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SUMMER 2018

ISSUE # 79


Wilderness Times | Summer 2018

UPCOMING EVENTS

CONTENTS 3

Principal’s Thoughts

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From the Chair of the Governing Council Shanti Berggren

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Valedictory Address Molly Chapman

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Speech Night Guest Speaker Milly Toovey

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Year 12 Results 2017 Success

21 Farewell Clark Ross 23

Faculty in Focus English

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Wilderness Minimester Ann Rooney

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Student 2 Student Bess Smith Fearless Girls, Strong Women Alison Short

31 KESAB Year 4

Thursday 8 March International Women’s Day

37 2017 Building & Scholarship Fund Donations

Thursday 22 March Southern Fleurieu Morning Tea

Saturday 17 March Head of the River Tuesday 20 March WOSA Annual General Meeting

Saturday 24 March Western Australia Reunion

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Catherine Ye Teacher Fellowship

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Wilderness School Foundation Christmas Appeal

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Wilderness Rowing Head of the River

Friday 6 April New South Wales Reunion

Roger Masters Drama Fellowship

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Old Scholars Wildy Women Leading the Way

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Old Scholars

Wednesday 9 May Wilderness School Foundation Annual General Meeting Friday 11- Saturday 12 May Queensland Reunions (Brisbane & Gold Coast) Friday 18 May Founders Day + 1960 & Prior Old Scholars’ Morning Tea Wednesday 23 May Jazz @ the Gov

Fairy Garden Rebecca Williamson

Friday 25 May WOSA Quiz Night

Wilderness School has a number of social media platforms to connect with our community and discover the latest news. www.facebook.com/WildernessSchool www.linkedin.com/company/wilderness-school twitter.com/wilderness1884

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34 Enrolments 35 Building International Partnerships 36 Introducing Members of the Governing Council Sarah Matthews

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Join the Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association page on Facebook. This page is set up for Old Scholars to communicate, network and hear about upcoming alumnae events. Once you are a member you can then share with other Old Scholars in your Facebook network.


“My advice to you is to say ‘yes’ to anything that seems remotely exciting (even if it scares you). It could be committing to a 6-year Medicine degree, or a month’s yoga teaching course. Whatever you decide, it’s guaranteed to open doors for you. Life will always be teaching you.”- Milly Toovey, 2007 Old Scholar


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Wilderness Times | Summer 2018

PRINCIPAL’S THOUGHTS SPEECH NIGHT ADDRESS Ms Shanti Berggren, Ms Milly Toovey, members of the Council of Governors, special guests, staff, parents and girls. Tonight’s ceremony provides a time for our senior students to reflect on the year past and to celebrate all that has been achieved. It is an occasion to recognise noteworthy talents and significant service to the School. For our Year 12s it is your finale, the conclusion of your lives as school girls. This is a moment to cherish, coloured by anticipation and excitement but also, we hope for our graduates, a touch of sadness about what is to be left behind. For parents, it is a time to take pleasure in the accomplishments of your daughters. We understand the many sacrifices you have made in order to give them the opportunity to be educated at Wilderness School and I am sure that tonight, like us, you feel a sense of pride and satisfaction in what they have achieved.

As we reflect on the year past, we recognise that, in the words of Dickens, 2017 in some ways has been both the best of times and the worst of times. For our students and for many in our community, we have been bemused by the political milieu of both the Australian and global landscape. At home and abroad our expectations about the qualities we hope for in our leaders have been challenged. Notions of truth have been redefined and the power of social media has escalated. We have had to consider the kind of world we hope to create and the ethics to which we ascribe. In his wonderful essay in the New Yorker, Pulitzer Prize winner, Junot Diaz spoke of 2017 as being a time when we need to cultivate not blind optimism but radical hope. Radical hope directed towards a future goodness, demanding flexibility, openness, and imaginative excellence. As an educator, the concept of radical hope is compelling. Radical hope requires us to see the world not through a lens of cynicism but with sincerity and that right touch

of idealism, with the faith that, together, we can speak and act to make things better. It asks us to believe that the future is firmly in our hands and will be determined by how we live and hope in the present, how we organise, with whom we form solidarities, and how we choose to be heard. In 2017, there have been voices raised. Millions of people worldwide joined the Women’s March in response to the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States. 420 marches were reported in the U.S. and 168 in other countries, including Australia, becoming the largest single-day protest in American history and the largest worldwide protest in recent history. No matter your political ideation, the marches were testament to the power of radical hope, and a collective commitment to unite around shared principles. Only last week, Time magazine named “The Silence Breakers” as its 2017 Person of the Year. Time’s editor in chief, Edward Felsenthal said, “the galvanizing actions of the women … along with those of


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hundreds of others, and of many men as well, have unleashed one of the highest-velocity shifts in our culture since the 1960s.” He was referring to the #Metoo campaign, a digital response to the allegations of sexual harassment and violence against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein. The #MeToo movement was felt globally. #MeToo became #YoTambien in Spain and Latin America, #AnaKaman in the Arab world, “us too” in Israel, #QuellaVoltChe in Italy and #BalanceTonPorc in France. While some are doubtful about the potential for such movements to produce social change, #Metoo reminds us that raising our voices to bring about social consciousness and solidarity is an imperative step towards a more equitable society. Social media can be a way young people make their voices heard through personal story and connecting to others with similar experiences. When we understand that the source of action lies within ourselves, we are living examples of radical hope.

As educators, we are inherently hopeful. It is our role to articulate an exciting and ennobling future for our students. We hope through the many and varied experiences of school life, our girls are able to channel their energy as ethical activists, advocates and philanthropists for the benefit of present and future generations. We believe that the world needs principled young leaders and citizens who utilise their education as a lens through which to understand both past and contemporary events, in order to engage in the now and in the future with informed and considered insight and impact. As an organisation that is hope-full, we will continue to cultivate in each of our girls a love of learning, the habits of an intellectual life, and the character, integrity and qualities of leadership to shape our world. Girls who debate with passion; who have the courage to take a stand; who know that in difficult times as much as in the easy ones, we must defend what we believe to be right. Everyday throughout our School, I witness girls making hopeful

decisions, acting to improve the status quo. I do not see defeatism or apathy but rather a sense of agency and a belief in their ability to craft their future. They are inventive, innovative, creative and sceptical. We know the calibre of our students. We know them to be driven by moral purpose, by a deep commitment to a just society, by an acknowledgement of their ability to make a difference to their community. So, as educators, we are concerned with the learning that will really matter, what Ron Ritchhart calls the residuals of education. We are unapologetically ambitious for our girls and our School. Ideas are the currency of the new economy. The future will be powered by ideas and our state and our nationhood requires a different kind of thinking; a capacity in our young people to be agile, to respond to uncertainty and face future challenges with confidence and an ethical perspective. School has a fundamental role to play in shaping the citizens of tomorrow. We too practise radical hope.   One of the clearest findings from international research on school performance is that the quality (Continued on next page)


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of a school cannot ever exceed the quality of its people. It is no accident that Wilderness thrives. It is teaching quality that enables student achievement, and everyday our teachers bring into their classrooms their professional expertise, crafting opportunities for girls to develop mastery of academic subject matter whilst also going beyond traditional disciplines, to ensure that our girls are furnished with the skills and dispositions necessary to succeed in the 21st Century. They are exceptional practitioners and it is a privilege to work alongside them. Our professional support staff keep the cogs of the school turning and working in harmony. They are the unsung heroes who discharge the necessary administrative and organisational tasks that enable our academic staff to deliver the many opportunities afforded to our girls in the classroom and beyond. Leadership plays a central role in ensuring quality teaching and quality learning and I am blessed to have an outstanding leadership team. Their deep sense of commitment, their shared vison, their endless commitment to an improvement agenda, and their relentless focus on learning creates a fertile and active educational agenda for our school. Wilderness enjoys its position of strength in no small part because

of the knowledge and wisdom of our Council. This year the leadership baton has passed from Mr Ken Williams to Ms Shanti Berggren. I would like to formally acknowledge and thank Ken whose wonderful leadership and support over 6 years has navigated the school into its current position as a centre of educational excellence and innovation. He has undoubtedly fulfilled his part in providing judicious governance to ensure that Wilderness is well placed to continue to prosper as a leading girls’ school well into the future. Going forward, we are in the safe hands of our new Chair, Ms Shanti Berggren, whose wisdom, vision and deep love of the school will lead us with confidence and good judgment. I extend to the other Governors the appreciation of our School Community for their careful guidance and stewardship. You each give so willingly of your time and your expertise. As do the members of our Council sub committees. Throughout the year, the focus of community responsibility has also been embedded within the activities organised through our parent groups. Our exceptionally active Parents & Friends Association, under the leadership of Mrs Karen Gough, volunteer their time and effort to

make possible many of the events which enrich school life for the girls and the community. Our Old Scholars ensure that the links to our past students remain strong. The Old Scholars Association under the leadership of Mrs Georgie Taarnby have recently launched a new strategic plan that looks to the future and provides key directions for our committee to ensure our alumni stay connected in meaningful ways. We also thank Dr Pooja Newman for her dedication and commitment as past president. Likewise, the philanthropic endeavours of the Wilderness Foundation play a central role in enabling us to enhance the learning environment of our girls and to build a robust scholarship endowment for future students. I wish to particularly acknowledge the Chair of the Foundation Dr Sarah Matthews who leads with such warmth and commitment. We were delighted that after many years of hard work the foundation is able to offer two new endowed scholarships, the Brown Sisters’ Memorial and the Creswell Year 10 Entrance Scholarships. Our appreciation must also be extended to the Foundation Events Subcommittee who provide powerful support to our Manager of Development and Community in


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raising funds and were so successful this year with the No Show Ball. As we move towards hosting the Head of the River in 2018 we are also extremely grateful for the generous leadership of Mr Tim Last and the work of the Rowing Committee in preparing for what will be a milestone event for our school community. Likewise, the Lacrosse Club add to the rich life of Wilderness. To our parent volunteers, we are enormously grateful. I thank, too, all our senior students for their curiosity, their love of learning and the openness with which they take on the challenge to grow and extend themselves in all areas of school life. And finally, Year 12s: I have spoken about the importance of radical hope and looking to the future with optimism and fortitude. What does this mean for you? As our graduating class, know that we are filled with hope for you. Each one of you gives testimony to a Wilderness education. The lessons you have learned and the relationships you have built are enduring. As I have said to you before, you are the true measure of our success. Not your ATARS, not your offers to universities here and around the country, but the young women you are now and who you will continue to become.

We have watched you grow and flourish. You have taken the opportunities given to you with enthusiasm and positivity. You have as a year level demonstrated extraordinary leadership and camaraderie. You have left a legacy for others to follow.

the digital and the physical adds richness to your relationships. We hope that when you leave us you live creative and messy lives, that you forget the word ‘failure’ and always remember that it is only by taking risks that we can extend and truly challenge ourselves, so be a little fearless.

So what do we hope for you? We hope you leave us with the knowledge, understanding and selfbelief to enable you to live lives of promise, purpose and fulfillment. We know what you are capable of. Our world needs your tenacity and courage now more than ever. We hope when you leave us that you will always be a little restless, seeking of new challenges, exploring new horizons whilst also recognising the importance of being in the moment and valuing the power of now. We hope that you will listen to others and not shy away from complexity. That you will build empathetic lives, approaching others’ hardship with compassion and understanding, and that that kindness will guide your actions. We hope you will never lose the beauty of sitting with your friends; the intimacy of personal contact through discussion and laughter; that the intersection between

We hope that in going forward you surround yourself with people who challenge you, teach you, and push you to be your best selves, that you will be grateful, generous and open, forgiving and aware of other people’s frailties. We hope you leave us with radical hope, believing in the possibility of a better world, and in doing so recognising your own power to make it so. So now begins a new voyage of discovery, crowded with beginnings, imbued with dreams and laden with opportunities. Be hopeful. Remember hope creates action and it is equally true that action creates hope. So be brave. We know you are ready. We know what you are capable of. Go well.

Principal Jane Danvers


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Wilderness Times | Summer 2018

FROM THE CHAIR OF THE GOVERNING COUNCIL Tonight, we come together to celebrate the achievement of our senior students and to formally congratulate and farewell the Year 12 class of 2017. We also come together to celebrate being part of the community of Wilderness School. In 1970, my parents made a courageous decision to enrol me at Wilderness. Courageous because my kindergarten fees of $90 per term ate significantly into their household budget and I had two sisters to come after me. What they could not have known at the time was (a) they were living the Wildy values, being true and courageous, and (b) they gave me an enduring gift that has outlived my time at school. It is the same gift I have given my daughters and each of your parents have given to you – and that is to belong to this amazing community of girls, parents and friends, old scholars, foundation philanthropists, and teachers.

In 2017, this community has stretched its arms around the globe and around each other. In May of this year, our Principal, Jane Danvers, and the Head of Teaching and Learning, Heather De Blasio, travelled to Canada to participate in a Summit of Educational Leadership. Jane was the keynote speaker on the topic Women in Education, taking her place on a panel of world-recognised educational leaders from the Ministry of Education in Finland and from Harvard. They discussed the challenges about advancing equity, diversity, and inclusion in and through educational leadership. As a consequence of our staff working hard to make and maintain global connections, we have strong partnerships in Boston at Dana Hall School, in New York at the Avenues School, and most recently in Hangzhou, China at the Yuhai Foreign Language School.

Having our teachers work in a global community facilitates ideation and cocreation – this is where questions come to multiply and working through their answers is where true innovation and transformation happens for the benefit of our daughters. As well as being a learning community, we are equally a caring community. We continue to nurture the Bhadure school in Nepal; this year celebrating 20 years of Wilderness in Nepal with a fundraising dinner led by Dr Sally Nobbs and attended by 200 of our family and friends. The teaching and non-teaching staff in this school give of themselves expertly and endlessly. This year at the Debating Intercol, in addition to the show of strength from the Year 12 sisterhood, there were rows of Wilderness teachers from all faculties turning up to be there for the girls.


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The same cross functional support was demonstrated during the Sporting Intercol, with the lead soccer referee being a Wilderness teacher from outside the PE department. I have lost count of the number of times I have left a sporting event with the chant “Wildy is Dynamite, and if you mess with Dynamite…” ringing in my ears, followed by the new fast-paced racy version of the ‘Lion Rampant’ – it’s a lot for an old scholar to take in but it crystalises the passion and effervescence of this community. And at its core is our Principal, Jane Danvers. I know that I am joined by every person in this gym in unanimously thanking Jane and her staff for our daughters. As a very wise former Chair of Council once observed, Jane and her staff are the key to the success of this school and the rest of us simply surf the wave of that success. In 2017, the School’s management team continued to work closely with the School Council. The Council’s efforts remain focused on the strategic, financial and governance oversight of the School. We strive to provide the appropriate balance of optimum facilities, staff, curriculum and other activities, with due regard to managing the significant costs entailed, bearing in mind the sensitivity of fee increases for our parents.

On behalf of Council, I again thank all those members of the School community, who work tirelessly for the School, with special acknowledgement of Paula Jolly, whose extraordinary hard work has enabled Council to work through the year efficiently and seamlessly. To each of my fellow Council members, thank you for your time and your support. As we have often remarked over the years, we have a wonderful collaborative Council who bring to the table not only their skills but the highest of integrity, putting this School first at all times. And now to the Year 12s. In that timehonoured Wilderness tradition, you have sung ‘Lord Dismiss Us’ for the very last time. It’s really hard to believe. I have known some of you since you were in Kindergarten. Surely it was just yesterday that you were playing in the sandpit but it couldn’t be because in February of this year I watched you all – tanned, made up and beautiful, floating in your formal dresses – young women with the world for the taking. I know from experience that there is no one that will know you as well as the cohort of girls you now sit with, that the nicknames you have given each other at school will probably stick with you for the rest of your lives. I know from experience that you will care for each other when you are older no matter where you are in the world, because

of the inalienable bond you share as the graduating class of 2017, and because each of you carry Wilderness DNA, inheriting a spirit of humility and the belief for unlimited kindness in relationships. When you leave the gym tonight, and hopefully hang your uniform up for the last time (and not throw it on the floor of your bedroom), take time to remind yourselves that you are amazing, take time to pay tribute to the fact that you stand on the shoulders of the people who are part of this community, on the shoulders of the women who came before you – the Brown sisters, who were innovators, disruptors, entrepreneurs, leaders, feminists. They have made it possible for all of us. Take time to figure out what will you make possible and for whom. And, of course, take time to come back and tell us. I wish you all the best. Thank you. Shanti Berggren Chair of the Governing Council


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VALEDICTORY ADDRESS FROM MOLLY CHAPMAN SRC, PRESIDENT 2017

“The class of 2017 consists of 81 young women, each having experienced a unique journey through the School. Some started at age 3 in the Kindergarten and predate more than half of the buildings on our everevolving campus. Some girls, like myself, started in the Junior School, others in later years. A few have come from overseas, others from rural South Australia, and even more from various parts of Adelaide; a not inconsiderable number within walking distance of the school, although that doesn’t stop them from driving. Over time, we have welcomed each new girl, embracing them as family, until we stood together ready to take on the challenges of Year 12.”

Good evening Ms Danvers, Mr Manifold, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen and girls. I have had the immense privilege this year of being President of the SRC, and it is in this capacity that I speak now on behalf of the Year 12 girls. Tonight marks the last opportunity for the Class of 2017 to farewell Wilderness and be farewelled in turn. This is a cause for sadness for many of us, but also for celebration, as this School has done so much to help us achieve our potential. We look forward to the challenges ahead, grateful for the education and all the support we have received here, because as ancient philosopher Lao Tzu once said, “New beginnings are often disguised as painful endings.” The class of 2017 consists of 81 young women, each having experienced a unique journey through the School. Some started at age 3 in the Kindergarten and predate more than half of the buildings on our ever-evolving campus. Some girls, like myself, started in the Junior School, others in later years. A few have come from overseas, others from rural South Australia,

and even more from various parts of Adelaide; a not inconsiderable number within walking distance of the school, although that doesn’t stop them from driving. Over time, we have welcomed each new girl, embracing them as family, until we stood together ready to take on the challenges of Year 12. In preparing this speech, I sought advice. My family suggested starting with a joke, quoting either Churchill or Woody Allen, including a second joke later on to keep the audience awake, and to not speak for too long. I have tried to follow that advice. As such, any good in what follows is mine. Any blame is theirs. So, what do you get when you cross Wildy girls with a pack of wild, hungry animals? The cafe line at lunch time on a Friday. Sorry, I know it’s not my best, but, like the punchline endings of jokes, the ending of schooling is important. It is a time of transition and a rite of passage. When carefully considering what I would take away from my time at Wilderness as having


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been most important, I found my mind consistently returning to one thing: the girls, and the friendships we shared. Year 12 has been undoubtedly demanding, and we have all stumbled at some point, but with the support of these amazing girls, managed to keep going. Now, we cross the finish line; not individually, limping and alone, but hand in hand, as one. In overcoming the challenges that we faced this year, we have grown as individuals, gained a strong work ethic and accomplished a great deal. Heeding Woody Allen’s advice that “80% of success is turning up”, we have worked hard. We have pushed our limits and achieved success in a range of areas, including academics, sport and the arts, to name a few. I hope the Class of 2017 will be remembered for their hard work in this regard, but also for the respect they have for one another and for the unique differences that bring them together. On countless occasions throughout this year, I have witnessed these girls support each other and accept the help of others.

The loud and outgoing cheered for the athletic, the strong problem solvers advised the leaders, the comics cheered up those who were stressed and emotional. This support contributed greatly to the success of such events as the American Big Lunch in Term 4 last year, the annual Glee competition, Wildy’s first Intercol win against Seymour, and frankly, us just surviving the year. Personally, I will never forget the strong and vocal support our Senior A debating team received when we won the Intercol debate away at Seymour.

Year 12, the dedication and genuine care of our teachers has become even more evident, as time after time they went above and beyond the call of duty.

We’ve also received support and guidance from many others this year, for which we are very grateful. I think I speak for all of the Year 12s when I thank our parents for their love and support. For all of the late nights, calming text messages and compliance with absurd snack requests, we salute you.

To Ms Danvers and Mr Manifold, thank you for your dedication throughout not only this year, but over all of the years that we have shared together. The inspiration and motivation that you provide so freely, in addition to your strong, steady guidance, have been a great source of comfort throughout a sometimes turbulent Year 12.

We also thank our teachers for the high quality of their instruction and particularly their support, encouragement and mentorship. In

To all those who have taught us since we entered Wilderness, thank you. You have contributed greatly to the people we have and will become. Some teachers are leaving the Wilderness this year, several completing particularly long and distinguished careers at this School. We thank them all and wish them the very best in the future.

Which reminds me to ask. What do you get when you hook up a Wildy girl to a lie detector? Always True. (Continued on next page)


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With each milestone this year came some sadness in knowing that it was our last. Tonight is the culmination of such finales. It is the last time we wear the Wilderness uniform, and probably the last time that we will all be in the same place at the same time. As this chapter of our lives draws to a close, a new one begins. This new chapter is unfamiliar and perhaps a little frightening, but holds all the possibilities of new excitement, challenges, relationships and successes. Like generations of Wilderness graduates before us, the Class of 2017 will become wonderful partners, parents and friends. It is very possible also, that within the graduating group sits a future Olympian, astronaut, Broadway star, bestselling author, human rights activist or Nobel prize-winning scientist. We now venture into the world, forged by the fires of SACE, to do the very best we can in working towards these achievements. At Wilderness, we have been provided not just with an excellent education but also encouraged to be ambitious, to aim high in our future pursuits, and to believe that young women are the equal of all in achieving whatever career and other goals we set our minds to.

There have always been challenges for people leaving high school, particularly perhaps for young women. Today is no different. Despite advances in opportunities for and achievements of women over recent decades, we are still faced with many difficulties and challenges ahead. Sexual harassment in the workplace is more prevalent than we may have thought and hoped, as revealed by the recent scandals and revelations arising from the “#me too” movement. The gender pay gap for the same work persists. Despite women having made up the majority of university graduates for some decades now, we are still underrepresented in positions of power and influence. Only 11 of the CEOs of the top 200 companies in Australia are women, with such a CEO more likely to be named John, Peter or David than to be female. These issues and others present obstacles to young women; however, our class of 2017 has been wellequipped by this School with the tools to take on and tackle such challenges and to achieve our goals in spite of them. As the poet Rupi Kaur wrote, “our work should equip the next generation of women to outdo us in every field; this is the legacy we’ll leave behind.” Wildy girls are taught this idea very early on,

and personally, I am very excited to see where this class find themselves in the future, motivated by this ambition. Finally, to the class of 2017. Thank you for electing me as your President this year. It has been an honour to represent you, one filled with excitement and friendships. Some say your school days are your best days. While I hope that turns out not to be the case, it is hard not to believe that at the moment, and that is because of you all. We arrived at Wilderness in different years, and during different phases of our lives, but have established friendships, a sense of sisterhood and a love that I am confident will extend well into the future. May we stay in touch for many years to come. I wish you every happiness, success and accomplishment. Our time at Wilderness has equipped us well for all those things, and, in whatever path we choose, to make a difference for the better. Goodbye and good luck. May the adventure begin. Thank you. Molly Chapman SRC President 2017


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B Above A. 2017 Year 12 Cohort on their first day of the 2017 new school year B. 2017 SRC Executive - Georgia Honan, Molly Chapman and Nicola Ricci


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SPEECH NIGHT GUEST SPEAKER MILLY TOOVEY

“It’s a super scary thought knowing that every decision you make from now on (whether good or bad) is going to affect your life journey, but also super exciting. Know that your path in life might not be a simple straight line; expect there to be bumps along the way.” I’d like to start tonight with a couple of questions: 1. Who here knows exactly what they want to do when they finish school? 2. Who here has no idea what they want to do? There is no right or wrong answer to either of those questions. It’s a blessing to feel so confident in knowing what you’d like to do when you finish school. And it’s absolutely more than ok to not know. Trust me, I guarantee some of your parents don’t even know what they want to do when they ‘grow up’. We’re all human, just figuring out our place and belonging in this world, and we’re forever growing up. What we do for work, does not define who we are. What we do for study or work is only a small piece of our lives. So, perhaps the question I should be asking you all is ‘who here knows who they are?’

Earlier this year I spent a month in India where I learned to become a yoga teacher and to heal myself emotionally and spiritually. I studied in the foothills of the Himalayas, woke up at 4:30am each morning from the sounds of bells and donkeys. I practised yoga 4 hours a day, meditated for 2, and chanted for one. I studied yoga, philosophy, and anatomy, and learned how yoga can cure disease. I shared a tiny room in an ashram, ate every meal in silence, and lived one month on a vegan diet, with no alcohol, no coffee, no sugar, not even chilli. I also had limited access to my phone and NO social media for an entire month! No Facebook. No Instagram. No Snapchat. Ok, so that’s a little lie. I did post some pretty pictures of India on Instagram! But believe it or not, it was the best month of my entire life. Not only did I


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regain my spirit, but I had never been in a place filled with so many people appreciating life. Their purpose, each and every day, was to practise being a good human. That’s what they do. They are defined by their actions towards others. So what did I want to do when I was sitting where you are 10 years ago? I certainly didn’t want to go to India. I wanted to be a graphic designer, because Art and Design were my strongest subjects, and I thought that was really my only option. Many of you are about to make (or have already made) a big decision on what you will be doing next year. It’s a super scary thought knowing that every decision you make from now on (whether good or bad) is going to affect your life journey, but also super exciting. Know that your path in life might not be a simple straight line; expect there to be bumps along the way. To talk about my (definitely not-straight) path so far in life: I did one year of architecture after I finished school, then I travelled to the US by myself for a few months before I switched to Visual Communications. After I graduated, I fell for an Englishman and moved to the Netherlands, where I helped create a brand for his tech company.

Enter startup world. The company won best startup of the Netherlands for two years in a row and it was certainly an awesome place to be in, despite it adding so much stress. I soon had an opportunity to take over an American startup, ClinkMe in San Francisco. It was a group messaging app with a lot of potential, however I had a huge problem with it. I was a 25-year old CEO running a company that was backed by $1.2 million and I had no vision for it. A group messaging app? C’mon, Snapchat will do this in no time, and they did. The advice I was told from the previous CEO was “fake it until you make it” and this advice eventually ate away at my soul. During this period in San Francisco, I was invited to mix with so-called successful people. From invites on a private jet plane, VIP parties, to litres of French champagne. This is what they did, and let’s just say I definitely got a taste of what money can get you. But material things are just short-term bursts of happiness. This was not me. Beneath the glitz and glamour, I saw how so much money could create so much pain. It sounds cheesy, but it’s true: I genuinely believe that the most beautiful and rewarding things in this world that money can’t buy are peace, sunshine, nature and love.

I felt I was losing myself entirely and I was just so mad at the world and how some people were so ‘lost’, and were emotionally unwell without realising it. And there I was running a group messaging app that was not doing the world any favours. I was mad at myself. It wasn’t until I was flying through the clouds (literally) during one of my many commutes from San Francisco to Amsterdam when I saw the words “Don’t hate. Create.” That was it! Little did I know but I was suffering big time from depression and the statistics of social media lowering girls’ self-esteem scared me. I needed to turn that baby around! Soon ClinkMe transformed into Boomcast. A storysharing social network dedicated to creating a positive change. We started by sharing my brother’s cancer survival story (which reached the Huffington Post), followed by one of my best friend’s stories about being born a boy with the soul of a girl. Sharing her story on Boomcast led to her speaking at TedX. She was the one that taught me that when passion and meaning are added to your professional goal, that is success. It was then that I realised the power of storytelling. The community on Boomcast grew to 1500 monthly active users. I was told that number was pitiful but I remained (Continued on next page)


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proud; that’s 1500 people each month spending time on something you’ve created. Users shared their stories of overcoming adversities, and shared their wisdom to help others. We helped give people a meaning for life. It became our mission to get some of the biggest ‘do good’ companies on board: change.org joined, Jay Shetty, Jane Goodall, Goalcast, Positive News, Rockefeller Foundation, Clinton Foundation (before Trump was elected). I was even on a podcast titled ‘How to change the world with Milly Toovey’. The pressure was on! It was all so exciting! That was until I thought I was dying… I was in New York with my amazing female co-founder and we were on our way to meet with one of our ambassadors when my body started to shut down. First I felt dizzy, then my right side of my body went numb. About 10 minutes later I couldn’t breathe, I lost all sensation of my entire body and truly felt like I was going to die. I had absolutely no idea what was happening and was rushed through to emergency. After some tests were made, and I started to regain feeling, it was clear that I just had a major anxiety attack. This is when I learned that anxiety happens when you think you need to figure everything out all

at once. I thought it was my purpose to make Boomcast the meaningful version of Facebook until Albert Einstein’s quote kept spinning in my mind: “You can’t fix a problem the same way it was created.” Then life happened, and my life’s path took another few turns. The company wasn’t making any money, my marriage fell apart, and I lost my spirit. I ultimately realised that this whole journey I had been on, was not who I was, a young female CEO of a social media company. So, I decided to heal myself to find my spirit again. “Heal yourself to heal the world”, we’d always say at Boomcast. I was preaching it, so it was time for me to practise it. So, on the 3rd of March this year, I decided to let go of the company, and say goodbye, on this day I felt that I had come alive, and 9 months later, here I am tonight, reborn. Coincidences in life are signs that you’re on the right path. Life is not a straight line. There will be obstacles and whatever you’re planning now, will likely change. Will you accept it? Perhaps you should even embrace the change. Because with everything you decide, everything you do, it will come to define you. You need to learn from your mistakes and make them a part of who you are and who you will become.

As women, especially as powerful as Wilderness young women can be, we need not to think about wanting to be on the top of the world, we need to think about how to change the world. But your only job right now and for the rest of you lives is to be good at being you. By living a life that is unique to you, you will soon realise what you were put on this planet to do. Your job is not to become a lawyer, a doctor or an artist, your job is to become a better version of you, year after year. As powerful female figure Marianne Williamson said: “The world will not be saved by another great novel, movie or business venture. It will only be saved by the appearance of great people.” My advice to you is to say ‘yes’ to anything that seems remotely exciting (even if it scares you). It could be committing to a 6-year Medicine degree, or a month’s yoga teaching course. Whatever you decide, it’s guaranteed to open doors for you. Life will always be teaching you. Sometimes I feel like it’s just a game with three simple rules: 1. Live in the now. Don’t dwell on the past, or worry about the future. 2. Seek the truth and always be true. 3. Be kind always, accept love, and give love.


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So, what’s next for me? As I’m still figuring out who Milly Toovey is, I want to continue to learn and continue to grow! I’m working for an incredible disability services company called SACARE. My new role model is a 24-year old young woman who can’t speak or walk, and can only move her right hand, yet she’s one of the most positive people I know. Sometimes the people you learn from are the ones you’d least expect. Next year I will be studying Community Health. I want to learn why in Australia depression will be the number one disability by 2020. I want to create a healing house for women and make community centres cool again. I want to finish writing an epic love story. I want to follow my heart and go back to the Netherlands and learn why the Dutch are always so darn happy, and bring that knowledge back to Australia! I have faith in human beings, just as long as we live life with true meaning, and with gratitude. But you’ve got to find that courage to get out there and be you in a world of everyone else, and just by being you, you are already making a difference. You’re not just somebody’s student, or somebody’s daughter, or anybody’s anything. You’re not even just yourself. You are yourself. So, let me track back to the question I asked you all at the

start. What are you going to do next year? You’re going to be your amazing self. Never for a moment doubt just how incredible you are and how incredible you can be. As you begin the next stage of your journey, reflect on the values you have learned and the growth and maturity you have gained during your years at Wilderness. Let us all – parents, teachers, everyone – be proud of the challenges we’ve faced, the adversities we’ve overcome and the lessons we’ve learned. Tonight, let’s graduate together from whatever stage in life we’re on and look forward with confidence that whatever decision we make now will lead us to the greatest journey of our lives. Now I’d like to finish tonight with something a little loving! I’d like the year 12 girls, to look around, turn to the girl next to you, smile, and give them a massive hug. Remind them that they’ll be more than ok. Because you are...and life is truly amazing! Enjoy! Milly Toovey (2007)


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YEAR 12 RESULTS 2017 SUCCESS Once again, our students have achieved excellent results. There were 81 girls who applied for the ATAR this year. Of the cohort, 75% were placed in the top 10%, with 59% in the top 5% and 26% in the top 1% of Year 12 students. The position of Dux is shared by three outstanding students who each achieved an ATAR of 99.95: Isabelle Greco, Amelia Craig and Bridget Smart. Isabelle Greco has been selected for the highest accolade of the SACE, The Governor of South Australia Commendation Excellence Award for Meritorious Achievement, which recognises overall excellence in the SACE. We are also delighted that Laura Montague has been awarded a Governor of South Australia Commendation - Aboriginal

Isabelle Greco

Amelia Craig

Student SACE Excellence Award and the Governor of South Australia Commendation Award, which recognises students’ exceptional achievements whilst undertaking the SACE. These are outstanding accomplishments. The Governor of South Australia presented Isabelle and Laura’s awards on the stage as part of the formal SACE Merit Ceremony on 6 February 2018. Reshma Berggren, Vatsala Bhatia, Sarah Bradbrook, Molly Chapman, Amelia Craig, Harmony Craig, Sarah Dinh, Eliza Geh, Isabelle Greco, Laura Hanlon, Gemma Holzer, Georgia Honan, Celena Le, Amanda Lu, Madeleine McNeil, Lauren Moularadellis, Joanna Nelson, Nicola Ricci, Bridget Smart, Lyna Yue and Kelly Zhou all gained an ATAR above 99.

Bridget Smart

Laura Montague

26%

WERE PLACED IN THE

TOP

1%

OF YEAR 12 STUDENTS NATIONALLY


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75%

59% WERE PLACED IN THE TOP 5% OF YEAR 12 STUDENTS NATIONALLY

WERE PLACED IN THE TOP 10% OF YEAR 12 STUDENTS NATIONALLY

Reshma Berggren

Vatsala Bhatia

Sarah Bradbrook

Molly Chapman

Harmony Craig

Sarah Dinh

Eliza Geh

Laura Hanlon

Gemma Holzer

Georgia Honan

Celena Le

Amanda Lu

Madeleine McNeil

Lauren Moularadellis

Joanna Nelson

Nicola Ricci

Lyna Yue

Kelly Zhou


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YEAR 12 RESULTS 2017 SUCCESS

74

MERIT LISTINGS

GENERAL MATHEMATICS Zali Abel Smith Sarah Bradbrook Zoe Hampshire Georgia Honan Celena Le Ruby MacMillan GEOGRAPHY Amelia Craig Nicola Ricci INFORMATION PROCESSING AND PUBLISHING

ACCOUNTING Madeleine McNeil BIOLOGY Sarah Bradbrook Joanna Nelson CHEMISTRY Harmony Craig Madeleine McNeil Bridget Smart DRAMA Siobhan Trimble ENGLISH Molly Chapman Harmony Craig Eliza Geh Georgia Honan Gemma Holzer Cherie Jansen Sarah Jolly Amanda Lu Catherine Nguyen Elizabeth Phan Amelia Pointon Eugenia Raptis Margot Robertson Emily Yull ENGLISH LITERATURE Reshma Berggren Isabelle Greco Madeleine McNeil Sophie Rosser Kelly Zhou ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE Giselle Nairn

Aditi Kamath

LEGAL STUDIES Reshma Berggren Laura Hanlon MATHEMATICAL METHODS Amelia Craig Isabelle Greco Bridget Smart Kelly Zhou MODERN HISTORY Laura Hanlon PERFORMANCE SPECIAL STUDY Yekaterina Hubczenko PHILOSOPHY Anthea Yew PHYSICAL EDUCATION Isabella Bradford Eliza Geh Ruby MacMillan

Amelia Osborn Elizabeth Renfrey Isabella Ward Chloe Weigall PHYSICS Isabelle Greco Bridget Smart RESEARCH PROJECT Emma Barlow Vatsala Bhatia Isabella Bradford Emilia Dolling Zara Fenton Ayani Gamage Eliza Geh Aditi Kamath Christina Karapetis Octavia Lee Danae Mavrakis Margo Muir Mahya Panahkhahi Anthea Yew SPECIALIST MATHEMATICS Isabelle Greco Kelly Zhou SOCIETY AND CULTURE Sofia Arlotta Georgia Honan WORK PLACE PRACTICES Zara Fenton Amanda Lu


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Zali Abel Smith

Sofia Arlotta

Yekaterina Hubczenko Cherie Jansen

Emma Barlow

Isabella Bradford

Emilia Dolling

Zara Fenton

Ayani Gamage

Zoe Hampshire

Sarah Jolly

Aditi Kamath

Christina Karapetis

Octavia Lee

Ruby MacMillan

Danae Mavrakis

Amelia Pointon

Eugenia Raptis

Anthea Yew

Emily Yull

Margo Muir

Giselle Nairn

Catherine Nguyen Amelia Osborn

Elizabeth Renfrey

Margot Robertson

Sophie Rosser

Siobhan Trimble

Mahya Panahkhahi Elizabeth Phan

Isabella Ward

Chloe Weigall


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FAREWELL FROM CLARK ROSS Clark Ross joined Wilderness School as a young, but experienced Teacher in 1988. He immediately joined the Science Faculty and taught many different subjects, including Middle School Science, Mathematics, Year 10 Genetics and Human Reproduction but in particular, sharing his true passion Physics. Highlights of Clark’s nearly 30 years in the Wilderness are countless, some past students however recall memories of the Year 12 Mambrey Creek camps where he covered Astronomy, Sports Days and Swimming Carnivals, but most importantly the resounding influence he had on many girls, instilling a love of Physics. Clark’s love of his vocation was ever present, putting the student at the heart of his teaching. He was passionate about Physics and was able to draw on a myriad of contexts to make content relevant and interesting. Clark was invited to address the 2017 Valedictorians at their Valedictory Dinner in October 2017, we are delighted to share his speech. As Clark would say… “Like your work, time to tick off” We wish Clark well in his retirement.

Wilderness is like a rich tapestry. With all its complex wafts and weaves. Many thousands of women have journeyed through the wilderness and have each sown their story into that tapestry. For many of you, your journey began in the Lower Junior School. Here we watched you take on your first challenges: reading, writing, maths and much more. All attacked with great gusto. We also saw your creative spelling, inventive maths and metascience. I was particularly in awe of your attempts to break the laws of physics. You considered gravity to be only decorative. You jumped, with the confidence of a Jedi from one part of the climbing equipment to another. No fear, you were bullet proof and taking no prisoners. I like to think of this as your stage of blind optimism. Yes, you had your stumbles and falls – both with schoolwork and at play – but with guts, determination, and above all courage, you picked yourself up, took up your needle and thread and began stitching your story into the tapestry. Why such courage? Well, you were a Wildy girl. By Primary and Middle School the challenges were all the same only different. There was always school

work but now came the juggling act of balancing all the opportunities on offer. Sports, music and drama. Often the drama was not just contained to the classroom. The squabbles in the yard, the complexities of friendship groups. You wore your heart on your sleeve. You were excited about the future. And from time to time there were tears. Despite all this we watched you flourish, your personality grew. We saw your passion for just about everything including the strong relationships you were forming. I like to think of this as your stage of incurable optimism. Yes, you had your stumbles and falls, both with school work and at play, but with sensitivity, kindness and above all respect for others, you picked yourself up, took up your thread, and continued to embroider your story into the tapestry. Why such respect? Well, you were a Wildy girl. By the Senior School your challenges were many, including management: you had become either a careful planner or great crisis manager. You learnt to manage: school work (although at this stage you thought you had more work than even a Year 12 could cope with); relationships; your time between Sport, Music,


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1994

Drama and friends; and, probably, most of all, to manage your parents. You discovered teachers had become counsellors, coaches, instructors and human. Life was lived large; opportunities were there for the taking. Overseas exchanges and trips. Expanding social life. Different subjects to choose. It was a time to take chances and seek new adventures. I like to think of this as your stage of pragmatic optimism. Yes, you had your stumbles and falls, both with school work and at play, but with a positive attitude, selfconfidence and an adventurous spirit, you picked yourself up, took to needle and thread, and continued weaving your story into that tapestry. Why such adventurous spirit? Well, you were a Wildy girl. This year has been, I think, one of quiet optimism. We have seen you meet challenges with: maturity; commitment to excellence; and, a sense of your position in the School. As staff we have appreciated the understanding, care and respect that you have shown to us. We value the friendships that you have developed with each of us. Your faces will always be in our hearts. Gandhi said, “The best way for a person to find themselves, is to lose

1997

themselves in the service of others.” A great many of you have taken on positions that are of service. Just as many of you have shown your service through your support, collegiality and collaboration with others. You have all shown how responsible you have become. But you have had your stumbles and falls both with school work and at play. With grace, dignity and a sense of responsibility to our community, you picked yourself up, took up your needle and thread, and kept embroidering your story into the tapestry. Why such responsibility? Well, you are a Wildy girl. Wilderness is like a rich tapestry. With all its complex wafts and weaves. Many thousands of women have journeyed through the Wilderness and have each sown their story into that cloth. You are about to become one of those women. Before you leave however I wish to set you one last challenge. Let this next stage be one of incorrigible optimism. I want you to show incorrigible optimism in your future working life. There is no such thing as ‘luck’. There is only probability and possibility. Probability is the randomness as described by Maths.

2005

2017

Possibilities are what you make. I want you to show incorrigible optimism in leadership. As teachers we know the skills, attitude and knowledge that you have developed to lead. Our society needs, more than ever before, to have strong, capable female leaders who show compassion, understanding, strength to seek help when needed and grounded self-belief. I want you to show incorrigible optimism in love and relationships. Dare to love and be loved. I’m sure there will be times when you stumble and fall both at work and at play. But with the values of adventurous learning, respectful relationships, a true and courageous self, and by being a responsible citizen, I know you will pick yourself up, take up the needle and thread, and craft your own grand narrative upon that tapestry that is Wilderness School. Why? Because you will always be a Wildy girl. Clark Ross Physics Teacher


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FACULTY IN FOCUS ENGLISH English aims to produce discerning, ethical and empathetic thinkers with a deep understanding of social and cultural issues. We want our students to be creative and fluent communicators and collaborative team members, as well as effective users of ICTs. Whether analysing Shakespeare’s King Lear from a feminist and psychological perspective or writing and performing a Slam Poem, the study of English engages students in the aesthetic and cultural aspects of a range of written and visual texts and develops their skills in expression and communication. At Wilderness, the English curriculum has been created to provide students with texts from the contemporary world and the past, as well as Australian and other cultural texts. Students also create texts, from imaginative to informative and persuasive, building skills in literacy through the writing process. Literacy is a primary focus of English, with students developing strategies to communicate information and ideas. Multiple approaches, including reading widely, language activities, vocabulary development, specific teaching to target skills, sharing ideas through group work, scaffolding and following models all assist in the growth of fluency and accuracy of expression. Ron Ritchhart’s Thinking Routines can assist in this process, supporting and scaffolding students’ thinking and learning. These activities can elicit student ideas, providing structures for students creating spoken,

written, visual and multimodal texts. Publication of student work through the website The Red Room Company, the Young Writers Awards and Spring Poetry provide authentic opportunities for our students to share their writing with a state and national audience. Information and communication technology is a dynamic part of the English curriculum, with students creating a quiz using Kahoots, analysing advertisements, digitally publishing through iBooks Author or making films using iMovie. Students have been highly engaged using iBooks to create Humans of Adelaide in Year 9 English, while for the annual Wilderness Shakespeare Festival Year 9 and 10 students collaborate, create and share their transformations of Romeo and Juliet and Twelfth Night. Digital storytelling in Year 12 English featured students telling powerful tales of family histories. These moving accounts, often of courageous journeys, with accompanying film, music and voiceover, gave the girls the opportunity to be immersed in genuine experiences, creating important family archives. The created texts demonstrate the students’ ability to work collaboratively, solve problems and communicate ideas using technology at school and beyond. Critical thinking is vital for engagement and participation in society, with students requiring the ability to discern the biases embedded in a range of texts, including the news and digital


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media. In the Year 9 Journalism unit, students work in teams to produce newspaper front pages using a particular viewpoint. Critical analysis, referencing the context of writing and the author’s perspective, enables students to understand the cultural and historical background, as evidenced by the study of dystopian texts. A focus upon protest and war poetry can ensure students understand the circumstances that led to this form of expression, and its impact upon contemporary readers. The power of persuasive language and the ability to influence an audience is a focus across year levels, from Year 7 presentations on cyber safety to Year 10 speeches on social issues and feature articles on a contemporary topic in Year 12 English. Personal and social skills are also developed through the English classroom. Empathy for others, establishing positive relationships, working in teams, using effective communication skills, and recognising and regulating emotions are all advanced in English. Professor Emeritus Keith Oatley of the University of Toronto explains that reading novels has the power to develop compassion, and “can encourage empathy in people as it forces readers to relate to the characters on the page and live their lives vicariously.” Through close reading and discussion of texts students experience and evaluate a range of perspectives and develop connections with characters in

different social contexts. Texts such as The Bridge to Terabithia in Year 7, Crow Country in Year 8, To Kill a Mockingbird and The Help in Year 9, Jane Eyre in Year 10, Macbeth and The Dressmaker in Year 11 and Atonement, Never Let Me Go and The Book Thief in Year 12 immerse students in other worlds, where characters confront problems such as bullying, racism, greed, ambition, betrayal and survival, drawing their readers and viewers into their worlds.

References Australian Curriculum http://v7-5.australiancurriculum.edu.au/ english/general-capabilities

An understanding of cultures, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives is also emphasised, with films and novels such as He Named Me Malala, The Queen of Katwe, The Eagle Huntress, Whale Rider, Bye Beautiful and Jasper Jones providing an opportunity to appreciate a range of cultural beliefs and attitudes.

SACE Stage 1 English Subject Outline https://www.sace.sa.edu.au/web/english/ stage-1

The study of English involves an enjoyment and appreciation of language, communication skills and cultural awareness, building ethical values and empathy and providing the essential skills to participate actively in school and in our society. Rosie Egan Head of English

Dezuanni, M and Notley, T (2017). ‘Most young Australians can’t identify fake news online’. theconversation.com/most-youngaustralians-cant-identify-fake-newsonline-87100 Oatley, K (2016). ‘Trends in Cognitive Sciences’. http://www.cell.com/trends/cognitivesciences/fulltext/S1364-6613(16)30070-5 Ritchhart, R (2015). ‘Creating cultures of thinking’, Jossey-Bass


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WILDERNESS MINIMESTER: ENTREPRENEURIAL LEARNING

“To succeed in this ever-changing world, students need to be able to think like entrepreneurs: resourceful, flexible, creative, and global.” Zhao 2012

At the end of Term 4, the Wilderness curriculum offered an opportunity to the Year 9 girls to extend their traditional subjects and topics in a Minimester.

One of the Capabilities of the Australian National Curriculum is to develop the behaviour to live and work successfully in the 21st century (ACARA 2017).

A Minimester is a short immersion course in which students develop their knowledge and skills by applying their learning to a new and meaningful task. This experience was set within the key learning areas of Business, Enterprise and Innovation and developed students’ entrepreneurial-minded thinking.

During the Minimester, the girls learnt an important life disposition: they had to be prepared and passionate about making the best use of their abilities to achieve their outcomes.

Over a four-day period in Week 8, the whole Year 9 cohort of 99 girls worked in teams that focussed on developing an entrepreneurial mindset. The teams were self-motivated to produce an exhibition stand that visually displayed a business pitch including a Business Model Canvas, multimedia promotional material, and a prototype. Within this product-orientated learning experience, students were engaged in critical and creative decisions, under time pressure, to achieve their team’s business ideas and to present it to an audience: the Wilderness Community.

The structure of the Minimester gave the girls the opportunity to make connections across the learning areas of Business, Design Technology and Multimedia. Students began on Monday morning with an introduction to entrepreneurial terms and myths, questioning what is innovation and ideation, and defining fixed and growth mindsets. Students then formed teams and defined their roles based on their skills. In their teams, students were adventurous and open-minded, and were encouraged to take risks by making decisions about their product. Moreover, the Minimester activities cultivated collaboration similar to a professional situation, as student teams were under pressure to present

their business pitches to authentic business mentors from the Wilderness community the following day. This involvement of business mentors from the Wilderness Community meant that all the groups were listened to, they could express their ideas, and they had a genuine stake in the decision-making process. “Adults play important roles in scaffolding and supporting this type of student participation by creating openings and new opportunities with and for students” (Shier 2015). On Tuesday morning, the students presented their business pitches to the mentors, who gave feedback enabling them to refine and develop their product. This feedback personalised their learning by allowing them to take control of design decisions. Students expressed the value of this experience: “The mentors gave constructive feedback, but the most valuable one was teaching us about actually making our product, how we can dream big and to know that there are no limits with business ideas. This allowed us to


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expand our product and think of ideas that would have not otherwise existed.” “The most valuable feedback my group received was the critical feedback. It really helped us extend and improve our idea. We learnt that by adding your story and experiences into your pitch I could connect everything with it and give value to our ideas.” “What I most appreciated was that the mentors were true entrepreneurs and knew a lot about how to run businesses. They had some good experience to help us out. One mentor said, ‘Don’t shy away from something that seems impossible.’” Leading up to the exhibition on Day 4, the teams learnt Adobe Applications with a guest speaker, Dr Tim Kitchen, a Senior Education Specialist, to create promotional digital and multimedia materials and prototype their business ideas using the 3D printer. This learning process cultivated design thinking, developing creativity and innovation through discovery, interpretation, and experimentation, and finally designing their business concepts. The students

were active participants in their learning, with daily team debriefs to track the development and progress of their ideas. The Minimester personalised student learning and engaged them in learning activities that engendered worthwhile skills and capabilities for students to flourish in their future vocations and pathways. Skills such as decisionmaking, creativity, collaboration and creating products of value to others were developed. The Year 9 business ideas demonstrated all of these skills and included apps to locate seats at public events, to reduce student emails, and products such as a sunscreen that changed colour when more application was required. “To succeed in this ever-changing world, students need to be able to think like entrepreneurs: resourceful, flexible, creative, and global.” Zhao 2012 Ann Rooney Head of Business, Enterprise and Innovation

References Anderson, M., Hinz, B. and Matus, H. (2017). ‘The Paradigm Shifters: Entrepreneurial Learning in Schools’. Mitchell Institute, Research Paper, < http://www.mitchellinstitute.org. au/reports/the-paradigm-shiftersentrepreneurial-learning-inschools/>, accessed 18 December 2017. Shier, H. (2015), ‘Children as researchers in Nicaragua: Children’s consultancy to transformative research’, Global Studies of Childhood, vol. 5, no.2, pp. 206-219. Zhao, Y. (2012), World class learners: Educating creative and entrepreneurial students. Corwin Press, London.


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STUDENT 2 STUDENT “The evidence is strong: the act of giving is a win-win and the findings on this seem to be universal” (Waters and Jach, 2016). Giving through service has dual benefits. The recipient receives the support they need and the helper’s physical and mental wellbeing is boosted. Peter Shaw, President of The University of Sydney’s Alumni Council, says: “There is something about giving to others that adds enjoyment to life. Finding the organisation or cause which engages your heart and mind, and contributing to it in ways that are meaningful to you and valuable to others, is a great gift to uncover” (The University of Sydney, 2017). Reading is undoubtedly a great cause and The Smith Family a truly worthwhile organisation that

empowers young Australians. This year, for the first time, students from Wilderness School participated in the Student2Student Buddy Reading program, an initiative of The Smith Family. This unique and effective program has facilitated significant improvement in reading skills and confidence for many students from disadvantaged backgrounds, helping them to make Year 12 completion a reality too. Reading is a critical life skill and low reading levels are known to impede success at school and restrict post-school options. Seventeen girls from Years 8 to 11 used their reading skills to make a difference in the lives of their Reader. They undertook training to help understand what it takes to be a Buddy and how best to support their Reader. They made the commitment to help a Reader for 18 weeks by ringing them 2 to 3 times a week, and listening to them read for at least 20 minutes each time.

“It’s a simple concept, but the outcomes speak for themselves: 95% of students improved their reading, with 64% doubling their reading progress. And something really meaningful: 94% of parents said their child felt better about themselves as a result of reading to their older buddy” (Caitlin Thomas, Student2Student Program specialist). Caitlin recognised the exceptional leadership skills of the participating Wilderness students, and their ability to be proactive, dependable and resilient. She also acknowledged that being a buddy has its challenges at times and the program doesn’t always run smoothly. It’s how the buddy responds to these challenges that makes a difference. Sarah Edwards (Year 10) shared her experience: “I was a bit hesitant about getting involved in the Student2Student


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program but once I made the initial contact with my student and she commenced reading to me I knew it would be okay. My reading buddy was very keen to read and some days I thought she would never stop. I soon realised this was a very worthwhile program and over the duration of the program I noticed how much more confident my buddy became. I think it was good for me as well.”

my conversations with Evan was the importance of literacy skills in not only an individual’s schooling, but in the future with factors such as social interactions, employability and self-esteem. Although the program was undoubtedly a lengthy and timeconsuming process, the end results combined with my newly gained, unique experience, was definitely worth the effort.

Angie Qiu (Year 11) shared her involvement with the program:

Students helping students is a great concept that has real benefits for all those involved. Wilderness School will continue to support The Smith Family in their endeavour to improve educational outcomes for disadvantaged young Australians through the Student2Student program.

“The Student2Student program required long-term commitment and several challenges arose throughout the process. However, I gained a deeper insight into the disproportionate literacy rates of students from disadvantaged backgrounds throughout Australia. The severity of the growing gap in literacy rates across Australian primary school children was brought to light. It was therefore a more than rewarding experience knowing that I was able to improve Evan’s reading age by over a year. The process expanded my skills as a mentor and tutor, and it taught me tips and tricks on assisting younger children in reading. One of the biggest lessons that formed from

Bess Smith Teacher and Head of the Extended Curriculum Program

References The University of Sydney (2017). 7 surprising benefits of volunteering <https://sydney. edu.au/news-opinion/news/2017/05/03/7surprising-benefits-of-volunteering-.html>, accessed 5 December 2017. Thomas, C. (2017). Presentation to Wilderness School Assembly, Speech, Student2Student Buddy Reading Program, Wilderness School, delivered 11 December 2017. Waters, L. and Jach, H. (2016). ‘Why Giving is Good for the Soul’, Pursuit, <https://pursuit. unimelb.edu.au/articles/why-giving-is-goodfor-the-soul>, accessed 5 December 2017.


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FEARLESS GIRLS, STRONG WOMEN RESILIENCE Grit is an essential practice we instill to prepare young women to take risks and create determination towards their purpose. Failure is a concept we renegotiate in this journey to develop understanding of perseverance. In Year 5 we have established Failure Day: a learning opportunity where girls attempt a new skill with acceptance of the possibility of failure. Students then share their experiences with peers and teachers in class. Day for Failure began in Finland in 2010 with the aim to encourage people to recognise and learn from mistakes as individuals, a community and as a nation. Finnish educator Pasi Sahlberg explains: “On this day, we try to educate those in our schools that failure and success are not opposites. Failure is on the same continuum with success and it’s often something you have to go through before you can become successful.” Haimovitz and Dweck (2016) indicate children who are encouraged to view failure as an opportunity for growth are more likely to demonstrate a mindset

that intelligence is malleable and never fixed, in comparison with children who are reinforced with the notion that failure is always negative. As adults, we convey views about whether failure is debilitating or enhancing in our responses to children’s setbacks. Our students spoke about feeling apprehensive and nervous before embarking on their projects, which included camping independently, grocery shopping, cooking meals for the family, learning to sew, and overcoming fears. Zara Emery commented that “after doing Failure Day, I wasn’t so sure why I was so scared of doing it. I felt proud of myself and if I didn’t do it I would have regretted not doing it.” Anastacia Sampson-Ly reflected that “I now know that failure isn’t all bad. Failure is about learning about your mistakes and making whatever you did wrong better. You don’t have to be humiliated about the things you did wrong but happy about the things you did right. I felt proud that I failed and tried again and succeeded.”


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Exploring and developing the concept of grit has been another key focus for expanding self-awareness and selfmanagement. Eloise Broster suggested that “it is important to use grit because grit makes you stronger, pushes you harder and tests you. If you use grit, it will benefit you with practice for next time.” Angela Duckworth’s studies suggest grit emerges as a significant predictor of success. After viewing and discussing her TED talk ‘Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance’, the girls created analogies for grit and formulated and responded to thought-provoking questions. When have I practised grit lately? When did I fail to use grit? What did I learn from this experience? What does grit mean to me? What will grit look like for me? Joanna Robinson explained that “grit feels like courage, pride and sometimes annoyance. When we use grit our brain is making new pathways and expanding. Grit isn’t easy; sometimes you want to throw yourself onto the floor and just

stop. Grit is that moment when you’re on that floor feeling sad and you say to yourself, “No, I will stay strong!” and you pick yourself up and carry on.” The Year 5s identified and researched inspiring individuals and examined their attitudes to achieving their purposes, reporting on how these people approached setbacks in their lives. Julia Gunther wrote that “fear inhibits the development of grit because it’s an emotional response, whereas grit is a logical learnt response. Teachers, parents and friends can help me to use more grit by lessening the fear of the unknown by providing encouragement and proven examples.” Alison Short Year 5 Teacher

References Duckworth, A. (2013). Grit, The Power of Passion and Perseverance ://www. ted.com/talks/angela_lee_duckworth_ grit_the_power_of_passion_and_ perseverance Haimovitz, K. & Dweck, C. S. (2016). What predicts children’s fixed and growth intelligence mind-sets? Not their parents’ views of intelligence but their parents’ views of failure. Psychological Science, 27(6), 859-869. Sahlberg, P. (2015). Fail Fast, Fail Smart. https://www.schoolbag.sg/ story/fail-fast-fail-smart


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KESAB YEAR 4

All living things alter their environment but none as extensively as human beings. Being a responsible, respectful and generous global citizen is at the heart of our School and its values. A Year 4 fieldtrip to Wingfield Waste and Recycling Centre was the provocation for fostering students’ passion for the environment and sparking a curiosity about the future of our world. Students were tasked with the challenge of how they could make a difference. They created their own learning paths by deciding on one simple way they could be of service to the community and act with integrity, promoting a sustainable future for the Earth.

‘I am only one. But still I am one. I cannot do everything, But because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do The something I can do.’ - Edward E. Hale Projects were focused on the reduction of landfill and the need to educate others about the unnecessary amount of plastic we use and waste everyday. Projects included a school community Book and DVD Swap; selling of


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reusable coffee cups, compost bins and reusable bags; the promotion of package-free lunches, supermarket food standards, and the collection and recycling of harmful items such as batteries and light globes that would have otherwise ended up in landfill. The projects allowed students to think deeply about the environment and the very important and relevant issue of waste and sustainability. Students were scientists, activists, researchers, creators, artists, marketers and project managers by participating in this project. They injected their own skills and found and developed talents they did not know existed previously.

“I surprised myself by learning different techniques on my sewing machine (for example doing an X in a square for the handles using a pivot technique which I had never seen or tried before doing this project). Before this project I had never even sewed a bag before!” – Lucia Andrae “When students are engaged in work that is challenging, adventurous and meaningful, learning and achievement flourish” (EL Learning, 2017). It was evident that students achieved more

than they thought possible, becoming active contributors, leaders and collaborators. “All students need to be successful if they are to build the confidence and capacity to take risks and meet increasingly difficult challenges. But it is also important for students to learn from their failures, to persevere when things are hard, and to learn to turn disabilities into opportunities”(EL Learning, 2017).

“I learnt about the importance of team work and collaboration. Next time we should work more as a team and slow down when something is difficult or confusing. I have learnt how to work with different people who are not necessarily my friends. I learnt how to learn from my mistakes and make new ideas even better.” – Victoria De Gilio This project had a profound impact on student engagement with not just each other but also the outside world. Students’ thoughts and ideas were challenged with the realisation that sometimes things don’t work out as planned. Overcoming situations like this is fundamental to success and personal

growth. “Learning is an expedition into the unknown. Expeditions draw together personal experiences and intellectual growth to promote selfdiscovery and the construction of knowledge” (EL Learning, 2017).

“Through organising the Book Swap I realised how many books quickly become unwanted. I learnt how to cooperate with people that I don’t usually work with. While we were doing the Book Swap I felt very excited and proud because we were making a lot of people happy.” – Layla Woodall This project provided an opportunity for students to step outside of their comfort zone, to lead, discover their abilities, pursue their passions, realise their responsibilities, and become activists for a better world.

Rebecca Trengove and Brenna Bence, Year 4 Teachers


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FAIRY GARDEN Tuesday 12 December marked the official and very special opening of our Reception Fairy Garden in the memory of Mrs Helen Cruickshank (nee Frayne), a passionate Wilderness old scholar from the class of 1941. With the help of the girls’ parents, teachers and the wider School community, the 2017 Reception classes designed, created and planted their very own fairy garden. However, this garden would not have been possible without the generous bequest from Mrs Helen Cruickshank. In honour of Mrs Cruickshank and her generosity, the Reception girls have named the garden and a special bench seat in her memory. On the day of the opening it was wonderful to have Mrs Cruickshank’s first cousin, Marie Boynton, and her niece Pen Rowe, both Wilderness Old Scholars, attend the ceremony and cut the official ribbon on the bench seat. It is hoped that for many years to come this garden will be added to and enjoyed by the girls and their families in the Lower Junior School. We are extremely thankful for this bequest and the beautiful link it has created between an old scholar, current students and those of our future. It is sure to ignite the imaginations of many girls in our school community. Rebecca Williamson Assistant Head of Junior School ‑ Early Years


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ENROLMENTS WELCOME NATALIE KLEIN

In April 2017 we welcomed new staff member, Natalie Klein to our team as Academic Registrar. We asked Natalie a few questions to get to know her… Do you have a mantra / philosophy? I am a strong believer that despite what life might throw your way, there is always something to be grateful for. At times being grateful is easy, particularly when things are going well. At other times it can be a bit more of a challenge to find something to be grateful for but it is certainly worth the effort. Gratitude can transform the way we see our lives. What virtue do you admire most in people? Compassion – Approaching life with compassion and understanding can make a huge difference in the lives of those around us. Hope – I value the ability to look to the future with trust, faith and optimism.

What is something on your bucket list? Ten years ago my family and I travelled around Australia for seven months, cooling off in crystal clear waterfalls, swimming with manta rays, flying over the Bungle Bungles, exploring gorges and hidden tracks. It was a very special time for our family. Our children are now finishing secondary school and my husband and I are looking forward to having some time to travel again. We enjoy exploring the remote corners of our amazing country and would love to revisit some of our favourite spots and have time to explore the many places we missed the first time around. Enrolments at Wilderness A few key changes have been made with regard to enrolments, notably our two key entry points. With a growing number of families commencing their journey from Reception, our two major intake points are at Reception and Year 7, with limited opportunities for entry in other year levels. Whilst places are not formally offered until two years prior to the commencement of the starting year, we would encourage any family considering sending their daughter to Wilderness to place their application as soon as possible to avoid disappointment. Thank you for making me so welcome in the Wilderness Community, if I can be of any assistance please drop by and let me know.


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BUILDING INTERNATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS The signing of a Resolution of Cooperation between Wilderness School and Hangzhou Yuhai Foreign Language School in the Zhejiang province of China provides an opportunity for both schools to foster ongoing global education collaborations. On the day of their visit, the delegates from Yuhai School received presentations from key staff on our current practice and learning models. Classroom visits allowed them the see these in operation across a range of subjects. Two of our international students also presented on their experiences at Wilderness. Wilderness is very honoured to have been invited to form this association with Yuhai Foreign Language School, as it provides opportunities for shared pedagogy, teacher training and development, and student cultural experiences.


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INTRODUCING MEMBERS OF OUR GOVERNING COUNCIL: SARAH MATTHEWS Sarah Matthews is an Old Scholar of Wilderness having graduated in 1986.

What is the mantra you live and lead by? Be kind. Work hard. Stay humble. Smile often. Stay loyal. Keep honest.

After leaving Wildy, she went on to complete her medical degree at Adelaide University, before spending a number of years abroad working in hospitals in the UK, Vietnam and Thailand. Following her return to Australia, she worked in the paediatric field and then completed her Fellowship in General Practice and Diploma in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Melbourne. She has recently completed a Masters of Reproductive Medicine. Sarah is currently a Fertility Clinician working at Repromed and an Executive Director of the Peggy Charitable Foundation.

What virtue do you admire most in people? Can I say three? Kindness, humility and respect.

Sarah was appointed to the Wilderness School Council in 2016 as a representative member in her capacity as Chair of the Foundation Board of Management. Sarah’s eldest daughter, Amelia, graduated from Wildy at the end of 2017. Her other two daughters are Harriet (Year 8) and Jessica (Year 7). Her son, Oliver, attended the Mamies. Recently, Sarah provided the following insight:

If you could have dinner with two famous people, who would you choose? Catherine Hamblin - She’s changing the lives of women through education, prevention and treatment for obstetric complications Hamish and Andy - they count as one - to add lots of laughs ...and I would love to also choose my mother. Not because she is famous but because it has been more than 10 years since I have been able to hear her wisdom. What is one piece of advice you would give our girls? Seek out and take up every opportunity school and life offers you. Be kind. Be inclusive. Have fun!

What is something on your bucket list? Northern lights - we are attempting to tick this one off in January. But if not, as my optimistic daughter reminds me, we will have great time not seeing them! Visiting one of the Hamblin Maternity Hospitals in Ethiopia. If you had to start over from scratch, knowing what you know now, what would you do differently? Explore more, take more risks, become a part-time florist and take time to grow and smell the roses. What’s the most important business or other discovery you’ve made in the past year? “It’s not what you do for your children but what you teach them to do for themselves that makes them into successful human beings”.

As an old scholar, how did being a Wilderness girl help you to succeed? Wonderment Importance of fun Lifelong friends Dynamic education Yearning to learn and acrostic poems!


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2017 BUILDING & SCHOLARSHIP FUND DONATIONS Thank you to the following who generously donated in 2017 to the Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Voluntary Building and Scholarship Funds. SCHOLARSHIP FUND Mrs J Angas Mr J & Mrs J Ayers Mrs V Beatty Mrs M Bowen Mr M Britten-Jones & Ms L Gill Mrs J Brooks Mr R & Mrs L Cavill Mr J & Mrs W Eyre Dr B & Mrs M Gunther Dr P Hoadley & Dr S Salonikis Miss J Horrocks Mr J Jin Mrs S Lindsay Prof D Lines Ms D Mallard Mrs A Marsden Dr J Milbank Mr H & Mrs B Nguyen Mr A & Mrs M Olsson Dr A & Dr A Page Mr A Pegler & Mrs M Killeen Mrs A Price Mrs E Price Mrs A Prior Assoc Prof S & Dr T Proudman Ms L Pyatt Mrs J Rischbieth Mrs B Sissons FOUNDATION BUILDING FUND Mr W & Mrs S Abel Smith Mrs C Alexander Mrs C Bennett Mrs S Berggren & Mr L Eliseo Mr T & Mrs J Binks Ms L Bowen Mr C Brindal Mr J Charlton & Ms J Lewis Dr R & Dr S Clarnette Ms N Cluse Mrs R Craddock Mr P Crawford Mrs E Davies Mr I & Mrs S Denbigh Dr S & Mrs K English Mr P & Mrs J Escott Mrs D Evans Ms E Fricker Mrs P Gebhardt Dr C & Dr S Goodson Dr K Gormly & Mr K Downing Mrs L Gormly Ms J Gracey Mrs J Gray Ms J Guest Mr S & Mrs C Habel Mr G Harper Mr G Hart Mr J & Mrs G Haseldine Ms B Hayward Mrs A Hennessy Mr P & Mrs A Highfield Mr P Hill Mr D & Mrs N Hodgson Mr T Hsi & Mrs T Nguyen Ms P Jolly Mr J & Mrs B McConnel

Miss G Monk Dr G & Dr C Newcombe Dr M & Dr P Newman Dr M & Mrs R Petrucco Mr J & Ms S Podreka Mrs A Price Mr S & Mrs N Quick Mrs M Rosser Mr C & Mrs A Russo Mrs M A Santin Capt D Sleath Mr J Sved Mr C & Mrs K Tallent The Peggy Charitable Foundation Wilderness Parents & Friends Association Inc Mr M Woodall & Ms R Downie WILDERNESS SCHOOL BUILDING FUND Mr C & Mrs S Abbott Mr W & Mrs S Abel Smith Mr M & Mrs T Andrewartha Dr G & Mrs K Bain Dr J Bakopanos & Ms L Reljic Dr Z & Mrs K Baran Mr A & Mrs S Beinssen Mr M & Mrs A Beveridge Mr T & Dr J Binks Mr C Langsford & Ms E Bowen Mr I & Mrs S Bradbrook Mrs J Bradford Mr E & Mrs M Bresson Dr R Casson & Dr C Smith Mr A & Mrs S Cavill Mr S Cavill Prof I Chapman & Dr B True Mr D Colovic & Dr M Thomas Dr J Craig & Dr S Matthews Mr D Cripps & Ms H Sheppard Dr W & Mrs A Crompton Mr D & Mrs S Damin Mr C & Mrs N Day Mr W & Mrs G Duncan Mr R & Mrs H Equid Mr P & Mrs C Farrow Mr P & Mrs K Felstead Dr A & Mrs C Fergusson Mr F Gao & Mrs Q Lin Mr J & Mrs S Gosse Mr J & Mrs K Gough Dr S Gouskos & Ms M Spathis Gouskos Mr D & Mrs A Greenslade Dr B & Mrs M Gunther Mr C & Mrs S Hahn Mr B Goulding Mr R & Dr R Hayward Dr J & Mrs K Heysen Mr J Hillier & Ms S Deering Dr P Hoadley & Dr S Saloniklis Mr A Hsi & Ms T Nguyen Dr A & Mrs N Hubczenko Assoc Prof J & Mrs M Jannes Drs D & S Jesudason Mr P & Mrs R Johnson Mr J & Mrs D Karytinos Mr C & Mrs E Koch Ms J Guest Mr D & Mrs H Kyros Mr A & Mrs M Lane

Mr C & Mrs R Lehmann Mr N & Mrs P Lippett Mr T & Mrs A Lo Dr H & Mrs S Macris Mr S & Mrs V Mavrakis Mr M & Mrs L McAskill Mr M Vance & Dr G McAuliffe Mr T & Mrs M McAuliffe Ms T Tasker & Mr S McBain Mr J & Mrs L McClurg Mr J & Mrs P McConnel Mr H & Mrs N McPharlin Mr C & Mrs A Mestrov Mr P & Mrs T Michell Mr R & Mrs S Mintz Mr B & Mrs I Moularadellis Dr J & Mrs M Moutos Mr J & Mrs A Newton Mr V & Mrs T Nguyen Mr D & Mrs L Oldfield Mr D & Mrs G Osborn Mr B & Mrs L Paddon-Jones Dr M & Mrs R Petrucco Mr T Phan & Mrs O Nguyen Dr K Salagaras Mr W & Mrs T Powell Mr R & Mrs M Price Mr S & Mrs N Quick Mr J & Ms F Raptis Dr J Ravindran & Dr V Limaye Mr M & Mrs B Renfrey Drs B & P Ritchie Mr G Rocca & Dr I Faranda Mr A & Mrs N Sampson-Ly Dr M Siaw & Ms L Petrov Mr A Smith & Mrs Y Kishimoto Dr A & Ms S Sood Mr N & Mrs L Sterenberg Mr I & Mrs A Thomas Mr S Ting & Dr D Toh Mr S & Mrs M Trimble Mr T Vu & Mrs P Nguyen Dr T Wiadrowski & Dr L Gower Mr B & Mrs J Wilson Ms J Collins Mr P Zappia & Ms M Ceravolo Mr D Zhou & Ms C Lao Mr C & Mrs P Honan Mr M Reu & Ms G Taarnby Mr B & Mrs R Jones Dr S Sooriyabandara & Mrs V Wijethunga Dr D & Mrs L Evans Mr L & Mrs S Zacharia Mr M & Mrs S Barnes Mr M Woodall & Ms R Downie Mr A & Mrs S Tiller Mr G Georgiou & Ms A Dalli Mr I & Mrs S Kennedy Mr M & Mrs S Callus Mr T & Ms N Greco Mr A & Mrs J Day Mr C & Mrs F Fulcher Mr W Teoh & Mrs S Yew Dr H Lee & Mrs A Lee-Lim Mr C & Mrs N Thirlwell Mr M & Mrs M Farmer Mr G & Mrs R Miles Mr K & Mrs M Tait Mr R & Mrs L Scamoni Mr S Madike & Mrs S Cugati Dr W & Mrs N Alkhazrajy Mr S Smart & Ms S David Mr T & Mrs K Last Mr T & Mrs E Hicks Mr P Politis & Mrs J Dunne-Politis Mr M & Mrs F Ward Mr T & Mrs B Cleland Mr P & Mrs K Cross Mr R & Mrs K Czechowicz Dr A & Dr S Anand Dr E KoKo Aung & Ms C Rowlands Mr L & Mrs R Hampshire Dr J & Dr A Gilhotra Mr C & Mrs K Tallent Mr P & Dr V MacLeod


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Dr G Chacko & Dr P Georgy Mr M Robertson & Ms J Osborne Mr R Fagg & Ms C Pomeroy Dr H Hamza & Dr S Chaudry Mr A & Mrs M Smart Mr R & Mrs K Smith Dr D Pringle & Ms J Coles Mr C Andrae & Ms N Nott Mr Y Akeel & Ms J Kim Mr A & Mrs A Hickey Dr L Zhang & Ms Y Hu Mr D Yeo & Ms S Oei Mr M & Mrs T Ashby Dr M & Mrs B Raeside Dr R Govindaraj & Dr T Ramkumar Mr D Tran & Mrs T Bui Dr D & Mrs K Percival Dr T & Mrs K Porter Dr T Govindan & Dr J Jayakaran Mr M & Mrs C Hood Dr V Chandura & Dr M Thambookothira Mr S Trinh & Mrs T Vu Dr P Janardanan & Mrs S Viswam Dr T & Dr C Goodson Mr D & Mrs N Hodgson Mr H and Mrs B Nguyen Mr M Guyot & Prof M Oppenheimer Mr B and Mrs M Young Ms R Cocchiaro & Dr A Cocchiaro Mr B and Mrs K Grosser Mr C & Mrs S DeVito Mr D & Ms C McConnel Dr E Fong & Dr J Ong Mr S and Mrs G Jayakody Mr J Gatt and Ms C Fan Mr C Leung and Ms O Wong Mr A & Mrs J DeVito Mr W Waterhouse Mr P Wang and Ms S Lin Dr K and Mrs S Lai

THE GIFT OF GIVING

Mr P and Mrs I Combe Mr M & Mrs A Dreosti Ms L Phan Dr A Kemp Ms H Hao Mr M & Mrs W Stewart Dr T Likos and Mrs D Novianti Mr D and Mrs C Foulis Mr M Crocker and Ms P Eylward Mr J and Mrs T Montague Mr J Masters and Ms A McPhee Ms L Cai Mr J and Mrs E Zikos Mr A and Ms S Barrett Mr S & Mrs E Davidson Mr M Hickinbotham and Ms S Mackenzie Mr T and Mrs L Alvaro Mr B McGrath and Miss F Chilco Mr G Emmett & Ms J Light Dr A Ashraf and Mrs Z Pervaiz Mr M Tully and Prof W Umberger Mr T and Mrs K Shierlaw Mr C Cheng and Mrs Y Yu Mr J and Mrs J Jones Mr C & J Mrs Holloway Mr J & Mrs A Maher Mr S Kinloch and Ms B Harris Mr X Lou and Ms K Li Dr K and Mrs S Retnaraja Dr E and Mrs G Holloway Mr M and Mrs S Cluse Mr M Kennedy and Ms T Le Mr Q Ren and Mrs H Liu Mr A and Mrs S Lowe Mr J and Mrs G Barry Mr M Vollebregt Mr Z Wang and Mrs L Zhang Mr J Jin Mr A Curtis and Ms E Butler Mr B and Mrs L Warner

Mr M and Mrs A Elmasri Mr C Mercorella & Ms S McNab Dr F and Dr A Lockie Dr G and Mrs C Drogemuller Mr Y Zhang and Mrs Y Ye Mr T and Ms A Ruddenklau Mr V and Mrs S Stroeher Mr M and Mrs M Venning Mr S and Ms C Lin Mr T & Mrs A Hawkins Dr K Wong and Dr E Chronowski Dr D Gunawardane & Dr A Kumaratilake Dr C Totage Fernando & Dr S Senanayake Dr S Ganesh and Ms D Kandiah Mr W Sha and Mrs J Liu Mr K Chan and Ms S Tam Mr Y Liang and Mrs X Liu Dr A Crawford Mr L Luo and Mrs R Chen Mr B Bonar and Ms S Mackay Mr B Li and Mrs G Chen Mr P and Mrs M Leonard Ms L Zaccara Mr C and Mrs B Richards Dr T Mah & Dr J Zhang Mr D and Mrs J McNeil Dr J Joseph and Mrs N Wahba Mr A Wood and Mrs R Vasan Mr X Zhang and Mrs D Qiu Mr L Zhao and Mrs Cai Mr C Li and Ms Q Zhang Mr H Feng and Mrs L Lin Mr Z Chen and Mrs L Zeng Mr S and Mrs J Lydeamore Mr Fitch and Ms Lysakowski Mr M Zhou and Ms X Yu Ms L Allonby-Neve Mr R & Mrs E MacFarlane Mr R Moffatt

Remembering the Wilderness School Foundation in your will is an incredible gift of generosity. It can come from people from various backgrounds, different professions, incomes and passions. It’s a way of showing gratitude, of making a difference, and enabling others to share some of the good fortune that you cherish.

Join Carolyn and other benefactors by including the Wilderness School Foundation in your will and becoming a member of the Green Door Society. Every single gift makes an enormous difference.

Carolyn Grantskalns, old scholar (class of 1970) and former Principal of Wilderness School (1990-2005) is both a leading advocate and member of our bequest program, the Green Door Society. “I want to be part of making sure great things keep happening for our girls at Wilderness.” We truly value Carolyn’s support.

A part of your membership includes a beautiful and unique brooch/pin and invitations to special events and activities at Wilderness School. For a brochure about the Green Door Society, email Jodie Escott jescott@wilderness.com.au or telephone 08 8344 6688 for a confidential conversation.

SAVE THE DATE

GREEN DOOR SOCIETY HIGH TEA THURSDAY 7 JUNE 2-3:30PM NEWMAN THEATRE MEMBER ONLY EVENT


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Wilderness Times | Summer 2018

CATHERINE YE TEACHER FELLOWSHIP The Catherine Ye Teacher Fellowship was established in 2013 from the generosity of a gift to Wilderness School by the Ye family. This Fellowship is offered annually to teaching staff, allowing the successful recipient up to $15 000 towards exceptional professional development outside of our regular Professional Learning Program.

We look forward to sharing updates on Bessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; studies and the impact it makes to her career journey at Wilderness and her continued teaching with the girls.

We would like to congratulate Bess Smith who has been awarded the 2018 Catherine Ye Teacher Fellowship. Bess will utilise this career opportunity by enrolling in a Summer School Program at the University of Oxford Mindfulness Centre.

Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community

Thank you to the Ye family whose vision and generosity makes this annual Fellowship possible to our amazing teaching staff.

Pictured: Bess Smith and Jane Danvers


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INTRODUCING THE ROGER MASTERS DRAMA FELLOWSHIP Roger Masters was a part of Wilderness School for 27 years, joining the School in 1990. He directed more than 50 major public productions and was Head of Drama from 2000-2017. His stamp on all aspects of Drama, on and off stage, did not go unnoticed. Early in 2017, an anonymous old scholar gifted a significant amount of money to the Wilderness School Foundation to establish the Roger Masters Drama Fellowship, recognising Roger Mastersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; legacy and dedication to Wilderness. The Fellowship is offered to Year 11 and 12 girls who study Drama as a subject. The successful recipient will have up to $2000 allocated to their choice of program/course/ workshop out of school hours in a Drama-related area. Roger Masters joined us for the official introduction of this new annual Fellowship to the girls in early November. Head of Senior School, Ben Manifold, is looking forward to receiving the applications in early Term 1, 2018. Without the vision and generosity of the old scholar, this Fellowship would not be possible. We sincerely thank them for the gift and opportunity it is giving our future Wilderness stars. Jodie Escott Manager Development & Community


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In early November we installed a beautiful, fresh 6-metre Giving Tree. The anticipation and excitement amongst both the students and staff is so special and we all celebrate the spirit of Christmas as soon as the tree arrives. Earlier in the year, we had discussions with Vinnies about opportunities to assist people in the South Australian community who are experiencing poverty and hardship. What we discovered was the difficulty Vinnies had in sourcing Christmas gifts for children aged 8-17 years. A brainstorming session was organised with our Citizenship Committee (Middle & Senior girls) and Vinnies with a list of appropriate and relevant gifts for this age group being established. Mrs Jill Bradford and Ms Lauren Thorn worked closely with the Foundation to enable the Junior School to support this Giving campaign. The Year 6 Community Care girls launched our Giving campaign at Assembly and assisted in the distribution of Giving boxes and posters throughout the entire School. The Junior girls also had an ornament placed on our Giving Tree when they donated. It has been a full team effort from the Mamies to Year 11 girls and all staff.

As you can see, the donations received were overwhelming, thoughtful and big hearted. Vinnies assisted 22 000 children in 2016. We believe that with the kindness, support and joy of giving that Wilderness families have shown in 2017, we continue to make a positive difference.

Thank you to everyone for being involved and bringing smiles to disadvantaged children in South Australia this Christmas. Jodie Escott Manager of Development & Community


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A

B

C

D A Installation of the Giving Tree B A snapshot of the very generous weekly donations received C Collection of goods made by Vinnies D Children receiving and enjoying gifts


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Wilderness Times | Summer 2018

WILDERNESS ROWING

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RAFFLE

TICKETS: $20 Terms and conditions apply. Thank you to QATAR Airways and Enhance Travel for their support of the Wilderness Rowing Club.

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This year Wilderness School has the great privilege of being the host school for the Head of the River Regatta which is the largest independent and public school sports event held in South Australia, with over 10,000 people in attendance. The opportunity to host only comes around once every 15 years and is an occasion for us to showcase our School and our wonderful community spirit. This regatta is the culmination of the South Australian Rowing Association schools’ season and is the most prestigious event on the calendar. The origins of the modern-day Head of the River trace back to 1922 and over many years has grown to the wonderful interschool competition we enjoy today. 15 South Australian Secondary Schools compete at the Regatta which will be held on Saturday 17 March at the Alex Ramsay Regatta Course, Military Road, West Lakes. I encourage you all to come down to West Lakes on 17 March to support our Rowers and enjoy a wonderful celebration of School sports. Jane Danvers Principal

Come Join Us Cheer on the Wilderness crews, enjoy the spectacle of Head of the River and soak up the atmosphere of the ‘Town Square’ as Wilderness School proudly hosts the 2018 Head of the River. Saturday 17 March From 8am Military Road, West Lakes


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WILDY INTERGENERATIONAL FAMILIES PRICE FAMILY

Three generations of the Price family have been educated at Wilderness. Starting with me, Ann Price (nee Herbert 1945) and followed by my daughter in-law Jacki Smith (1978), my daughter Bubbles (Pauline) McConnel (neé Price 1981) and my two granddaughters Morgan Price (2012) and Annabel McConnel (Year 8). There is not much that we don’t agree on when we reflect on our time at Wildy. We all developed life-long friendships that began at school and continue today; relationships which are highly valued and have withstood the test of distance and time. The values established and taught by the Browns and then by the

Principals and custodians of the school that followed, remain with us for life and form a very strong bond. We also agree that life after school has presented each of us with challenges that have been met with a determination, courage and resilience of which any Lion Rampant would be proud. We also recognise that our school motto, ‘Always True’, has remained a constant in our lives. We have all experienced what it is to be taught by teachers who not only cared about us but who left us with the skills to continue to learn both academically and from life experience. And yes, we

all had our favourites! There is no disputing that Morgan and Annabel have been lucky enough to wear the most attractive school uniform (no sports bloomers or airline hats for them!) There are only two things we do not agree on – the best tune to sing the School Song to and who to barrack for on sports day, Antholiza or Amaryllis (may the best team win)! Ann Price (1945)


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RUSSELL FAMILY Cynthia McNeil (nee Paterson) Sarah Russell Kate Russell Emily Russell

1939 – 1946 1966 – 1978 daughter 1970 – 1982 daughter 2003 – 2005 grand-daughter

Why Wilderness you ask? Neither of my parents attended a private school, but clearly it was something they both wanted to do for my brother and me. I commenced at Wilderness in Kindergarten in 1939. Later in that year, World War 2 broke out, so it was really important for us, as very young girls, that we had a family environment. Wilderness and the 4 Misses Brown certainly provided that in spades. The values they taught us reinforced what we were taught at home, and that was so important.

I remember the First Aid bags we had and the underground shelters.

and I accredit this for my love of French during my entire school life.

The Misses Brown showed such love and care for all their girls, even knowing our names, Miss Mamie in particular.

And, of course, then there was sport, in particular tennis. My love for tennis continued and still does today.

We used to have our races on the Running Track and Gwenneth Ballantyne taught us Drama. She produced plays like ‘Alice in Wonderland’ (I was Alice) and these were on a temporary stage outside for all the parents to enjoy. Learning French in Grade 1 is something that was absolutely amazing as I never heard of any other school teaching French at such a young age,

I believe today I am a well-balanced person and I know that this is a result of the grounding I received at Wilderness. We were taught to be ladies with good manners and good values, and that is the reason why both my daughters, Sarah and Kate, and Grand-daughter Emily, went to “Wildy”. Cynthia McNeil (1946)


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WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY Wilderness School is proud to be able to celebrate the successes of all our past and present students and the many outstanding achievements of our Wildy women. Leading the Way offers you an insight into some of our amazing old scholars’ lives, beyond the Wilderness School gates.

the diversity of clinical experiences I had, particularly in rural settings, and this is what made general practice an attractive speciality for me. During that time, I met my lovely husband Nick, and when I finished Uni I moved back to Adelaide. I have really enjoyed working at the Royal Adelaide Hospital and then undertaking training to become a GP. I finally completed all my study in July this year – 17 years since I left Wildy!!!!

DR ADELAIDE BOYLAN (2000) RACGP GENERAL PRACTICE REGISTRAR OF 2017 What ignited your passion and describe your life journey and career thus far? Like so many people, when I finished school I really wasn’t sure what I wanted to do. I studied Law and International Studies at Adelaide Uni (but in reality spent most of my time rowing, working and exploring Australia and the world) and didn’t particularly love my brief dabble as a lawyer. The idea of being a doctor had niggled away at the back of my mind since about Year 10. At the time, I decided a 10-12 year pathway to being finished with study was just too much when I wasn’t 100% committed to the idea, and so I decided to apply, with a plan that if I got into Medical School, that would be great, and if not, I would settle down and seek out a job in Law or Development that I loved. I was lucky enough to get into the Sydney Medical School and spent 4 years in Sydney, the North Coast of New South Wales and Dubbo. I loved

What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls? Don’t be afraid to give different things a go and try to take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way; you never know what might ignite a passion in you. And make sure you look after your own health and wellbeing, especially when things get busy and stressful. What have been some key defining moments? Meeting Nick and the arrival of our little boy, Charlie, who is about to become a big brother! Making the decision to pursue a career change, especially at a time when most of my close friends were starting to settle into real jobs and establishing their ‘grown-up lives’. Finishing Medical School – I found some aspects of the course very difficult academically and remember sitting outside Sydney Uni crying (and I’m not a crier!) in total disbelief when I got an email to say that I had completed the program and had been awarded Honours. And then I accidentally deleted the email so spent the next few hours thinking it must have been a mistake!


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adult congenital heart disease and am currently Director of our inherited Aortic Disease Clinic. I found my passion when I started Cardiology as a trainee. I loved the challenge of making the diagnosis and still do. It is so rewarding to see how far the management of complex patients has come.

DR AMANDA BARLOW (1977) CONGENITAL CARDIOLOGIST What ignited your passion and describe your life journey and career thus far? I graduated from Medical School at Adelaide Uni in 1984. A Fellowship in Pediatrics in Adelaide and Pediatric Cardiology in Melbourne followed. I moved to Vancouver for further training intending to stay for 1 year, but I met my husband and remain there. For the last 15 years, I have been working in paediatric and

I am a strong believer in work/life balance. I always loved sports and finally found my niche was endurance running and triathlon. My husband and I compete in triathlons around the world. We have a great network of friends who do the same. Horses have always been a big part of my life and I have a show jumper who has competed successfully locally and in the US.

I saw a video of the Hawaii ironman and decided that was the ultimate challenge. I worked hard to qualify and had an amazing day. You learn a lot about how far you can push yourself physically and mentally in a race that long.

What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls? Believe in yourself and never give up. Life will throw you some curveballs and doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always lead you where you thought it would, but new paths mean new opportunities. Wildy will show you how to find that strength. There are so many great role-models.

DR VIRGINIA HILLIER (1963) DR CATRIONA ANGAS (1976) SA GENERAL PRACTICE OF THE YEAR 2017 (BOTH)

Describe your life journey and career thus far We graduated several years apart, but both of us have always had a passion for Medicine. We opened our doors of our new practice in 1990, with no patients, and a vision of providing comprehensive, high-quality medical care with access to allied

What have been some key defining moments? I had planned to be a vet but had to turn down the offer to Vet School. I figured the next best thing was Paediatrics. It was a career-changing decision, which led me down a different but equally rewarding career path.

What are other key aspects within the practice? We have always valued our industrious staff, aiming at finding people with the appropriate skill set, along with encouraging continuing professional development. To this end, both of us have a strong commitment to teaching the next generation of doctors, and for a number of years we have been teaching medical students and supervising trainee doctors to obtain their fellowship in general practice.

What advice would you give aspiring Wilderness girls? To aspiring Wilderness girls, choose health services, to families and the a career in Medicine if you have a community. We had no training in passion for it, are prepared to work running a business but it was our hard, and can work well in a team. belief in the model, in addition to General Practice in particular enables perseverance, along with our ability one to build relationships over many to adapt to computerisation, and the years, is never boring, challenging at ever-changing Government policies and accreditation standards, that led to times but incredibly rewarding, and Arkaba Medical Centre becoming well combines well with having a family. established.


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Wilderness Times | Summer 2018

WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS WELCOME TO NEW OLD SCHOLARS The Old Scholars’ Association launched a new initiative this year. To replace our evening event, we enjoyed a sumptuous breakfast in the Wildy Café with all the 2017 Year 12 girls who would become our newest old scholars shortly after. It was wonderful for many of our committee members to meet 81 new old scholars. Olivia Stoeckel prepared a fabulous selection of juices, yoghurt, fruit and bacon & egg baps. Many of the girls were very excited to collect their recently purchased old scholar jewellery: a memento that they will proudly wear. Jane Danvers and I shared with the girls the importance of keeping in touch, networking and sharing their journey across their new conquests. We have old scholars doing incredible things on every continent of the world, who are only too willing to advise, assist or just meet for a coffee. The WOSA Life Member Certificates are presented to each girl at Speech Night. We welcome our 2017 old scholars and look forward to learning about their journey across many years to come. Georgie Taarnby (1985) President Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association

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A Eliza Geh, Sarah Jolly, Georgia Honan, Georgie Taarnby, Nicola Ricci,Renae Dyer, Cherie Jansen, Molly Chapman, Sian Hardie, Camille Guyot, Janani Ramamoorthy B Eliza Geh with her OS necklace C Girls with their OS rings

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GOLF DAY 2017

Twenty four Wildy Old Scholars from around the state braved the hot weather to embrace the annual Old Scholars’ Association Golf Day on 13 November at Royal Adelaide Golf Club.

Whilst the competition was reduced to 13 holes due to the heat, eagerness and camaraderie was at its best! Willa Michelmore was a strong individual winner of the perpetual trophy for 2017, with Vicki Bolt a close runner-up. The team winners on the day were Susie Osborne, Angela Bonnin, Sally Cudmore and Steph Evans. A delightful lunch followed play in the cool ambience of Royal Adelaide’s dining room with our


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The table settings, with fresh roses from Anna Colley’s garden, and the menu were perfect thanks to the outstanding work of Olivia and her team in the Wildy Café.

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The Old Scholars Lunch in the Wildy Café was well attended with over 60 past students. Some who never miss it, as well as some new guests who took the opportunity to reconnect with friends of the past were in attendance. It was wonderful to see them pick up where they left last time they saw each other as if no time had passed at all, confirming the solid friendships of the ladies.

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This year’s entertainment performance was coordinated by Ruth Shrimpton with some of the Junior School flautists. It was very entertaining and once again showcased the extraordinary talent of our girls. All in all, it was a great catchup and opportunity to be part of some wonderful memories and entertaining stories.

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Georgie Taarnby (1985) President Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association

friends from Woodlands, Seymour, Annesley and Girton. Wilderness passed the inaugural Esau Cup for best performing school for 2016 to Annesley – the 2017 outright winner. We would love to see as many golfers as possible next year. Please diarise 12 November 2018 and advise of any contact changes to the Development Office. Vick Thwaites (1975)

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Wilderness Times | Summer 2018

WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS REUNIONS CLASS OF ’77 40 YEAR REUNION It’s been 40 years since the Class of 1977 left Wilderness School. To celebrate this, a reunion lunch was held at the Kentish Hotel on Saturday 28 October 2017. The lunch was attended by 29 Wilderness girls, after a school tour conducted by Jodie Escott. The dining room was decorated with school blazers, berets and hats, winter blue and brown checked pleated skirts and blue jumpers from 1977. The dining table had placemats with photos of the school years from 19651977, paper chain dolls in uniform material, and pink roses galore in blue containers. Continuing the theme were cupcakes with blue icing and adorned with the school emblem on rice paper.

The highlight was the school reunion’s ‘Life Stories’ booklet (compiled by Sally Roberts), which completed the capturing of our lives during the 40 years since school, and showed the diversity of our combined life experiences, as well as many similarities. We all agreed that ‘Wildy’ has shaped our lives. A We can’t wait for the next reunion, although the committee: Meredith Olsson (Haines), Anne Arnfield (Rischbieth), Sally Roberts and Glenda Whiting need a few years to get ready for another!

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Glenda Whiting (1977)

A rolling slideshow with photos from the school years and anecdotes of life in 1977 brought roars of laughter and more stories being shared as lunch and drinks were consumed. It also featured a quiz about topical events from 1977 to test our memories!

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For reunion questions please contact Jodie Escott, Manager of Development and Community on jescott@wilderness.com.au


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CLASS OF ’12 REUNION LUNCH On a slightly overcast Summer day, 28 Wildy girls from the Class of 2012 met at the front gates for the first time in the 5 years since we left. A school tour from Jodie Escott led to a lot of ‘ooh-ahhs’ – especially in response to Dr Nobbs’ mural! We then boarded a bus to take us up to Anderson Hill, Lenswood, where we enjoyed wood-fired pizzas and rosè overlooking the vineyard. With very friendly staff, it was a lovely afternoon, and most of the party kicked on at the Lion into the evening.

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Sydney (Bec Putna, Georgie Ricci, Kate Beresford and Sally Heading) and from Darwin (Hanna Mitchener), and our recently returned Maree Tolis from the United States.

to see everyone and catch up with each other’s lives. Even in five years it can be so easy to lose touch, yet when reunited, it was easy to pick up where we left off.

I think I speak on behalf of those who attended in saying it was great

Eliza Colley (2012)

Special shout-outs to the ‘interstaters’ who travelled from

SOUTHERN FLEURIEU DINNER The Old Scholars Southern Fleurieu Dinner was held this year at Eat@Whalers, Encounter Bay on Friday 20 October. We had a group of 12 girls and 1 lovely young husband of our youngest old scholars in the group. The night was great fun. Everyone seemed very happy to be there and we had a lovely age range from 27 to 89 years! Everyone got on famously. A few of the girls had had their Decade Reunions this year and a few are due to have them in coming years, so there were lots of tips and suggestions being relayed between them all. Next year the Southern Fleurieu Group will meet for a Morning Tea.

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Booie Hayward (1981) Old Scholars’ Liaison Officer D Laura Davidson & Bec Bryden

A Anne Evans (Shierlaw) Carrie Robson (Barker) B Dini Stock ( Turnbull ) and Mary Shierlaw (Russell) C Marni Ayers, Sally Roberts D Sarah Dawes (Lyons) Leann Symonds (Brice)

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Wilderness Times | Summer 2018

WILDY NEWS

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1958 REUNION Thursday 25 October | Lunch The River Cafe, North Adelaide Contact: Bev Royal E: beverlyroyal.bfr@gmail.com OR Contact: Kate Rathbone E: kate.rathbone@optusnet.com.au

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& C 1968 REUNION EBR E L Weekend of 15 - 16 September final date TBA Contact: Di Semmler E: admin@agrisemm.com

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DEATHS June Noblett (Hone) 1944 Judy Porter (Mullner) 1948 Josie Barnes (Wollaston) 1950 Susan Robertson (Miller) 1959 Josephine Alexander (Pender) 1961 Mary (Weenie) Taylor 1984

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2008 REUNION Contact: Kirsty Michael E: kirsty_michael91@hotmail.com OR Contact: Phoebe Waters E: phoebe.waters135@gmail.com

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The wedding was made all the more special by having Sahar’s Wildy singing teacher, Joanna Arulampalam Tropeano sing as she walked down the aisle at the cathedral and by having the Wildy String Quartet play at the beginning of the reception.

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1988 REUNION Saturday 2 June | Lunch Hugh Hamilton Winery Contact: Sophie Gosse E: jsgosse@gmail.com OR Contact: Kirsten Gormly E: kirsten.gormly@gmail.com 1998 REUNION Saturday 15 September | Dinner The Kentish Hotel Contact: Edwina Hicks E: edwinaporter@hotmail.com

Sahar Marvasti (2008) to Aurelio Signoriello

BIRTHS Annabel Flynn (Biven) (2000) – Lucy Rose Flynn Adelaide Kidman (Boylan) (2000) – William Alexander Kidman Margot McGovern (2003) – Frankie McGovern Hender Katie Dawkins (Porter) (2001) – Alexandra Katherine Dawkins Penelope White (James) (2003) – Theodore Griffin White

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MARRIAGES Mallory Goldman (Rawlings) (2007) to Matthew Goldman

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1978 REUNION Saturday 15 September | Dinner Red House, North Adelaide Contact: Jacki Smith E: designaname@bigpond.com

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WILDY BABIES

WEDDINGS

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A Annabel Flynn (Biven) (2000) – Lucy Rose Flynn B Adelaide Kidman (Boylan) (2000) – William Alexander Kidman C Margot McGovern (2003) – Frankie McGovern Hender D Katie Dawkins (Porter) (2001) – Alexandra Katherine Dawkins E Penelope White (James) (2003) – Theodore Griffin White

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C A Mallory Goldman (Rawlings) & Matthew Goldman B Mallory Goldman (Rawlings) with wildy bridesmaids Madeleine Rawlings, Harriett Walker, Courtney McDonald & Brooke Edginton (St Peters Girls) C Sahar Marvasti 2008 married Aurelio Signoriello

IF YOU ARE AN OLD SCHOLAR WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU AND SHARE YOUR MILESTONES AND CELEBRATE YOUR SUCCESS. Please email your news and a photo to: oldscholars@wilderness.com.au


Wilderness Times | Summer 2018

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