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SPRING 2017

ISSUE #78


Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

CONTENTS 3

Principal’s Thoughts

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Meet the SRC Executive For 2018

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Butterfly Project Rebecca Williamson

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Reception Fairy Gardens Abby Matte

11 STEM in Year 2 - Dollhouses Kate Brennan

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Wilderness Debating Matthew Hawkins

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Introducing Members of our Governing Council Will Abel Smith

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Mary-Ann Matthews Scholarship

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Green Door Society

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Wilderness Foundation No Show Ball Brown Sisters Memorial Year 10 Entrance Scholarship

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Faculty in Focus Mathematics

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Raising Awareness: Gender Equality Georgia Honan

36 Creswell Year 10 Entrance Scholarship 40

Wildy Women Leading the Way

43 WOSA Wilderness Old Scholars Events and Celebrations Reunions

Wilderness School has a number of social media platforms to connect with our community and discover the latest news. www.facebook.com/WildernessSchool www.linkedin.com/company/wilderness-school twitter.com/wilderness1884 vimeo.com/wildernessschool ES

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17 Year 9 REALISE Lauren Walker 19 The Importance of Technology Lani Brockwell 21 STEM Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths

O C I AT IO

Join the Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association page on Facebook. This page is set up for Old Scholars to communicate, network and hear about upcoming alumnae events. Once you are a member you can then share with other Old Scholars in your Facebook network.


“[The STEM gender gap] disempowers girls and women and throws a shadow over entire societies, placing a break on progress to sustainable development. In this new age of limits, when every country is seeking new sources of dynamism, no one can afford to shunt aside 50 percent of its creativity… 50 percent of its innovation.” UNESCO Director-General, Irina Bokova


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

PRINCIPAL’S THOUGHTS

In a rapidly changing society where technology and innovation are transforming the workforce, there are extraordinary opportunities for young women who are agile, inventive and curious about their world. A recent UNESCO report, ‘Cracking the Code,’ described the significant underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professions worldwide, arguing that girls are the greatest untapped resource in providing a sustainable future for our world. At present only 28% of all STEM researchers are female and it is disturbing to note that since Marie Curie won the Nobel Prize

in 1903, only 17 women have won a Nobel Prize in physics, chemistry or medicine, compared with a staggering 572 men. With more than 40% of today’s jobs at risk of becoming automated and approximately 75% of fast-growing occupations requiring STEM skills, it makes sense to encourage our girls to develop and pursue their natural love of the sciences. Evidence shows that girls’ self-efficacy and attitudes are strongly influenced by the explicit and implicit messages they pick up from a very young age. The way parents, teachers and the wider community interact with girls has a determining influence on the way they view their capacity in STEM-related subjects or in their consideration of STEM as a potential career pathway. Recently we welcomed astronaut Sandra Magnus, Executive Director of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics to Wilderness. Sandra flew five missions for NASA, logged 157 days in orbit, and lived for more than four months on the International Space Station. Her dream to become an astronaut started in Middle School. But it wasn’t until she discovered engineering that it became a reality. Sandy shared how when she looked back at Earth from space, she


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“[The STEM gender gap] disempowers girls and women and throws a shadow over entire societies, placing a break on progress to sustainable development. In this new age of limits, when every country is seeking new sources of dynamism, no one can afford to shunt aside 50 percent of its creativity … 50 percent of its innovation.” UNESCO Director-General, Irina Bokova

noticed how, “very small and very fragile our atmosphere is. It makes you think about our planet as a whole system. We’re all there living together as human beings and other organisms and we have to take care of each other.” We are delighted that 11 Wilderness students have nominated to take part in the HASSE Space program in Houston at NASA next year. Who knows which of them will be Australia’s next female Astronaut? Learning in an all girls’ environment also gives students a head start. UNESCO suggests, “single-sex learning environments … allow greater time for teacher interaction and opportunities for inquiry for girls.” At Wilderness, no subject is gendered. Our girls spend their days being mathematicians, artists, historians, writers, linguists and scientists. We introduce girls to STEM when they are very young, nurture their STEM interests, and support them to sustain STEMrelated efforts through to university. Girls from Year 9 and 10 participate in STEM Sista, a program developed to provide girls with industry experience and mentoring from experts. A record number of students have been selected to attend the National Youth Science Forum in

Canberra, a credit to the girls and their teachers. High numbers of girls continue STEM subjects all the way to Year 12 and beyond. Many have personal success and embrace opportunities offered. Recently, Bridget Smart and Isabelle Greco (Year 12), were awarded 2 of only 3 Marta Sved Scholarships for studies in Mathematics by the University of Adelaide. Another 11 girls participate in the University’s early entry program which guarantees acceptance into most Faculty of Sciences Degree programs if they study two subjects selected from Biology, Chemistry, Specialist Maths and Physics. Our graduates work at the highest levels and are making their mark internationally. After 2 years at MIT in Harvard, Phiala Shanhan (2007) has taken two positions as an assistant professor at the College of William and Mary in Virginia, and a senior staff scientist at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, also in Virginia. Phiala was recently named by Forbes Magazine as being one of the most influential people in science under 30. From Intel to Facebook, Google and Apple, technology companies are joining other STEM industry leaders to attract women into

their organisations. Coco Wong (2008) now works for Elon Musk’s Tesla organisation as an Engineering Program Manager. With the development of the defence program in South Australia and the announcement of the National Space agency, new opportunities are emerging on a daily basis. It takes a collective effort to capture the minds and hearts of girls and inspire them to pursue and persist in STEM studies and careers. In a world where girls are driven to succeed and often pressured to get things right, STEM gives them the opportunity to play, to experiment, to learn from grand failures and to make startling discoveries. Nurturing the curiosity and courage to explore ignites the flame of innovation. This is the future. This is the opportunity we want available and accessible for all Wilderness girls.

Jane Danvers Principal


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

DANAE MAVRAKIS SRC PRESIDENT

MEET THE SRC EXECUTIVE FOR 2018 Wilderness School actively cultivates leadership qualities in our girls. We aim to build the understandings and skills of leadership through the curriculum and the many, varied activities of school life in order to become respected leaders who act with integrity and model ethical behaviour. We are delighted to introduce our SRC Executive for 2018.

What legacy would you like to leave Wilderness? The SRC of 2018 want to try to leave Wilderness a better place than we found it; a difficult task, but one that we are determined to accomplish nonetheless! Our primary focus for next year will be to increase support for all girls, and therefore inspire the rest of the girls at Wildy to do so as well. This falls under two main categories: supporting the growth of relationships between girls of all year levels, and supporting girls in their involvement within any activity, be it extra-curricular, community or in class. For example, we want to see as many girls as possible supporting their peers by coming to watch Intercol, the Annual Music Concert, the Debating Grand Final, the drama play, or whatever else it may be. Ultimately, we want to continue this year’s SRC vision by ensuring all girls pursue their passions, and show them as much support and encouragement as we can along the way. What does leadership mean to you? Leadership to me means guiding and inspiring others, through a shared vision, to accomplish our goals. It is about putting together a team and ensuring that this team can work as a cohesive unit. Essentially, a leader’s job is to get the best out of people. Leadership isn’t about the leader, it’s about being able to inspire and motivate others to excel and thus reach their capabilities and beyond. What are three things we don’t know about you? • I am an avid Harry Potter fan and I constantly pull out random trivia from the series • I know the entire Hamilton musical off by heart • Greece is my favourite place in the world Which three people would you invite to dinner and why? Malala Yousafzai for her incredible strength, bravery, and passion for human rights; Emma Watson for her intelligence and efforts surrounding women’s rights; and Lin Manuel Miranda for his sheer genius and capacity to create the incredible. Most of all, I would love to simply witness these three people in a room together, as I believe listening to their conversation alone would leave a huge impact, as well as heavily inspire me.


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ASHLEIGH DE SILVA SRC VICE PRESIDENT

ANTHEA YEW SECRETARY

What legacy would you like to leave Wilderness? To be part of a leadership group that inspires girls to support one another within all areas of the school, whether that be through involvement in sport, music or various other commitments. As an entire year level, we would like to further foster interconnected relationships between year levels and ensure 2018 is the best year it can be.

What legacy would you like to leave Wilderness? As part of the SRC, I hope to create an environment that inspires girls to support each other wholeheartedly in all their endeavours, whether they participate in music, sport, drama, debating, art – anything and everything! We want girls to know that their commitments and achievements are worth celebrating, and that they can gain strength and encouragement from those around them. Through this, we hope to deepen the relationships between year levels and show that every girl can play a part in creating a supportive environment for all.

What does leadership mean to you? A leader is constantly learning and adopting new views to further improve their capabilities. A good leader values all environments that build and foster relationships where people are engaged and feel connected to those around them. Successful leaders know how to reach their goals, always keeping the end in mind, and are responsible citizens who take responsibility for their own actions. What are three things we don’t know about you? • Officeworks is my favourite store • I love knitting • I am extremely afraid of pigeons and geckos Which three people would you invite to dinner and why? I would invite Emma Watson, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Alicia Keys to dinner, as I believe that these three women are truly remarkable and inspirational female rights advocates, who have done so much with their lives already and would have amazing stories to share.

What does leadership mean to you? To me, leadership is about listening sincerely to everyone, and doing the best you can to inspire a team (or in our case, our Wildy family) to work towards fulfilling a common vision. Moreover, I believe a successful leader unlocks in others the confidence to become leaders of their own accord. The ability to empower others to create their own change, no matter how big or small it may be, is a characteristic of truly admirable leadership. What are three things we don’t know about you? • I love public speaking • My Hogwarts house is Ravenclaw • I used to have a pet chicken that my brother and I lovingly named Chicken Licken Which three people would you invite to dinner and why? Michelle Obama, as she is the epitome of eloquence, resilience and humility, and is so passionate about girls’ education; Sheryl Sandberg, as she is a strong and courageous female role model in STEM; and Charlie Teo, for his sheer audacity in choosing to operate on brain tumours deemed inoperable by other neurosurgeons, fighting to give his patients more time to spend with their loved ones. These people are truly remarkable and would have valuable messages and experiences to share.


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

BUTTERFLY PROJECT I wonder… Does a caterpillar really turn into a butterfly? This was the question that sparked the interest of the Mamie House girls when they recently engaged in their thought-provoking butterfly project. With the support of Wendy and Kathy, the Mamie House educators, the girls investigated the life cycle of a butterfly through their own observations, questions and research. At every stage of the project, the girls were incredibly excited by their discoveries, particularly as the learning was continuously driven by their own curious questions. They were thoroughly immersed in science, mathematics and literacy, and supported to develop the skills to predict, observe, reason, record, investigate and ask questions, which was impressive given that at the time of the project, most girls were only three years old.

I wonder… What is a caterpillar doing when it is inside a chrysalis? In response to this question posed by one of the students, predictions were made, some of which are documented below. ‘The caterpillar is sleeping and it is going to change its wings.’ Amelia D ‘I think he is sleeping and he is changing into a butterfly.’ Maya ‘It is changing its wings. He changed them in the chrysalis.’ Charlotte ‘They have to stay in there for a long time and slowly change into a butterfly.’ Amelia M I wonder… How long does it take for a caterpillar to turn into a butterfly? The girls made predictions and observations, which were recorded and reviewed as the project progressed. The number of days they thought this would take varied from three to one hundred days. Constant and careful watch was

maintained for twenty-one days and then finally the girls were in a flutter of excitement as two of the monarch butterflies hatched. With much joy and enthusiasm, the girls patiently waited for their wings to dry, eager to release them into the Mamie House garden. I wonder… After releasing the first butterfly into the Mamie House garden, a final question was asked, ‘How can you tell the difference between a boy and a girl butterfly?’ This had everyone perplexed, especially the teachers, as they had not considered the answer to this question before. Again, predictions were made and documented. ‘It is a girl because of the way she moves her wings.’ Chloe ‘You need to look at them.’ Charlotte ‘It has spots!’ Amelia D ‘A Dad comes out first.’ Charlotte Still unsure of the answer, it was decided that it would be helpful to


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conduct some research using a book borrowed from the Library. It was determined that a female butterfly has thick stripes on her wings and a male butterfly has thin stripes and two black dots. Next time a butterfly hatches, the girls have decided that they will use their ‘scientific eyes’ and look carefully at their wings to see whether the butterfly is male or female. Ben, Beau, Krystal and Winter were all carefully released into the garden, which was a very exciting event. I wonder… What can we do to encourage butterflies to visit the Mamie Garden? ‘You can look at the sky…they need to work, they need to sleep and they eat.’ Chloe ‘You look for more eggs.’ Julia ‘You need a pretend picture of a butterfly.’ Maya ‘We need to put some fairy notes in the garden.’ Amelia D

‘We need more butterflies and I could do some magic.’ Vasiliki After some discussion it was decided that a special flower would be planted to attract butterflies into the garden. The flower was also accompanied by some drawings of butterflies so that the butterflies would know where to land. This project not only captured the hearts and minds of our youngest learners but their Year 5 buddy class also enjoyed constructing a chrysalis and a butterfly out of clay with their little friends. The Mamie girls always enjoy learning with their buddies but this was an especially enjoyable activity and an excellent opportunity for the girls to share their new knowledge with the ‘big’ girls. There is no doubt that this project continued to ignite the Mamie House girls’ love of learning, especially as it was continually driven by their interests

and questions. Due to the success of the project, the girls are now carefully observing tadpoles, and the cycle of learning has begun again.

Rebecca Williamson Assistant Head of Junior School ‑ Early Years


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

RECEPTION FAIRY GARDENS Wonderment, awe, creativity and imagination are at the core of the Reception Fairy Garden Project. We decided to initiate a project that would be student focussed and driven, and we are so pleased to see how the project is unfolding. Miss Mamie Brown once said that “We ourselves hope there will always be laughing girls, sparaxis and gum trees and a few dogs in the garden, even when the Browns will have crossed the border.” And what better way to honour this than to build a play space where the girls can be amongst the wilderness. Our girls have thoughtfully taken steps to plan, build and create special spaces in their playground where they can escape to their imagination, and in the busy lives of children they can just simply be children. The values that we hold dear are that of respectful relationships, adventurous learning, responsible citizenship, and a true and courageous self, and it is wonderful to see how this project encompasses all of these ideals. Our girls can interact with their friends kindly, tell stories, make new friends, play within natural surroundings, and be responsible for looking after their special space. As Margaret Brown once said: “We founded this school with the strong belief in


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the need for unlimited kindness in relationships, joy in learning and academic adventure, a spirit of humility, and the balance between seeking individual excellence and success and generous service to the community.” Our students have wonderful inquiring minds and as Albert Einstein once said: “Play is the highest form of research.” This project has allowed the girls to learn to write procedures; create pertinent surveys; and, to be chefs, artists, builders and architects. They are compiling design briefs, learning about financial literacy, and organising and running their very first fundraiser.

building stages of the project. These experiences have created an ownership and personal love where we see the students taking home their ideas to their families and coming to school the next day with models and art work of their thinking. We are so honoured to have our Fairy Garden named after a former old scholar. We are pleased to announce that our Garden will be named “The Helen Cruickshank Garden”. We think it is a lovely sentiment to have a sensory and imaginative garden to honour Mrs Cruickshank’s memory and bequest to the school.

They have engaged in real life learning and explored their creative selves. Not only has this project inspired the children and teachers but we have also had interest from our parents and the wider community. Due to the generosity of our school community, the girls will have their designs of fairy houses, bridges and fairy play equipment, just to name a few, transformed into professional posters. This process has allowed the girls to work with architects on their computer programs to produce the finished product. We have had an overwhelming number of volunteers wanting to help us with the craft and

The enthusiasm and pride our girls are taking in this project is why we teach. To see the joy of their love of learning and the happiness on their faces is why we enjoy guiding and shaping their experiences. We will leave you with a thought from John Burroughs: “Knowledge without love will not stick. But if love comes first, knowledge is sure to follow.” Abby Matte Reception Teacher


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

STEM IN YEAR 2 DOLLHOUSES

Education that inspires and engages takes many different forms as the interests of students shift with their age. In Year 2, integrating play is essential to grounding our students’ understanding of the purpose of our tasks. As part of our curriculum, the Year 2 girls embarked on a termlong project to create dollhouses by combining their skills and knowledge of measurement, push-pull forces and creative design. We challenged the girls’ spatial and measurement skills by requiring specific inclusions, particularly shaped windows, a 9cm tall doll, and the use of simple machines. The girls were free to plan and build their dollhouse according to their creative desires. This project builds on our focus of STEM education, which is an interdisciplinary approach to build rigorous academic concepts through real-world lessons. Students are asked to apply Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics in context, to make connections between school, community, work and the global enterprise (Tsupros et al, 2009). Integrated projects are essential to our students’ growing abilities. This is evidenced through the STEM Connections Project finding that

students’ skills are enriched when learning areas are combined and when authentic learning opportunities focus on solutions-based project learning (ACARA, 2015). Zara Armitage experienced this process, commenting: “I had a problem because my first lift was too heavy for my pulley to work so I had to design it again.” The girls’ work was hands-on and collaborative, and decisions about solutions were student-generated. The STEM environment offered rich possibilities for creative solutions. When designing and testing their dollhouses the girls at times struggled and failed to solve the problem. They could learn from what went wrong and try again. The Year 2 girls realised that mistakes were a positive step on the way to discovering and designing their product. Bella Pasin observed: “I enjoyed making my dollhouse. I used a cup for the elevator first but it broke because my doll weighed too much. So, I made another one out of cardboard and lots of tape. Then I tested it by holding the string to check that the new one could hold my doll without breaking. I think I will remember about pulleys now because I got to learn by experiencing it myself and having to fix something.” Eva Baggio

also commented: “I had a problem measuring inside the house because my ruler wouldn’t fit so I had to work out other ways to measure. I had to make two elevators because my first one didn’t work.” The STEM curriculum provides opportunities for all learners to develop skills and learn content important for 21st Century learning at an appropriate level of challenge (Vygotsky, 1978). Using activity-based learning models, students are provided opportunities to develop their reasoning skills, critical thinking skills, creativity and innovation. It allows students to develop a set of thinking, reasoning, teamwork, investigative and creative skills that they can use in real-life situations. The process inspires students to formulate questions that can be answered through investigation. This informs the students’ understanding before they begin the engineering design process to solve problems (Kennedy and Odell, 2014). Alexandra Pringle said that she had to “really think about where I needed things to go in advance because I needed to think about the mechanical features and have a steady hand. Getting the second floor on was the trickiest part.” Meanwhile, Charlotte Holsten had to “measure properly so


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“I enjoyed making my dollhouse. I used a cup for the elevator first but it broke because my doll weighed too much. So, I made another one out of cardboard and lots of tape. Then I tested it by holding the string to check that the new one could hold my doll without breaking. I think I will remember about pulleys now because I got to learn by experiencing it myself and having to fix something.” - Bella Pasin, Year 2

that the wall paper fitted on the wall.” In addition to creating some amazing dollhouses, the girls investigated how pulleys work, and designed 3D rooms and furniture using Makers Empire on iPads. The connections between twodimensional and three-dimensional shapes are casually formed before they are taught explicitly in later years. They increased their ability to persist and problem solve through the various challenges that arose and adapted their thinking to the unexpected. The girls worked collaboratively with the Year 5 students who helped add wiring and lights to their dollhouses, exposing them to concepts and challenges beyond their development. On completion of the project, the girls were given time to evaluate the experience. Margot Tembel reflected that, “We were learning about measuring, and making the doll house made it so much easier for me to understand why I had to learn about measuring. It was hard before, but making it fun and more real made it so much easier for me to understand.” Kate Brennan Year 2 Teacher

REFERENCES ACARA (2015). ‘Stem Report’, https://www. australiancurriculum.edu.au/resources/stem/ stem-report Kennedy, T., and Odell, M. (2014). ‘Engaging students in STEM education’, Science Education International, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 246-258. Tsupros, N., Kohler, R., and Hallinen, J. (2009). ‘STEM education: A project to identify the missing components’, https://www.cmu.edu/gelfand/ documents/stem-survey-report-cmu-iu1.pdf Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). ‘Interaction between learning and development’ in M. Cole et al (eds.), Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes (pp. 79-91). Harvard University Press, Cambridge.


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

FACULTY IN FOCUS MATHEMATICS

“When am I ever going to use this?” “Why do Specialist Maths if I’m not going to do Engineering?” “I did Algebra at school and have never used it” “Why is Maths so important?” These are just some of the questions and comments most frequently heard by teachers of Mathematics, challenging the value of some of the mathematical concepts taught in schools. Certainly there are times when Mathematics is presented primarily as a functional activity: we study Mathematics because it provides a solid foundation to many aspects of daily life, and it helps us to function competently as a consumer

and citizen. As students advance and delve deeper into Digital Technology and the Sciences, they are able to experience firsthand that Mathematics underpins scientific understandings and technological advances, even though it can still appear to students as a series of unrelated theoretical algorithms which they must endlessly practise. However, the skillset we want for our students at Wilderness is not confined to the utilitarian aspects of Mathematics, such as reading a graph or a spreadsheet, or even solving a quadratic equation. The challenge for our Mathematics teachers is primarily how to convey to our students the idea that Mathematics is a way of thinking and that problem solving is a journey into the unknown that is full of intrigue, inspiration, creativity and discovery. Teaching and learning for understanding, with an emphasis on pattern and structure, and the accomplishment of discovery, has become more important than finding ‘the value of x’.


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Our work with Ron Ritchart for the last 18 months has provided us with a powerful and effective framework to create our own Culture of Thinking within our classrooms, so that our students not only know ‘how’ and ‘why’, but they also have the ability to apply their knowledge and transfer understanding in unfamiliar contexts. Keith Devlin, Professor of Mathematics at Stanford University, says that “It’s still the case that Maths gets you jobs, but the skill that is in great demand today, and will continue to grow, is the ability to take a novel problem, possibly not well-defined, and likely not having a single “right” answer, and make progress on it, in some cases (but not all!) “solving” it (whatever that turns out to mean). The problems we need Mathematics for today come in a messy, real-world context, and part of making progress is to figure out just what you need from that context” (Shapiro, 2014). Whilst it is well known that Mathematics is multi-disciplinary, has vast scope, and is universal, it is often used in unseen and covert ways, so that in practice it is often unrecognisable in

terms of what is learned at school. Our reply to the Algebra comment above is always that you don’t even know that you are using it! For example, when you make decisions requiring rational and logical thought, and when you sort and analyse to solve difficult problems, you are using algebra. Persisting, challenging, and thinking critically and innovatively will equip our girls for a future filled with vast and multi-dimensional qualitative and quantitative changes. Learning ‘what to do when you don’t know what to do’ requires creativity, discernment and acumen, and if we can get our students to see that Mathematics is many, many things other than getting the answer right, then there is every chance that they will be equipped for that future. Helen Douvartzidis Head of Mathematics

REFERENCES Shapiro, P. (2014). ‘5 Things You Need To Know About The Future Of Math’, www.forbes.com/sites/ jordanshapiro/2014/07/24/5-thingsyou-need-to-know-about-the-future-ofmath/#47fa9378590e


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

RAISING AWARENESS: GENDER EQUALITY Earlier this year, four members of the Wilderness SRC approached four prefects from Prince Alfred College to start an initiative to raise awareness about gender equality in both our school communities. We were thrilled with the support we received from the boys in helping us address this topic. In our initial meeting, we considered specific issues that are most prevalent in today’s society, such as the gender pay gap and prescribed gender roles. However, as students, we determined there was little we could do about these issues, and we decided instead to focus on sexual harassment, an issue much more relevant to adolescents. It was not until we began the project that we realised just how much of a problem sexual harassment is. According to the United Nations, 1 in 5 women and 1 in 10 men globally have

been sexually harassed at some point in their lives. To raise awareness of sexual harassment and how it can be prevented, our new-formed team of students, along with Mr Trentin from Wilderness and Ms Psaromatis from PAC, went about planning assemblies at both schools. School Captain of PAC, Nick Demianyk, outlined the fundamental aim of the initiative in his address, as he said “We want to simply educate people on how actions are perceived and what we believe is and is not okay.”


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The team also produced a short video which was played at the assemblies. This featured students from both Wilderness and PAC delivering a powerful message about the prevention of sexual harassment, with one line declaring “It can be as easy as pointing out a hurtful comment, or challenging the way we talk.” Wilderness student Reshma Berggren concluded the assemblies, explaining that “In every circumstance, we should have zero tolerance for sexual harassment. Taking responsibility falls to every one of us.” All eight students, along with the two teachers, have been incredibly proud to be part of this project, and look forward to seeing how the next group of leaders continue the initiative.

Georgia Honan 2017 SRC Vice President


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

YEAR 9 REALISE

CRAWFORD CAMPUS

“Whenever I am asked how REALISE was for me, I always answer the same. I say that it was amazing, because it truly was. All of the girls in our class heard the stories about how eye-opening and wonderful the previous girls’ experiences were, but I don’t think we really understood this fully until we were really there. REALISE was not only a fun and enjoyable experience, it was also a huge learning opportunity for all of us.” (Hanah Denison) Embracing opportunities that reach beyond the physical confines of the classroom, all Year 9 students at Wilderness School participate in REALISE: a three-week long, unique and dynamic learning experience at our Crawford campus on the Coorong. In this learning environment, students are supported to become capable, confident and connected young women, developing their resilience and resourcefulness in the face of any challenges and uncertainty they may face. The value Wilderness School places on Respectful Relationships is intrinsic to the philosophy embedded throughout REALISE of team work, group cohesion, and relationship building. The girls’ wellbeing is enhanced in a safe and supportive environment, as they build and strengthen relationships with peers and adults. REALISE provides girls the chance to demonstrate real world application of their learning. It encourages them to pursue both personal and group success by taking responsible risks and being resourceful within their environment. Independence is fostered by girls taking responsibility for their actions and being involved in all

aspects of the program including daily leadership, menu planning, shopping for and cooking their own meals, and maintaining a clean and tidy cabin. “Over the 3 weeks, I was faced with many challenges, but with the support and the positive atmosphere that the girls and staff provided, I achieved things I never thought possible. Realise has taught me so many important skills and has provided me with a greater sense of independence.” (Scarlett Miles) The Outdoor Education aspect of the program builds girls’ character by offering them the opportunity to persevere through challenges, be resilient, develop grit and confidence. From conquering the abseil at Mt Arapiles, surfing the waves on Long Beach in Robe, kayaking on the South Lagoon of the Coorong, or bushwalking along the lakes on the Nukan Kungun trail, the girls are taken out of their comfort zones to realise their potential, achieving goals that they didn’t believe were possible in incredible environments.

“REALISE involves challenging and extending us beyond our comfort zones. In particular, rock climbing was a challenge to many of us, as we faced a common fear of heights. We had to develop a strong sense of trust in both ourselves and our team of belayers. Despite the challenges faced, we all persisted and many of us conquered our fears and made it to the top.” (Tahlia Holzer)

REALISE plays an important role in building the girls’ appreciation for the natural environment, whilst addressing the need for environmental conservation both in their local area and on a larger scale. A significant focus for 2017/2018 involves a partnership with Friends of the Coorong, whereby the girls on REALISE are planning and building a bush walking shelter, which will not only be beneficial to the future Wilderness students but also the local community by attracting interstate and international visitors to the region.

“A community grows when people help each other out when being selfless, caring and kind. The community grows when people take time to know each other and not give up on others. It grows when people talk about their problems and create solutions together. It’s about giving things and not expecting back.” (Sophie Goulding) Equally the REALISE program introduces the girls to significant subject matters such as the sustainability of our world, ethical issues, and Indigenous culture and history, preparing them to be agents of change by acting as responsible citizens. Whilst contributing data to the Tangaroa Blue Foundation through beach litter surveys, realising the extent of our waste problem in Australia, hearing from Sea Shepherd and listening to the stories and history of Raukkan from Clyde Rigney, the girls are motivated to make long-lasting change in their community. Their efforts to live sustainably whilst at REALISE include making ethical shopping choices, focusing on specific issues


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which hold personal value to each group, taking reusable shopping and vegetable bags to the supermarket, and making and using beeswax wraps to replace glad wrap in their cabins.

“REALISE has shaped me and helped me realise the importance of family, friends, reflection and living sustainably. It is important for our generation to experience what it is like to live sustainably and the impact we have on our world. Having people such as Sea Shepherd come in and talk to us and activities such as the beach clean-up walk, where we picked up 45kg of plastic and rubbish, have helped me gain a new perspective. I speak for the year level when I say that even upon arriving at home, we have made a conscious effort to take shorter showers, switch off power points when not in use, and use paper bags when shopping. Also, many of the girls, including myself, have invested in a ‘Keep cup’. REALISE was a magical experience, creating memories to last a lifetime, and we are all so fortunate to have had the opportunity.“ (Panayiota Dimitropoulos) The power of REALISE is in the transformative experiences girls are exposed to over the three-week period, encouraging them to develop perspective, whilst fostering lifelong learning and building skills essential for their future successes. Lauren Walker Coordinator of Outdoor Education


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

THE IMPORTANCE OF TECHNOLOGY Since the invention of the hand-axe, our culture has been characterised by our ability to adapt to technology. As educators we consider how, when and which elements of technology we introduce to our students. The Technologies Scope and Sequence is the instrument that we use to facilitate this journey for students. This document integrates the Computer Technologies and Design Technologies fields, building skills vertically as students progress. The Scope and Sequence enables our teachers to operate with a clear purpose: to equip and inspire students to deal critically and creatively with reality, and discover how to participate in the transformation of their digital and designed world (Hederman, 1982). The question is not why we teach our girls technology, but how we can do so to empower their visions; visions which we acknowledge are independent of us, as they define and re-design our future.

As educators, we know that education carries far past the classroom door or the last day of Year 12. In writing the Technology Scope and Sequence, we attempt to consider the future and estimate the challenges our students will meet. In 2015, there was an international shortage of 38% for employees in fields requiring STEM skills. As careers and communication are re-imagined, this gap is expected to widen before it closes (UNESCO, 2015). Consider that female participation rates in some industries such as Gaming Software are as low as 12% and that this industry is expected to be worth US$113 billion in 2018 (IGDA, 2017). In sharing this knowledge with my Year 5 students, their frustration and confusion was palpable, and thus as their guide, it is difficult not to feel bound to consider the factors at play and to begin preparing them for the challenges that lie ahead. While gendered stereotypes create the greatest barrier to women’s participation in STEM careers (Huhman, 2012) the perception of


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requiring permission is the key factor in building resilience (Margolis and Fisher, 2002). To combat this, Wilderness has examined the gateways that exist in our students’ access to technology and have created spaces for creative exploration. Across year levels, tasks are embedded with the processes of Art and Design, Mathematics tasks ask students to create a built product, and Science tasks engage with creative design processes. Further to this, initiatives such as the Coding Club and the Technology Committee give students time for exploration and play. Through these activities, we promote an assumed right to explore and create in a supportive environment. This empowers students to construct meaning which is their own, and to form knowledge of software past the boundaries of our class tasks. It is too easy to assume that 21st century skills are an educational fad and not take the opportunity to acknowledge that our students are being required to be more emotionally resilient and intellectually flexible than any generation before them.

Not every child is destined to be an engineer, a software designer or an app developer; however, they will exist in a world in which they must engage and utilise technology to create success in their own journey. We endeavour to equip every student with the confidence, terminology, experience, and an assumed right to engage with these and future technologies and negotiate the impact their journey has on our culture and world. Lani Brockwell Teacher of Year 5

REFERENCES Hederman, M. (1982). ‘Paolo Freire’s pedagogy of the oppressed’, The Crane Bag, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 58-63. Huhman, H. (2012). ‘STEM fields and the gender gap: where are the women?’ https://www.forbes.com/sites/ work-in-progress/2012/06/20/stem-fields-and-thegender-gap-where-are-the-women/#3ed8a39441ba International Game Developers Association (2014). ‘Game developers at a glance’, http://c.ymcdn.com/ sites/www.igda.org/resource/collection/9215B88F2AA3-4471-B44D-B5D58FF25DC7/igda_ surveyresults2014_v7.pdf Margolis, J and Fisher, A. (2002). ‘Unlocking the clubhouse: women in computing’, MIT Press, Cambridge. UNESCO (2015). ‘Closing the gender gap in STEM’, http://unesdoc.unesco.org/ images/0024/002457/245717e.pdf


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

STEM

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, MATHS

STEM touches every aspect of our lives, from our smartphones to the technologies that enable us to explore the world around us and outer space. It also drives innovation in our fast-changing global economy. To succeed in this environment and for Australia to continue to prosper into the future, our students need a strong foundation in STEM. With employment in STEM growing two times faster than non-STEM occupations, key aspects of the strategy focus on: • building teacher capability to transform STEM learning • increasing student engagement in STEM learning • achieving excellence in STEM learning. A number of Wilderness girls have had success in the STEM area this year. An account of their experiences, their journey and how it has changed their perspective for the future is as follows.

NATIONAL YOUTH SCIENCE FORUM (NYSF) Although it was only a short two weeks, the 2017 National Youth Science Forum was one of the most fulfilling experiences I have ever had the privilege to be a part of. Initially thinking that I would simply have the opportunity to do things that I would normally not be exposed to such as visiting laboratories, speaking to leading professionals and learning about current innovations in the STEM industry, NYSF far exceeded my expectations. Coming into the forum with an inkling of pursuing Medicine in the future, I returned with a wealth of knowledge about exciting careers in STEM that I had never considered before such as Bionics or Aerospace Engineering, and how every occupation was interrelated and could not be narrowed down to a single field or a single pathway to get there. One of the most memorable talks at the forum was listening to Nobel Laureate Professor Brian Schmidt speak about his theories regarding the expansion of the universe since the Big Bang. As I had


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MARTA SVED SCHOLARSHIP FOR MATHEMATICS AT ADELAIDE UNIVERSITY This year I have been fortunate enough to be offered the Marta Sved Scholarship for Mathematics at Adelaide University. Named after an incredible mathematician, and a past Wilderness Mathematics Teacher, this scholarship will provide invaluable support for me as I, hopefully, commence a Bachelor of Mathematical Sciences (Advanced) in 2018. never thought about it before, the talk opened my eyes to a whole new world of astronomy and how planets in space are accelerating away from a central point. His humility, philosophy and advice to the group that his success was simply dependent upon, “unbridled enthusiasm and 100% of my time” was awe-inspiring. Moreover, not only has NYSF broadened my perspective on the careers in STEM by being surrounded by such a diverse peer group, all passionate and driven to achieve their goals, NYSF allowed me to gain the much-needed confidence and motivation heading into Year 12, to make informed decisions and be driven to pursue my aspirations, regardless of how wild they may seem. Overall, the infectious energy of the forum, the inspiring and determined peers that I’m sure to have made life-long connections with, and the opportunities that we have all been given and will be given as a part of the NYSF community are all reasons that make the NYSF such a valuable experience. Sarah Dinh

Whilst I have always enjoyed Mathematics, Wilderness has been crucial in giving me the confidence to pursue this passion. From Year 6, when I first came to Wilderness, I felt encouraged to learn and grow, with extended problem solving classes providing a vital opportunity for me to flourish and be challenged as a learner, and gain confidence in my own abilities and understanding. I truly believe that it is through challenges and mistakes that we learn best, so having this opportunity, and this space where I felt free to take risks and make mistakes alongside other incredibly capable girls, provided an important foundation upon which I have been able to develop my problem-solving skills – both in and out of Mathematics. Throughout Middle School, being taught by the same passionate teachers who teach senior Mathematics not only laid the ground-work for a close-knit and supportive faculty, but also made classes fascinating and engaging.

Moreover, the community within classes, as we all helped each other improve our understanding and cooperated in solving questions with each other, meant that every girl had the opportunity to learn, grow, and teach. Now, in Year 12, being taught by teachers that have become important role models and friends, Maths classes have become a flexible environment, where teachers have found the balance between supporting us and letting us challenge ourselves independently as we move towards the unfettered world of university study. Having such supportive teachers and close-knit classes has made me more confident in my own abilities and has given me the space to indulge my passion for maths. I am truly so thankful for the all support and encouragement that I have received at Wilderness that has enabled me to not only nurture my dreams, but chase them. Isabelle Greco


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

STEM

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, MATHS

NATIONAL YOUTH SCIENCE FORUM PERSONAL LETTER NYSF consisted this year of two 12-day sessions held at the Australian National University Campus in Canberra. The NYSF is a program designed to connect students with an interest in Science and other STEM areas. At the forum there were students from all over the world. Between intriguing lectures, insightful lab visits, amazing events and meeting brilliant people, each of us were given the support to explore the forefront of scientific endeavour, a licence to follow Science. As NYSF alumni, we are part of a larger network of likeminded individuals, which will surely be invaluable to our future endeavours. Before I arrived at the session I didn’t have a real sense of the amazing journey which NYSF would reveal itself to be. Greeted at Burgmann College by students just as excited to start the forum as we were, I knew the session would be an amazing experience. Over the first few days the 196 students at the session bonded and met both their floor and interest groups. Having a strong interest in Physics, I was very excited to meet the rest of the Wu group, named after Chien-Shiung Wu, a Nuclear Physicist who helped develop the process for separating uranium-235 and uranium-238 from uranium metal via gaseous diffusion. In the Wu group there were 13 other students. It was amazing how well the groups were allocated - we all got along brilliantly and were constantly excited about the intriguing lab visits we attended.

While all the lab visits were excellent, the lab visit to the Physics Research Lab at ANU, where we were given a tour of both the Laser and Nuclear Physics labs, particularly stood out to me. We saw scientists who were able to image atoms by utilising the single photon emitting properties of electrons when exposed to correctly configured lasers and the 22 metre particle accelerator which is used for a wide array of research. While we were there a PhD student was using nuclear fusion to create gold isotopes from two lighter atoms, and the head of research was helping to prove the existence of dark matter. I was exposed to mind blowing science which has solidified my desire to pursue Science as I move from school into university. Another highly impactful experience of NYSF was the video conference with CERN. It was a unique opportunity that I do not think many other students will have. The physics that occurs in the particle accelerator is amazing, partially because it is done for pure scientific discovery but also the implications the discoveries made have on Physics. Throughout the 12 days we also heard from some inspiring speakers about pesticide resistance, drug legalisation, science in policy, forensics, Marine Biology and much more. Each of these talks broadened my scientific interests and gave me a better understanding of the wide range of opportunities available in Science. In addition to all the amazing lab visits, experiences and lectures, I had the

pleasure of meeting so many amazing people: brilliant, like-minded students who I spent the session laughing with, inspiring scientists and students who were eager to share their experiences, the lovely Staffies who were always ready for a laugh, the amazing staff at NYSF who made everything possible, the generous Rotarians who endorsed and supported me through the application process, Mr Ross for his encouragement and all the life-long friends I made during session. I would like to extend a special thank you to Margaret Northcote who made my attendance at the session possible, your generosity will never be forgotten. Attending the NYSF was an opportunity which has impacted me greatly, although probably in more ways than I am currently aware. Between intriguing lectures, insightful lab visits, amazing events and meeting brilliant people, my thinking has shifted. Year 12 stopped being an ends in itself but instead became a means; a means to explore the forefront of scientific endeavour, a licence to follow Science, to enjoy every second of Year 12 and most importantly to remain true to myself. Catherine Nguyen


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VISIT BY NADSA ASTRONAUT SANDRA MAGNUS Between 25 and 29 September, Adelaide had the opportunity to host the International Astronautical Congress, bringing astronauts, engineers, space agencies, universities, and space professionals from around the world to convene and give presentations. I had the privilege of briefly attending the IAC this year, seeing a presentation from Bill Nye, CEO of the Planetary Society and famous TV presenter, about the Society’s recent work with solar sails. The experience was truly one of a kind, and is something I will remember and treasure for many years to come. I was able to explore my passion and interest in astrophysics and space with likeminded people, developing my knowledge about solar sails and investigating joining the Society. Another opportunity which the congress presented was having NASA astronaut Sandra Magnus visit and talk to our girls about her journey to NASA and life on the International Space Station. I was honoured to be chosen to introduce her and talk to her personally about the IAC and working as an astronaut. I aspire to one day work on the International Space Station as Sandra did, and it was incredible to be able to meet someone who had lived out my dream. She

encouraged me to pursue Physics and Mathematicss at university, giving me inspiration and motivation to continue following my passions. Overall, attending the IAC and meeting Sandra was a highlight of my final year at Wilderness, and I am extremely grateful for being able to experience such once in a lifetime opportunities. I encourage all girls interested in astrophysics and the universe to continue studying Physics and Mathematics in their senior years at school and into tertiary studies, as one day a Wildy girl could be travelling to Mars and beyond. Sarah Damin

Astronaut Dr Sandra Magnus with Wilderness School students Sarah Damin and Lucy Davis. Photograph from The Messenger


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

WILDERNESS DEBATING

“If we want future generations of students to… use critical thinking to get to the heart of what’s important, if we want them to go beyond participating in a conversation to actually raising the level of national discourse, and if we want them to… use [political debate] as a tool to address complex problems, we had better start teaching them the means to do so early.”

In 2017, Wilderness entered 15 teams in the Schools Debating Competition and was represented in the finals of all 5 grade levels; arguably our most successful year in terms of number of participants and the balance of results achieved. It seems timely then to reflect on what makes Debating such an attractive activity for students to undertake, and to draw attention to the benefits it brings in other aspects of their lives. In promoting the value of Debating, American educator Paul Deards (2014) had this to say: “If we want future generations of students to… use critical thinking to get to the heart of what’s important, if we want them to go beyond participating in a conversation to actually raising the level of national discourse, and if we want them to… use [political debate] as a tool to address complex problems, we had better start teaching them the means to do so early.”

We would argue that Debating achieves precisely these aims, and more so, that it closely aligns with all four of the core values of Wilderness School. Debating encourages responsible citizenship by asking students to inquire into matters of local, national, and sometimes global significance, and to form opinions on controversial issues. In the recently completed season, students debated such diverse topics as Australia’s relationship with the United States, the South Australian Government’s energy policy, the viability of the Commonwealth Games, development of the Adelaide parklands, and constitutional recognition of Indigenous Australians, among many others. Accordingly, students develop the research skills that will prove invaluable in their later years of schooling and in tertiary study. It requires adventurous learning by provoking students into uncovering and then justifying viewpoints that they may never have previously


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The victorious Intercol Senior A Debating team (L to R): Maddie McNeil, Laura Hanlon and Molly Chapman.

considered. Debaters are frequently analysing the ‘moral imperative’ behind a particular issue, and are asked to explore the myriad effects that might flow from taking a given action in response. By way of example, our Intercol-winning Senior A team (pictured) was forced to argue against introducing gender quotas in Federal Parliament to encourage greater female representation; adopting a position that some, no doubt, found quite objectionable. Hence, Debating encourages the development of empathy and provides unique practice for occasions in life where one is left to advocate for something contrary to what is believed in by the individual. Debating demands a true and courageous self by compelling students to stand in front of an audience, often with limited preparation, to speak on a complex subject matter with which they might only very recently have familiarised themselves. In Years 9 and above, an additional challenge is thrown in: being interrupted at regular

intervals with ‘points of information’ from opposing speakers. The ability to verbally communicate a coherent message to even a small group of people is an invaluable life skill. Repeated practice of this skill in turn develops the self-confidence of the debaters. Moreover, successful Debating requires a team to form a coherent and consistent argument, and that they recognise the key points offered by the opposing speakers and devise effective rebuttal in response. It is in this teamwork, but also in the requirement that rebuttal be delivered courteously, that we see the development of respectful relationships. Further to this, a particularly positive aspect of Debating at Wilderness is the relationships that form between younger debaters and their older coaches, some of whom work with the same team for three or more years. In 2017, outstanding coaching was provided by Isabelle Greco, Sarah Damin and Catherine

Nguyen (Year 12), along with Ashwini Ravindran and Mahya Panahkhahi (Year 11), among others. Debating teaches the value of teamwork, and particularly at Wilderness, the rewards of volunteering. Returning to the essence of the quotation at the top of this article, we hope that our debaters become the future leaders in our society, and trust that they go out into the wider world well equipped to positively shape discussion on the most important issues affecting us all. Matthew Hawkins and Cathy Juniper Debating Coordinators Reference: Deards, P. (2014). ‘Making the case for teaching students to debate’, Education Week, vol. 34, no. 1.


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

INTRODUCING MEMBERS OF OUR GOVERNING COUNCIL: WILL ABEL SMITH Will is a former Senior Executive of family business S Kidman and Co Ltd, holding the position of Livestock and Marketing Manager for a number of years, as well as responsibilities as part of the Investment Committee and as a Director for 23 years. S Kidman and Co Ltd is one of Australia’s largest beef producers, which runs 190,000 cattle, cattle stations and pastoral leases across approximately 100,000 square kilometres of Australia. Currently, Will is a grazier and investor. Will was appointed to the Wilderness School Council of Governors in 2013 and has served on the Investment Committee since 2013 (Chair from 2014) and the Finance Committee since 2016. He also joined the Executive Committee in 2017. Will and his wife Sara have two daughters, Zali (Year 12) and Bebe (Year 8) thriving at Wilderness. Recently, we asked Will a number of questions. Here he shares his views.

What is the mantra you live and lead by? Treat others as you wish to be treated. What virtue do you admire most in people? Generosity of spirit and a good sense of humour! If you could have dinner with two famous people, who would you choose? Would love to have dinner with Sir Sidney Kidman, my Great Grandfather - I would be fascinated to get his take on the world. Warren Buffett, the famous investor would be my other choice, I would love to pick his brains! What is one piece of advice you would give our girls? I think, like my daughters, that they are very lucky to be attending such a dynamic institution as Wildy, which will give them a great many skills and advantages they will need in the future. You then need to work hard and make the most of your opportunities.

What is something on your bucket list? So many amazing countries and cultures to see, I am working my way through as many as I can. Morocco is the aim for this year. Next year Northern lights...... If you had to start over from scratch, knowing what you know now, what would you do differently? Tough one, all I know is I would love to be 18 again and know what I know now, years of experience would definitely be a great assistance to someone so young. I have been most fortunate in my life and there is not a lot I would do differently or change. What’s the most important business or other discovery you’ve made in the past year? Change can be a good thing, it is easy to get set in your ways. Time is marching on, make the most of your time!

“Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel” – Socrates


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MARY ANN MATTHEWS SCHOLARSHIP 2017 The Mary Ann Matthews Scholarship is offered annually to current Year 11 or 12 students. This scholarship enables a Wilderness girl to travel anywhere across the globe and undertake a challenging project or placement to broaden her perspective of the world. Congratulations to our successful applicant for 2017 – Zara Fenton. Zara, who is currently in Year 11, will travel to Phnom Penh, Cambodia in December 2018 with Volunteering Solutions to volunteer at an orphanage for children 3-16 years of age. In addition to her school studies, Zara is also completing a VET course in Dental Assisting and hopes that these new skills will add to her repertoire working with these children.

Mary Ann Matthews believed in learning through a global outlook, allowing individuals an appreciation and respect for social, cultural and religious diversity, along with a sense of global citizenship. This is sure to be an extraordinary experience for Zara. We look forward to her sharing her travels with us.

Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

GREEN DOOR SOCIETY & OUR CRAWFORD CAMPUS Roslyn Judson (1962) was an old scholar, former employee of Wilderness School and a proud member of the Green Door Society. She was formerly a committee member of the Old Scholars’ Association, including becoming President in 1995. Sadly, Ros passed away on 14 January 2017. The Foundation recently received a bequest from Ros Judson’s Estate. With this gift, a cabin has been named the ‘Judson Cabin’ at CRAWFORD. Our Crawford campus is on the Coorong and has become an integral part of the learning and social fabric of Wilderness. Crawford on the Coorong offers countless generations of Wilderness girls exceptional

outdoor and adventurous learning. This is a wonderful legacy to a woman who was passionate about learning and all things Wilderness. Ros Judson will always be fondly remembered by the Wilderness community. We thank her for her forward planning and generous bequest.

Underpinning many opportunities at Wilderness are generously made bequests. Importantly for us, a bequest made today allows us to express our gratitude to you personally for your intended gift.

Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community

Please contact Jodie Escott (08) 8344 6688 to discuss the possibility of making a bequest. All conversations are in complete confidence.


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ABOVE Roslyn Judson (Matthews) 1961 School Camp Tasmania TOP The Judson signs at the Crawford Campus RIGHT The Letter of Appreciation from Geoff Judson, Husband of Roslyn


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

WILDERNESS FOUNDATION NO SHOW BALL

What was the No Show Ball? It was your chance to purchase tickets where the only task was to choose your ticket number & hope you might win one of 4 incredible prizes. No need for babysitters, no new outfit, dry cleaning nor auction bidding. Tickets were well priced at just $50 each or 3 tickets for $100. All money raised went directly to the Wilderness School Foundation. Fundraising is vital to our Foundation to bring developments to life, like Browns’ House and our new Brown Sisters Memorial Entrance Scholarship. Our No Show Ball was a fun and fabulous way for everyone in our community to get involved. We were thrilled by the support, selling out 600 tickets in record time! I would like to thank the following people and their generous prize donations: - Alice & Julian Newton with Sebastian Lip for the Pilatus private Jet for 8 people return to Melbourne - Donna & John Karytinos for the $2,000 Fair Price Group voucher - Julia Dowling inviting Sondra Deering

& James Hillier to donate Nordburgers for a year - Olivia Stoeckel in the Wildy Café for 4th prize – student lunch orders for a year. Jenni Guest, Chair, and the Foundation Events Committee were central in collaborating, advising and assisting in preparing the No Show Ball. Thank you for your dedication. On 27 September, the No Show Ball held the draw of the sought-after prizes at Browns’ House. Congratulations to our very excited winners: 1st Prize Sarah (Booie) Hayward 2nd Prize Leanne Ahrens 3rd Prize Sally & Steven Knox 4th Prize Peggy Gebhardt The No Show Ball raised $18 000, which is brilliant. The school community’s continued support of the Wilderness School Foundation is applauded. Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community

ABOVE First prize winner, Booie Hayward with Jane Danvers


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A Jane Danvers drawing the winning tickets assisted by Candace Blom B Alice Newton, Portia Newton & Booie Hayward C Edwina Lumbers. Georgie Duncan & Georgie Osborn D Amelia Osborn & Grace Escott E Jodie Escott & Sarah Matthews F Jen Guest, Peter Escott & Nicole Day

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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

Bringing smiles to disadvantaged children in South Australia this Christmas This year our annual Christmas Tree will be a Giving Tree. Wilderness School are supporting Vinnies and the opportunity to donate items for boys and girls 8-17 years old. In 2016, Vinnies assisted 22,000 children. It is up to us to share the joy of Christmas and put smiles on the faces of children who are experiencing poverty and hardship.


Our Citizenship girls worked with Vinnies to create appropriate gift list for these children. Here are some ideas to help you. Many items are available from discount department stores. Christmas gift ideas for children aged 8-17 Girls Bags Bath bombs Bath robe Beach sets Beach towel Beach toys Bean bags Bed socks Board games Body creams Body glitter Body spray Bracelets Brushes Chalk Craft kits Cushions Diary Earrings Fairy lights Fit ball Gloves

Hair Chalk Hair ties Hand lotion Hand weights Head bands Headphones Key rings Lego Lip Gloss/lip balms Makeup Makeup bags Movie Vouchers Musical instruments Nail polish Note books Novels/books Novelty USBs Onesies Pencil cases Pens/pencils Perfume Personal grooming

Playing cards Puzzles Pyjamas Recipe books Reed sticks Ribbons/bows Rings Scarves Science kits Shower gel Skateboard Sketch pad, pencils Skipping ropes Sleeping bag Smiggle items Store vouchers Sunglasses Tea gift packs Throw rugs Toiletry gift packs Water bottles Yoga mat

Goggles Hair products such as gel/wax Hand balls Hand weights Headphones Movie vouchers Musical instruments Nerf guns, balls etc Novels/books Novelty USBs Pencil cases Playing cards Puzzles Rocket launcher Rubik’s cube Science kits Skateboard Sketch pad, pencils Skim Ball

Sleeping Bag Snorkelling equipment Soccer goals and ball Sport socks Sports wear Store vouchers Sunglasses Toiletry gift packs Trading cards Trike Vortex Wahu outdoor toys Water pistols Wristbands

Boys Action figures Aeroplanes Back packs Balls – Football, basketball etc Beach towel Beach/pool toys & sets Beanies Board games Board shorts Body spray/aftershave packs Boogie board Camera Caps Chalk sets Chess/Checkers Cricket sets Fit ball Frisbee Gift cards

Bring your unwrapped gift: Junior School girls Items can be placed in your classroom Middle and Senior School girls Please bring your items on any Wednesday and place in your House Room


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

BROWN SISTERS MEMORIAL YEAR 10 ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIP “Many things prized elsewhere count for nothing at all within its gates but the founders continue to offer their own sound currency: gaiety, courage, intellectual adventure and unlimited kindness.” – Miss Mamie Brown

Excellence in academics, sport and Arts are recognised and celebrated at Wilderness School. In honour of our Founders’ belief in the value of education for girls, the Brown Sisters Memorial Entrance Scholarship has been established. During 2013, a scholarship trust was born to raise funds to offer 100% tuition fees and consolidated fixed charge to an accomplished and high achieving girl, who owing to financial circumstance, would otherwise not have the opportunity to attend Wilderness School. We are elated to officially launch this three-year scholarship (Years 10 to 12 inclusive) for a student to commence in 2019. It has been made possible by the incredible generosity of our School Community philanthropically giving to the Wilderness School Foundation

Scholarship Fund over the last 5 years. For this, we sincerely thank all of you. The Foundation will continue to seek donations to this Fund in the future to ensure it is perpetually endowed. Applications for the Brown Sisters Memorial Entrance Scholarship can be found on our website www.wilderness.com.au It is open to girls who are not currently a student of Wilderness School. Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community


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CRESWELL YEAR 10 ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIP We are pleased to announce that applications are now open for the Creswell Year 10 Entrance Scholarship (inclusive of Years 10-12) for a new student to commence at Wilderness School in 2019. We are humbled by the $200 000 bequest left by old scholar Joan Creswell specifically for a 100% tuition scholarship (including consolidated fixed charge). Candidates will be selected based on their: - written application - interview process - academic record - financial considerations

ABOVE Joan (front row third from left) with the Leaving Honours Class of 1948 in front of Browns’ House.

If you know of an academically talented girl who may not be able to attend Wilderness School due to financial circumstance, please ask them to apply at www.wilderness.com.au Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY

CAROLYN CHADUNOW (1992) RESEARCH ASSISTANT FLOREY INSTITUTE OF NEUROSCIENCE & MENTAL HEALTH

Can you tell us about your journey after leaving school? I completed Year 12 at Wildy in 1992. From there I went straight to Uni and completed a Bachelor of Engineering in Electronic Engineering at the University of South Australia. I really enjoyed the study and the academic challenge of doing very complicated Maths and Physics. When I finished study, I worked as an engineer in private industry for a year, then moved to a government job in the Defence sector. I ended up staying with that employer for 15 years, although I had several roles and a partial career change during that time. At first I was an engineer/scientist doing computer modeling and simulation of various processes, which was technically very interesting. After a while though, I began to find that I was missing the

people side of things. Sure I worked with great people, but the focus of my work was a bit dry at times and something just seemed to be missing. This feeling kept growing until one day (after about 5 years) I decided to move into management and take up more of a facilitation role within the executive of my work group. So for two years, I did no engineering work. It was great at first, going to meetings, facilitating workshops, organizing events, writing and disseminating processes – all the “people stuff” I felt I had been missing. This was only a fixed term role, and by the end of it I found I was now missing the academic challenges of the engineering work. I could not win! It was at this point that a very astute supervisor of mine noticed that I wasn’t quite happy and really pressed me about what I wanted to do with my career, encouraging me to think beyond the options available in my immediate workplace. At that point I felt confident enough to say that what I really wanted to do was Psychology! I had actually been thinking about it for a few years. I was fortunate enough to have a supervisor who encouraged me to follow this up. I even managed to move into a completely different area of work, within the same organization, that dealt with human factors; that is, the human user side of technology, rather than focusing on the technology itself. At the same time, I began my studies in Psychology at Flinders University. I completed the Graduate Diploma in Psychology in 2007 and then received my Bachelor of Science majoring in Psychology in 2008. It was hard work because I studied full time whilst still working 3 days a week. But armed with my new knowledge, I dived into the human factors area and I found this to be a really good blend of the

people and technology side of things. I worked in this area for 5 years and had many exciting experiences, possibly my favourite being field trials with the Australian Army where we would camp out for weeks on end, putting various vehicles and technology through their paces. Eventually, however, I started to feel like I wanted to take my psychology training further and work with people on their own personal issues. Again, this feeling got stronger until I couldn’t avoid it anymore and I decided to do the Masters in Clinical Neuropsychology. This course was not offered in Adelaide, so I would have to travel interstate. So, in 2014, my husband and I packed up and moved to Melbourne where I undertook the Masters in Clinical Neuropsychology at Melbourne University. I absolutely loved this course: a blend of clinical psychology and neuroanatomy, with the aim of being able to diagnose, evaluate and treat various disorders of memory and thinking which have an organic basis. Going back to Uni full time at the age of 38 was a bit daunting – could I still do it? But I learnt so much and finally felt this is what I was meant to do. I graduated in 2016 and currently work in the field of Alzheimer’s Disease research. My days are full of interviews and cognitive assessments, largely with people over age 65, where I apply my skills and knowledge to help make diagnoses and assess eligibility for, and progress during, clinical trials. It is the perfect blend of people involvement and application of critical thinking skills to problems of a personal nature. I am only “young” in my new career and I can’t wait to see where it will take me next!


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What / who ignited your passion for Science? My Dad who was also a scientist, very logical, methodical and a great critical thinker. Also, Mr Ross! I loved Physics classes at Wildy. It just made so much sense to me and I appreciated Mr Ross’ positive feedback and encouragement of my skills and interest in that area. Now I am constantly inspired by the range of professors and neurologists I work with who have immense knowledge in their respective fields and are always keen to share this with others. What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls entering your field? I would say follow your interests and give it all you’ve got. But listen to yourself and be prepared to make some detours along the way. How did being a Wilderness girl help you to succeed? Self-confidence. The ability to back yourself, your decisions and knowing that you have the resolve to follow things through. Do you have a mantra / philosophy? You never stop learning! Take what you can from all situations. Even if you need to do some things that don’t interest you, it can still be a valuable learning experience.

KATHERINE ADRIAANSE (2005) ZOO VETERINARIAN, MELBOURNE ZOO Can you tell us about your journey after leaving school? After graduating from Wilderness in 2005, I went on to study a double degree in Chemical Engineering and Science at the University of Adelaide. It turned out that Engineering wasn’t for me, but I loved the science! I graduated with a Bachelor of Science, majoring in genetics, and followed through with an Honours research year based at the Hanson Institute. I had always been passionate about conservation, (when I was little I wanted to be a lawyer for Greenpeace and save the whales!), but I wasn’t really sure how I could make a career out of it. During my Honours year, I began volunteering at the Adelaide Zoo, and I found the direction I wanted to go! The next year I was off to study the postgraduate Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Melbourne. Throughout the degree and after graduation, I took every opportunity I could to

work with wildlife, and learn about the field of conservation medicine in Australia and around the world. This included spending a number of weeks completing two subjects in Conservation and Wildlife Management through the Centre for Wildlife Management at the University of Pretoria in South Africa, as well as a research field trip to the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea, sampling the local bird population for evidence of disease. After graduating as a veterinarian, I worked in private practice in Adelaide and at the Adelaide Koala and Wildlife Hospital, as well as volunteering at Adelaide Zoo again – this time as a vet. From there, I was lucky enough to gain my current position as veterinary resident at the Melbourne Zoo. What / who ignited your passion for Science? I have always been fascinated by the natural world, and I think it was inevitable that I ended up in a STEM field. However, during my journey I have met some wonderful, inspiring individuals that have encouraged me along the way. I had some excellent science teachers - in particular, Ms Judy Cox, Dr Sally Nobbs, and Mr Clark Ross, who helped further ignite my interest, and gave me the foundation which has helped me to succeed. I continue to meet new role models in conservation medicine – from veterinarians who do their bit for wildlife in private practice, to somewhat eccentric wildlife vets who wear lederhosen in the Papuan rainforest, not to mention the clinicians I work with at the zoo, who are a constant source of inspiration.

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WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY Do you have a mantra / philosophy? My Dad has this saying that, “You get 100% of what you don’t ask for”, which is his version of “You’ll never know if you don’t try”. Following my Dad’s advice has given me the confidence to always pursue every opportunity, even if I’m a bit embarrassed to ask, feel like they probably have a better option, or I don’t think I’m quite qualified enough. It’s turned out well so far! What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls entering your field? If you know what you want, then go for it, hard! Take every opportunity that presents itself and don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty – volunteering is the best way to build a network and develop a career in conservation. If you don’t know what you want for your career or for your life yet, don’t be perturbed by those around you that do, just don’t stop looking. You’ll find it. How did being a Wilderness girl help you to succeed? Wilderness taught me that I am capable of anything and gave me the confidence to reach for my dreams.

If you could have dinner with a famous Scientist, dead or alive who would it be and why? Sir David Attenborough. He has brought the beauty and wonder of the natural world into people’s living rooms and made it accessible to everyone. He has never sat by idly as natural places have been destroyed – his commitment to broadcasting the plight of the planet, and demanding its discussion in the public sphere is truly awe inspiring. It would be incredible to spend an evening sharing thoughts with him. What do you predict for the future of Science and what would you most like to see? We have some excellent researchers in Australia who are constantly making inroads in wildlife conservation science, but I would like to see these areas take priority and gain mainstream funding. We have to get serious if we really want to make a difference. I also hope that the world continues to realise how important women are in STEM fields, and that careers in all of these disciplines become more accessible to women both in Australia and internationally, especially in underprivileged countries.


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LOTTIE STANBURY (2014) CREATIVE DIRECTOR, FRIO THE LABEL Can you tell us about your journey after leaving school? After graduating, I took a gap year where I went travelling around Europe and America for 6 months, working at an American Summer Camp for two months. This was the greatest experience and taught me so much about the world and myself. What ignited your passion and describe your life journey/career? Right up until the beginning of this year, I had no idea for what I wanted as a career. I began my degree, Bachelor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship in 2017. Do you have a mantra / philosophy? Work hard for yourself, or harder for someone else.

What does a typical day look like for you? When I don’t have university, I wake up, check my emails and grab a coffee. Then I’ll organise the jackets which need to be delivered to Adelaide Boutiques and then drop these off. Then I wrap and post the jackets for all online orders which are to be sent interstate and overseas. I’ve become very good friends with the employees at my local post office! From here, I’ll sit down and complete the tasks on my to-do list, such as ordering more products, organising shoots, arranging content for Instagram, designing products for future collections and completing my Uni assignments in between. What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls? Give everything a go! How did being a Wilderness girl help you to succeed? My time at Wildy taught be the importance of hard work. I learnt strength and independence which has absolutely helped me succeed once leaving school. What is the most intriguing fact you have learnt about yourself? My determination. I’m surprised every day to see how far I have come and how determined and motivated I am to keep going. How have you overcome challenges or setbacks? The most important thing that I have learnt is to not be afraid or back down when things go wrong. Showing courage and being assertive when there is a set-back is so important.

Who inspires you and why? All women in business. I’m inspired by people who turn amazing ideas into reality through hard work and dedication; trailblazers, who create their own path and success. What did you think you would be pursuing when you left school? I have always been overwhelmed by this question, because I never had an answer. It was due to my indecisiveness that I decided to study such a broad degree, which now is probably the greatest decision I could have made. What have been some key defining moments? Simply just seeing people in my jackets and accessories and watching the demand for them grow was the most amazing moment as I realised the potential for the business to grow. Also, when Vogue published a story about myself and the business – it’s everyone’s dream to feature in such a highly-regarded publication! Finally, being asked to participate in the Adelaide Fashion Festival South Australian Showcase Runway in October. All these moments have kept me motivated. What are your future plans? I come from a family with five generations of women who all owned their own small business. I want to continue working hard and see how far I can grow Frio. I would love to create a lifestyle brand and ultimately expand into homewares. I want to continue building a collection of on-trend, eclectic pieces from natural products that are both fun and affordable.


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TORI TASKER (2012) PUBLIC PROGRAMMES TEAM LEADER AT NATIONAL SPACE CENTRE, UNITED KINGDOM Who ignited your passion for Science? My passion for science has come from a lot of people at a lot of different times. My earliest memory of loving Science would be receiving the CSIRO Double Helix science magazine as a child and visiting CSIRO with my dad; I imagine this is what started it all. Onwards from then, it would be my Wilderness Science teachers that facilitated my passion, even though I was more engaged with Biology and Chemistry at that time, than Astrophysics and Astronomy. Mrs Isabelle Linde, Dr James Rothgrew, Dr Sally Nobbs, Mrs Deb Skelly and Mr Clark Ross, were all influential in my passion for science. Nowadays, it would be the scientists whom I am very fortunate to meet, and the scientists across the world, who continue to inspire and fuel my passion for Science and communicating it to the public.

If you could have dinner with a famous Scientist, dead or alive, who would it be and why? I would be honoured to have dinner with Jocelyn Bell Burnell. She is an astrophysicist, currently affiliated with the University of Cambridge, who is very well-known for her work during her postgraduate years. She discovered the first radio pulsars in the sky, an incredible achievement of the twentieth century. Although her supervisor and his colleague received the Nobel prize for this discovery, as they too were involved, she was not included in this awarding. To have dinner with someone who had such a crucial part in something so influential on our knowledge of the Universe would be a very surreal experience. I would love to hear her personal recount of observing and analysing the radio pulsars, and ultimately coming to the conclusion she did. What do you predict for the future of Science and what would you most like to see? I think the future of Science will see us understand the Universe and the world we live in in a way never seen before, and I think technology will be used in ways never done before to help us achieve this. We live in a very exciting time of scientific discovery and adventure whereby it is possible that Science could fundamentally change how we view ourselves, even more than it already has. I very much would love to see us put humans on Mars and to find other forms of life in the solar system. I would also like to see Australia play a key role in this and only a few hours prior to writing this, the Australian Space Agency was announced! I don’t think I could be more excited for the future of Science, Space and Australia’s involvement!

How did being a Wilderness girl help you to succeed? As a Wilderness girl, I was encouraged to explore opportunities, embrace challenges and find my passion. By working towards these at Wilderness, a safe and comfortable environment for trying new things, I felt so much more able and confident to do so in university and the workplace. Most importantly, I think, being a Wilderness girl allowed me to succeed, because I knew, without a doubt, that despite what some members of our society and our world believe, being a woman would not bring me down; it would not lower my ability to make a worthwhile contribution that was equal and if not greater than those of the opposite sex. Being a Wilderness girl allowed me to succeed because I knew this to be true: that being a woman should mean I am treated as equal, given equal access to opportunities such as education and academia, shown equal respect, granted equal pay, and most fundamentally, given equal value to my ideas and opinions. Being a Wilderness girl allowed me to grow up in an environment where this wasn’t what being a woman should mean, it was what being a woman did mean. Do you have a mantra / philosophy? My mantra at the moment is ‘what doesn’t challenge you, doesn’t change you’. Nothing can make you grow personally and professionally like being challenged! What does a typical day look like for you? I try to begin my days pretty early at around 6 or 6:30am with a cup of coffee and breakfast. At around 7:30/8am I’ll head into work to get a jump start on the day. If I’m not doing any study (I am currently on the last course of a Graduate Certificate in Astronomy from


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Swinburne University of Technology) I’ll either brainstorm post ideas for my blog or continue writing a current one. If there is no study to be done or blog posts to write, I will begin on work emails and making a to-do list for the day, if I haven’t already done one the day before. An important task for the first hour of the day is to update myself on space news through Twitter, NASA news and National Space Centre’s space calendar, and follow up on any major news stories or events so I can brief the science interpreters when they arrive at 9:30am. Once the majority of staff arrive at 9am, I will start to follow up anyone I need to meet with later on that day and then I’ll get stuck into whatever project I am working on. This has recently included a training session for the

SARAH DAY (2013) • • • • •

Herefords Australia Youth Ambassador for 2016/2017 Recipient of the Herefords Australia CM Hocking Scholarship UNE Country Scholarship Bendigo Bank/Rural Bank Scholarship Deputy Senior Resident Tutor for Academics at Robb College at University

science interpreters, a new weekend talk on travelling to space, posting on social media, creating a new science demonstration, or brainstorming completely new ideas and programs. After working on projects all morning, I’ll head for some lunch at 1pm which will be either in the staff room or at my desk watching space documentaries. In the afternoon, I’ll try to wander the galleries of the centre to get a feel for visitor engagement of that day and do some filming or photography for upcoming social media posts. Often, any talks or presentations for me to attend will be in the afternoon. There might be a masterclass on pressure suits given by the National Space Academy, or a special guest to the centre, or I will travel off site to visit a university. Once back at the National Space Centre, I will reply to

any remaining emails, check over any centre events for tomorrow, make to-do list for the next day and head home.

What course are you studying? Bachelor of Agriculture and a Bachelor of Business at University of New England in Armidale, NSW

information on an animal, including breeding values and parentage. This sort of technology is exciting because it opens up a lot of opportunities and gives producers the information and ability to make the best breeding decisions they can. I think agriculture in the broader spectrum has some very exciting years ahead, with the growing need to feed the world.

Where are you hoping your study will take you? I am currently looking into many different options but am interested in the technology that is available to primary producers to assist in making their cattle herds more efficient. So I would like to be able to work with producers in effectively implementing these technologies. What do you predict for the future of agriculture in Australia, or what would you most like to see? I think that in the future, the uptake of all of the new technologies, particularly genomics, will be huge. Genomics is a tool that can provide all genetic

What did you think you would be pursuing when you left school? Throughout secondary school, I always envisioned myself as a surgeon. I saw my life after school at the University of Adelaide’s Medical School where I would train to become either a neurosurgeon or a paediatric surgeon. Although I didn’t get into Medicine I began a psychology degree at the Australian National University with the hope of pursuing Graduate Medical School. It wasn’t until July 2015, six months into a change of degree into Archaeology, that I decided not to continue to pursue Medicine. So, in High School, I never thought I would be pursuing science communication and space science!

How did being a Wilderness Boarder help you to succeed? Being a boarder at Wildy gave me a lot of opportunities to be able to meet a whole range of people and step outside of my comfort zone. What or who ignited your passion for agriculture? Growing up on a property definitely contributed to it but my family as a whole and particularly my Dad.


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WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS WHAT’S BEEN HAPPENING WITH WOSA? The major event for the Wilderness Old Scholars is our Annual Quiz Night, held in May. The entire Old Scholars’ committee was responsible for the coordination of donations and sponsors as well as collection from classrooms, and sorting and wrapping of the silent auction items donated for Quiz Night Casual Day. The setup of the Gym was amazing, and the ambient lighting this year by The Hive (IT team) and speedy roll out by the Maintenance Department really set the scene for a fantastic night. Last year saw the Quiz Night retirement of Peter Fried – the Auctioneer over many years with us. Once again, we sincerely thank him for his long-standing support of our event. While searching for a new Auctioneer we discovered outstanding talent on our door step. Two senior Wilderness students – Janani Ramamoorthy and Annalisa Zacest – along with St Peter’s old scholar Will Fitridge had recently participated in the Auction Idols event and were keen to step up and sell the Major Auction Items. They were supported throughout the auction by Richard Colley. It was extremely entertaining and a wonderful opportunity to have current students working to enormous success. We thank them for their outstanding contribution. The evening was so much fun and competitive amongst many very clever tables. Overall, we raised around

$22,000. Thank you for all of the support from the school community and old scholars. I cannot speak about success without mentioning our long-standing MC Scott McBain. Scott has tirelessly given so much time and laughter to WOSA’s Quiz Night. As his daughter Lily completes her schooling at Wilderness, so does Scott as our MC. Thank you for everything. You have been a star. I would also like to thank the Development Office, the friendly and persuasive Foundation girls, plus old scholar Nama Warburton for phenomenal quiz questions, old scholars Holly Gardner, Julia Roberts and Tessa Michell for cross checking totals, and the entire Old Scholars’ Committee for their continued dedication and energy towards our biggest fundraiser of the year. The WOSA annual dinner was held in late September at the Maid and Magpie Hotel. This is always a fun evening with girls from across the decades. We moved from a cocktail- style event to a dinner this year, and The Maid did not disappoint. We enjoyed indulging in the recent refurbishment and fabulous food. We were privileged to have Principal Jane Danvers and the SRC Executive Molly Chapman, Georgia Honan and Nicola Ricci join us with an entertaining and thoughtful overview of all things Wildy. Our annual get together is always something to look forward to. Thank you to the subcommittee of Lily Schuller, Millie Shinkfield and Lorraine Gormly for bringing this event to life. Georgie Taarnby President Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association

WOSA ANNUAL DINNER


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MAJOR AUCTION – MAJOR FUN AND SUCCESS! We received a call from a very happy Penny Bowen who was the winning bidder of one of the Quiz Night’s main auction items – Chef’s Vision – a personalised dinner designed and cooked in your own home by celebrated SA chef Matt Fitton. She said the food was superb and Matt is amazing at what he does and such a friendly person. He served 6 courses, each with matching wines, and it was some of the best food she has ever tasted. She wanted to thank the WOSA Committee for sourcing him for a Quiz Night auction item and would definitely do it again. Yvette Lagozzino PA to Community & Development Manager


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WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS REUNIONS CLASS OF ’57 REUNION LUNCH Fifteen girls from the class of ’57 gathered together for a very happy lunch at the River Café, (down by the Weir) on 31 August, which followed a tour of the School for some.

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Libby (Jones) Lloyd interrupted a holiday in Queensland to join us and Anne (Burnell) Prior flew in from Melbourne. It was lovely to see everyone and catch up with their news. We all send our love and best wishes to the girls who could not join us this year – we plan to make the next Reunion in five years’ time! Please keep in touch with either classmates or the School. Lorraine Gormly Wilderness Old Scholar

G A Anne Prior (Burnell) Micheleine Hannaford (Tidswell) B Hatherleigh Shaw (Pedlar), Barbara Lamb (Mc Ewin), Lorraine Gormly (Irving) C Jennie Coleman (Talbot), Ann Hawker (Crawford) D Jilly Goodwin (Davies), Jo Lloyd (Todd), Ann Bailey (Grundy)

E Libby Lloyd, (Jones), Ro Switajewski (Lloyd), Marian Carpenter( Snow) F Marion Carpenter (Snow), Jill Williams (Bowering), Lorraine Gormly (Irving), Hatherleigh Shaw (Pedler) G The group at Lunch

For reunion questions please contact Jodie Escott, Manager of Development and Community on jescott@wilderness.com.au

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CLASS OF ’67 REUNION LUNCH The class of ‘67 reunion started on a fine but cool day at the Hawkers Rd gates. Booie & Jodie showed us around the School, impressing us in particular with the new gymnasium, Michell Music Centre, Newman Theatre, and the architectural brilliance of the administration building. We were all over-awed by the changes since we left 50 years ago!! A lunch followed at Ruby Red Flamingo. Lots of fun and laughter and reminiscing was had by all, as we went around the table and exchanged memories and updates of what we had

done since 1967, and told of where we were in life at present. The food was delicious. All in all, it was a great success.

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Bid Lewis Wilderness Old Scholar

ABOVE Front Row L-R: Josephine Magarey, Nancy Mattner, Candy Bennett , Sue Ivanovic, Christine Hunt 2nd L-R: Caroline (Tass) Forster, Susie Reid, Jen Sawers, Annie Lovejoy, Marn Baldock 3rd L-R: Bid Lewis, Sal Chapman, Robyn Hage, Jane Heaft, Carol Wadham 4th L-R Penny Mackenzie ,Marie Cann, Janet Grieve, Sue Knight , Lesley Gosse, Sue Harris, Di Finnegan Absent -- Jan Gray (already left)

CLASS OF ’97 REUNION LUNCH The Class of 1997 enjoyed a fantastic tour of the school and then a delicious lunch at the Kentish Arms on Saturday 19 August, celebrating our 20-year reunion. Over 70% of the year made it, with many making a huge effort to get there travelling from QLD, NSW, VIC, NT and country SA. We were all blown away by how the school has changed and all of the amazing facilities and opportunities the girls now have at Wilderness. We then enjoyed lots of laughs and reminiscing of our school days at the Kentish, while we were surrounded by blue and brown decorations. We also enjoyed cupcakes with chocolate Wildy emblems on top and listened to music from 1997 for a bit of fun. We were very lucky to have such a great group of girls in our year level and it was great to catch up with everyone on the last 20 years.

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WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS REUNIONS CLASS OF ’87 REUNION EVENING

transformation of the old Memorial Hall into the Newman Theatre and the Music Centre. They loved that the Browns’ House had been so lovingly and sympathetically restored and modernised. The tour really brought so many of our memories back to life again.

The Wildy spirit was certainly alive and well at the 30-year reunion for the class of 1987, which was held on Saturday 16 September. We had 36 Old Scholars of the 1987 class attend. The evening started with a school tour where we visited both the older and refurbished areas of the school. We revisited the terracotta tiles that many of us laid in the Centenary year outside the Green Door. The ladies were amazed at the

The reunion continued at the Kentish Hotel where a photo board with many old photos and memorabilia brought back memories. Wine, canapés and Wildy lion badge cupcakes were enjoyed by all. We really appreciated the fact that so many of the Old Scholars had come from interstate

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A Alison Grant, Kate Oaten, Annabel Bennett B Front - Joanna Buttfield & Rachel Russell. Back Christine Farina, Vidya Limaye & Georgia Norman C Meg Ryan, Joanna Buttfield, Alison Grant, Christine Farina, Marnie Lott, Iona Levinson, Vidya Limaye, Georgia Norman D Rachel Russell, Kate Zealand & Sim Cavill E Vorawan Jayanama, Robyn Jones, Rachel Russell, F Manda Brook, Kirsten Marshall & Claire Bates

and country areas, and even overseas, especially for the reunion. Thanks to all those people who made this event possible and we look forward to the 40-year reunion! Meg Ryan Wilderness Old Scholar

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CLASS OF ’07 REUNION EVENING The 10-year reunion was held at the Archer on Saturday 9 September. There was an excellent response, with around 50 old scholars attending and many travelling from interstate and regional locations. The reunion was a fantastic opportunity for everyone to touch base and reconnect with old friends. The reunion commenced with a school tour at 5pm. The group were impressed by the number of new facilities and infrastructure upgrades which the school had undergone since 2007, including the Café, Browns’ House and Newman Theatre.

Zoe Dempster Wilderness Old Scholar A Alex Leske, Mary Bradshaw, Matilda Ramsey, Laura Germein, Kath Grace B Ally Newcombe, Milly Toovey, Claire Schleuniger, Rhiannon Kemp, Steffany Kwok, Elizabeth Rennison C Christine Pilla, Hannah Gregg, Anthena Warner, Sophie Power, Kirstyn Smith, Adrienne Ey D Georgie Fried, Kate Carter, Zoe Dempster & Kate Burchell E Liana Skrzypczak & Vi Tran F Terissa Small, Catherine Rehn, Zara Shroff, Lucy Eaton, Caitlyn Ogilvie G Group shot in front of Browns’ House

CLASS OF 2012 5 YEAR REUNION Sunday 26 November Lunch Anderson Hill, Lenswood $55 (includes lunch with 2 glasses of wine ne & bus transfers)

www.trybooking.com/SIXH Contact: Eliza Colley E: eliza.colley@student.adelaide.edu.au

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Back in the late 1940s and through to the late 1970’s, Wilderness School educated boys and girls in Reception, Year 1 & 2. Following these years, the boys then joined St Peter’s College or Prince Alfred College. Annually, we invite our Old Boys back for a cocktail party. It is always a great night! 24 boys joined us in 2017 in Browns’ House Archive Gallery and Foyer. Many were able to assist in adding names to some of our pictures. Hearing stories about Miss Mamie and Miss Annie can only make you smile and cherish our rich history. The countdown to catching up again next year has already begun!

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C A Hugh Nield and Michael Magarey B Ernest Gray, Jane Danvers C Geoff Creswell and Ernest Gray

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1957-’63 MORNING TEA The Old Scholars Morning Tea for those who graduated between 1957 and 1963 was held in the Archive Room of the Browns’ House on Tuesday 12 September.

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15 old scholars joined us for this event and it was a lovely trip down memory lane. These women had some wonderful stories to share over a cup of tea and as usual delicious food provided by Olivia from The Wilderness Café. We are looking forward to seeing them again and our other Old Scholars at the Annual Lunch for the 1964 and prior year group on Thursday 2 November.

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A Anne Del Fabbro, Penny Burton, Genevieve Monk B Hatherleigh Shaw, Lorraine Gormley C Helen Farrelly, Judy Humphreys, Bev Royal

D Myfanwy Jones and Susan Kemp in The Newman Theatre E Pauline Stock, Penny Burton, Sue Ashby, Pen Rowe F Sue Ashby, Pen Rowe, Pauline Stock, Judy Ross, Bev Royal


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WILDY NEWS ANNOUNCEMENTS

WEDDINGS

MARRIAGES Ketrah Parsonage (Eaton) (2004) to Rob Parsonage BIRTHS Brianna Johnson (Chappell) (2006) – Harvey Albert Johnson Nikki Macor Heath (Macor) (2001) – Phoebe Macor Heath Lauren Siow (Lim) (2005) - Evelyn Ruth Siow Melissa Fahey (Brookes) (2006) - Willa Elisabeth Fahey

DEATHS Kate Raftery (Andrew) 1992 Jane Bungey (Jessop) 1948 Susan Robertson (Miller) 1959

WILDY BABIES A ABOVE Ketrah Parsonage (Eaton) (2004) with husband Rob Parsonage at their wedding in Vietnam

IF YOU ARE AN OLD SCHOLAR WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU AND SHARE YOUR MILESTONES AND CELEBRATE YOUR SUCCESS.

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Please email your news and a photo to: communications@wilderness.com.au

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C A Brianna Johnson (Chappell) (2006) – Harvey Albert Johnson B Melissa Fahey (Brookse) (2006) Willa Elisabeth Fahey C Nikki Macor Heath (Macor) (2001) – Phoebe Macor Heath D Lauren Siow (Lim) (2005) Evelyn Ruth Siow


Wilderness Times | Spring 2017

30 Hawkers Road, Medindie SA 5081 Phone + 61 8 8344 6688 www.wilderness.com.au CRICOS Provider Code: 00375B

Wilderness Times Issue 78  
Wilderness Times Issue 78