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WINTER 2017

ISSUE #77


Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

UPCOMING EVENTS

CONTENTS 3

Principal’s Thoughts

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Green Door Society

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Welcome to Chair of Council Shanti Berggren

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Mary-Ann Matthews Scholarship

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Playing to Learn Rebecca Williamson

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Wildy Women Leading the Way

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Gender Equity Ben Manifold Reshma Berggren

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Old Scholars Reunions

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Women in Politics Neve Curtis

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SPARC - Igniting Girls

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Faculty in Focus Performing Arts

Tuesday 29 August Junior Art Show Thursday 31 August Old Boys’ Cocktail Event Tuesday 12 September 1957 - 1963 Old Scholars Friday 20 October Southern Fleurieu Dinner Friday 27 October Valedictory Dinner Tuesday 31 October Year 12 Visual Art Exhibition Friday 3 November Junior School Sports Day

19 Wilderness Mathematics on the World Stage Rhiannon Giles 21 Founders’ Day An Open Letter to the Wilderness Community Wilderness in Nepal Sophie Nery

Wilderness School has a number of social media platforms to connect with our community and discover the latest news. www.facebook.com/WildernessSchool www.linkedin.com/company/wilderness-school twitter.com/wilderness1884

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Join the Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association page on Facebook. This page is set up for Old Scholars to communicate, network and hear about upcoming alumnae events. Once you are a member you can then share with other Old Scholars in your Facebook network.


‘One can only imagine the empowerment and engagement that is felt by a child who is free to play, search for and follow their passions, each and every day.’

Rebecca Williamson, Assistant Head of Junior School ‑ Early Years


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Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

PRINCIPAL’S THOUGHTS

“You can’t be what you can’t see.” Marian Wright Edelman

The term “role model” dates back to sociologist Robert K. Merton, who used the phrase to describe ways that people model sets of behaviours they admire in others. Looking back, most of us can name someone who inspired us or made a significant difference to the adults we became. Our role models guided and led us. They helped us determine our future. Throughout their development, girls should be exposed to a wide variety of role models not only to combat negative stereotypes, but also to ensure that every girl has the potential to find a role model with whom she connects. Having a woman to look up to has proven to be

a crucial part of girls’ development. In fields like Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), it is well recognised that positive role models are a significant predictor of interest and success in STEM for women. A woman in a position of power allows girls to envision themselves in the same position and to create goals for their own success. At Wilderness, we are able to surround our girls with members of our community who can guide and arouse in them the ambition and self-belief to dream big and aspire to the highest levels of their chosen field. We want the girls in


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our School to imagine themselves as lawyers, doctors, engineers, dancers, scientists, mothers, political leaders, artists, innovators and entrepreneurs. We want them to see women making choices, expressing their opinions and being actively involved as citizens in their community so that they will recognise these traits in themselves. Their acts of courage will inspire bravery. Their acts of compassion will encourage kindness. Hearing the stories of others help us to define and construct our own life’s narrative and provide hope and optimism for the future. Our Old Scholars enter every field

of endeavour and live across every continent. They generously share their personal and professional journeys, engaging in open and authentic conversations about what it means to be mothers, partners, leaders and professionals, revealing both the joys and the challenges along the way. Aristotle believed that we learn to live a moral life by modelling the behaviour of moral people. By connecting our girls to women and men who are change agents, they learn to use their voices for good. They understand that they too can make a difference to our world and that they can, and should be,

passionate advocates for the issues they believe in. By intentionally exposing each girl to accomplished adults with diverse experiences and by giving her the opportunity to engage with contemporary issues and political debate, we hope to prepare her for the choices and challenges she will face as a woman and a citizen of the future. Jane Danvers Principal


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Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

WELCOME TO: CHAIR OF COUNCIL, SHANTI BERGGREN

We are delighted to introduce the new Chair to the Governing Council, Shanti Berggren (1981). Shanti is an experienced lawyer having worked in Los Angeles, Singapore and Sydney. Shanti returned home to Adelaide in 2005 so her daughters Hema (2015) and Reshma (Year 12) could have a Wilderness education. Shanti joined Wilderness School’s Governing Council in 2007 and has served on the Finance and Development Committee (2008 – current) and joined the Executive Committee in 2013. Recently we sat down with Shanti to ask her some questions, here she shares her views.

CURRENT ROLES • Deputy General Counsel, Optus Business • Chair, Board of Directors, Wilderness School • Chair, University of Adelaide Law School Advisory Board • Non Executive Director, HomeStart Finance What is the mantra you live and lead by? An easy question because my mantra has been so clear for so many years crystallised in the Atticus Finch quote from To Kill A Mockingbird: ‘You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view … until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.’ My primary role as a commercial lawyer is to bring parties together – doing that successfully means standing in the shoes of the other person and understanding what’s important to them .. and why!


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B A

As an old scholar, how did being a Wilderness girl help you to succeed? The beauty of Wilderness is that the lessons I learned in the 70s continue to be taught today although today I think we are much more eloquent in the way we express these Wildy truths. Resilience has long been part of the Wilderness DNA and without doubt it is the lesson I have relied on both intuitively and consciously. If you weren’t a lawyer, what would be your ideal job? At the end of the West Wing TV series, CJ Gregg, the White House Chief of Staff is made a job offer by Frank Hollis (a Bill Gates/Ted Turner-like character) to manage a new $10 billion charitable organisation. She tells Hollis the best way to spend his money is to start building proper roads in Africa in order to make it easier to get food and services to people in need. The task is so mundane that the media won’t even notice. This episode has stuck with me and provides the backdrop for my ideal job… to have the financial freedom to take on a seemingly mundane task that would make substantive change. I don’t know exactly what my task would be but I know the result would be beneficial for women – perhaps a solution that allows women to spend time establishing their careers without compromising

their most productive biological years in which to have children – right now those two windows of opportunity appear to work on a mutually exclusive basis. What virtue do you admire most in people? Out of the box thinking – the ability to solve problems with lateral thinking. If you could have dinner with two famous people, who would you choose? When my girls were little and appreciating that their Mum was an old scholar they naturally assumed I was at school when the Misses Brown were in charge. It was only when they were a little older that they realised that I was old but not that old! Having said that I would love to have dinner with the Brown sisters who would today be characterised as disruptors in the education industry. I would also love to tell them about the Glee competition. The other person I would like to have dinner with is Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook, a female in the tech industry. I feel like Sandberg gets me and the Brown sisters shaped me.

What is one piece of advice you would give our girls? Choose carefully. Once you walk out of those gates for the last time as a Wildy girl, you will leave changed and as Wildy women you will no doubt lead change. Learn quickly that there are so many things that are not in your control – let them go but where you can make an impact, where things are in your control, choose with purpose – your tone of voice, your personal brand, how you earn and spend your consumer dollar– everything you do has an impact.

C A Shanti (centre of front row) on the Annie House stairs 1970 B Sports class on the lawns 1971 C Shanti and daughter Reshma on the Annie House stairs

To watch Shanti’s view on the importance of educating girls to be strong and resilient, visit http://wilderness.com.au/side-by-side


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Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

PLAYING TO LEARN Given that ‘play’ for adults is often considered to be in opposition to ‘work’ and described as a type of activity one engages in for enjoyment, rather than for any serious reason, it is not surprising that the benefits of playbased learning are often overlooked. (Whitebread 2012). Play-based learning has infinite advantages and far more than can be articulated in a single document. It is much more than just ‘playing’ and it requires outstanding teaching. Play takes place within a physical and social space, and thus, one of the greatest benefits of play-based learning is that it provides endless opportunities for children to develop social skills. When children play together they build relationships, resolve conflicts, develop empathy, learn to share, to negotiate, to lead and to develop self-advocacy skills. (Barblett cited in Early Childhood Australia). They build social groups, test out their theories and make adjustments accordingly (Early Years Learning Framework). ‘Play provides a supportive environment where children can ask questions, solve problems and engage in critical

thinking’ (Early Years Learning Framework). A child who is determined to build a castle, create a book or find out the answer to a burning question, is a child who will be motivated to ask questions and solve problems until they follow through on their desires. What ignites this desire? Firstly, the learning environment lays the foundation and creates the provocation. Creating an inside and outside learning environment that is thought provoking and engaging for all children, requires careful observation, planning, time and effort. This alone though is still not enough to achieve the above intention set out in the Early Years Learning Framework. Whilst children are playing in the learning environment, it is the thoughtful, deliberate, yet gentle questioning by adults that extends learning and develops critical thinking skills. Ron Ritchhart’s simple, yet incredibly powerful question: ‘What makes you say that?’ is one of those questions. What about literacy, numeracy, science and other core subjects? These are embedded in all aspects of early childhood learning. One can only imagine the empowerment and


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engagement that is felt by a child who is free to play, search for and follow their passions, each and every day. When children follow their own interests and these interests are carefully documented, reviewed and planned for by educators, authentic, lasting learning takes place. When a project is particularly interesting and meaningful for a child it is more likely to yield success. Play sparks the interest but it is the very skilled educator who fuels the fire. Maddalena Tedeschi, an Italian Pedagogista from Reggio Emilia and lecturer at the recent REAIE Conference in Sydney, stated that, ‘Educators must always look skywards but keep their feet firmly placed on the ground.’ In other words, it is important to have big dreams about what can be achieved, but is vital to ensure that learning experiences carefully link to the ages, stages of development and the curriculum for the children. Ginsburg (2007) expresses it beautifully when he says that, ‘Perhaps above all, play is a simple joy that is a cherished part of childhood.’ So whilst play is an incredible platform for learning, it also allows children the opportunity

to simply enjoy being (Early Years Learning Framework) and this is certainly something to treasure in our fast-paced world. Finally, Loris Malaguzzi, founder and facilitator of the Reggio Emilia educational philosophy, stated that, ‘What children learn does not follow as an automatic result from what is taught. Rather, it is in large part due to the children’s own doing as a consequence of their activities and our resources.’ These activities and resources that are provided are a direct result of the work of exceptional teachers. Rebecca Williamson Assistant Head of Junior School ‑ Early Years


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Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

GENDER EQUITY 2017 maybe remembered for some significant changes in women’s sport as the AFL and Netball Australia move slowly towards greater equality in opportunity and pay. There is no doubt that these changes have been welcomed, yet one could be mistaken for thinking significant progress has been made in the desire for greater equality and transparency in the workforce for women.

gender barriers. The notion that “You cannot be what you cannot see” underlies many of the programmes offered at Wilderness and is essential in breaking the discrimination mould that currently exists in the corporate world today. As stated so eloquently by Amelia Earhart: “Women, like men, should try to do the impossible. And when they fail, their failure should be a challenge to others.“

To coincide with International Women’s Day on 8 March 2017, consultant Conrad Liveris released data on CEO’s and chairs leading Australia’s largest 200 companies. What is incredibly disappointing is that there are only nine women CEO’s and 10 women chairing boards in the ASX 200. The fact is that the number of women in these key leadership positions has actually fallen in 2017.

Unfortunately, there is a constant stream of stories showing gender disparities both in the work place and home. As a male in a leadership position at an all-female school and a father of two girls, I believe strongly that it is time that all men stood up and became part of the fight for gender equality. It is not the job of a woman to convince a male of the importance of gender equality; men should be responsible for their own prejudice and that of other men. It is only then that we will have a truly equitable society, and one in which there is no reference to gender in the corporate world.

At Wilderness, we unreservedly and unashamedly apply a modern feminist lens to all that we do. We provide an education that prepares each girl for the challenges and choices that she will face as a woman and citizen of the future. This begins with exposing our girls to a range of women who have made a significant impact in their field of employment and have overcome

Ben Manifold Head of Senior School


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‘The desire for basic human rights is wrongly seen as an extreme philosophy; a misconception which foregrounds the importance of opening up the discussion on gender equality.’

Despite excelling in the education sector, with 39.6% of women having achieved a bachelor degree or higher, compared with 30.4% of men in the same age bracket, women continue to be underrepresented in the workplace, as the labour force participation rate remains over 14% higher for men. As evidence mounts that boosting female leadership would lead to a 13% increase in the GDP, it is unequivocal that a spotlight on gender equality is morally and economically required in Australian businesses. Women are no less accomplished than their male counterparts, but female career growth is challenged by prejudice that is often overlooked in Australia. The phenomenon of ‘unconscious bias’ refers to the implicit stereotyping that affects one’s decisions, which particularly limits ambitious young women who apply for jobs with male-dominated hiring panels. Many employers are partial to hiring younger images of themselves - not always purposely,

but instead as a product of heedless decision-making. This also may include disregarding female applicants due to the assumption that they will be distracted by care-taking and family responsibilities; a normalisation of sexism derived from traditional gender roles. As most professionals remain largely unaware that this bias affects them, change has been stagnant for women in the corporate sector. However, when companies do create an open discussion about equality, instead of arguing over inequality, change can follow quite quickly. To bridge the gap, a shift in cultural perceptions must be made within Australia, requiring action from both men and women. Unfortunately, ‘feminism’ - the advocacy of equality for both sexes is interpreted dichotomously within society. The desire for basic human rights is wrongly seen as an extreme philosophy; a misconception which foregrounds the importance of opening up the discussion on gender equality. As a young woman on the verge of attending university and with an eye to entering the workforce, I believe it

is important for all young Australians to be aware of their biases and to be educated about how their thinking may influence others. The 2017 SRC has been passionate in pursuing gender equality, and reflecting on how we, as future employees or employers, may achieve it. We were delighted to collaborate with the Prince Alfred College prefects to push towards solidarity and support for both genders in the matter, and as a result, we will present in shared assemblies later this term. We would like to invite you to join us in making an active effort to ensure that both boys and girls will receive the same opportunities in the future. Achieving gender equality requires all of us to be responsible about how we treat other people, and to have the courage to stray away from the status quo. Reshma Berggren, Year 12


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Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

WOMEN IN POLITICS

On Friday 21 July, Reshma Berggren and I were honoured to accept an invitation to a Women in Politics luncheon at Parliament House. The luncheon was an intimate event attended by South Australian Liberal politician, the Honourable Michelle Lensink MLC, and a group of passionate young women who are advocates for building women’s representation in politics, with particular emphasis on women’s leadership.

A recurring topic of conversation was the significance of youth political involvement and understanding. Hannah, the newly elected President of the Women’s Council, expressed the importance of developing a political conscience and connections. She argued that it is paramount to have your voice heard as a young person due to the lack of representation for younger demographics in parliament. Chloe, a Wilderness Old Scholar who is actively involved in youth politics, concurred, stating that political involvement gives her a broader sense of purpose and fantastic opportunities to meet inspiring and like-minded people. The conversation shared with Hannah, Chloe and other lunch guests about youth political involvement highlighted to me the significance of standing up for what you believe in and being aware of government decision making. With the March 2018 state election fast approaching, it’s clear that one of the ways to broadcast your voice is through


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casting a vote. However, I fear that many newly-turned adults have limited political experience or understanding to make an informed choice about who to vote for with many following either their parents’ preference or popular party lines. This is extremely destructive as every vote matters and, thus, should be cast with conviction and understanding of its broader effect. Guests at the luncheon also keenly quizzed Michelle about any disadvantages she has experienced as a woman in the male dominated climate of Australian politics. Michelle highlighted the importance of women in political leadership roles, whole-heartedly acknowledging and expressing her concern for the lack of female representation in Australian politics. However, she and many others are keen to change this situation, hoping that the preselection of more women will result in more females in parliament and break the hold of the ‘boys’ club’. Hannah agreed, adding that the push for change and gender equality, whether that be in parliament or any male dominated field, needs to

come from the top of all organisations. While the South Australian Legislative Council and House of Assembly continue to be dominated by males, the courageous effort of women like Michelle Lensink inside the chambers is initiating movements and encouraging other young women to speak up about the lack of female representation in parliament. It was indicated that the only way to solve this issue was for support of gender equality, across society, to come from the top of all organisations. Sustained efforts by Michelle, Hannah, Chloe and other inspiring female political figures are paving the way for a gender-balanced and more representative political future in South Australia, a future that I’m very excited to be a part of. Neve Curtis, Year 12


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Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

SPARC IGNITING GIRLS EMPATHY DEFINED:

“Displaying understanding, acceptance and respect for others’ differences by recognising perspective through social awareness and generosity. It is showing compassion for someone or something with pure intentions.” Collaborative definition by Year 8, 2017

Our journey to promote student agency began in 2016 with an invitation from AISSA for students from a range of schools around Adelaide to collaborate on the Rudolf Group Project with Yong Zhao. Yong Zhao is a Foundation Distinguished Professor in the School of Education at the University of Kansas. He is also a professional fellow at the Mitchell Institute for Health and Education Policy, Victoria Australia. His work focuses on the implications of globalisation and technology on education. Yong’s work with AISSA aimed to change education to better equip students to lead successful lives in first world economies. This work aims at personalising education, exploring the creation of ‘work that matters’ and developing globally connected learning environments. Yong believes that schools must help children to find what is uniquely theirs to do in the world and schools must therefore look very differently at the education they provide if they are to

guide students towards their individual successful futures. Through this opportunity five current Year 10 students, Mabel Gorman, Alyshia Vu, Annalisa Zacest, Kristen Yeung and Amanda Hsi, were inspired to develop a social justice course as they saw a gap within our current curriculum. These girls worked to develop a learning framework and passionately provided insight and inspiration for the direction the future course should take. They expressed a need for a collaborative, hands-on and action-orientated approach, in which students would have the opportunity to pursue a passion project that would authentically ‘make a difference to the lives of others’. They were inspired to ensure that a culture of thinking sat at the core of the project and that it should enable girls to examine social, political, cultural and environmental issues.


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This work laid the foundations for a subject offered this year at Years 7 and 8 called SPARC. We really wanted to honour the girls’ work and build a program that reflected their aims. We commenced planning by discussing possible directions with Ron Ritchhart, a Senior Research Associate with Project Zero at Harvard Graduate School of Education. He suggested using the Global Competence Framework formulated in 2011 by his colleagues, Veronica Boix-Mansilla and Anthony Jackson. The Framework asks students to firstly investigate the world beyond their immediate environment, recognise the perspectives of others, translate these ideas into appropriate actions to make a difference and communicate ideas with a diverse audience. For us the most pivotal aspect of our course was to design an experience that would challenge girls to feel deeply, to

unlock empathy and invoke a need to make a difference. Our immersion at the Project Zero Classroom at Harvard made us more aware of how it feels to be a learner and the power of an emotional experience whilst learning. Drawing from our experiences during a mini course on Howard Gardner’s ‘The Good Project’, we learnt how to enable students to consider their role as a good citizen, good person and good worker, so that they can live more fulfilling lives and leave a positive, lasting impact on our world. To this end, whilst writing SPARC, we ensured students were exposed to confronting imagery that would challenge their comfort zones. Many of these images involved complex issues and multiple perspectives that would evoke varied emotional connections. We were aware that in a heightened emotional state it can be difficult to articulate feelings, connections and understandings, so students were invited to journal their experiences using a range of Harvard Thinking Routines, writing and art.

In 2017, the Year 7 students spent a term exploring a range of social, political, environmental and cultural issues and developed a well-rounded understanding of empathy. This will put them in a good position to take action in Year 8. These ideas were extended further at Year 8 where students planned a passion project and took authentic action. Please read the inspiring work of some of our girls on the pages to follow. Simone Burzacott-Gorman Head of Science & Danielle Kemp Teacher of Science

References: AISSA Publication : http://www.ais.sa.edu. au/__files/f/209115/2016%20AISSA%20 Leadership%20Booklet.pdf Project Zero Good Life : http://www.pz.harvard. edu/projects/agency-by-design


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Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

SPARC IGNITING GIRLS STUDENT VOICE

The most recent statistics show that in 2015 in Australia there were 43 399 children placed in out of home care, most of whom were under the age of 9. This number has risen steadily since 2011. Being placed in out of home care is usually a result of the child’s parents or care-givers being unable to look after them and can include cases of abuse or neglect. There is currently an inadequate number of people who are taking on roles as foster or kinship carers for these children. This results in more than 5% of children being placed in residential care. These group homes are often run by ‘for profit’ companies and may provide inadequate care and pose some safety risks for children. My plan is to provide children in residential care with art supplies as a way to express themselves. Art therapy is one of many types of therapy

used by people of all ages and could enable these children to express their emotions and feelings to help them through their difficult situation. With donations from Wilderness students and their families, an art pack, including a visual diary, water colours and fine liners could be donated to the children who need them most.

‘Art washes from the soul the dust of everyday life.’ Pablo Picasso Jasmine Meldrum, Year 8


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Despite what the media say, beauty cannot be judged based on a person’s looks. Fair & Lovely is a face cream marketed in India which promises lighter and therefore, according to the company selling it, more beautiful skin. The company’s advertisements suggest that those with a darker skin tone struggle in life and cannot be accepted in the community. Dove, another famous brand which aspires to help all people, especially women, feel good about who they are and what they look like, is owned by Unilever, the same parent company as Fair & Lovely. On its website Dove says that ‘beauty is not defined by shape, size or colour’ contradicting Fair & Lovely’s message on bringing ‘hope to women’ by making them fairer. Unilever’s condemnatory messages influence many people around the world, including teenagers, lowering their selfesteem and making them believe they need to change to be accepted. Inspired

by a family member in India who uses Fair & Lovely, I decided to take action and change what I consider to be racist and discriminatory. As a part of my project, I emailed Unilever UK about their hypocritical brands with a response yet to come. I also organised a petition, currently with 67 supporters and plan to send it to Dove and Unilever UK, this time hopefully with a response. Racism through the media and fairness creams must stop and the world must see that beauty is not and will not depend on the colour of our skin but instead on the colour of our thoughts and actions. Gauri Wechalekar, Year 8


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Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

FACULTY IN FOCUS PERFORMING ARTS

Creativity is about connecting things but when you ask creative people how they came to a certain outcome, they often don’t really know. They say they just started out to solve a problem and ended up somewhere often quite unexpected. What has probably happened is that an individual, or a group, took experiences they had had and connected them to some other idea or approach and created a whole new thing. In Drama we are quite used to setting out on a creative journey without actually knowing where we will end up. That’s the fun of it. Creative people have to be prepared to launch into the great unknown, something that can be discouraged if you are aspiring for certainty in education. The performing arts are about risks and surprise. Just imagine how dreary it would be to tell the same story, in the same way, over and over again. The audience would very quickly lose interest and so would the performers. To join the same dots in the same way is not how Drama works. In Drama classes students are encouraged to be comfortable with

the unpredictable and the uncertain and to try different solutions. Drama uses creativity through improvisation, reinterpreting great classic scripts or new works, changing the nature of character, designing a new set or costume style, composing new music to fit a new production and increasingly using new technology to reshape the world within the theatre. Its all about constant risk taking and enjoying the outcome no matter how surprising. Drama is about the synthesis of ideas, skills and stories to make a statement about how we think the world seems to be working or even more excitingly, could work, if things were allowed to change. How does this approach actually work in practice? Recently, the Year 12 Drama students were working on their Group Devised Performance. The task is to take an approach to Drama, used by a famous performance practitioner, and apply it to your own choice of content. The Year 12 group is working in the style of famous American director, choreographer and designer Julie Taymor, most famous


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for her huge hit production of ‘The Lion King’. The group has researched many of Taymor’s productions to discover how she uses folkloric stylistic influences, puppetry, masks, music, choreography and technology. The group has then decided to apply her approach to an extract from ‘Alice in Wonderland’. At this point the creative process takes off. One student will design and apply character makeup and design and make costumes. Another will design, construct and paint the set which will also include some video projections of the infamous disappearing Cheshire Cat. A third will make a Bunraku puppet version of the sleepy Dormouse and a fourth will create a sound track. Each group member will also perform as one of the characters in the final performance. This whole process will require hundreds of decisions, theoretical and practical, to be made. Each one of these decisions will lead to another and the presentation will be taken in a new direction and a unique thing is created.

Let’s look at one aspect of the eventual production. The Cheshire Cat is going to appear and disappear as both a projection and a live character. So firstly the makeup designer designed a cat makeup based on the work of artist Del Barton. At a practical level this meant using skills of painting, making a cat’s ears head band and soldering wire to make whiskers. Once the makeup was applied to the actor, a process which took 3 hours, it was then filmed using green screen photography and special lighting. Next an edited sound scape was added and iMovie software created the eventual ghostly animal that fades in and out against a surreal background. You can see that each step of the presentation involves creative decisions. If you apply this string of decisions to each aspect of the presentation, a unique performance will be created. In their presentation the students have also decided to use abstract Mondrian-style patterns painted

on the furniture and surreal ethnic style costumes will be worn by the characters. Each student is working on her own aspect of the performance but each aspect is a part of the one team effort applying elements of Taymor’s style. This requires a constant dialogue, changing and adapting each element to create an end product which is eventually performed to a live audience. At this final stage the students receive a response to their new vision. A whole new world will be opened up, an ‘Alice in Wonderland’ never seen before. As Albert Einstein famously said, ‘Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere’. It is vitally important to balance the education system with the creativity of the performing arts, to find the gold that is buried in our imagination to create a new and better world. Roger Masters Head of Drama


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Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

WILDERNESS MATHEMATICS ON THE WORLD STAGE

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The American Educational Research Association (AERA) was founded in 1916 and strives to advance knowledge about education, to encourage scholarly inquiry related to education, and to promote the use of research to improve education. This year the Association’s annual meeting was held in San Antonio, Texas. The meeting was attended by some 15 000 delegates from over 80 countries. B

A The Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Centre B The poster dispaly

AERA received more than 13 000 submissions for this year’s meeting, so I was honoured that my poster, written with Professor Barry J. Fraser, ‘Learning Environment and Attitudes in Middle-School Mathematics’, was selected for presentation at the meeting. It was particularly pleasing as our submission was reviewed by highly qualified reviewers from the Special Interest Group – Learning Environments, a particular focus of our study.


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A main objective of our study was to investigate the associations between the classroom learning environment and the attitudes of middle-school Mathematics students. Studies like ours are important in the current educational climate, where the decline in Australia’s ranking in international educational assessments of Mathematics and Science has raised grave concerns (Australian Academy of Science, 2009; Office of the Chief Scientist, 2014). The latest PISA and TIMSS reports for Australia reveal ‘an absolute decline’ in achievement levels in Science and Mathematics (Australian Council for Educational Research, 2016a, 2016b). Kennedy, Lyons and Quinn (2014) suggest that government, industry and educational sectors should be alarmed by a decline in student participation in intermediate and advanced levels of school Mathematics, because school STEM is the basis for creating citizens with the literacy and awareness required in the future.

As studies of associations between the learning environment and attitudes among middle-school Mathematics students have been infrequent, our research adds to the body of past research into attitude–environment relationships in other subjects (particularly Science). Our findings suggest moderate, positive associations between the learning environment and students’ attitudes to Mathematics have tentative, practical implications for practitioners. In particular, higher classroom Task Orientation was linked with more enjoyment of Mathematics lessons and a more positive attitude to mathematical inquiry. In addition, greater teacher support was associated with greater student enjoyment of Mathematics lessons, and more involvement was linked to a more positive attitude to mathematical inquiry.

I am grateful for the support of Jane Danvers and Wilderness School for my attendance at the AERA Annual Meeting. I also gratefully acknowledge the support of the Catherine Ye Teacher Fellowship which assisted my study in 2015. Rhiannon Giles Head of Cedar House and Teacher of Mathematics

Reference List Australian Academy of Science. (2009). A national strategy for mathematical sciences in Australia. Retrieved September 16, 2015, from http://www.austms.org.au/tiki-read_article. php?articleId=49. Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER). (2016a). PISA 2015: First look report. www.acer.edu.au/ozpisa Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER). (2016b). TIMSS 2015: A first look at Australia’s results. www.acer.edu. au/timss Kennedy, J., Lyons, T., & Quinn, F. (2014). The continuing decline of science and mathematics enrolments in Australian high schools. Teaching Science. Retrieved September 14, 2015, from http://search.informit.com.au.dbgw.lis.curtin.edu. au/documentSummary;dn=685386398396236;res=IELHSS Office of the Chief Scientist. (2014). Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics: Australia’s future. Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved September 16, 2015, from http://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2014/09/professor-chubbreleases-science-technology-engineering-and-mathematicsaustralias-future/


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Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

FOUNDERS’ DAY 2017

The annual Founders’ Day event was a day of celebration and nostalgia shared by Wilderness girls old and new. The morning’s assembly provided a fascinating glimpse into the past, with members of the SRC sharing the School’s history from its humble beginnings on Mann Terrace to its current flourishing home in Medindie. Several old school uniforms were modelled by Year 12 students, ranging from the simple crested blazer, once only worn by tennis players, to the skirt and tie that we know and love today. The story of Wilderness’ evolution was eye opening to many of the girls who were hearing and seeing it for the first time, but to the old scholars in attendance, particularly guest speaker Mary Shierlaw, it was clearly one remembered with fondness.

The assembly was followed by morning tea in the Old Scholars’ Association Gallery, where memories were shared over tea and coffee. On several occasions, other members of the current SRC and I found ourselves enthralled by stories of air raid drills in the 1940s and of never to be forgotten conversations with one of the Brown sisters. To be surrounded by these women and to hear their stories was an indescribable privilege. Hopefully the tradition of Founders’ Day remains strong into the future, providing an opportunity to reflect upon the Brown sisters and the vision, courage and passion that they devoted to the school we cherish today. Molly Chapman SRC President 2017


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Celebrating our Founders, the Brown family, is always a wonderful event in which many of our old scholars cherish the opportunity to participate. On Friday 19 May, we were joined by more than 35 old scholars who were from the classes of 1956 or earlier. Our guest speaker was old scholar Mary Shierlaw (nee Russell). Mary attended Wilderness from 1939 until 1945 and was in Amaryllis House. Her sister Betty Moore (nee Russell) also attended Wilderness and was in the Class of 1947 but she was in Carob! Mary’s late husband Joe Shierlaw was a Wilderness student from 1931-1933. She also has a niece Sally Shierlaw who taught at Wilderness. Mary has 4 children; Helen (Class of 1976, Anne (Class of 1982), John who had 2 daughters at Wilderness – Emma (Class of 2004) and Kate (Class of 2006) and Tim who has Ella Shierlaw currently in Year 6 at Wilderness Mary shared stories of her school days

and some of the many changes since she was a student at Wilderness. It was captivating for all to hear. Following a roll call and celebration of Wilderness School’s history in the Assembly, our special guests wandered to the Old Scholars’ Association Gallery for High Tea. Marg Keane, Archivist, had worked diligently to share an historical display featuring many of our old scholars from their school days including original photographs, uniforms, letters and much more memorabilia.

Newman Theatre and a full tour of the redeveloped Browns’ House. ‘My goodness, so much has changed. If only I could be at Wilderness School today.’ Our old scholars were astounded at the transformation and appreciated the state-of-the-art facilities available to the girls. Since our fabulous annual celebration with our old scholars, we have received a number of updates recalling names of students from the late 1940s and 1950s and also some cherished mementoes have been donated to place in our Archives and share with our community.

It was also an opportunity to cross check some of the names on the photographs. We are slowly gathering a complete list of ‘who is who’ thanks to the brilliant memories of our old scholars. It is heart-warming to share the many memories of school days and the laughter reminiscing with these pictures and keepsakes.

Founders Day with our old scholars is an event we look forward to from which everyone leaves smiling. Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community

Jane Danvers welcomed our guests and was joined by the SRC girls who chatted with our old scholars. Following a delightful morning tea, a few of the old scholars enjoyed a walk through the new Science laboratories,

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A Sally Hopton, Jane Danvers & Anne Levy B Sally Hopton, Anne Levy & Barb Fargher C Ron Waxman & Patrick Bagot D Pamela Bond, Booie Hayward & Anne Levy

E Liz Manifold & Jill Gray with students F Mary Shierlaw & Ann Marsden G Jeanette Chapman, Pamela Bond, Lorraine Gormly, Barb Fargher H Margaret Young, Rosemary Dyer & Mary Michelmore


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AN OPEN LETTER TO THE WILDERNESS COMMUNITY

This year in April, Wilderness in Nepal was invited to be a part of the Opening Ceremony of the Junbesi Secondary School as recognition of the hard work of the Wilderness community in raising funds for the rebuild of the school following the 2015 earthquake. It was a great privilege for me to go to Nepal along with Dr Sally Nobbs OAM, to act as a representative of Wilderness School students to help build the connection between our students and the Junbesi Secondary School students. When I was offered the opportunity to be part of the 2017 Wilderness in Nepal Trip, I felt blessed. For me, Nepal is a magical place of changing scenery and kind people. Unlike the 2015 trip, this trip covered a different region as we trekked near the Everest Range to a village called Junbesi, which was badly damaged in 2015. Within this community, there is the medical centre that you help with your fundraising, and the Junbesi Secondary School. After the earthquake, the Wilderness community raised over $48 000 to help supply

roofing materials for many buildings within the village, including homes and the medical centre, and $30 000 was raised to help rebuild the school. When we visited Nepal this year, I could see firsthand the damage caused by the earthquake but also many signs of rebuilding. It was very obvious that concerted efforts were being made to improve the living conditions for the Nepalese. When we arrived at Junbesi after 10 days of trekking, we were met by an amazing welcome from the community. Every single person greeted us with a huge smile on their face. We were followed all the way through the village to our lodge by the local children from the school. One of the most humbling sights of the whole trip was to see the temporary school. The conditions were cold, dark and cramped, not unlike a garden shed. However, seeing the newly built school was heart-warming. The children now had reasonable-sized classrooms, which were insulated and had skylights to illuminate the whole room.


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I would like to thank the entire Wilderness community for your support of Nepal over recent years. To the parents, thank you for giving your daughters that gold coin donation for their dress-up days. To the staff, thank you for supporting all the crazy Wednesday lunches the students hold throughout the year. To the girls, thank you for your dedication in organising and running fundraisers like the Boarders’ Fashion Parade to help raise money for the communities in Nepal. Your hard work is received with such gratitude. With all your efforts and all the money raised, you gave people back their homes, their medical centre and their school.

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A View of Junbesi B WIlderness in Nepal team with sherpas C Sophie officially opening the school D Celebration at the Opening Ceremony

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ALWAYS REMEMBERED A LASTING LEGACY AND A NEW SCHOLARSHIP Joan Creswell was a student of Wilderness for her entire school life. She began when she was almost 5 years old and completed her schooling as Head Prefect in 1948. In 2002, she visited our Year 3 girls to share the history of Wilderness School and her many memories. Her passion for Wilderness was inspiring. When Joan died in 2016, she bequeathed $200 000 to the Wilderness School Foundation. In a handwritten letter she asked that the money be utilised for a scholarship for a new girl entering Wilderness School for Years 11 and 12. She asked that it be named the Creswell Scholarship and be awarded preferably to ‘one whose family could not manage this (tuition) for financial reasons’.

We are hoping to invite applications for this scholarship this year, the recipient to commence in Year 11 in 2019. We are both honoured and humbled by Joan’s vision for our school and take pride in offering this scholarship as a legacy to her memory and all who knew her.

THE GIFT OF GIVING

A bequest can support an area that you are passionate about or be for general use. It allows you to contribute to our school without impacting on your lifestyle today. For a brochure and additional information about the Green Door Society, please email Jodie Escott jescott@wilderness.com.au or telephone 08 8344 6688 for a confidential conversation.

MAIN PICTURE Joan (front row third from right) with the Leaving Honours Class of 1948 in front of Browns’ House. ABOVE Portrait of Joan


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Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

MARY ANN MATTHEWS SCHOLARSHIP AN INVITATION TO APPLY During Week 3, Term 2, we were fortunate to have 2016 graduates, Gabriella Belperio and Grace Williams return to Wilderness School. Both girls shared their experiences of travelling abroad and they encouraged the Year 11 and Year 12 girls to consider applying for the 2017 Mary Ann Matthews Scholarship. Gabriella was the 2015 recipient volunteering in Cambodia and Grace the 2016 recipient who worked with Projects Abroad in Fiji. Both girls travelled in December 2016/January 2017. It was motivating to learn about the many differences they experienced

and how they were able to contribute to society and assist and learn from the children and adults with whom they were working. This is an extraordinary scholarship offered annually to one recipient who will have the chance to travel and volunteer either locally or abroad. It is an incredible opportunity for current Year 11 and 12 girls to make a difference in the world. The selection process will be completed in early Term 3 and the successful 2017 applicant will be announced soon after. Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community


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CHOOSE A PROJECT CLOSE TO YOUR HEART. At Wilderness School, we know the value of girls-only education and an exceptional learning environment. Together they have a profound and lasting impact, enabling our students to achieve their potential in school and life. As a community school, we rely on your generosity to allow us to be the pinnacle of all facets of education for our girls. This year, we invite you to show your support for our school by making a tax deductible donation to our key projects. Wilderness School Foundation Scholarship Fund The Wilderness School Foundation Scholarship Fund will enable us to award a Years 8 to 12 scholarship to an academically talented girl from outside our school, whose family could otherwise not afford to send her. Our aim is to achieve the entire capital ($1 million) this year for the perpetual endowed fund, with the first scholarship awarded soon after. Wilderness School Foundation Building Fund The Wilderness School Foundation Building Fund is our major source of income for significant redevelopment and capital works. Examples of the fund’s recent achievements include the new Flexible Learning Space Classrooms in the Science & Humanities Building, Browns’ House and the Newman Theatre. New projects are in planning now with naming rights available. To find out more information or to make a donation visit wwww.wilderness.com.au/community-life


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Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY What is your Mantra or Philosophy? It may be a cliché but I honestly believe that ensuring you stay balanced and healthy is so important. Earlier in my career I used to regularly work to all hours of the morning and occasionally all night. My sleep was minimal and despite exercising regularly I knew I was compromising my mental and physical health. I now prioritise sleep, exercise and having a fairly balanced and healthy diet. I also believe that it is imperative to maintain a work-life balance and while I work hard, I also ensure I make time for me too.

CATHERINE NEWMAN (2006) COMMERCIAL LITIGATOR

What ignited your passion and choice of career? I believe my passion for criminal law originated from reading Enid Blyton’s children’s books when I was growing up. I remember fondly reading all of the Secret Seven series and always being so fascinated by the mysteries and investigations in which the characters found themselves. As I grew older I found myself reading mainly crime fiction (which hasn’t changed) and it helped me to discover that I wanted to work in a career that encompassed my passion for both criminal law and child protection. I believe my work with children who had been sexually abused also inspired me to work in a career where I could help and be a spokesperson for victims. Criminal prosecution is very fulfilling in this respect.

I believe that one must always be willing to continue learning and to always keep an open mind to developing and growing. Finally, I suppose my other mantra or philosophy would be to keep in touch with people and mentors. It is much easier in this technology era to maintain relationships and I have found over the years and from living in different countries and cities how important relationship maintenance can be. Life is full of surprises and there have been so many occasions where I have been able to reach out to somebody from my past, be it for a career move or advice or in my personal life, because I have maintained contact. What is a typical day like? There is never a typical day in my job per se. Some days I am in court in trial, some days I am in court conducting a criminal sentence, some days I am in the office drafting submissions or reviewing evidence and other days I am meeting with barristers, victims, police or witnesses in relation to my cases. I learn something new each day.

What would your advice be to aspiring girls? If you are lucky enough to have a passion and an idea about what you want to do while still in school as I did, my advice is to trust your gut. Not many people are fortunate enough to know what they want to do while still at school and many people discover that as they go through university and try different things. I practised in a number of legal areas while knowing deep down that I really wanted to work in the criminal law. I also advise being open-minded and flexible to change and opportunities. Opportunities will arise that will shape your future if you allow them to. I cannot recommend highly enough the importance of travelling and, if possible, living and working overseas. The experiences you will endure develop you in so many ways and build resilience, independence, selfsufficiency and flexibility. How did being a Wilderness girl help you to succeed? I developed a very good work ethic from being at Wilderness as hard work and results are encouraged and facilitated by the dedicated teaching staff. Wilderness encouraged me and my peers to be independent, confident women and my time at Wilderness enabled me to develop a sense of independence and a trust in my own capability. I always had such supportive teachers, many of whom I am still in touch with and who dedicated so much of their time to developing and supporting me, both academically and personally.


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SHARON LEVY (1969) PRESIDENT OF DOVETAIL PRODUCTIONS Tell us about your journey from leaving school? I went to Flinders University studying Drama, Psychology and Philosophy. It was the early 70s and we studied the dramatic movements of the 20th Century including Naturalism, Realism, Surrealism, Absurdism and other philosophical isms of the day. Immediately after graduating I moved to Sydney, worked at the Elizabethan Theatre Trust for a year, then to London where I worked at the British Arts Council and then went travelling through Europe and the Middle East. For the next two years I divided my time between the UK, touring with the British Theatre of the Deaf, and Sydney where I worked with director Nigel

Triffit. In the late 1970s I married and moved to Atlanta, Georgia, where my (now ex) husband had been hired by the U.S. Center for Disease Control. I didn’t know a soul in Atlanta so had to figure out the scene there, knocking on a lot of doors. My first job was making sound effects for the Alliance Theatre, the main company in Atlanta. Eventually I joined a group of like-minded young artists who had just formed a theatre company and together we began to create original work which was well received, and over a decade we built the company into one of the premiere theatre companies in Atlanta. By this time I’d visited New York, met some important theatre artists there and eventually answered the call to move to the Big Apple in 1990. Since that time, my focus has been principally on developing new work which has toured to festivals worldwide. More at www. dovetailproductionsinc.com. Do you have a mantra / philosophy? To quote Ru Paul – ‘Figure out who you are and turn the volume up’. How did being a Wilderness girl help you to succeed? The example set by the Brown sisters that you could venture out into the world as a strong independent woman was invaluable. And taking the motto ‘Good courage in the hour of strife’ seriously. What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls? Be curious. Work hard. Study and learn about everything you possibly can but focus most on what speaks to you and what you feel most truly expresses who

you are. That’s most likely what you’ll be really good at and will allow you to live your life to the full. What is the most intriguing fact you have learnt about yourself? That I have a head for business. I never thought I was interested in or had an aptitude for business but, for show business, I do. Very necessary if you’re going to be half-decent producer. How have you overcome challenges or setbacks? Of course. Nobody gets through life without setbacks. The key is whether you can get back up, dust yourself off, take the time to think about what went wrong, learn from it and then get back on the horse. A sense of humour helps too. Who inspires you and why? Great artists – musicians, actors, dancers, singers, composers, writers. And my sisters. What did you think you would be pursuing when you left school? Exactly what I have. I knew it was what I wanted even though I didn’t have a clue how to get there. I just kept searching and putting one foot in front of the other. What have been some key defining moments? Working with the cast of The Gospel at Colonus who have become family. You can’t fake it with them and that gives you permission to be yourself. There’s nothing better than really being seen, respected and loved for who you are and what you bring to the table.

Wilderness is expanding its knowledge about our old scholars. We are establishing a new and exciting archival digital catalogue and sharing news about you. Please send us editorial or details about your life – career, moving home, marriages, babies or perhaps an old scholar who has passed. You can email us communications@wilderness.com.au, upload via our inbox on Facebook, or complete at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/wildernesswomenworldwide Everything important to you is important to us!


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WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY

EBONY CAVALLARO (2001) NINE NEWS REPORTER

Tell us about your journey from leaving school? Since graduating from Wilderness in 2001 I studied at Queensland University of Technology before starting my Journalism career. I’ve been in the media industry for almost 14 years, working mostly all around Queensland. I’ve loved (almost) every minute of it. I’ve been working at Nine News based in Brisbane for almost seven years. What ignited your passion and choice of career? At Wilderness I loved studying English and Drama, but it was a History teacher who really set me on my path. One of the local boys schools wanted to film a segment for an SBS show called “School Torque,” and they wanted a girl to help present the article. It was my

first TV experience and it ignited my passion for working on camera, and telling people’s stories. At university I took on every possible opportunity to intern, which is how I landed my first job with Channel 7. My first full time job was in Mackay. I spent a few years moving around to different regional towns and cities, cutting my teeth and honing my craft. It was fun and exciting, but there was a lot of moving around. I had some great experiences, covering natural disasters like floods and cyclones. The stories I’ve loved the most are the ones that made a difference, they really stick with you. In journalism we see the best and worst the world has to offer. From cruel accidents and murders to every day heroes who remind you just how good people can be.


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Do you have a mantra / philosophy? My mantra in life is the Nike slogan “Just do it”. I think you always know what you really should do! Working in an industry where I see first hand how a split second can change the course of a life, I think its really important to live for today. What is a typical day like? A typical day for me is an early alarm, I get up before sunrise. A quick scan of the papers and online news sites, while listening to the radio news, then checking in with the Chief of Staff. When I hit the office its time for some research, calling contacts and experts to get as much information as I can about the topic I’m covering. Most days involve a live cross into the morning or afternoon news bulletins, in between interviewing people and writing a story for the evening news. No two days are ever the same - its the best and worst part of the job! You never know when or where you’ll end up, which means friends are very used to me constantly running late or cancelling last minute. What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls? My advice to Wilderness girls: Chase those things that give you a fire in your belly. If you don’t know what those things are yet - don’t worry! Life has a funny way of throwing you in the direction you need to be. I wish I’d spent less time worrying about what the future would look like. For me, life today doesn’t look like I thought it would, but the reality is so much better than I imagined.

How did being a Wilderness girl help you to succeed? I think one of the best things Wilderness taught me was resilience. The ability to dust yourself off after a setback is, I think, one of the keys to both success & happiness. There’s been plenty of hiccups along the way. Its funny, the real challenges are the things you just don’t see or even imagine coming! I’ve learnt its really important to surround yourself with good people - the “family” you create makes all the difference in the tough times. I’ve had to learn to ask for help and advice when I need it, and when you’ve got a great network, it certainly helps. Who inspires you and why? I’ve been fortunate to meet some amazing people throughout my career, from CEO’s to celebrities. But the people I admire most are those who’ve helped make a real difference. One of the Charities I’ve been involved with helps homeless women and victims of domestic violence access basic hygiene and sanitary items. Share The Dignity’s founder, Rochelle Courtenay started the charity in her lounge room. Her initiatives Its in the Bag, and Dignity Vending machines (I’m the proud namesake of one of the machines!) have created a nation wide sisterhood and made a tangible difference to women in need - despite many people telling her she couldn’t achieve her goal. We need more people like Rochelle.

What have been some key defining moments? One of my more defining life experiences was when I took a break from media. I was burnt out - physically and mentally from my job. So I made a lifestyle change and spent 7 months driving coal trucks in a mine in North Queensland. It was challenging work - the trucks are big, and the shifts are long. I was not a natural truck driver! But the experience gave me the mental space I needed to get some clarity and perspective in my life. Ultimately I decided to return to media, but that was a real turning point in my career. The perspective and life experience I gained from that time away, ultimately made me better at my job, and my career started to really accelerate.


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WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY

CLAIRE GLYNN-ROE (2012)

JANE WELLS (1988) UVEITIS AND MEDICAL RETINA SPECIALIST IN OPHTHALMOLOGY Jane has spent the past 2 years living in the United Kingdom doing further subspecialty training in Ophthalmology. She was based in Manchester at the Royal Manchester Eye Hospital, where she completed a Senior Clinical Fellowship in Uveitis and Medical Retina. Since returning to Australia at the end of last year, Jane has relocated to Canberra, where she is now the Uveitis and Medical Retina specialist in Ophthalmology at the Canberra

Hospital. Jane also spends 2 days a fortnight in Adelaide in her second position as Senior Clinical Lecturer in Ophthalmology at Flinders University. Life is certainly busy! Jane is obviously an adventurous and successful old scholar. Thank you for sharing your incredible career journey and success. Congratulations!

After graduating from Wilderness, where she was a member of the SRC, Claire accepted a scholarship at Bond University and lived in student accommodation. It has been another amazing educational experience. Claire truly believes that Wilderness gave her the ability to succeed. We would like to congratulate Claire who graduated from Bond in February 2017 with a Bachelor of Laws degree.


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1972 REUNION On Saturday 29 April, 18 girls from the class of 1972 met for an informal evening of drinks and finger food at the Red House in North Adelaide. We were celebrating 45 years since we finished Year 12. The night was a resounding success! I had to encourage the last group out the door, still chatting well after it was time for the café to close! We were well looked after by old scholar Kate Russell and her team. The food was fabulous and there was plenty of it. Everyone enjoyed their welcome glass of bubbles too! The girls loved the venue. It was cosy and intimate and worked really well for the size of our group. Everyone just chatted and ate with time and space for mingling too. Now I’m thinking about the 50 year reunion and hoping that we get a great turn out for that! Roll on 2022! Carolyn Cockburn (1972)

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WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS REUNIONS NEW SOUTH WALES REUNION A glamorous and vibrant group of Wildy Old Scholars met at The Royal in Paddington. The new venue attracted a great crowd. There were 51 girls, and a great age range, which always makes the night so much fun. It was lovely to see all the girls finding common ground through the night. The girls were interested to hear about the physical changes at the School with the opening of the three new buildings last year and many seem keen to visit when they are next in Adelaide, something which is certainly encouraged. Thank you to everyone who came and to Wunny Black and Millie Michael for their advice and assistance. Thanks to all for making it such a fun and happy night!

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A Wunny Black, Suzie Hamilton-Flanagan, Lou Geddes B Jess Hill Smith, Millie Michael, Edwina McLeay C Tory Cole, Georgie Taylor, Steph Rapajic-Leaver D Georgie Gibbons, Miranda Barnes, Victoria Wells

E Mary Crawford, Anna Freney, Amy Holt F Diana Hirsch, Marie Boynton, Wendy Boynton G Lucy Patten, Kate Dickson, Susie Anderson, Mandi Wicks, Georgie Rasmussen, Caroline Searcy, Tamara Kerlander H Kate Hage, Felicity Hennessy, Kate Eagle

For reunion questions please contact Jodie Escott, Manager of Development and Community on jescott@wilderness.com.au

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VICTORIAN REUNION It was an early start for our Wilderness Old Scholars living in Victoria on Saturday 24 June but it was well worth it! We enjoyed breakfast at The Botanical, South Yarra, a gorgeous venue for a brisk, sunny, winter morning. Thank you to Samantha Wood and Sarah Findlay for their assistance. Jodie flew in from Adelaide joining the girls for a fabulous morning that drifted well into the afternoon. We are looking at a Friday evening event in 2018, the date to be advised early next year. Thank you to all who came along.

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A The Botanical gathering B Samantha Wood & Annabel McDonald C Tess Porter, Megan Goodwin & Jane Chapman D Kirsti Edmunds & Isabel Duncan E Sophie Goldsworthy & Alice Bungey F Marianne Cooklin, Annabel McDonald, Trish Parker & Alice Gilbert G Shannon Magasdi & Natasha Hogan H Megan Goodwin, Jane Chapman & Alice White I Sarah Findlay, Anne Duncan, Carolyn Chadunow J Elisa de Wit & Emily Taylor

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IF YOU ARE AN OLD SCHOLAR WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU AND SHARE YOUR MILESTONES AND CELEBRATE YOUR SUCCESS. RHODA NICHOLS BOTH (NEE ROYAL)

Please email your news and a photo to communications@wilderness.com.au

OLD SCHOLAR DATES FOR THE 2017 CALENDAR

TERM 3

Old Boys’ Cocktail Party Thursday 31 August 1957-63 Morning Tea Tuesday 12 September Annual Dinner Thursday 28 September @ The Maid

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Coffee Morning for Old Scholars with Daughters at Wilderness Wednesday 18 October Southern Fleurieu Dinner Friday 20 October 1964 & Prior Old Scholars’ Lunch Thursday 2 November Golf Day Monday 13 November


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WILDY NEWS WILDY BABIES

ANNOUNCEMENTS ENGAGEMENTS Elizabeth Nosworthy (2003) to Mark Dansie Meredith Nosworthy (2004) to Norman Schulze

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A Bianca Blaschek (2002) - Aspen Trinity Jaensch Blaschek B Melissa Sheldon (1998) – Winnie Sheldon Kasbergen C Jane Simmons (2001) – Ella Linda Mayell D Alannah James (Williams) (2009) – Xavier William James E Eve Fairey (Potter) (2002) – Isla Hope Fairey F Joella Nelson (Klein) (2006) - Maddison Ann Nelson

BIRTHS Bianca Blaschek (2002) - Aspen Trinity Jaensch Blaschek Melissa Sheldon (1998) – Winnie Sheldon Kasbergen Jane Simmons (2001) – Ella Linda Mayell Lisa Boot (nee Nosworthy) (2005) – Felicity Anne Boot Alannah James (Williams) (2009) – Xavier William James Eve Fairey (Potter) (2002) – Isla Hope Fairey Joella Nelson (Klein) (2006) - Maddison Ann Nelson

DEATHS Josephine Hosking (Angus) (1937) Judy Callman (Hines) (1958) Lesley Tanner (Giles) (1944) Marcia Harvie (Jones) (1946) Philippa Matches (Timcke) (1950) Christine Zemancheff (Horrocks) (1959) Cedric Wells (1942) Roslyn Judson (1961) Fiona Luckett (1948)


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Wilderness Times Issue 77