representation of their animal as it stands today. We also wanted to introduce a focus on digital technologies to bring our learning to life. This would complement our growing understanding of the importance of building skills, confidence and heightened engagement with digital technologies during the Junior School years. We know this can help to prevent reduced engagement in technology in the Middle Years. For this reason, Chris Lanthois was invited to teach the Year Six girls the basics of Adobe Illustrator, used by professionals in multiple industries. Illustrator is already used in the Senior School. Our girls quickly became confident and proficient users of the

software, which was a challenging process. After they drew their animal they had to adjust the weight and colour of all lines, to instruct the laser cutter to either cut, etch or fill. The Adobe files were then sent to Fab Lab Adelaide, a volunteer run, digital fabrication workshop, to be processed through a laser cutter. You can imagine the excitement when we returned with a collection of beautiful animals, laser cut from wood and Perspex. Eric Walters, Head of STEM at Marymount College, NYC, emphasises the importance of ‘making’ for a purpose, not just for the sake of making. “It must have a real world application” (2018). So, using our Perspex animals, we decided to create an educational and informative Environmental Trail through the school gardens on World environment Day, to raise awareness of the unique animal species in Australia and their status in the wild. Each animal was accompanied by a QR code, leading to an online document with a photo, common name, conservation status and where it is still found, unless extinct. Girls from the Junior school were given a ‘passport’ and went on a journey of discovery to find as many animals as they could. Each animal was scanned and relevant information was recorded on their passports. Year 6 girls displayed outstanding leadership skills, acting as ‘Rangers’ to guide and support the girls on their discovery. This project also involved a literacy focus using the Harvard Visible Thinking Routine, ‘Step Inside’. This thinking routine helps students to explore different perspectives and viewpoints


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as they try to imagine things, events, problems, or issues differently. “In some cases, this can lead to a more creative understanding of what is being studied.” (Project Zero 2002). We certainly found this was the case and the girls were able to skilfully transfer their creative writing skills into this routine. Girls were asked to write from the perspective of their animal’s habitat, using their scientific understanding and creative writing skills. “Step inside. I am the Eucalypt forest. I have stood on this land for what seems an eternity. I create and support life and I have endured and observed the changing seasons. The golden fall of Autumn, the biting cold of Winter, the fresh start of Spring and the scorching heat of Summer. I have seen the animals which live here on all their errands around my forest. But I believe the most amazing of all the creatures here is one that is nearly extinct. The phenomena of the Orange Bellied Parrot…..” (Jeevan Gilhotra) “Step inside, I am the sandy, loamy desert. I look around me. The land is empty, I am empty. I know that I am home to the Lesser Bilby. But I cannot see them. They are hiding, hiding from predators. There have been many visits from unwanted guests and the Lesser Bilby is having trouble surviving…..”(Isla Marton) Throughout this project, our girls were engaged and motivated to learn about the unique wildlife of Australia and develop a deeper understanding of the factors which contribute to their status in the wild. Through Library supported research, hands on creative learning and utilisation of the Harvard Thinking Routine ‘Step Inside,’ Year 6 girls were able to develop and illustrate a deep and thorough understanding of the current issues facing Australian wildlife. Heather Davis Year 6 teacher

REFERENCES Baker, J 2016, Window on a Changing World, accessed 15 June 2018, <https://www.jeanniebaker.com/focus/ window-on-a-changing-world/>.

visiblethinkingpz.org/VisibleThinking_html_files/03_ ThinkingRoutines/03g_CreativityRoutines/StepInside/ StepInside_Routine.html>.

EL 2018, Design Principles. Core values of EL Education, accessed 15 June 2018, <https://eleducation.org/ resources/design-principles>.

WWF Australia 2018, conservation of endangered Species, Ocean Ark Alliance, Australia, accessed 7 June 2018, <http://www.wwf.org.au/what-we-do/species#gs.7A7HKqI

Harvard Project Zero 2002, Step Inside: Perceive, Know about, Care about A routine for getting inside viewpoints, Visible Thinking, accessed 15 June 2018, <http://www.

Walters, E 2018, Skype interview


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

CRITICAL AND CREATIVE THINKING IN MIDDLE SCHOOL GEOGRAPHY

In support of the Geography Teachers Association of South Australia, Elise Walker and myself were given the opportunity to present a workshop on Critical and Creative Thinking in the Middle School, during their conference in May. As Year 7-12 teachers of Geography, we approached our workshop by applying a lens to ACARA’s General Capabilities and the potential they hold within our subject to promote student excellence and success. Participants were engaged in thinking routines that we frequently use with our students such as ‘Parts, Purposes and Complexities’ and ‘What’s the Story’. This assisted teachers to see an activity through the eyes of a student and identify the types of thinking involved.

The Australian Curriculum directs middle years teachers to teach them to respond to questions in a geographically distinctive way, provide students with opportunities to develop a wide range of general skills, capabilities and dispositions that can be applied in everyday life and work. Geography encourages students to become regional and global citizens capable of active and ethical participation (ACARA, 2017). At Wilderness, teaching and learning prioritises the ‘take homes’, the lessons, skills and proficiencies, that can be transferred to the girls’ lives both in the school community and once they finish school. As such, the focus of our workshop centred on inquiry based learning, the act of seeking information by questioning and investigating.

Throughout our workshop at the GTASA annual conference we stressed the importance of making geography come alive in the classroom; to promote enthusiasm and motivate students to become truly adventurous learners. By focusing on the importance of ‘doing’, we conveyed to attendees that success and excellence involves not only creativity and collaboration, but that students should also be encouraged to study geography outside the classroom. This might be an inquiry undertaken in the school grounds, just beyond the school, or further afield. Participants explored learning activities aimed at actively engaging middle school students in the Australian Curriculum for Geography through the inquiry model as well as examples of ‘hands on’ fieldwork techniques aimed at all year levels, that could be built into courses. At Wilderness, adventurous learning is epitomised through our focus on exploring issues locally, nationally and globally. In


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doing this we have built fieldwork into each Geography course from year 7 to 12, to support studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s investigation of relevant issues through the exploration of data, analysis of geographic information, and the asking of geographic questions. Students at Wilderness undertake a wide range of fieldwork from assessing the suitability of the Parklands for a shopping precinct, to assessing the liveability of newly established suburbs. Enabling Wilderness girls to be adventurous in their learning, to be inspired by their own curiosity and feel empowered to shape change were key themes we encouraged our workshop participants to focus on in their own classrooms. Through inquiry based learning we shared the benefits our students have gained by investigating geographical information and thinking deeply about questions that do not have straightforward answers. Geography

at Wilderness stimulates students to be curious and imaginative in investigations and fieldwork. Moreover, we encourage them to think creatively about the places and spaces they use, as well as probable and preferable futures. Elise Walker & April Bickley Teachers of Geography


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

LANGUAGES WEEK In Week 6 we celebrated our inaugural ‘Languages Week’ with an assembly, a series of foreign language movies, TV show viewings and a ‘Wildy Around the World’ wall. A highlight for many was the Languages Assembly which included a number of stories showcasing how old scholars use or have used languages in their daily lives. We were inspired by those old scholars who regularly show Adventurous Learning by communicating with others and conducting business in a language other than their mother tongue. We heard from current students who have been to China and France on school tours and exchanges and how those experiences have positively impacted their love of the language and influenced them to continue to learn. One message was clear: for many it was about following their passion, one which was often ignited at school. Here are summaries of some of their stories:

HILARY MITCHELL Hilary studied French and Spanish at university and then worked in the fashion industry in Spain for 12 years, including time with French designer, Christian Lacroix. Now she works in the wine industry in the Clare Valley and has vintages in Spain and France. “I would highly encourage students to take up languages as it allows many career options as well as a wider perspective and understanding of other cultures.”

NHAN NGUYEN Nhan studied French until Year 10 and completed Year 12 Chinese, also spending some time in Beijing on an AFS/ACC scholarship when she was 16 in the Summer of 1998. She moved to Paris at 30 where she was only meant to spend a year on a working holiday maker visa however ended up spending 5 years as she met her husband there. During this time, she would speak French to her husband and operate in French on a daily basis, working in English and French, including teaching English at Sorbonne Universities. On the weekends, she would communicate with her parents in Vietnamese through Skype and with Parisian relatives in Chinese.


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KATIE PORTER Katie graduated in 2001 with Chinese as one of her Year 12 subjects. In Year 10, she took part in the China tour and it was on that trip that her fascination for China and its language truly blossomed. Katie saw the language as just one element of greater cultural opportunities. While at the University of Adelaide she went on a six-month language exchange to Beijing and remembers that one day, all of a sudden, she was sitting in class and remembered listening and actually understanding what the teacher was saying! That absolutely amazing day turned the six months into a year. Katie’s career started at the Australian Embassy in Beijing in the Department of Immigration and Citizenship where she used Chinese daily, including working in covert operations. She was Lenovo’s chief concierge taking care of 1200 VIPs at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, and in 2010 she worked at World Expo in Shanghai managing the protocol department. It was here that Katie’s language really excelled, and she was asked to be the voice of the pavilion making announcements in both English and Chinese. In Australia Katie has worked with Dairy Australia and Food South Australia. Both roles involved her using her Chinese language skills and connections to develop links between China and Australia in the food industry. “It was a significant commitment to learning Chinese, but this has shaped the last 15 years of my life and I absolutely loved my time in China. Beijing feels like my second home.”

SUSAN CADBY Susan married an Italian and has been living in Florence for the past 40 years. Already fluent in Spanish, having lived in Spain, she learnt Italian in about 3 months. Initially teaching English, Susan then branched into translating with some interpreting. Currently she’s self-employed and works from home, just outside the historic centre of Florence.

LILLI CAVILL Lilli lived in Switzerland and France during 2017 in order to learn French to assist with her career in the wine industry. She talked about the challenges she faced conversing in French, wishing that she had continued with her French studies after Year 10. “I remember being asked by some friends not ‘do you speak another language,’ but ‘what languages do you speak?”’

Susan reflects that “it’s a pretty fulltime job as there is so much demand for English in Europe. I translate from Italian, French and Spanish into English. It’s a job I love and I work through translation agencies plus I have a pool of private clients, translating anything and everything. I do a lot of pharmaceutical and medical translations (fields where I am most specialised) but also technical and literary.”

A passionate advocate for learning another language, Lilli says “I urge you to keep your options open. I know I will use French again.” We thank Lilli for taking the time to speak to the Middle and Senior School about the impact and opportunities learning a second language has given her. “It’s a big world out there. I really encourage you to go and explore it, but go that extra bit deeper and learn that second language and the opportunities are endless.” Stephanie Andrews Head of Languages & Elisa Savio Teacher of French


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FOUNDERS’ DAY 2018 I like to think of our school as a big, strong, old and beautiful tree. A tree with branches that have formed over the years and with leaves that grow and then fly away at the end of every season. Just like a tree passes nutrition and gives support to its leaves to grow every year, our School instils the girls with its values: passion, courage, a sense of adventure and citizenship, and above all, kindness and care for one another. These qualities do not come by simply by chance. Much of this Wilderness spirit can be attributed to the wonderful Brown Family who founded our School all the way back in 1884. What came to mind when old scholars were asked to describe the five Brown sisters include “books, sunshine, dogs, flowers, friends,” and “behind and sustaining all these were gaiety, courage, intellectual adventure and unlimited kindness.” Our School, now a large tree which has over 800 pupils, began as a small seedling: a humble home-school, where eldest Brown sister Margaret taught the rest of her family from their home on Mann Terrace, North Adelaide. Through the school’s evolution, we have grown

our own branches of a school name, a uniform, the five houses, the motto ‘Always True’, the school song, the new buildings, and the new teachers and principals. But despite our growth and success, our roots have remained the same – we are still kind, true and courageous, adventurous learners and responsible citizens, of which the Brown sisters would be proud.

Next, we got to meet one of the many Wilderness Old Scholars that have helped shape our modern history: Mignon ‘Minnie’ Bowen (née Holden, class of 1945) who spoke to us about her experiences during her time at Wilderness. It was absolutely wonderful hearing about Wilderness life back then and how it is different to what we experience now.

To honour our tree’s roots, the girls from Reception to Year 12 gathered on Friday 18th May for the annual Founders’ Day Assembly. The service began with a roll call to recognise the many visiting Old Scholars, who generously took time out of their schedules to be present.

After listening to an enchanting performance from the Wilderness Jazz Choir, the assembly concluded with a heartfelt rendition of the School Song.

Following this, the Junior, Middle and Senior SRC executive girls described the school’s history, exploring how many aspects of our school have changed through time. A highlight was undoubtedly the display of a selection of Wilderness uniforms ranging from the 1950s through to 1999 – which current Wilderness students proudly modelled.

Danae Mavrakis 2018 SRC President


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“A world outlook? Is it possible? Girls, you are growing up in a big world. Grow big and generous ideas.” Miss Margaret Brown, 1933

Celebrating our Founders, the Brown family, is an historic and highly anticipated event in the Wilderness calendar. It is an opportunity for the School Community to recognise the vision, passion, commitment and respect to education of Mary and her daughters Margaret, Kate, Annie, Wynnie and Mamie Brown. Established in 1884, Wilderness School was originally named The Medindie School & Kindergarten or most commonly known as Mrs Brown’s School. Wilderness was adopted in 1918. Our motto and lion crest ‘Semper Verus’ (Always True) was developed by one of the Brown family brothers, Harry. Our celebrations in 2018 included an Assembly hosted by the SRC Executive and included a parade of many of the Wilderness School uniforms from days gone by and a stunning performance by our award-winning Jazz Choir. Our guest speaker was old scholar Mignon (Mini) Bowen (Holden) who finished her schooling at Wilderness

in 1945. Mini was introduced by her grand-daughters and current students Emma and Zoe Hood. She shared some wonderful and entertaining memories of her days at School with the Brown sisters. Mini is still a Spracky girl through and through and is always cheering on her grand-daughters at Swimming and Sports Day. We thoroughly enjoyed listening to Mini’s fond memories and instilled in all of us that our School values continue to be ‘who we are’. A roll call was announced by Head of Senior School, Ben Manifold for the 28 old scholars (classes of 1960 and prior) who were special guests at our Assembly followed by a memorable Morning Tea in the Old Scholars’ Association Archive Gallery. A simply wonderful celebration for all things Wilderness and to reminisce about days gone by. Jodie Escott Head of Advancement


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

SOPHIE DAVIES HEADS TO NIDA Sophie Davies (Year 12) was the first recipient of the recently launched Roger Masters Drama Fellowship which was made possible by the incredible generosity of an anonymous Old Scholar. This is an amazing opportunity for a current Year 11 or 12 student studying Drama to undertake a short course or program in a drama related area. This is Sophie’s journey 2018.

I was greatly honoured to be the inaugural recipient of the Roger Masters Fellowship earlier this year. To have my passion and enthusiasm for Drama recognised with such an exciting opportunity was beyond anything I had hoped for during my time at school. The generous donation by the anonymous old scholar allowed me to travel to the National Institute of Dramatic Arts (NIDA) in Sydney, one of the pre-eminent tertiary institutes for studying theatre and film production in Australia. NIDA offers several holiday courses across their campuses in Sydney for young people of all ages, and for my course I spent a week at their main facility in Kensington. While learning in the “Screen Actors Society”, I got my first taste of screen acting under the direction of a professional NIDA tutor with ten other actors in years eleven and twelve. Having had wonderful experiences with stage acting in my drama classes at school, I took this course as a chance to broaden my acting experience and skillset.


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The coursework itself explored fundamental acting principles and those specific to screen acting, such as intention and obstacles, beat changes, how to analyse a scene and the essential processes to gain a faster and deeper understanding of a script. We began by each performing the same monologue to a camera, and then moved on to doing some partnered work from a variety of well-known scripts for seniorschool-aged characters. From the onset, we watched back our work as a group and received feedback, and learnt from each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s successes as well as our bad acting habits and mistakes. Living alone in a small unit in Sydney for a week was a plunge into the deep end for me in terms of independence, and added another dimension entirely to the learning experience provided by the fellowship. The experience of living a working week as an actor-in-training on the NIDA campus was, overall, a dream come true.

Acting, as a discipline, can be quite inherently vulnerable â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the ability to connect with characters and situations beyond your own experience requires the application of empathy and a personal honesty. At school, my experimentation in acting has taken place among a familiar cohort of girls and under the guidance of teachers who I know and trust, and in genres of stage acting that lend themselves to larger-than-life roles. It was daunting to move from these familiar situations into the quiet comradeship of screen acting, accompanied by strangers. I was pleasantly relieved, and then overjoyed, to discover that my classmates for the week were a group of vibrant, creative and lovely people, and all in the same boat. The small class size and the wonderful environment created by our tutor meant that we became quickly at ease, and every one of us felt a great sense of belonging despite being vastly different people. The common goal of pursuing an improvement in our acting united us â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from some who had never acted before to one

girl who had attended a specialty performing arts school. It is almost never comfortable to watch back your work on screen, especially while surrounded by others, but we found in each other a shared respect that made it not only tolerable but fun to share our progress. I would implore any passionate, forthcoming drama student to apply for the Roger Masters Fellowship, and to use it as an opportunity to climb well and truly outside your comfort zone. For me, this has been a true confirmation that the further we reach and the more we risk with our creativity and our adventurous learning, the more we have to gain. Sophie Davies Year 12


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INTRODUCING MEMBERS OF OUR GOVERNING COUNCIL: BILL WATERHOUSE Bill Waterhouse is the Managing Director of Herron Todd White, a property valuation firm in South Australia. He is also a former Board Member of Barkuma, a Not-for-Profit disability employment enterprise. An enthusiastic sportsman, fisherman and self-confessed ‘ordinary’ golfer, Bill is also a father of three children. His youngest, Eliza, will graduate from Wilderness at the end of 2018. Bill Waterhouse was initially appointed to the Sites and Services Committee in May 2014, before being appointed to Council in September 2016.

What endeared you to Wilderness School? Our Daughter Eliza set her sights on Wildy and was determined to be a Wildy Girl. We also knew many current and past parents at the time and we were familiar with the excellent culture at the school. What virtue do you admire most in people? I admire people who are determined. I think honest people who can set their sights on a goal and give it a red hot go, overcoming obstacles along the way, while maintaining a sense of humor should be admired. I can think of a few leaders at Wilderness who possess those characteristics. If you could have dinner with two famous people, who would you choose and why? I think scientists Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein. Hawking’s major work on the nature of the universe and time continued the work of Einstein. They were two very intelligent, determined people and both had a sense of humor.

What is one piece of advice you would give to our girls? Be kind, determined and always maintain a sense of self-worth. If you had to start from scratch, knowing what you know now, what would you do differently? Many people of my generation rushed into working life not really knowing what we wanted to do or what we might be best suited to. Things still worked out well, but if I started from scratch I would take time to learn more about myself before setting a path forward in life. What’s the most important business or other discovery you’ve made in your career? An important business discovery was that I actually had the ability to start a business and make it work! That still amazes me! What is on your bucket list? I don’t have a bucket list! That might lead to regrets and I’m determined to keep them to a minimum. I will however visit my Daughters exchange family in South Africa and do a Safari.


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

GREEN DOOR SOCIETY BEQUEST SKINNER SISTERS During 2016, the Executor of the Skinner Estate advised that the Wilderness School Foundation were beneficiaries. This Green Door Society bequest was made up of a donation of $100,000 plus the residuary of their Estate. Late last year, the Foundation had received a total of $519,000. To receive this significant amount of money towards capital works, scholarships and the future of Wilderness is heartfelt.

With advice from our Investment Committee, $180,000 has been invested into the Scholarship Fund which is dedicated to the perpetual Brown Sisters’ Memorial Entrance Scholarship. The remaining philanthropic gift has also been invested. We will ensure these monies create a forever legacy to the Skinner sisters in the near future and share how this will be created.

ABOVE LEFT 1929 Joan with Brown family dogs ‘Bonnie’ & ‘Pup’ ABOVE RIGHT 1928 Kathleen back row 3rd from left

Genevieve Monk is an old scholar, former teacher and was the Old Scholars’ Liaison officer at Wilderness School for many years. She recently shared some of her memories of her time spent with Kathleen and Joan Skinner.


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I first met Kathleen and Joan Skinner in May, 2002. They lived in a beautiful old home in Hawthorn. This house had been the residence of their family for many years. They lived with their father, mother and older brother Hickson, who was killed in the First World War in 1917. After the deaths of both parents, the ‘girls’ continued to live in the family home. These two ladies had attended The Wilderness (as it was known then) for their senior schooling and were very proud of being Old Scholars. They used to travel to interesting places and loved talking about these trips. Unfortunately Joan was profoundly deaf and Kathleen was beginning to lose her hearing too. On my first visit, they put me on a chair between them, so I had to swivel my head to face each of them as they talked to me. By the time I left, my neck was quite sore, so on my second visit, I made sure I sat facing both of them at the same time! They went to the most interesting places and on my third visit, they had just returned from Mongolia and North Korea! I asked them why they had chosen to go to these countries and it served me right, as their reply was “because we hadn’t been there

before, dear”! Then Kathleen said “After all, dear, what else is there for us to spend our money on?” This led to some further discussions around the potential for the Skinner Sisters to be benefactors to Wilderness School. They thought this was an excellent idea. The late Richard Gardner helped the sisters facilitate the process and he was the perfect person for this, treating them with kindness and politeness as I knew he would. I had many enjoyable visits with Kathleen and Joan. They were delightful and excellent hostesses and I didn’t need to eat dinner on the nights of my visits. Genevieve Monk

Underpinning many opportunities at Wilderness are generously made bequests. From strengthening educational programs to improving facilities, broadening scholarship offerings to attracting specialist staff, bequests contribute greatly to our School and its culture. If you wish to include Wilderness School in your will and join our Green Door Society, please contact Jodie Escott, Head of Advancement on 08 8343 1088 or jescott@wilderness.com.au for a confidential conversation.


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

WELCOME JEN GUEST NEWLY APPOINTED PRESIDENT OF THE P&F As an inquisitive young girl, Jen would always try and peer over the brush fence on Northcote Terrace, keen to catch a glimpse of what lay beyond. Fast forward a few years and it soon became the obvious choice when selecting a school for her daughters, Phoenix and Saskia. Wilderness had the academic reputation, philosophies and community minded culture she was looking for.

“I was looking for a school that shared and upheld similar values to my own given children spend as much time, if not more, in the care of their school as they do their parents. “The all-encompassing culture of a non-denominational school greatly appealed to me, as did the outstanding academic reputation and the extraordinary grounds and facilities that were on offer. “What was also very important was the commitment and clear motivation of all staff who strongly support and guide the girls in being the best they can be personally and professionally. I want my daughters to be adventurous learners and responsible risk takers.” Since the beginning, Jen has immersed herself in every aspect of school life. Currently, she is serving as the President of the Parents and Friends

Committee, Chair of the Foundation Events Committee, Member of the Governing Council, Representative on the Foundation Board and a member of the Wilderness Rowing Committee as the conditioning coach. With the precious time she has left over, Jen runs her own private allied health business! However, she concedes her primary and most important role is being a mother to Saskia (Year 2) and Phoenix (Year 8). Jen describes her eldest daughter Phoenix, who started her Wilderness journey in the Annie house, as a quiet achiever.

“Nix studied classical ballet and other dance genres for 8 years when she discovered rowing through school. I observed an interesting change in my daughter in that she demonstrated a strong desire to support her ‘team’ over continuing a ‘solo’ activity external to the school. “ “Phoenix is very proud to be a Wildy girl and I am pleased she understands how lucky she is to be a student here. “Saskia, my littlest, was born into Wilderness. She has just started playing Lacrosse and is very keen to be able to represent her school in future years.”

Impressively, both sisters have also assumed the role of caretakers of the Brown Family Grave Site, located at North Road Cemetery, since 2017. Jen is a selfless individual and generously gives of her time whenever she can to help at Wilderness events and gatherings. Her mantra in life is to always work hard to extend your boundaries, follow your gut and only pursue what truly makes you happy. Finally, we asked Jen what was the most important discovery she has made in her personal and professional life and what advice she has for our girls. “Everything you do, everything you learn, everything you experience from the early years, through adolescence and young adult life is important. “Place everything in your tool kit and I promise you, you will call on it at some point. As I get older, I realise how important every little thing was and is. “Choose where you want to be, create a plan to reach that place, always collaborate your personal loves, believe in your own ability. Don’t allow little setbacks stop you – use setbacks to build on your experience. You will reach your goals!”


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SONY CHILDREN’S SUMMER CAMP From 30 September to 2 October 2018, Wilderness School students will join forces with St Peter’s College to host a Sony Foundation Camp for children with special needs. This exciting venture will take place over three days in the Boarding House at St Peter’s College. The purpose of the camp is to provide an enjoyable and memorable experience for the children and to give their parents, carers and siblings two full nights and days of respite. We are keen to hear from families who would like to be involved and have children aged between 8 and 14 years’ old with special needs. Our Year 11 students will be companions for the children for the duration of the camp and will get to experience the joys and challenges that come with the privilege of caring for a child with special needs. The students will be supported by a team of teaching and medical staff as well as a support crew made up of Year 10 students. This venture provides an opportunity to not only experience incredible personal growth but to contribute to a common goal. At the same time, much fun is had by all as a range of engaging and enjoyable activities have been planned. The Sony Foundation Children’s Holiday Camps are a wonderful initiative that began in 1999 and has grown significantly to around 30 camps Australia wide each year. We would love to hear from anyone who knows a child between 8 and 14 years who has special needs and would like to be a participant in this years’ camp. Please contact Bess Smith (Head of Extended Curriculum) at esmith@wilderness.com.au


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

WILDY INTERGENERATIONAL FAMILIES O’GRADY FAMILY Shirley O’Grady (Barker)

1937-1947

Kathleen Craven (Lucas) Natalie McBryde (Lucas) Isabel Barker (Lucas) Cedric Lucas

1895-1906 (Aunt) 1900-1912 (Aunt) 1904-1915 (Mother of Shirley) Attended the kindergarten (Uncle)

Susan Damin (O’Grady) 1974-1981 (Daughter of Shirley) Sarah Damin 2010-2017 (Grand Daughter of Shirley)

The memory of the Brown Sisters has stayed with me forever. • Margaret – who had retired but seemed to be an ever present force behind the green door. • Wynnie – was pretty, sweet natured and the outgoing sister and with whom some fathers genteelly flirted. • Annie – brisk, efficient and slightly scary but always so kind if you were ill or injured. • Mamie – my favorite. Clever and organised, who knew her pupils by name and nature, An inspirational teacher of mathematics and good behaviour. She encouraged me to aim for University.

A A Isabel Barron Lucas aged 25 B Shirley O’Grady, Sarah Damin and Susan Damin

The calibre, kindness and caring of the teachers stands out in my memory. Encouragement to be the best you can be. To be a good and loyal friend to be kind and helpful to others to share your possessions and ideas to be well mannered at all times to face new situations and problems with courage and due consideration to be lateral thinking to be “Semper Verus” to be proud to be a “Wildy girl”

I have listed Encouragement earlier – it was so helpful and inspiring. However the example of the sisters; hard working, caring of the girls in mind and body, running a school with all its attendant problems and being innovative leaders in schooling was outstanding. They didn’t need to be suffragettes; they just got on with life in a man’s world and made a success of it! I have tried to emulate them. The other major factor was my friends, who have supported me for years and were always there if needed and always a joy to see. Shirley O’Grady (Barker)

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TAYLOR FAMILY Anthea Wood (Codling) Jim Taylor Annie Merrill (Taylor) Alice Brown Airlie Brown Arabella Brown

During Anthea’s years at Wilderness School, she collected many memories of fun, laughter, sport and the occasional moment or two in the naughty spot, which was located in a blue circle near the receptions. Wilderness always had such a supportive athletic community, from Sports Day at Prospect Oval, the first match in Devonshire St with the new softball team, or athletics on the now paved ‘running track.’ The school spirit was incredibly rich and proud, both on

RIGHT Airlie Brown, Alice Brown, Anthea Wood, Annie Merrill and Arabella Brown

Amaryllis 1949-1954 1940-1942 (Husband) Amaryllis 1978-1982 (Daughter) Amaryllis 2007-2014 (Grand Daughter) Amaryllis currently in year 11 (Grand Daughter) Amaryllis currently in year 11 (Grand Daughter)

and off the field. To be able to re-live this and cheering on my grandchildren during sport reinforces the everlasting spirit and brings back precious memories. The broad subjects and extra-curricular activities Wilderness offered and has expanded on since my schooling, taught

me to be a diverse and open-minded individual. I can see this reflected in my daughter and granddaughters, whom pose many admirable, different, and unique interests, hobbies, and attributes.


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WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls? Follow your passion and do what you love. Don’t feel like you have to do something because that’s what other people are doing, do it because you love it. This is your life so it’s your chance to make the most of it.

ELLA ADAMS (2016) CHAMPION GOLFER

What ignited your passion and describe your life journey and career? I have always been around golf and I couldn’t see myself not playing the game. When I moved to Australia at the age of 9 I started to get more into golf. I started to go to junior clinics and play tournaments. I was never forced to play, I chose to and my parents encouraged me to do what I love. After seeing continuous improvements I was eager to keep going and see how good I could get. Ever since then I have loved the feeling improving and playing good shots that even through the tough times I am able to see the bigger picture and stick to it.

What have been some key defining moments? One key defining moment was representing South Australia for the first time when I was 12. This was my first time travelling as a team and wearing the Golf South Australia clothes. I really enjoyed this, and being able to play with other Australian golfers. This inspired me to improve and get selected for more tournaments. Another key defining moment was travelling overseas for my first international tournament. I was chosen to represent Australia in San Diego, California when I was 16. It was amazing to play with elite international players and experience what it’s like to play overseas.


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What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls? Don’t put limitations on yourself and what you can do – reach for the stars, even if you think it’s unachievable. If there’s one thing that Wilderness has taught me, it’s to aim high, strive for success (whatever that may be – everyone defines success differently), and be the best version of yourself. Also, find your passion and make that passion your career – if you have a passion for something, you will naturally excel at it. Ask for opportunities, and take advantage of every opportunity that comes your

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SARAH IASIELLO (2005) CHIEF SUBEDITOR COSMOPOLITAN MAGAZINE AUSTRALIA

What ignited your passion and describe your life journey with your new role at Cosmopolitan? Like many people, after completing my university studies, I didn’t know what my career trajectory looked like. Since I was a child I wanted to work in the magazine industry, as I had a passion for writing and editing, as well as fashion and beauty. However, I had no idea how I would break into such a highly competitive industry. In 2016, when I was 28, I felt I was mature enough to make the move. I sent out a few emails to big magazines in Sydney about interning. I did a four-week internship at NW (New Weekly) magazine, at the end of which I was asked to come back and cover someone’s role for three weeks. At the end of the three-week stint, I was offered the position of copy editor at NW in December 2016. After nine months at NW, I was put in charge of the copy editing team. Then, in December 2017, a job was

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way – even if it doesn’t work out, you’re still one step closer to figuring out what you do want to do in life. Last but not least, be prepared to work hard and to start at the bottom – this is when you learn the most about yourself. Surround yourself with people who will inspire and motivate you; and always give 100 per cent.

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Wilderness School is proud to be able to celebrate the successes of all our past and present students and the many outstanding achievements of our Wildy women. Leading the Way offers you an insight into some of our amazing old scholars’ lives, beyond the Wilderness School gates.

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advertised for a chief copy editor at Cosmopolitan magazine. I jumped at the opportunity as it was my dream job, and I’ve been happily working there ever since. What have been some key defining moments? Having my very first article published under my own name. It was the start of my career and building my portfolio. It was the first time where I could really see that my dreams were beginning to materialise and come to life. Also, when I landed the job at Cosmopolitan. I grew up reading Cosmo, so to be a part of its journey and success is incredible. Sometimes, I still have to pinch myself as it’s all happened so quickly!


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LAUREN PUVI (2006) FOUNDER & DIRECTOR ÖÖSEL

What ignited your passion and describe your life journey and career? I was always interested in various areas of design from an early age. After completing my Fashion studies, I moved to Sydney to work for SARAH & SEBASTIAN jewellery. Working for a start up was a great experience as I was required to work across many aspects of the business. I gained a lot of important knowledge I have needed in starting my own business.

What was your motivation? I have always wanted to start my own business. Building something of my own from the ground up and being able to express my self creatively through my work appealed to me. I have always had a love for beautiful things and pyjamas were no exception! It was this, along with identifying a gap in the market that drove me to begin my sleepwear brand.

What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls? Create your own path and try not to compare yourself to others. Someone else’s success does not equal your failure. What have been some key defining moments? Moving interstate was really great for me, personally and professionally. Although it was daunting at the time, it is the greatest decision I could have made and moving back to Adelaide in August last year. It was the perfect time and perfect place to start my business.

FIONA MCCALLUM (1987) AUTHOR

“Making Peace” was recently released and is Fiona’s 10th novel in seven years – an amazing feat and incredible read. “Making Peace” is an uplifting story of new and old friendships, letting go of the past and looking to the future.


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TORY TOOGOOD (1990) WOMEN’S, MEN’S AND PELVIC HEALTH PHYSIOTHERAPIST 2018 COMMONWEALTH GAMES PHYSIOTHERAPIST

What ignited your passion and describe your life journey thus far? I have always been a problem solver, so physio is a great career fit for someone who is interested in the body, loves to help people and especially to help them to help themselves, and loves to nut out problems. Sport and being active has been a feature though most of my life, although I was a late bloomer at school. I was the girl who tried but didn’t get much success until a few years after I started rowing, which was a brand new sport to Wildy then. I raced in the first Head of the River that Wildy competed in, in 1987 (we finished last), but we all developed year on year. I love that we can continue to develop and improve throughout our lives. After rowing at school and then on the State and National rowing teams for six years, I went back after 15 and 20 years to surf boat row, and started marathon running in the meantime. I have run marathons on 6 of the 7 continents over the last 6 years. South America is the only one still to go! In between my various physical goals, I have studied, worked, established businesses, worked for myself, employed staff, contracted to specialist rooms and university, married, had children, divorced, remarried and continue to be busy parenting 3 teenagers. It’s always a juggle, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. There are challenges in each aspect of my life, I don’t think anything is ever easy, but continuing to make the best of a situation is part of the reward.

What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls? Say “yes” to opportunities. I consider myself a bit of an accidental World Champion and Olympian as I didn’t dream of that for years as so many kids seem to. I just kept on turning up, doing the work, striving to improve, and took a deep breathe when the self doubt or nerves loomed large. Having other people supporting you, even by just expecting that “you can do it” can help enormously in creating enough self belief to give something new a go. Role models and mentors are useful here as well - knowing that someone else has already succeeded makes my success less unlikely. Offering your services and being willing to help out or try something new allows you more chances to find your passions, and to find what you love. Most of my most defining moments have come about by volunteering my time or experience to others - even employment opportunities have come from connections made when fundraising or other volunteering.

What have been some key defining moments? Key moments have included exceeding everyones expectations (including our own) when my pair partner, Alison Davies, and I won a Silver medal at the World Rowing Championships in 1993 in the Czech Republic. Before that, I think it was just squeaking in to the First IV+ at school in 1988 - the belief that my coach, Denise Collins had in me. I think the day I was offered my first physio job, at the RAH, as a New Graduate was pretty defining. There were only 5 positions, and almost the entire cohort applied (80). I did not have an excellent Academic Transcript - there was a non graded pass for one subject and too many “P’s” in some of the early subjects, that I had completed while rowing on the National Team. I took 8 years to complete my 4 year degree, amassing life experiences, living and working away from home, doing all sorts of odd jobs and casual work as the travel required of my sport made usual jobs (and full-time study) impossible. But I had done very well in my clinical subjects, and I had worked in some capacity since I was 12 and did a Messenger newspaper round. It is something that really stuck with me, so now, as an employer, I always look to what potential staff have done outside of their degree. What other experience do they have, what else makes them tick, what are they passionate about? Life is far more than just the good grades- it is about the experience you make of it and it applies to girls at Wilderness today as much as it applied during my rowing and university days.


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Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS

WOSA REPORT This year the Old Scholars Association has gained another 81 old scholar members and we were privileged to have 2 tables of the class of 2017 join us at this year’s Quiz night. The WOSA Quiz Night is our largest fund raising event on our calendar. Held in May this year, it was another outstanding success raising over $17,000. Thank you to all Committee Members for your commitment. The transformed Gym was reflective of a Gala event and we thank the teams from the Development Office, Hive and Maintenance, without their vision to transform the gym into an event space, the evening would have certainly lacked the beautiful ambiance they created. We are grateful for the immense support from our school community, all families, friends and sponsors for their generous contribution of donated items for the Casual Day. These items make up the silent auction as well as donations to the main auction.

The key auction items this year included: • Family Photograph Session by Simone Hacknell Photograph • Disney on Ice donated by Optus • Nordburger for a year donated by Sondra Deering • VIP passes to Shania Twain thanks to Space Events • Mixed Dozen of Premium Wines donated by Wildy Families • Home Sales Service donated by Fox Real Estate. Once again, we were fortunate enough to have the extraordinary talent and voice of Scott McBain as Master of Ceremonies, with an improved format and question structure, making for and entertaining evening. The main auction was conducted by Will Fetridge, from Klemich Real Estate and he ensured that we captured every bid for our worthy cause. No bid escaped the talented Auctioneer. Thanks once again to the Wildy Community for making this year’s Quiz night a great success.

Our next major event is the Annual Dinner, being held on Friday 10th August at the Maid and Magpie Hotel, followed in November by the pre-1964 Old Scholars lunch. Please refer to the Old Scholars Facebook Page for details. Georgie Taarnby (1985) President Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association


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UPCOMING OLD SCHOLAR EVENTS WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS' 2018 ANNUAL DINNER

UNITED KINGDOM REUNION Sunday 15 July No.32, Clapham Common Contact: Booie Hayward bhayward@wilderness.com.au WOSA ANNUAL DINNER Friday 10 August The Maid Contact: oldscholars@wilderness.com.au All Welcome OLD BOYS’ COCKTAIL PARTY Thursday 30 August 5:30 - 7:00pm Browns’ House Foyer & Archive Gallery Contact: Jodie Escott jescott@wilderness.com.au 1961-1970 MORNING TEA Tuesday 18 September 10:30am Old Scholars’ Association Archive Gallery Contact: Jodie Escott jescott@wilderness.com.au

2018 Old Scholars’ Golf Day Monday 12 November, 2018 8:00am for 8:30am Royal Adelaide Golf Club Bookings and Enquiries to Vicki Thwaites E: vickt@tpg.com.au | M: 0438 355 673 *More info coming soon

WOSA GOLF DAY Monday 12 November Royal Adelaide Golf Club Contact: Vicki Thwaites vickt@tpg.com.au WOSA OLD SCHOLARS’ LUNCH Tuesday 20 November 12:00 noon Newman Thearte Contact: Jodie Escott jescott@wilderness.com.au


Wilderness Times | Winter 2018

WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS REUNIONS 1988 REUNION On June the 2, we saw 33 ladies from the class of 88 ventured through the school gates again for a tour of the school.. Many hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been back for a long time and were very impressed with the new developments. Thank you to Jodie Escott for the extensive tour of the school. We then boarded a bus to Hugh Hamilton Winery at McLaren Vale, which was kindly hosted by Mary Hamilton who was in our year.

We then boarded the bus and were dropped at the Queens Head hotel where the catch-ups continued late into the evening. It was a marathon session but lots of fun. Milestone reunions donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come around that often! Sophie Gosse (McCurdie 88)

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A Class of 1988 Group Photo B Natasha Hogan ( Macdonald) Martha Hill (Young) Josie Lahey, Marni Ayers C Mary Hamilton, Rebecca Embury, Claudia Gaston, Rachel Erbe (Gristwood) D Rachel Hampshire (Fllewellyn ) Fiona Marr (Hall), Tash Ronald (McEntee) Charlotte Middleton (Hogan) E Sarah Myall,(Adams) Cathy Dix,(Stock) Libby Jacka (Thomas) ,Julia Clarke (Gebhardt) Jane Wells

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We arrived at the stunning Hugh Hamilton Winery. The sun was shining and we enjoyed drinks on the verandah followed by a 3-course meal, which included funny slides from our school days and plenty of beautiful wines!

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An enthusiastic group of OS attended the dinner. We all had a lovely relaxed catch up. The Canberra Girls are keen to catch up each year and have started brainstorming a venue for 2019. If there is anyone in the ACT studying, or at The Australian Defence Force Academy (Duntroon) , we would love

to know so we can send invitations to you for next year’s dinner .

ABOVE From left to right: Mary Napier (Ogilvy), Lesley Bills, Dinah Morrison (Gordon), Jenypher Russell (Nagel), Tara Russell, Jane Wells and Amanda Lynch

Looking forward to seeing you all again in 2019 Booie Hayward OS Liaison Officer

QUEENSLAND REUNION A fun and entertaining group met on Saturday 30 June for the Queensland Reunion held at The Morrison Hotel in Brisbane. Their host, Jodie Escott arrived fashionably late after a cancelled 6am flight and then further delays into Brisbane due to low cloud. All was not lost, and a terrific lunch was enjoyed with superb food, wine and fascinating conversation. Thank you to all of our guests for bringing this great afternoon to life. Jodie Escott Head of Advancement

ABOVE From left to right: Annabel Flynn (Biven), Russell Byrnes, Nicole Le Maistre, Penelope Megginson, Susan Cottrell (Brook), Henk Van Roy, Anne Freeman, Diana Nobbs (Jose), Carissa Blaschek, Georgina Smibert, Baby Freddy

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WILDY NEWS

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& C 1968 REUNION EBR E L Weekend of 15 - 16 September final date Venue: TBA Contact: Di Semmler E: admin@agrisemm.com

BIRTHS Kimberley Dohnt (Huis In’t Veld) (2007) – Henry Christian Dohnt Laura Davidson (White) (1997) – Angus John Davidson Annabel Denton (Sawers) (1999) – Charles (Charlie) Denton

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MARRIAGES Brooke Locke (2009) married Luke Hoogsteyns Ebony Cavallaro (2001) married Jason Hirt

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1978 REUNION Saturday 17 November | Dinner Red House, North Adelaide Contact: Jacki Smith E: designaname@bigpond.com

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2008 REUNION Saturday 8 September Contact: Kirsty Michael E: kirsty_michael91@hotmail.com OR Contact: Phoebe Waters E: phoebe.waters135@gmail.com

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1998 REUNION Saturday 15 September | Dinner The Kentish Hotel Contact: Edwina Hicks E: edwinaporter@hotmail.com

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A Brooke Locke (2009) married Luke Hoogsteyns B Ebony Cavallaro (2001) married Jason Hirt

IF YOU ARE AN OLD SCHOLAR WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU AND SHARE YOUR MILESTONES AND CELEBRATE YOUR SUCCESS. Please email your news and a photo to: oldscholars@wilderness.com.au


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30 Hawkers Road, Medindie SA 5081 Phone + 61 8 8344 6688 www.wilderness.com.au CRICOS Provider Code: 00375B

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