Page 1

AUTUMN 2017

ISSUE #76


Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

UPCOMING EVENTS

CONTENTS 3

Principal’s Thoughts

5 From Little Things, Big Things Grow Liz Meaker

33

Old Scholars’ Report

35

Old Scholars’ Reunions

37

Old Scholars’ News

Tuesday 13 June Christ Church Concert Friday 23 June Boarders’ Charity Fashion Parade

7

Faculty in Focus Music

9

Contemporary Learning Belinda Arnfield

Saturday 19 August Sports Night

11

A Culture of Thinking Sam Capurso

Wednesday 23 August Annual Music Concert

13

Positive Education April Bickley

Friday 28 July Clare Community Dinner

Friday 25 August Yorke Peninsula Community Dinner

17 Foundation Catherine Ye Fellowiship Donor Artwork Unveiling

Tuesday 29 August Junior Art Show Thursday 31 August Old Boys’ Cocktail Event

21 Foundation Mary Ann Matthews Report Grace Williams & Gabriella Belperio 26 International Collaboration Jessie Zhang & Rosie Broderick Old Scholars Wildy Women Leading the Way

Wilderness School has a number of social media platforms to connect with our community and discover the latest news. www.facebook.com/WildernessSchool www.linkedin.com/company/wilderness-school twitter.com/wilderness1884

ES

S OL D S

C H

N

Wilderness School

A

SS

N

OL A RS ’

WI LDER

29

O C I AT IO

Join the Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association page on Facebook. This page is set up for Old Scholars to communicate, network and hear about upcoming alumnae events. Once you are a member you can then share with other Old Scholars in your Facebook network.


‘A lot of people say that I am very confident and outgoing. I think my Wildy years really gave that to me. Being in a class of girls (now women) who were all destined for amazing things and are very successful personally and professionally, drove me to have to stand out and excel somehow!’ Alyce Tran 2003, Founder of The Daily Edited


3

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

PRINCIPAL’S THOUGHTS There is enormous power in using our voice with and for others. This was never more apparent than at the uLead conference in Alberta, Canada, during the first term holiday break. Over 1200 women and men, from across continents and different educational jurisdictions, came together to join in open, authentic conversations about the challenges of leadership in the 21st century. As educators we were bound by a singular commitment to prepare young people to live in a world more equitable and just than ours. In particular, we were concerned with the opportunities and challenges facing aspiring female leaders as they enter the workforce. I had the privilege of being asked to be on a keynote panel to speak to the delegates about women’s leadership and how we can best cultivate

leadership capability in our students and nurture and develop aspiring leaders. Each day as we walk alongside our girls, as they learn about their world and their place in it, it is important that we engage them in courageous conversations, that we challenge them to be bold, to be 10% braver. We must talk openly about the challenges aspiring women face, and share the journeys that successful women have travelled including the challenges and the choices they have tackled. To let them know that most people in life who have experienced some success have done so by making mistakes along the way. That the measure of success is often characterised by the way we bounce back.

It is not enough to let our girls know they can do anything. At School they are thriving. Wilderness graduates enter tertiary institutions and continue to shine. Yet as they enter postgraduate study or the workforce the trajectory of success changes. From that time on, the subtle gender bias that persists in organisations and in our society disrupts the learning cycle at the heart of becoming a leader. It is still difficult and challenging to be a woman leader in Australia today. The third year of data collected and released by the Workplace Gender Equality Agency shows that across Australian workplaces, women continue to be under-valued and under-represented at senior levels. Indeed, the grim truth is that in 2017 Australia has slipped from 24th to 46th in the world rankings in the Global Gender Gap report.


GIRL FO C USS ED

4

We need to challenge the structural biases that prevent women from pursuing the highest levels of leadership whilst also enjoying rich family lives, strong partnerships and motherhood if they should so choose.

As a leader of a girls’ school and a mother of daughters, I find this unacceptable, particularly when we have the wonderful legacy of being the second country to give women the vote. What is clear is that gender equity in the workplace is fundamental to a society that is both prosperous and fair. It is up to all of us to be agents of change. It is important that those charged with the responsibility of educating the next generation of leaders, have the opportunity to use their voices and share their stories. We must challenge the structural biases that prevent our graduates from pursuing the highest levels of leadership whilst also enjoying rich family lives, strong partnerships and motherhood if they should so choose.

At the end of the day, we want every Wilderness girl to have choice. To be able to fulfil her potential to succeed in her personal and professional life; to progress in her career whilst embracing the challenges and joys of being a woman. International forums like uLead amplify our collective voice to work together to leverage a better and more equitable future for all our children. Jane Danvers Principal

Above Jane at the uLead Conference in Alberta, Canada


5

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

FROM LITTLE THINGS, BIG THINGS GROW


GIRL FO C USS ED

6

As educators working with very young children who join our community as young as 3 and 4 years of age, it is difficult to imagine that these little girls will eventually be in Middle Primary, Middle School, Senior School and beyond. While it is vitally important to plan for each step of a girl’s developmental journey, there is also a need for that plan to include ‘big picture thinking’ about the skills and dispositions that we want to develop along the way. We must constantly ask the question, ‘Are we doing enough?’ to ensure that the learning opportunities we provide for our girls today fit in with a bigger trajectory that sets them on the path to enter the world as learners, astute and critical thinkers, activists and compassionate change makers. Mapping and constantly reviewing this plan is necessary to ensure that we are changing our thinking, as the important thinking about learning changes, and to discern what is of value and needs to be held close. This view of the long term means carefully considering who we are intentional about having as people of influence in our girls’ lives, ensuring that the attitudes in our classrooms align with our values, the experts we engage with, the behaviours, both socially and in terms of learning that we value and uplift, and the peer modelling and mentoring that we put in place to inspire aspirational thinking for the future. One of the ways we do this is by ensuring that we are providing our girls with opportunities to develop their sense of self-worth and value from the very beginning of their

learning journey. Ishita Katyal, the 10 year old writer who opened the 2016 TED Conference, said ‘Instead of asking children what they want to do when they grow up, you should ask them what they want to be right now.’ We are charged with finding ways to help girls, little and big, to develop agency, to have a positive impact on their world as young people so that, by the time they step out into world as young adults, they are fierce in their beliefs and have the efficacy to make a difference. We know that, developmentally, little girls’ learning in Early Learning and Junior Primary must be primarily focussed on themselves and their immediate world around them. Learning about families, community and developing a sense of connection and self within these environments allows children the opportunity to explore what it means to be a contributing member of their societal group. They learn together about personal responsibility, caring for pets and/or gardens, their learning environments and they develop compassion for others through these experiences. While planning, implementing and assessing against the Australian Curriculum ensures we are meeting the important legislative educational requirements for our students, we know that it is the learning to be a learner, the experiences that allow for critical thinking and the forming of opinions and the opportunities to have outreach, whether it be on a school, local or global community scale, that allow our girls to refine the skills necessary to ultimately

flourish in our world and to be the best they can be throughout their lives. Intentional programs that go beyond the standard curriculum, such as Wilderness’ work with Ron Ritchhart on developing a Culture of Thinking, our cross age Buddy Program, Passion Projects and our ever-evolving STEM curriculum provide positive learning opportunities for girls across all ages. Psychologist and researcher, Lev Vygotsky, said that ‘Children grow into the intellectual life around them’. When we build into our teaching and learning programs evidence based and contemporary pedagogies that ask children to think, to ponder and to wonder, to take risks and to ‘get comfortable with being uncomfortable’ in their learning, we enable the sequential development of imperative skills and build our young people’s capacity to truly engage in an intellectual life. This is the ‘why’ of what we do, what we are striving for when we ask ‘Are we doing enough?’ This is the purpose of the future thinking, the planning of the seemingly little, yet somehow enormous undertakings that begin in early childhood, continue throughout Junior School and into the Middle and Senior years that will enable our students to step boldly into and make their mark upon the world. Liz Meaker Head of Junior School & Early Years


7

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

JESSICA CRAIG SRC PRESIDENT

MEET THE JUNIOR SRC EXECUTIVE FOR SEMESTER 1 2017 Wilderness School actively cultivates leadership qualities in our girls. We aim to build the understandings and skills of leadership through the curriculum and the many, varied activities of school life in order to become respected leaders who act with integrity and model ethical behaviour. We are delighted to introduce our Junior SRC for Semester 1 2017.

What are you looking forward to in your role this semester? I am looking forward to challenging myself to improve my public speaking while reading the nominations and helping others along the way to do the same. How will you leave your leadership footprint? I want to inspire others to dream big and be a good role model to help them with this. Who inspires you and why? My family especially my two sisters since they have had experience in leadership and help me when I have troubles. What are three things we don’t know about you? • My favourite movie is The Parent Trap • I love Brussels sprouts • I hate plain cake.


GIRL FO C USS ED

8

ELIZA QUICK SRC VICE PRESIDENT

CHARLOTTE THOMAS SECRETARY

What are you looking forward to in your role this semester? I am looking forward to improving my public speaking when I have to say the prayer for every week’s Assembly. I am also looking forward to seeing what I can do to help encourage and inspire the girls in the Junior School.

What are you looking forward to in your role this semester? I am looking forward to working with the other students and getting to know them.

How will you leave your leadership footprint? I will leave my leadership footprint by helping others and making sure everyone is kind to all people, whether they know them or not. Who inspires you and why? The person who inspires me is Bethany Hamilton because her arm was bitten off by a shark when she was surfing. She strived to keep surfing even if she couldn’t properly get up on her board she still kept trying. She makes me want to keep persisting at activities in life and obstacles even if there is something really hard. What are three things we don’t know about you? • My mum is a Wilderness Old Scholar • When I am older I really want to strive to be a lawyer • I started public speaking when I was six, when I did Theatre Bugs and I was Koala Lou.

How will you leave your leadership footprint? I will make other students happier and try to make Assembly a little bit more fun by giving a creative speech each week. Who inspires you and why? My friends, family and teachers because of the support and help they offer. What are three things we don’t know about you?

• I want to be an inventor or architect • I have two pet cockatiels (mini cockatoos) called Popcorn and Coco • I try to be creative and innovative in everything I do.


9

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

FACULTY IN FOCUS MUSIC

WHY WILDY SINGS

Wilderness is a school that sings. We offer a variety of open and specialist choirs enabling all students to participate. As a whole school, we mark the beginning of assembly by singing together. We believe that group singing is beneficial for all, irrespective of vocal ability. Why? What is so special about singing?

I don’t sing because I’m happy. I’m happy because I sing. William James There is so much good that comes from group singing it is difficult to choose where to start. But we can find a beginning in this quote from Aristotle:

Above all, human beings seek self-esteem and happiness. Wilderness values learning that addresses life goals. Learning music requires self-discipline and commitment, both of which build self-esteem. Studies on the mental health effects of participants who sing

in choirs are consistently positive. One study commissioned by Victoria Health found that people in choirs report fun, enjoyment, happiness, humour, excess smiling, invigoration, exhilaration and relaxation. When one becomes fully immersed in choral activity there is little attentional space left over to worry about the self. Students gain increased confidence through public performance. Further to this, a good way to improve the speaking voice is to cultivate the singing voice. There is no doubt that choral singing is good for physical health. The full body experience that is singing requires attention to posture and various body muscles. Stress can cause an increase in blood pressure, pulse rate, and body temperature. Activities that alleviate stress reduce these health problems. One Swedish study found that when people sing together their heartbeats are synchronised. Singers not only coordinate their breathing, but choral singing has the overall effect of lowering the heart rate. Music–the most emotional and centripetal of the arts-has a unique capacity to change our physiology and hence moderate our emotions. Many people self-report

that music makes them feel better physically, and research claims that endorphins (the body produces these to combat stress and pain) are released through singing. SING TOGETHER AND CONNECT— OXYTOCIN Recent neuroscientific research has linked the hormone oxytocin with singing. If there is such a thing as a morality hormone, oxytocin just might be it. Oxytocin is a hormone produced by the brain that contributes to feelings of trust, generosity, compassion, kindness, caring and empathy for the people around you. The brain releases oxytocin in large quantities after physical activity, which bonds couples together. One activity that leads to the highest levels of oxytocin production is singing with others. Therefore, singing together can transform people to a more receptive frame of mind for bonding with one another. Singing together generates trust and harmony among people, and trustworthiness is an essential factor for prosperity and happiness. The personal skills developed through choir are numerous. Choral singing requires one to stop, listen and be aware. This occurs on an emotional,


GIRL FO C USS ED

10

empathetic, physical and even spiritual level. The requirement to generate ensemble through teamwork requires compromise, discipline and commitment. Choirs provide an alternative teamwork environment from sport and incorporate cross-age mentoring. Choristers pay attention to what someone else is doing and coordinate actions with others. This requires an attention to subtlety. Not least important are the musical skills learned in choirs. We encourage instrumentalists to participate in choirs for the invaluable contribution to personal musicianship. In a broader educational context, American based The Chorus Impact Study found that students who sing in choirs get better school grades than those who don’t sing in choirs. Possibly the most important benefit resulting from choirs is the resultant sense of belonging, a sense of social connection, social identity, group cohesion and purpose. These benefits are not dependent on the quality of the singing. We share our voice and seek beauty together in a collaborative rather than a competitive manner. Beauty is the lubricant of the soul! The

Victorian government has invested in choir programs with the aim of building community. Now, singing in groups has become the number one community arts activity in that state. The ‘bottom line’ for governments, companies and schools is that choral singing programs are inexpensive to set up and accessible across economic and cultural strata. The voice is free. In February 2015 The University of Birmingham released a research report that ties music learning with character. Schools in the United Kingdom are chartered with responsibility not only to teach intelligence, but also character and morality. This report found that students involved in music or drama, with choir receiving a special mention, performed significantly better on character tests than any other schoolbased extra-curricular activity. Choir programs have contributed to the rehabilitation of prison inmates. Look to Venezuela where the remarkable El Sistemá orchestral program for disaffected children has been extended to include a choral program. In these prisons the orchestra and choir options are the most popular activities selected

by inmates. As one inmate said, ‘My life has changed 100 percent’. Elsewhere, youth in detention facilities report consistently positive outcomes from singing in choir, including significant improvements in emotional stability, social behaviour and happiness. An additional benefit is that which audiences receive from attending choral concerts. Seeing and hearing people sing together gives one hope. This is particularly true when older adults hear the thrilling sounds of adolescent choirs. Our performances give listeners an opportunity to explore their inner self. This is the most wonderful gift from musician to listener. Music gives the soul energy. Music is humane and social; it is the tonal bridge-building fabric of society. Music plays a vital role in energizing the self and gives us a reason to live, a reason to be. Choral music provides our girls with a constant source of beauty and wonder. Through choirs we have the opportunity to preach to the world that music is, as Beethoven said, a revelation greater than all wisdom and philosophy. Michael Griffin Head of Music


11

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

Schools and educators across the world are shifting to meet the current and future needs of students and to engage them in relevant learning and global experiences. Skills that students require today and in their future lives vary from those traditionally taught in schools and now encompass innovative and entrepreneurial thinking. Wilderness School, always seeking to be at the forefront of education initiatives that will benefit our girls, has been working alongside educational leaders across the world to ensure that we are a centre of excellence.

Our work with Yong Zhou, a Foundation Distinguished Professor in the School of Education at the University of Kansas, recently led us to engage in a study tour led by the Association of Independent Schools of South Australia. The tour was for school leaders from SA, WA and NSW. As part of the tour, I was able to continue our work with Yong on developing student autonomy, product oriented learning and working across a global campus. I also had the opportunity to look outside our local community to see firsthand what leading schools and educators in America are doing differently and to consider this in the context of Wilderness School. Two schools that we visited in Hawaii included Punahou School, which Barak Obama attended, and Mid Pacific Institute which, like Wilderness School, has a Reggio Emilia philosophy and implements ideas from Harvard Project Zero. The Study Tour Group was also invited to attend the Hawaiian Association of Independent Schools Conference. Among the keynote speakers was American venture capitalist Ted Dintersmith, an advocate for education policies that foster


C E NTRE O F E XC E LLE NC E AND INNOVATION

12

CONTEMPORARY LEARNING

creativity, innovation, motivation and purpose. His educational documentary and book Most Likely to Succeed explores schools across the 50 states of America and encourages people to reimagine school and its purpose. The final part of the Study Tour was a custom residency at High Tech High, a charter school established in 2000 in San Diego, founded on the principles of equity, personalisation, authentic work and collaborative design. Diversity and student agency are key components at the school and were obvious at each of the Elementary, Middle and High School campuses that we visited as well as in their graduate program for teachers. High Tech High CEO, Larry Rosenstock, shared with the group some insights into the philosophy of the school which blurs the line between academic and technical learning and endeavours to make all learning meaningful, an idea that resonates deeply with Wilderness School’s commitment to Lifeworthy Learning. The opportunity to consider both the learning environments of leading schools in Hawaii and San Diego and counsel from educational leaders from

across the world, through the lens of our own Wilderness School, has been powerful. Our focus on learning experiences for our girls that are rich, varied, transferable and relevant aligns with what the best and most dynamic schools are pursuing. Our commitment to developing student autonomy, collaboration and making thinking visible is commended by the best thinkers in education. It is affirming to know that we are providing our girls with experiences that will optimise their future success. The study tour has also given us the opportunity to consider our future growth and to widen our network of expertise in education for both our girls and our teachers. Belinda Arnfield Head of Middle School


13

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

A CULTURE OF THINKING

FOSTERING A CULTURE OF MATHEMATICAL THINKING

At Wilderness School, Mathematics is taught with a dual focus at the forefront: facilitating a culture of mathematical thinking, and challenging anxiety and fixed mindsets surrounding learning this subject. This operates within a wider context in which, firstly, there is a ‘plateau in student achievement and a significant decline in student performance’ in Mathematics in Australia (Australian Mathematical Science Institution, 2016) and, secondly, ‘only 28 per cent of [the] STEM-qualified… workforce… [was] female in 2011 compared to 55 per cent for all fields in the tertiary qualified population’ (Professionals Australia, 2014). We are striving to do our part to address these two national challenges. One longstanding preconception has been that you are either ‘good’ at Mathematics or you are not or, in other words, that mathematical ability is only something you are ‘born with’. However, work around growth mindsets, such as that conducted by

Carol Dweck and Jo Boaler, has shown that this type of thinking is unfounded (Boaler, 2016). Regardless of the current level of proficiency, growth in mathematical aptitude is possible if one believes it is. ‘Math anxiety’ as it is known in the research (Foley et al, 2017), can be experienced by any student, including those who excel in the subject. Hence, the Mathematics faculty continually works towards facilitating a mindset in students in which it is the learning that is valued most as, when this is the case, achievement follows quite readily. Learning is not easy – it comes with failure, doubt and fear. However, it also comes with a great sense of accomplishment and reward. Hence, it is our responsibility as educators to continually extend our girls in their learning, even when they are feeling challenged, as they will be better mathematicians for it. Other preconceptions of Mathematics relate to it being characterised by routine computation and memorising procedures, with capable


C E NTRE O F E XC E LLE NC E AND INNOVATION

14

mathematicians only working alone and without the aid of a calculator. The traditional view of the Mathematics teacher has been that they present these facts and formulae for students to rehearse and restate as passive recipients of mathematical lore (AISSA, 2016). It is this that is likely responsible for the view that Mathematics is not useful. However, Mathematics is so much more than arithmetic and formulae, as it is applied to solve real-life problems all the time – from addressing groundwater contamination, to economic forecasting, to drug delivery – in contexts that are collaborative and have access to technology (Lord, 2017). Indeed, feedback from one of my students has been that ‘...it is really helpful when things are related to real-life situations as it allows us to put things into perspective.’

compartmentalising their knowledge into ‘textbook chapters’ or ‘cramming’ before a test. Feedback from another student has been that ‘...when we are allowed to explore multiple ways of reaching one answer, it really makes us think.’

In order for students to see this and be ready to apply Mathematics in the real world, it is vital they are exposed to both familiar and unfamiliar mathematical contexts, and supported to make connections between different concepts and skills, rather than

Our core philosophy as teachers of Mathematics therefore can be summarised as follows: we teach for understanding.

Educational Psychologist, Lev Vygotsky, posits that learning operates within a social context. The Mathematics faculty’s work with Ron Ritchhart, internationally renowned for his involvement with the Worldwide Cultures of Thinking Project, has provided it with new strategies to foster a culture of thinking and positive sense of community within our classrooms so that students can feel confident to take responsible mathematical risks, collaborate and communicate with each other, and value their mistakes as learning opportunities.

Sam Capurso Teacher of Mathematics

References The Australian Mathematical Science Institute (AMSI) and The Centre for Education Statistics and Evaluation, quoted in AISSA, 2016, Position Paper for SA Independent Schools – Mathematics. Boaler, J., 2016, What’s maths got to do with it? Penguin, Random House. Foley et al, 2017, ‘The Math AnxietyPerformance Link: A Global Phenomenon’, Current Directions in Psychological Science, Vol. 26 (1), 52 –58. Lord, G, 2017, ‘Maths: why many great discoveries would be impossible without it’, The Conversation Media Group Ltd. Professionals Australia, 2015, Women in STEM position paper.


15

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

POSITIVE EDUCATION Wilderness has taken a pro-active approach to the implementation of Positive Psychology across the school. This has entailed embedding the principles of Positive Education to enable each girl to reach her full potential. The journey of implementing Positive Education is necessary to equip our girls with the skills to flourish as global citizens. Building a culture of resilience, hope, meaningful work and curiosity is important to students and staff. As part of this process I attended the Discovering More Positive Education course at Geelong Grammar School (GGS) in April. This course built upon the Positive Teaching Practices course held on-site at Wilderness School in September of 2016.

from across Australia, Singapore and Dubai. Attendees ranged from Principals to Early Career Teachers, Directors of Wellbeing to educational consultants, all aiming to improve upon their understanding and application of Positive Education. The Institute of Positive Education at GGS is internationally recognised for their evidence based approach to training teachers about Positive Education.

Positive Education recognises the importance of providing opportunities for students to truly flourish. This aligns directly with a key strategic intent at Wilderness, to apply a research based approach to wellbeing across the school, through investigating and instilling values in our girls which will enable them to both achieve academically as well as make significant contributions in society.

It was a privilege to be asked to attend the highly sought after course, which was emphasised to me upon arriving at GGS, surrounded by leaders in Australian education. The passion that all participants brought to the program over the four days was invigorating and led to a truly inspiring experience. Each day was divided into two major topics, with their own break-out session, focussing on whole school approaches to embedding wellbeing and the VIA Character Strengths, with each component supported by empirical research. This immersive experience was fundamentally transformative in content delivered, skills honed and knowledge all participants left equipped with.

The four-day residential course on the Corio Campus ran from 3 to 6 April and was attended by 40 educators

The Positive Education topic of curiosity was one that particularly resonated with my teaching at Wilderness


C E NTRE O F E XC E LLE NC E AND INNOVATION

16

School. Being curious is an important aspect for our learning and thinking focus and is integral to facilitating an enriching learning environment in my classroom. The course delved into the importance of character strengths and the ways in which we can develop these in our students. The opening plenary highlighted the reserach based benefits of curiosity, listing longer life, greater intelligence, greater sense of meaning and purpose as well as the ability to resolve conflict. We were invited to consider the relationship between curiosity and creativity and the ways in which stimulating curiosity can be a spring board to pursuing challenges and pushing the boundaries of our own understanding. This approach complements our resilience curriculum, which focusses on teaching our girls the skills they require to achieve their goals. This course enabled me to consider, at a deeper level, the ways in which curiosity affects the neuroplasticity of students’ brains through continual consideration of the world around them. This information presented directly aligns with the Wilderness DNA in how learning, thinking and wellbeing are intrinsically linked. The work we have done previously around Growth Mindset (Carol Dweck) and Cultures of Thinking (Ron Ritchhart) has great synergy with

the principles of Positive Psychology. I am grateful for the opportunity to have attended the Positive Education course at Geelong Grammar School this year and look forward to continuing this work at Wilderness. April Bickley Teacher of Geography

Above April at Geelong Grammar


17

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

WILDERNESS SCHOOL FOUNDATION A

CATHERINE YE TEACHER FELLOWSHIP

We offer the Catherine Ye Teacher Fellowship annually. Applications are invited from current staff. It provides exceptional education opportunities and our aim is to support Wilderness School teaching staff in completing research/study projects outside the regular Professional Learning Program. Mr Brad Snell is the successful 2017 recipient. He will utilise up to $15,000 towards his Master of Education (Educational Management) through Melbourne University over the next two years. We would like to thank the Ye family for their generosity in making this Fellowship possible. Congratulations Brad! We look forward to hearing about your success and the impact your studies will have both for you and Wilderness School.

B

C

D

E A Ian McBryde & Ellen McBryde B Rose Duncan, Kate McCurdie, Tom McCurdie & Jock Duncan C Ahmed Kafagy & Hadeer Anter D Paula & David Johnson E Sara & Will Abel Smith


STE WARD S HIP

18

DONOR ARTWORK UNVEILING During 2016, our School community was invited to donate to the Foundation Building Fund and, as recognition, have their family name honoured within an artwork in Browns’ House or Newman Theatre. Recognised South Australian artist Silvana Angelakis worked closely with us to design and produce 3-dimensional creations that were artistically pleasing and in harmony with each building. The Browns’ House brief was about family and belonging. The Brown sisters gifted Wilderness School to the community. We cherish this responsibility with pride and devotion. Now hanging across two walls are three beautifully crafted large leaves. Likened to a family tree, these leaves hold the names of generous families who gave to the Browns’ House redevelopment. Newman Theatre is all about drama, theatre and ambition. The artwork is polished stainless steel lit behind with more than 250 LED lights and containing the names of the wonderful families who gave to the theatre redevelopment. It is bright and contemporary. During the evening, when we have many performances, the artwork really ‘comes to life’. It is a crowd stopper.

IMAGINE

DONATE

CREATE

DISPLAY

CELEBRATE

These unique, striking and outstanding artworks are a legacy to each family who donated and share our passion for exceptional education and the values that we instil in our girls. We officially unveiled the artworks on Monday 27 March at an event held in Browns’ House foyer. Guests included philanthropic members of our School community, Council, Foundation Board members and key development committee members. It was a fabulous opportunity to admire the artworks. Olivia Stoeckel from the Wildy Café catered and was ably assisted by Foundation girls. In true Wilderness style, some ‘younger’ old scholars served refreshments to our guests. The evening also offered tours of Browns’ House, Newman Theatre (in the middle of rehearsals for ‘Firebird’) and the recent refurbishment of the Science laboratories.

F

During the unveiling, to see the belief, belonging, understanding and passion that so many people in our community have for Wilderness School makes us so proud. As a school community, we rely on and sincerely appreciate gifts to the Foundation from current families and old scholars that enable capital works and ensure that Wilderness School continues to be a leader across the globe in girls’ education.

G F Jane Danvers & John Charlton G Silvana Angelakis & Jane Danvers


19

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

CHOOSE A PROJECT CLOSE TO YOUR HEART.

Let your generosity forever change the life of one new girl. Or share it with every girl.


STE WARD S HIP

20

At Wilderness School, we know the value of girls-only education and an exceptional learning environment. Together they have a profound and lasting impact, enabling our students to achieve their potential in school and life. As a community school, we rely on your generosity to allow us to be the pinnacle of all facets of education for our girls. This year, we invite you to show your support for our school by making a tax deductible donation to our key projects. Wilderness School Foundation Scholarship Fund The Wilderness School Foundation Scholarship Fund will enable us to award a Years 8 to 12 scholarship to an academically talented girl from outside our school, whose family could otherwise not afford to send her. Our aim is to achieve the entire capital ($1 million) this year for the perpetual endowed fund, with the first scholarship awarded soon after. Wilderness School Foundation Building Fund The Wilderness School Foundation Building Fund is our major source of income for significant redevelopment and capital works. Examples of the fund’s recent achievements include the new Flexible Learning Space Classrooms in the Science & Humanities Building, Browns’ House and the Newman Theatre. New projects are in planning now with naming rights available. To find out more information or to make a donation visit wwww.wilderness.com.au/community-life


21

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

WILDERNESS SCHOOL FOUNDATION MARY ANN MATTHEWS REPORT The Mary Ann Matthews Scholarship is offered to a current Year 11 or 12 student. It is offered annually and has been made possible by the Matthews family. Their late mother, Mary Ann, was passionate about the importance of travel and encouraged her family to experience diverse cultures and develop a deeper social conscience. This scholarship allows a girl to have an experience somewhere in the world and provide an unforgettable lifelong story. We have two extraordinary experiences to share following some unique volunteering and travel.

Gabriella Belperio (Class of 2015) travelled to Cambodia and worked with Projects Abroad Grace Williams (Class of 2016) travelled to Fiji to volunteer in Viti Levu with the Care & Community Village Project. Here are their stories.

GRACE WILLIAMS: Last year I was fortunate enough to be selected as the recipient of the Mary Ann Matthews scholarship for 2016. This allowed me to travel to Fiji in December 2016 to undertake a two week Care and Community Village project through Projects Abroad. I experienced life in a traditional Fiji village, living with a local host family and experiencing many aspects of village life while working on a worthwhile project. My group was assigned to Korovuto Village, on the island of Viti Levu, located approximately 40 minutes from the city of Nadi. The majority of our work in the village was supporting the local kindergarten. We helped coordinate educational games and activities for the children and worked diligently on painting the school building. As Christmas was just around the corner, we helped the children prepare for the celebration by making festive decorations and presents for their families. We also prepared activities with ‘colours’ as the theme, testing the children on their knowledge of colours through colouring in, painting and paint mixing activities. These activities inspired us to make ‘colours’ a focal point in our painting of the school building. We painted a rainbow alphabet along one wall, fruits on another and a giant rainbow sign for the name of the kindergarten on one of the outside walls. We were very proud of the fact that one could actually see the sign and the rainbow from the road passing the village.


STE WARD S HIP

22

My host family and the local community were overwhelmingly welcoming and caring towards the rest of the volunteers and to me. They truly introduced us to their way of life, including us in their daily prayer and song circles and sharing traditional recipes. We were invited to one of their town meetings, where we met the chief of the village and witnessed a traditional Kava ceremony. We were also fortunate enough to attend two weekly Sunday church services, followed by a communal lunch when children from all over the village came to my host family’s house to enjoy the meal. We also had amazing experiences outside the village. Janesh, our FijianIndian bus driver for the two weeks, invited us back to his family house for a traditional Indian meal. He lives with his wife, three children, two sisters, parents and grandparents in a house next to their rice field in the hills. They proudly welcomed us into their home and together we shared a traditional family meal. After our first week of volunteering we had some time off to visit some local tourist highlights. We visited some natural mud pools and hot springs as well as the pool at the Hilton’s Double Tree Resort, a resort near the village. The surrounding area of Nadi and Korovuto has many resorts as Fiji’s largest economic industry is, unsurprisingly, tourism. The Fijian government makes an effort to ensure locals are employed so, as a result, nearly all of the adults in Korovuto

village were employed at the Hilton’s Double Tree resort. Throughout the project, in respect to Fijian customs we wore sulus – a type of wrap around skirt. On the last night, as a farewell, our host families prepared a traditional Fiji Lovo – a feast of food prepared over a fire in the ground. We wore a formal version of the sulu with a matching shirt, in formal Fijian style. I will miss my Fiji family and sincerely hope I will be able to visit them again. I thoroughly enjoyed experiencing a new culture in such an immersive way and experiencing first-hand the positive impact our actions can have on those less fortunate than us. I truly enjoyed the experience and believe I created long lasting memories. I hope to undertake similar projects in the future and travel back to Fiji to visit my host village. Grace Williams (2016)


23

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

MARY ANN MATTHEWS REPORT CONTINUED

GABRIELLA BELPERIO: It’s a great concept - giving back. Whether it be on a large scale, overseas somewhere to people who are less fortunate than yourself, or a smaller scale, to a local community or family and friends. As Henry Van Dyke said, ‘It is not the gift, but the thought that counts.’ I have always believed strongly in this and so when the Mary Ann Matthews Scholarship was introduced in 2015, I immediately jumped at the opportunity. I was in Year 11 when I found out that I had been awarded the scholarship, so to have thought that in just over a year’s time, I would be travelling to the developing country of Cambodia, alone, was quite nerve racking to say the least. Year 12 was over in the blink of an eye and before I knew it, it was 8am on 8 January and there I was, sitting next to a 2 year old child (who thought it was a good idea not to sleep) on an 8 hour plane flight to Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Arriving at 9:30pm on a Sunday night was prime time for families to be arriving back in the city, meaning that I quickly learnt that the ‘push, shove and beep’ method of driving was preferred over any type of road rules. I soon arrived at my shared apartment accommodation where I was greeted by people I had never met before from places including America, England, Belgium, Denmark, China, Italy… (the list goes on), ranging in age from 16 to 72. Regardless of where we were from, our age, background or gender, we all held the common interest in and desire

to ‘give back’ through volunteering under various programs in Cambodia. I started the following day with an induction program, being greeted by my Cambodian Course Coordinator and tuk tuk driver - these were my ‘go to’ people for any questions, concerns, feedback or just a good laugh regarding my program and people with whom I soon became best buddies. I was part of the Care program run by Projects Abroad, which is a volunteer abroad organisation. Each program is involved in some way with a local Cambodian organisation called Khemara which, since its opening, has played a significant role in working for the advancement of women and children in Cambodia by working directly with communities. Day 1 was busy, from trying to get my head around the road rules, or lack thereof, to meeting the children, teachers and kindergarten where I was to be based for the next month as well as being given a city tour with newly found American friends. From Day 2 I was volunteering each week-day in a local kindergarten called Khor Mouy, about 20 minutes from the centre of Phnom Penh with about 40 boys and girls aged 3-7 and 2 teachers. The typical day began with a half hour English lesson with the older children in which I taught basic English such as types of common foods, the alphabet, types of weather and days of the week. Next, the children came together to watch a movie, play with toys or colour

in pictures to decorate the classrooms while lunch was being prepared. One of the teachers made lunch each day. This consisted of rice with some kind of vegetables and meat. The older children would set up plastic tables, chairs and a washing station outside for everyone to wash their hands before sitting down to lunch. Teeth cleaning and nap time happened after lunch. Then, the children had showers in small groups in a concrete cubicle with cold water and very little shampoo, the boys going first and the girls following after. The children were then allowed to have play time outside, which is when I soon found out that these small bodies and sweet smiles definitely had a hidden competitive side when it came to playing soccer or chasey. My time spent in the kindergarten was eye opening, inspiring and heartbreaking all at the same time. The children were respectful, helpful, mature, somewhat cheeky and full of gratitude for everything they were involved in. The teachers were kind-hearted, willing to learn and very positive in all they did to allow the children to have a fun and educational day. Weekends provided a change of pace, often spent travelling around to explore the rural life, culture, infrastructure and food of Cambodia. This was also great bonding time with other volunteers from the apartments. Activities included abseiling and stand up paddle boarding in the small beach town of Kampot, travelling on a night


STE WARD S HIP

24

bus with bunk beds for 6 hours to Siem Reap, spending 5 hours at Angkor Wat, watching the sun set behind the incredible architecture, roaming the polluted streets of Phnom Penh to find the best markets, restaurants, henna artists and landmarks, meeting locals, witnessing some pretty amazing living situations and learning about the history of a place that was under the Pol Pot regime not all that long ago. Two words to describe the Cambodian people would be kind and selfless from local supermarket staff, to passing people on the streets, restaurant staff, market stall holders and the rest everything these people were involved in was done with a smile. They are just so happy even though the majority of them live in difficult conditions. They have never been able to experience conditions such as a modern house with a door that actually locks or a proper shower with hot running water. I would like to thank Mrs Danvers, Mr Manifold and Mrs Escott for accepting me for the Mary Ann Matthews Scholarship back in 2015 and assisting me with organising my trip, and the Matthews family for providing me with this incredible opportunity. It’s not every day you get to choose a place you want to go in the world to fulfil a passion. And lastly, to Mary Ann Matthews - thank you for being an inspiration. Gabriella Belperio (2016)


25

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

GIVING AT EVERY OPPORTUNITY The late Helen Cruickshank (nee Frayne) was passionate about Wilderness School. An avid old scholar, she was always connected. She was the coordinator of our Old Scholars’ events in New South Wales for many years after completing her schooling. During 2016, the Wilderness School Foundation received a bequest of $5,000 from Helen Cruickshank’s estate. We are honoured and genuinely appreciative that Helen considered Wilderness School in her will. In the Lower Junior School, preparations have begun for a ‘Sensory Garden’ which will be established and named in honour of Helen’s legacy to our School. The garden will be shared by our ELC, Reception and Year 1 girls. We look forward to keeping you

updated with its progress. We have been hoping to establish a sensory garden for quite some time. It is now a reality due to Helen Cruickshank.

THE GIFT OF GIVING

A bequest can support an area that you are passionate about or be for general use. It allows you to contribute to our school without impacting on your lifestyle today. For a brochure and additional information about the Green Door Society, email Jodie Escott jescott@wilderness.com.au or telephone 08 8344 6688 for a confidential conversation.


TH RIV ING AND C O NNE CTE D C O M M UNIT Y

26

GLOBAL CONNECTION A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE You need to look no further than to our international students to see our school value ‘True and Courageous Self’ being lived every day. To make the decision to move to a new country and study in your second language presents many challenges and requires a level of courage on a daily basis. The international girls arrive with many hopes and aspirations, one of which is their desire to make strong connections and close friendships with the local students. Language limitations in the early days and other intercultural nuances, mean that this doesn’t necessarily come easily, but as a school that also promotes global citizenship, we continue to look for ways to encourage and foster cross cultural connections. The International Assembly organised by our International Committee celebrated not just the culture of our current international students but also the cultural groups represented in our school community that have had a much longer association with Australia. Having a friend from a different culture is a ‘true gift’ as through them you are granted a genuine and deep appreciation of the subtle differences in our cultural perspectives and the commonalities that bind us in the

human spirit. But the benefits go even beyond this. Recent research from Drake University indicated that not only did graduates who interacted with international students in college go on to acquire the skills you would expect—speaking a foreign language and relating well to people of different cultures—they also developed a host of cognitive skills that are seemingly unrelated. Among them are the ability to question their own beliefs and values, acquire new skills and knowledge independently, formulate creative ideas, integrate ideas and information, achieve quantitative abilities, understand the role of science and technology in society and gain in-depth knowledge in a specific field. In each case, graduates who reported high levels of interaction with international students reported ‘significantly higher levels of skill development’ than those who reported little or no interaction. The global perspectives of our students are also promoted through the global classroom projects in many areas of the school. Rosie Broderick Head of Boarding & International Recruitment


27

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

WHAT IS IT LIKE TO BE AN INTERNATIONAL STUDENT AT WILDERNESS SCHOOL? AN INTERVIEW WITH JESSIE (XUE WEI) ZHENG

My name is Jessie Zheng. I am an international student in Year 12 at Wilderness School. I am from a small city named Sanming in China. I came to Wilderness School in February 2016, and started my new life since then.

What is it like to be an international student? When I first came to a new school, I was scared and overwhelmed as English is a big problem for me. During my time here, I have met a lot of new people including both international and local girls, and I made friends with them gradually. I now believe that language should never be a barrier for people of different cultures to get closer, we just need to be willing to try to come to know each other. I would like to share my culture to everyone, by showing people who I am, where I come from, how I feel about certain things, and the way I interpret the world. In Wilderness School, I became a more enthusiastic, more joyful and happier person. I love all of my subjects even though they cause me to stress out sometimes. I love my role as the International Student representative of the SRC, and I love this beautiful school where there are teachers, the boarding house staff and the students. ‘Learn everything you can, anytime you can, from anyone you can; there will always come a time when you will be grateful you did.’


TH RIV ING AND C O NNE CTE D C O M M UNIT Y

28

Why did you choose Wilderness? How is Wilderness different from your school in China? From the perspectives of my parents and international agents, academic outcome is one of the most important things they value for a school, also they hope that I am going to have a good future through education. Indeed, I have learnt how to write a formal business report, allocated work for employees in the workplace and written a narrative to engage readers. All of these skills I had never learnt and they are completely different from my learning experiences before joining Wilderness. However, I will tell my parents that the most important thing I have learnt in Wilderness is not out of textbooks and academia, but it is how to be the best I can be throughout my life and how to amaze myself. I have become more independent and capable of managing my life appropriately. Facing different cultures used to be a big challenge for me, but now I have more courage to communicate across cultures. I am glad that I am studying in Australia and having such opportunity to make friends all over the world. Also, I am always learning from mistakes. The more mistakes I have made, the biggest improvements I have made. ‘You will never find something better if you stay in your comfort zone.’

What is your aim as a leader? During this journey, there is one person who always enthuses me to try my best with everything and always believes in me. Her name is Lowell So and she was the International Student Representative in 2016. I think she is a good leader. Because of her, I am inspired to be stronger as she is a role model in leadership for me and I am grateful and honoured to be the International Representative 2017. All international girls are my motivation, their fantastic personalities contribute to our school. I recognise that some of them are afraid of taking the first step towards the community. As a Wildy leader this year, I intend to encourage the international girls to be more engaged in school life. Also I want to help the girls to solve their life or study problems within my ability and to build intercultural connections and, hence, continue to make a difference to Wildy. Also, many international and local girls are glad to join and be involved in our School International Committee this year. We have planned to organise activities such as film nights and food challenge to foster intercultural understanding between all students,

and allow an opportunity to build a bridge between local and international girls. Hopefully, throughout this year, international and local girls will have more communication opportunities and have a closer relationship. Last but not least, I am very appreciative for the opportunity to live and study in this amazing school community. I will be a Wildy girl forever and I will be very proud of myself being a Wilderness School student forever.


29

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY

Do you have a mantra / philosophy? You can literally do anything.

ALYCE TRAN (2003) CO FOUNDER OF THE DAILY EDITED

Alyce Tran is the face and creative mind behind the global sensation The Daily Edited. From a young age Alyce showed a keen interest in business, selling strawberries at the front of her family’s farm. Now an astute business woman, Alyce is running a multimillion-dollar company by embossing monograms on leather goods with her co-founder and business partner Tania Liu. We recently sat down with Alyce to ask her about her journey and to share with us her tips for success…

Tell us about your journey after leaving school. After school I studied Law/ Commerce at the University of Adelaide. I then went on to work for a judge in the Court of Appeal in Melbourne and at a large corporate law firm in Perth and Sydney (King & Wood Mallesons). I’ve been all over the place! I’m now based in Sydney. Whilst working as a lawyer I started a side business (clearly being a lawyer wasn’t that much fun!), The Daily Edited (TDE). Running TDE has been my full time job for the last few years. The Daily Edited is now a leather accessories business (it started purely as a blog and then it was a clothing brand) predominantly online but with a series of shop-in shops in David Jones in Australia, Robinsons in Singapore and Saks Fifth Avenue in the US.

What does a typical day look like for you? I get up quite late (8am – well I am my own boss right?) go to the gym and then get to my office at around 10am. I have approximately 25 staff in my office at any one time (we have 100 staff worldwide but at my office I have my core team) and I try to speak to each of them briefly when I get in to see where they are with their work. I then get to my desk and respond to outstanding emails. That may involve me deep diving into our finances, literally designing a new item for our range or putting together a pitch or proposal document. A lot of people ask me if I still create all of the images that go onto all of the TDE channels. The answer is, yes of course. In the afternoons I spend time creating content, coming up with new ideas for our products and working on longer term projects for the business. At the moment, for example, we are currently designing our shop-in shop for Saks Fifth Avenue in New York. At around 5.30-6pm most of my staff have left the office. I stay back for an hour or so.


TH RIV ING AND C O NNE CTE D C O M M UNIT Y

30

Imagine living a life of contrasts; growing up on a cereal and wool farm in regional South Australia to living in the hustle and bustle of inner city Melbourne while studying as a mature age student. With the opportunity to realise my attributes, I began a writing and editing consultancy working between Melbourne and Sydney in corporate circles. My dream was always to become an author. Being a Wilderness girl certainly gave me the values of resilience and of being a true and courageous self to chase my dream.

What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls? The sky’s the limit, there is no set path to success, just be willing to give anything a go. How did being a Wilderness girl help you to succeed? A lot of people say that I am very confident and outgoing. I think my Wildy years really gave that to me. Being in a class of girls (now women) who were all destined for amazing things and are very successful personally and professionally, drove me to have to stand out and excel somehow! How have you overcome challenges or setbacks? One word – resilience. So Wildy. What did you think you would be pursuing when you left school? A career in the law!! I thought I would be a partner at a law firm. What are your future plans? To keep growing TDE into a global and long lasting business. www.thedailyedited.com

FIONA MCCALLUM (1987) WRITER

Graduating from Wilderness in 1987 Fiona went on to graduate from Deakin University with a Bachelor of Arts (Professional Writing). After brief stints in administration, marketing and recruitment, Fiona started Content Solutions, a consultancy providing professional writing and editing services to the corporate sector. During this time she continued to develop her creative writing skills by reading widely and attending short courses. Her first novel ‘Paycheque’ was published in 2011. Successfully publishing many novels since, her book ‘Leap of Faith’, published in 2015, was named on Better Reading's list of Australia's Top 100 Favourite Books for 2015. We asked Fiona to share with us a brief account of her journey and source of inspiration…

Moving back to Adelaide allowed me the chance to pursue my writing dream. After almost 10 years of rejections from agents and publishers, look at me now!! In only five years, I have sold over 300,000 copies across 8 bestselling novels and am listed as one of Australia’s top women’s fiction authors. My ninth novel ‘Finding Hannah’ has just been released. It is a touching story, set in Melbourne, about healing in tragedy and the power of strong friendships. It is a heart-warming journey of self-discovery.


31

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY she is typically invited to give tens of international presentations each year. Despite living overseas, Phiala maintains ties with Australia and is a regular guest on the ABC Radio National Science Show with Robyn Williams. Phiala has recently accepted a new position in the United States, as Professor of Physics at the College of William and Mary with a joint appointment as Senior Research Scientist at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This year, she was named on the Forbes Magazine ‘30 under 30’ list of most influential people under 30 years old. We ask Phiala what advice she would give aspiring Wilderness girls…

DR PHIALA SHAHANAN (2007) BSC (HPCP) (HONS), PHD

Phiala is a researcher in theoretical physics whose work seeks to unify nuclear and particle physics. Recently, her collaboration performed the first simulation of a nuclear reaction from a particle physics perspective, using large-scale calculations on the biggest supercomputers in the world. Her work has also provided the first theory benchmarks for the planned electronion collider, a machine that will be built in the United States with the mission of understanding gluons, the subatomic particles responsible for binding matter together.

In early 2015, Phiala finished her PhD at the University of Adelaide. Her work was awarded the Postgraduate University Medal, the Bragg Medal for the best Physics PhD in Australia, the SA Science Excellence Award for the best Science PhD in SA, and the American Physical Society Dissertation award for the best PhD in her discipline worldwide. Since moving to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Centre for Theoretical Physics in the United States as a research scientist two years ago, Phiala’s work has seen international attention, and

What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls? The advice I would give Wilderness girls is to make the most of the amazing opportunities they have to try out lots of different things. You never know what you might like and what might turn into a career or a lifelong hobby or passion. How did being a Wilderness girl help you to succeed? I was extremely well-prepared to start the next phase of my education and enter university. More than that, I never had any doubt that I could do or be whatever I wanted to, which has a lot to do with the opportunities and support in all areas of my life and education that I found at Wilderness.


TH RIV ING AND C O NNE CTE D C O M M UNIT Y

32

I travelled and based myself in many locations within capital cities of Australia as well as London. After returning to Australia, I finally settled in Perth. Armed with a Diploma in Business Administration and a Diploma of Journalism I was ready to take on the world. For a while I worked with a private publishing business which proved to be a brilliant learning adventure.

LANNAH SAWERS-DIGGINS (1972) WRITER Lannah grew on the family sheep station and joined the Wilderness community as a boarder at the age of 11. After leaving school in 1972 Lannah went on to hold various positions in Adelaide, before joining the Bank of Adelaide. During her years there she started travelling interstate on ‘trouble shooting’ trips. This gave her a taste of life away from Adelaide – she was never to return permanently. Lannah shares her story with us, reminding us never to give up on our dreams!

My boarding days at Wildy remind me of many pen friends from around the world. I have always loved writing. A key defining moment where I honestly woke with an epiphany was due to my late father. He had been writing a manuscript about our ancestors. His writing, along with many pictures, was passed around my family for many years and finally landed with me. As my father had never had the opportunity to publish his work, I realised that with my passion for writing and this wealth of information, I was destined to write a book. ‘Red Dust Dreams’ was published and distributed internationally in March. It is available in hard cover and e-book. There are launches planned for Perth

JOANNE CYS (1985) PROFESSOR Joanne Cys LFDIA has been appointed Head of School: Art, Architecture and Design at the University of South Australia. Professor Cys was inducted into the Australian Design Hall of Fame in 2016 in recognition of her advocacy for the design sector.

and Adelaide in coming months. There is also a documentary based on the book in production! The interest has been huge and I am in the process of introducing a YouTube business that reviews rural and remote businesses in Australia. I have always been passionate about the outback and writing. However, I was in my mid 50s before I finally began living my dream. It was a very proud moment in my life having the possibility of writing a non-fiction, factual, fascinating book.


Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS ASSOCIATION ADELAIDE FRINGE

OL D S S S E

BIRTHING KITS

N

A

SS

OL A RS ’

Later in March our committee welcomed the youngest and newest old scholars with a fantastic celebration. The class of 2016 enjoyed drinks, canapés and the beginning of ongoing networking opportunities at the Wildy Cafe plaza. It was a wonderful time to speak about the ethos of WOSA and upcoming events. We look forward to seeing many of you at our Annual Quiz night in the Wildy Gym on Friday 26 May.

H

Wednesday 8 March was International Women’s Day and another fantastic opportunity for the Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association (WOSA) to spread the message of positivity for women! Once again we funded 400 birthing kits with the assistance of a Krispy Kreme fundraiser organised by the Year 9 girls who assembled the kits that benefit women in developing countries across the globe. It was a wonderful morning sharing the Wildy spirit and creating a generous donation to women in need.

Pooja Newman President, WOSA

JAIL BIRDS

C

N

The Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association continues to be a hive of activity with renewed vigour in 2017. It was thrilling and a real privilege to host Melissa Sheldon’s ‘Jailbirds’ at Newman Theatre. This was part of the Adelaide Fringe activities and allowed old scholar actors from many different years to come together and tell a story of women’s hardships in an entertaining way. The show was well supported by our local community and beyond and we hope our Association can support further opportunities in the future as this appeals to old scholars of all generations.

L D I ER W

33

O C I AT IO


TH RIV ING AND C O NNE CTE D C O M M UNIT Y

N

WI LDER

O

OL A RS ’

S’

N

O C I AT IO

A

SS

N

WI LDER

H

H

A

SS

S

O C I AT IO

WELCOME TO NEW OLD SCHOLARS

A Rosie Egan, Sophia Nery & Nadia Jose B Chloe Davidson, Jamie Rose Koch, Niki Panayiaris, Gabrielle Pehlivanides, Claire Morphett, Lowell So & Sophie Thomas-Jones C Pooja Newma & Ruby Brus

S C

E

SS

OL D

SS LD OE

C

N

34

A

B

C

D

E

F D Beljana Daly, Jane Danvers & Sophia Nery E Olivia Tremaine & Mathilde Warne F Lilli Cavill, Matilda Ross, Ben Manifold & Catriona Walsh


35

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS REUNIONS

DRINKS @ THE MAID

OLD SCHOLARS TOUR & MORNING TEA

A

B

There is something special about old scholars wanting to share in the Wilderness journey. On Wednesday 15 March, we were joined by twelve old scholars. We managed a complete tour of the School from the ELC through to the Senior School including the recently refurbished Science labs. We were all wishing we could be back at school learning! Morning Tea was served in the Old Scholars’ Association Archive Gallery within Browns’ House. It was a delightful morning with many comparisons of former school days and the opportunities our girls have today.

HIGH TEA IN WA

C

D A Becky Bransbury, Shanti Berggren, Sharon Bain, Irene Korsten B Gini Bungey, Genevieve Monk C Mary Fantasia, Lorraine Gormly D Anna Colley, Millie Shinkfield, Lily Schuller

On Saturday 25 March, a group of Wilderness old scholars based in Western Australia enjoyed an elegant and conversation filled High Tea at The George. Thank you to Amy Mansell (class of 94) who was integral in organising and hosting the event. It was a fun Saturday afternoon. Guests who joined Amy included: Bindy Miles (Bruce) Charlotte LePoidevin Christine Collette (Coles) Hilary Brooke (Eggleton) Helen Marshall (Weir) Kate Nelligan Lannah Sawers-Diggins (Sawers) Chrissie Mavrofridis Amy Mansell (Greenslade-Palmer) Our W.A. dinner will be on Saturday 16 September with partners. Save the date and see you soon!

A A Mary Fantasia, Rebecca Plummer, Helen Rossis, Lorraine Gormly, Jeni Muir, Meg Ryan & Vidya Limaye


WILD

NS

RS

IO

EV

EN

& C RA ELEB

T

& C ELEB

OLD SCHOLAR REUNION DATES FOR THE 2017 CALENDAR

QUEENSLAND REUNION Due to Cyclone Debbie, Brisbane suffered torrential rain and flooding in the week leading to our reunion. When Jodie Escott, Manager of Development & Community flew in, the sky was Wildy blue and the weather was seriously picture perfect for the annual Queensland Reunion lunch. Our afternoon was brilliant! So much to share about strong, successful Wilderness women and the incredibly diverse journeys – some in recent years and some across many countries. An enormous thank you to Sarah Daly (class of 73) who organised a fantastic venue at Libertine Restaurant and great menu!

S

T

UPCOMING REUNIONS Victoria Reunion Saturday 24 June for Breakfast Table Salute: Alan & Anne Symons, Georgina Smibert, Nicole Le Maistre, Russell Byrnes, Anne Freeman, Henk van Roy, Ebony Cavallaro, Annabel Biven, Jacqui McInerney, John & Prue Walsh, Josephine Philp-Taylor, Spike Taylor, Elizabeth Trott, Penelope Megginson, Sarah Daly

USA REUNION Our first ever USA Reunion, hosted by Principal Jane Danvers, was held on Sunday 23 April. Brunch was served in the Wine Room at Public Restaurant, on a beautiful spring day in New York. It was wonderful to share stories of living in one of the greatest cities in the world and to hear about the extraordinary successes of our old scholars, both professionally and personally. We have promised to meet again soon. Hopefully, this was the first of many future opportunities to come together. Thank you to Fiona Guthrie who was integral in coordinating the event and was so generous with her time.

For reunion questions please contact Jodie Escott, Manager of Development and Community on jescott@wilderness.com.au

1967 Reunion & School Tour 19 August for lunch 1997 Reunion & School Tour 19 August for lunch 1957 Reunion & School Tour 31 August for lunch 2007 Reunion & School Tour 9 September from 5.00pm 1987 Reunion & School Tour 16 September from 4pm 1977 Reunion & School Tour 28 October for lunch 2012 Reunion & School Tour 26 November for lunch

IO

EN

S

LA

LA

EV

T

O

ER

S

O

WILD

ES

36

H

N

S OL D S S E C O NL D S C H

ER

TH RIV ING AND C O NNE CTE D C O M M UNIT Y

T A R


S

WILD

LA

IO

NS

NS

RS

RS

EV

EN

& C RA ELEB

T

S

T

& C ELEB

IO

EN

S

LA

O

EV

T

O

ER

ES

H

N

S OL D S S E C O NL D S C H

ER

Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

WILD

37

T A R

VERA DOW WRITING PRIZE Madeleine Harris (Year 8) and Sophie Davies (Year 11) recently joined Anne Dow for morning tea at her home. Both girls have been recipients of the Vera Dow Writing Prize. Vera Dow loved literature and her Middle School Writing Prize is offered annually. Her great grand-daughter Aisha is an old scholar (class of 2004).

RHODA NICHOLS BOTH (NEE ROYAL) 26.3.1913 - 15.5.2017

Anne Dow is an amazing woman and both Sophie and Madeleine enjoyed a wonderful morning. The table was set with the finest china and Anne was proud to share the story of how the prize came to be. Anne is an author in her own right and gave a copy of her book, ‘The Three Js’, to the girls.

On 26 March, Rhoda celebrated her 104th birthday. Born in 1913, Rhoda was a boarder at Wilderness School during the mid 1920s. During her school days Rhoda played tennis and learned ballroom RHODA NICHOLS ROYAL) dancing. She hasBOTH many(NEE amazing memories of her school days. Rhoda was an avid and leading lawn bowler well into her 80s and only moved into an aged care facility in 2016! She has 3 children, 8 grand children, 17 great grand children and 1 great, great grand child.

Anne Dow (who is 93 years of age) is the daughter-in-law of the late Vera Dow and continues the Dow family passion for writing and legacy to Wilderness School.

Above Sophie Davies, Anne Dow & Madeleine Harris

OLD SCHOLAR DATES FOR THE 2017 CALENDAR

CELEBRATING 104 YEARS

TERM 3

Old Boys’ Cocktail Party Thursday 31 August 1957-63 Morning Tea Tuesday 12 September Annual Dinner Thursday 28 September @ The Maid

Sadly Rhoda passed away peacefully on Sunday 14 May. Our sincere condolences to her family.

TERM 4

Coffee Morning for Old Scholars with Daughters at Wilderness Wednesday 18 October Southern Fleurieu Dinner Friday 20 October 1964 & Prior Old Scholars’ Lunch Thursday 2 November Golf Day Monday 13 November


TH RIV ING AND C O NNE CTE D C O M M UNIT Y

38

WEDDINGS

ANNOUNCEMENTS MARRIAGES Skye Findlay (2006) married Michael Keene on 29 April 2017 BIRTHS Catherine Williams (nee Rollison) (1999) Emma Williams Jasmine Papilion (nee Green ) (2005) Emma Papilion Penny Schapel (nee Daw) (2006) George Philip Schapel Nikole Tsekouras (nee Rozaklis) (2006) Jonathon Tsekouras

DEATHS Margaret (Peggy) Archer (Mellish) (1954) Jenny Dunn (Tonkin) (1955) Jim Forwood (1952) Kathleen Day (Trotter) (1947) Janet Mehan (Winnall) (1947) Heather Bonnin (McDonald) (1945) Rhoda Both (Royal) (1925/26)

WILDY BABIES

A

B

C

D

A Catherine Williams (nee Rollison) (1999) Emma Williams B Jasmine Papilion (nee Green ) (2005) Emma Papilion C Penny Schapel (nee Daw) (2006) George Philip Schapel D Nikole Tsekouras (nee Rozaklis) (2006) Jonathon Tsekouras

IF YOU ARE AN OLD SCHOLAR WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU AND SHARE YOUR MILESTONES AND CELEBRATE YOUR SUCCESS.

Please email your news and a photo to communications@wilderness.com.au


Wilderness Times | Autumn 2017

30 Hawkers Road, Medindie SA 5081 Phone + 61 8 8344 6688 www.wilderness.com.au CRICOS Provider Code: 00375B

WILDERNESS TIMES - 76  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you