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SPRING 2016

ISSUE # 74


Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

UPCOMING EVENTS

CONTENTS 3

Principal’s Thoughts

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62 Challenges Melanie Hoskin

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Preparing for the Fourth Industrial Revolution Senior Pathways

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The Importance of Resilience

11 Language, Power & Relationships 13

Visible Learning The Rudolph Project

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Adventurous Learning Giffoni Film Festival

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World Scholars Cup

17 19

2016 Exchanges South African Exchange Visitors from New Zealand Boarding Exchange

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Visiting Teachers Dana Hall

Tuesday 25 October 1963 & Prior OS Lunch

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Wilderness Wellbeing On the World Stage

Monday 7 November Old Scholars Golf Day

29 Wilderness Science Saving Endangered Plant Species 30

Friday 18 November Current OS Parent Coffee Morning

Parents & Friends

REUNIONS 2016

Foundation Mary Ann Matthews Scholarship 31 Foundation Cocktail Event 33

3,000km to School Connected Community

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Old Scholars Wildy Women Leading the Way

SRC Executive for 2017

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WOSA Annual Cocktail Event

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Faculty in Focus Physical Education

39

Old Scholars Reunions

23

Teacher Fellowship Wilderness to Harvard

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Old Scholars’ News

Class of 1966 Dinner The British Hotel Saturday 5 November Class of 1996 Saturday 5 November The Lion Hotel ACT Reunion Lunch Saturday 19 November

Wilderness School has a number of social media platforms to connect with our community and discover the latest news. www.facebook.com/WildernessSchool www.linkedin.com/company/wilderness-school twitter.com/wilderness1884

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Join the Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association page on Facebook. This page is set up for Old Scholars to communicate, network and hear about upcoming alumnae events. Once you are a member you can then share with other Old Scholars in your Facebook network.


“It’s more like a Promised Land to us... Forty years in the wilderness has a nice ring about it; and seeing as we can hardly call a school The Promised Land, we shall call it ‘The Wilderness’.’”- Miss Margaret Brown 1893


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

PRINCIPAL’S THOUGHTS

‘One isn’t necessarily born with courage, but one is born with potential. Without courage, we cannot practise any other virtue with consistency. We can’t be kind, true, merciful, generous or honest.’ - Maya Angelou In a rapidly changing world, the problems humanity faces are complex. One of the most fundamental obligations of any society is to prepare its children to lead productive and fulfilling lives, to become creative,

courageous and ethical citizens who will create a stronger and better future. If we want our girls to be effective in the world of tomorrow, with the skills and knowledge to excel, we know that they will need to be versatile, tenacious, collaborative and kind. Our school years are deeply formative. As we prepare to farewell our Year 12s, it is our hope that they will go out into the world and model the values that they have acquired throughout their School journey. Values shape our way of living and acting in the world. In a broader sense they permeate all we do. They are the ideals that infuse every relationship we develop and every experience we pursue. They help us to create the future we want.


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The Wilderness values are as relevant today as they were when the Brown sisters first contemplated establishing the Medindie School over 130 years ago. From the beginning, we have called for our girls to be adventurous in their learning, respectful in their relationships, responsible in their citizenship and true and courageous in their endeavours. These ideals have nourished generations of students, providing deep roots for our community and the foundation for all that has grown and flourished over the years. In strong winds they have sustained us and, like a compass, they have guided our decisions about what has been best for our girls. Belonging to Wilderness brings the gift of being part of a collective journey with each student, staff member and family

playing their part. Our graduates are the true measure of our success as a school and one of the many privileges I enjoy as Principal is meeting so many of our old scholars and hearing their stories. This year I had the great joy of spending a sunny London Sunday with some of our UK alumni, wonderful women working and living far from home. Each was pursuing her individual dream and facing the challenges that come with making a new life in another country. Together they were defined by their courage and their willingness to open themselves to new experiences. All were connected by their shared experience of being a Wilderness graduate and their shared understanding of what it means to be ‘Always True’.

Over lunch, Melanie Hoskin, who graduated in 1994, shared a story that epitomised how the values we form at School continue to give significance to our lives. At a time of greatest grief, Melanie chose to face life head on, triumphing over challenge and choosing courage over misfortune. Melanie exemplifies what we wish for all our girls; to live their lives authentically, to experience the world wholly, from every perspective, to step into the unknown and try something never done before. In her story we see how our School values are played out. I commend her for her courage. Jane Danvers Principal (Read Melanie Hoskin’s story on page 3)


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

SIXTY-TWO CHALLENGES “...if you attempt to achieve your dreams, you’ve already achieved far more success than most, and you’ve lived by the ‘Always True’ motto that you’ve sung in so many assemblies, you are being brave and you are being bold.”

Be Brave. Be Bold. Be Always True. As I read these phrases in the Principal’s Speech Night address printed in February’s ‘Wilderness Times’, they couldn’t have been further from what I currently felt. It was a wet, miserable London day, and I hadn’t got out of bed yet; duvet days were worryingly becoming my norm as I struggled with diagnosed complicated grief/PTSD. Only five months had passed since I’d received the devastating news that my mother had been killed in Adelaide, and with new evidence regarding the incident having come to light only a week before, I didn’t feel very brave, certainly not bold and I had no idea what was true for me anymore. Yet, as I continued to read Jane

Danvers’ words about inner courage, knowing your voice and being true to yourself, I started to think about all the things I was grateful for. A Wilderness School education is something I will always be grateful for, particularly as a scholarship winner. It was my old class cohort who rallied the most in October 2015 to be there for me. While I was being ushered home in a taxi on the other side of the world, helpless and being served up copious amounts of ‘Keep Calm’ tea (and as the day went on, something stronger), the news about my Mum was doing the rounds on Facebook. My former Wilderness class went into action, and before the day was out, many of them had used their social media skills and contacts to get my flight from London to Adelaide brought forward. Others sent messages of support and when I arrived back in Adelaide they met me for coffee and even attended the funeral. Remembering this kindness got me thinking. So many children around the world, especially girls, do not have

the privilege of even basic schooling. In times of tragedy, they have to be completely self-reliant and also avoid the many unscrupulous people wanting to capitalise on their unfortunate situation. I was alive, and I had learned the hard way that life is short and can be taken in an instant. When Mum died, I didn’t just lose a parent. As a self-employed consultant, I temporarily lost my livelihood and I had to reflect on a lot of my life choices and plans that I’d made for the short and long term. I’d very quickly come to the realisation that some things weren’t right for me, but I was at a loss to decide what I wanted to do with my future. As I read on through the magazine, I saw the feature on the October Nepal trip, and remembered that eight years previously I had registered my interest in the Old Scholars trip, only to then not go when ‘life got in the way’. My interest was piqued; I’d read all the reports the previous year about the earthquake and had posted on Wildy Old Scholars Facebook page the day


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after the quake to ask about the school. There were people in Nepal who had lost far more than I had, and were struggling to rebuild their economy. At least when I’d returned to London the month after Mum’s death I had new clients and a full workload within a week - another benefit of a good education and confidence in oneself. Before that cold March day was over, I’d developed a new life plan, the motto ‘Semper Verus’ and strapline ‘With the heart of a lion’ had been the kick that I needed. I was going to do 62 challenges in 62 months, or I was at least going to do my best to achieve them all. The point was that I was going to try. I’d rediscovered my ‘lion’s heart’ through some powerful words given to those Wildy girls graduating and, in choosing the 62 challenges, I focused on what was important to me - giving a voice to those who couldn’t easily speak for themselves, educating girls, being creative in my hobbies (like writing), seeing our beautiful planet, experiencing other cultures and, most importantly, using my education for

good change in the world. I’ve already achieved several of the challenges, and many others are in progress. It wasn’t necessarily one challenge per month as many are long-term. In October I will be visiting Nepal, and meeting girls at Bhadure School. I will also be raising sponsorship to rebuild a school by trekking to Everest Base Camp. Those who remember my Wilderness days will know how much this will be out of my comfort zone - if I could get out of sport, Mt Crawford camping trips or any other physical activity, I would! Yet Nepal is somewhere I’ve always wanted to go, and seeing Mt Everest was top of the bucket list. As you read this, hopefully I will be well on my way! To quote Principal Danvers, ‘Life can hurt and it won’t always be fair, but the way we choose to respond to the hurt and unfairness will determine who we ultimately become.’ I’ve learned that life isn’t fair, and I know that there are likely to be more injustices headed my way as the legal side of my

family’s tragedy begins. Yet now I have a personal road-map for the coming years and I know that the biggest failure would be not to try at all - to give up and let the demons win. If there is one thing I’ve found since starting the challenges in April, it is that doors open when you try. By talking positively about what I am doing, four strangers whom I’ve met have now gone and booked something they were putting off. In conversation with a neighbour and also a colleague about my writing challenges, I’ve discovered that, between them, they know the two biggest selling female authors of the moment and they’ve arranged an introduction. My words of advice to both current Wildy girls, and those who have since left, would be that if you attempt to achieve your dreams, you’ve already achieved far more success than most, and you’ve lived by the ‘Always True’ motto that you’ve sung in so many assemblies, you are being brave and you are being bold. Melanie Hoskin (1994)


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

PREPARING FOR THE FOURTH INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

At this time of year, important decisions are being made by all girls in the Senior School about their future studies at School or, for the Year 12 students, at university. All girls in Years 10 – 12 are involved in one on one interviews with the Head of Senior School and the Careers Counsellor, Ms Caroline Rocco, to assist them to make informed decisions. The challenge for all girls in their decision making is not only centred on which subjects or course to undertake but, more importantly, the skills they will need for the future and what the workforce will look like in the next 5 to 10 years.

At the World Economic Forum held in Davos in Switzerland in January this year, it was identified that over one-third of skills (35%) that are considered important to the workforce today will change. By 2020, the Fourth Industrial Revolution will have brought us advanced robotics, automated transport, advanced materials, artificial intelligence and biotechnology. These changes will transform the way we live and work on a daily basis. Some jobs will disappear and others will grow. There will be a number of jobs that do not exist today that will become part of the norm. With this in mind, it is vital that schools keep in touch with the skills that students will need in the workforce and align their curriculum to keep pace with the ever changing skill set required. The report ‘The Future of Jobs’ presented at the World Economic Forum highlighted the current shifts that are occurring and the skills that will be required. In summary, the changes to the Top 10 skills were as follows:

Source: Future of Jobs Report, World Economic Forum


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So what does this mean for schools? Creativity moves from 10 to 3 in the Top 10 list of skills required by workers in 2020. While technology and robots will assist us greatly, they cannot ‘think’ as creatively as humans (yet!). In his book ‘Creative Schools’, Sir Ken Robinson defines creativity as ‘the process of having original ideas that have value.’ With this in mind, students will need the ability to solve complex problems in unique and original ways. This, combined with a high degree of emotional intelligence and the ability to work effectively with others, will be essential. Wilderness School is determined to be at the forefront of girls’ education and to be a centre of excellence and innovation. In line with our strategic intent to build alliances with leading educational institutions and organisations, all academic staff undertook two days of training with Ron Richhart from Harvard University in ‘Visible Thinking’ based on the Harvard Project Zero at the start of Term 3 this year. This training is deliberate and essential to ensure thinking routines are taught in all classes at

Wilderness from Reception to Year 12. As mentioned, girls will need the skills to be able to solve complex problems and this begins with the thinking routines to work collaboratively and find appropriate solutions. Over the last two terms, the Senior Leadership Team has spent many hours reviewing the current curriculum to ensure that what we are teaching is in line with the skills our girls will require for the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Central to this review was the work of internationally renowned education expert, Jong Zhao. This reflection time has been rewarding, challenging and inspiring as we move to change the way courses are structured and presented. One of the most enjoyable sessions included hearing from a group of Year 9 girls who presented their thoughts and ideas, based on their time with Jong Zhao, to the Senior Leadership team. Every year, a range of guest speakers from private and public industries, universities in Australia and around the world and representatives from the Defence Forces, Engineering, Medicine, BAE, Banking organisations and other fields are invited to School to present at

assemblies or lunch time sessions. This is essential as ‘girls can’t be what they can’t see’ and it enables them to make informed decisions about their future. At Year 10, girls begin their SACE journey with the Personal Learning Plan which is an essential component of the SACE Certificate. As part of this course, Pathways Week involves the Year 10 cohort going on organised visits to the four Adelaide universities, Flinders, UniSA, Adelaide and Torrens Universities and guest speakers are invited to outline their career journeys. All girls are also involved in Mock Interview sessions and undertake a week’s work experience in a range of occupations. As educators, we know that change won’t wait for us to catch up and is inevitable. This must be at the forefront of all our decision making to ensure that our girls are ready for and can benefit from the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Ben Manifold Head of Senior School


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

THE IMPORTANCE OF RESILIENCE “It is important that schools offer opportunities, alongside the ‘traditional’ curriculum areas, that will enable students to develop dispositions necessary for resilience, resourcefulness and success no matter what their future.”

Educators and parents will often reflect on the kind of future that their students or children may face and the kind of world that they are preparing for. The familiar catch cry ‘the only constant is change’ has never been more true, and with the future ahead an unknown, it can be easy to say that we just want them to be happy. However, it is important to acknowledge that along with the many joys and successes that we experience, facing challenges and adversity is an inevitable part of life. We can choose to help smooth the path for the students and children in our care, or we can prepare them to appreciate the richness and diversity of life and relish the challenges that will come their way. It is important that schools offer opportunities, alongside the

‘traditional’ curriculum areas, that will enable students to develop dispositions necessary for resilience, resourcefulness and success no matter what their future. This can be achieved both through a shared commitment across all faculty areas and explicitly in special school programs. One such program at Wilderness is ‘Realise’ in which Year 9 girls participate for three weeks at our Crawford campus on the Coorong. This program enables girls to not just discuss skills for life but to immerse themselves in the daily tasks of living with others, cleaning, shopping and cooking, engaging in the community, being outdoors and working with outside agencies to support the environment. Realise provides

girls with opportunity for authentic experiences, to build their love of learning, to develop self efficacy and to experience the value of learning from mistakes. Andrew Fuller, a clinical psychologist specialising in the wellbeing of young people in Australia, has compiled a list of ways that help to build resilience and many of the suggestions from Fuller complement the Realise program and the Wilderness Resilient Adolescent Program that the girls undertake prior to leaving for Crawford. Like the sociologist Hugh Mackay, Fuller tells us that the desire for a sense of belonging is strong. Building close relationships, developing empathy and connecting with the community are all important ways to foster a support


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network that can be relied upon should problems arise. Relationships are central to the outcomes of the Realise program. Given their distance from home and the range of new tasks that they need to engage in independently, girls develop a new respect for the support that their families afford them every day. They are also able to forge deeper connections with their peers and new relationships with adults in the community to support them in their new endeavours during the program. In today’s world, we all know the feeling of rushing from one event to another and the feeling that time seems to be going faster than it ever did. Fuller explains that it can be difficult to be resilient and address challenges without the capacity for taking time in our busy lives for quiet reflection. It is important that students are equipped with skills in time management, relaxation, promoting good sleep and reflective behaviours. Realise allows the practise of these skills as girls disconnect from technology

and reconnect with themselves for an hour of directed reflection each day. Whether writing letters, keeping a journal or reading for enjoyment, girls deeply appreciate the time that we call ‘Chill Out’ and often plan for more unstructured time away from technology or activities when they return home. One of the greatest benefits of learning at Crawford is that, due to a new and unfamiliar environment, it allows our girls to experience different types of success and to develop a better sense of who they are and where their strengths lie. Fuller encourages us to celebrate our differences to build resilience. The range of experiences during Realise does allow our girls to recognise and celebrate new achievements. This is particularly due to the way in which we encourage the girls to follow their curiosity and to be spontaneous, another of Fuller’s recommendations. Although the Realise program is developed by specialised staff, it allows for the

flexibility of student decision making and is frequently adapted by students to pursue their interests and abilities. Although we do sincerely hope that our girls experience immense joy and happiness in their lives it remains important to us that we are preparing our girls for whatever their future holds. The values and dispositions that steer learning at Wilderness will enable our girls to be courageous and responsive in their ever changing lives. Belinda Arnfield Head of Middle School


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

LANGUAGE, POWER & RELATIONSHIPS

“The wellbeing of our girls is intrinsically linked to their sense of belonging and the positive connections they each make throughout their time at Wilderness and beyond.”

Building a thriving and connected community that nurtures and values the relationships we have with each other is a strategic priority for Wilderness. The wellbeing of our girls is intrinsically linked to their sense of belonging and the positive connections they each make throughout their time at Wilderness and beyond. We therefore implement a range of programs grounded in contemporary and evidenced-based educational theory, each of which enables our girls to develop the necessary skills to navigate social relationships with kindness, strength and personal integrity. In the Junior School, we begin with the Social and Emotional Wellbeing Program, Kimochis, which exposes our girls to the language of emotions. The girls engage in a wide range of learning experiences giving them the opportunity to explore their emotions in relation to social situations, providing them with the vocabulary to have a voice with their peers and explicitly teaching words and actions that are appropriate in various ‘tricky’ situations. This focus prepares

girls for the inevitable challenges they will face as they navigate friendships in a way that develops a sense of personal identity and inner strength. These skills are nurtured and developed over time as the girls move through the Junior School and increase in complexity as they mature. Supporting our girls to communicate effectively will ensure that they develop strong, trusting and authentic relationships, both during their time at Wilderness and throughout their lives. We know that equipping them with the tools and language that enable them to navigate their way through the inevitable relational challenges they will face as they grow and develop is essential. Ensuring that the teaching and learning in this area is intentional, sequential in skill development and individualised to meet the needs of each girl is key to ensuring successful outcomes. As our girls move into Years 3, 4 and 5, more focus is given to exploring the intricacies and nuance of personal


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relationships, in particular the role of power. All relational connections are influenced and impacted in some way by power and supporting our girls to develop a knowledge and understanding about this is imperative. We begin by discussing what the word ‘power’ means to each girl and then explore the symbols of power in our world. The girls have opportunities to extend their thinking in this area through the use of Harvard Thinking Routines, a range of tools that encourage deep and complex thinking and questioning. An extension of this is naming people who are perceived as powerful and interrogating the reasons why. We often observe our girls change their thinking in relation to what they perceive as ‘powerful’ throughout these learning experiences, as they really consider how their personal and our shared values align with their ideas about power. The positive use and, conversely, the abuse of power in relationships is a natural progression in our exploration of this concept. It is here that we provide opportunities for the girls to apply

their thinking to their own experiences of friendships, both positive and challenging. Peer relationships are often complex and rely on the ability to read the body language of others, decode facial expressions and interpret tone of voice. Each of these is significant in its own right and we know that certain ‘looks’, often what is not said, hold great power. Naming and giving a vocabulary to the ways in which both individuals and groups use or abuse their power in connection to others in our community is very important. It provides a voice and level of peer and personal accountability for our girls that ensures their interactions come from a place of informed choice when considering how they treat others, as well as how they allow themselves to be treated. It requires our girls to draw on their true and courageous selves.

means showing unlimited kindness in all relationships, lies at the heart of who we are as a community.

The personal responsibility that accompanies the exercise of power in relationships is great and we believe that engendering a deep sense of this in our girls, strengthening the understanding that to be a Wildy girl

Liz Meaker Head of Junior School

Ensuring that we provide opportunities for our girls to engage in consistent, rigorous and rich learning experiences that develop skills is of course a priority at Wilderness. We recognise that it is essential to support our girls to develop effective communication skills, build understanding about the complexities of social relationships, including the personal responsibility that accompanies these connections, and maintain a deep sense of self throughout. In fulfilling our mission, ‘to enable each girl to be the best she can be throughout her life’, we equip each girl with the knowledge, language and ultimately the power to succeed in her personal and professional life.


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

VISIBLE LEARNING THE RUDOLPH PROJECT

During Terms 2 and 3, Mabel Gorman, Kristen Yeung, Annalisa Zacest, Amanda Hsi and Alyshia Vu (Year 9) had the opportunity to work with acclaimed American academic, Professor Yong Zhao. The Foundations Distinguished Professor in the School of Education at the University of Kansas, Professor Zhao is the author of 100 articles and 30 books, including his most recent, Counting What Counts: Reframing Education Outcomes (2016). Named after the famed reindeer in the well-loved Christmas carol, the Rudolph Project challenges 21st century educators and students to seek more personalised educational experiences so that each young person can excel in their own unique way, solve real-world problems and engage in creative and entrepreneurial learning activities that add value to the lives of others. Along with other students from twelve South Australian independent schools, the Wilderness Rudolph group has been inspired and excited by their encounters with the charismatic and entertaining Professor Zhao. Our Year 9 Rudolph students have been meeting twice weekly to

develop a proposal for an innovative curriculum project for Middle School students. The proposal, named sParC, focuses on what they call ‘disciplined creativity’. It integrates and applies skills from Thinking and Learning and Character and Wellbeing in authentic situations as students develop ideas for investigations and projects, which following approval, are then undertaken. High quality products which add value to the lives and experiences of others are the expected outcomes. The girls are keen to access expert local, national and international mentors who will be able to support them in their endeavours. The School’s Senior Leadership Team and curriculum leaders have been impressed with the Rudolph students’ proposal. In August, Mabel Gorman and Kristen Yeung participated in a student panel at the National conference of the Association of Heads of Independent Schools Australia (AHISA), held at the Convention Centre in Adelaide. Mabel and Kristen explained the aims of their project to the assembled leaders in a creative and lively animation. When asked how the project had made a

difference to their learning, Kristen made mention of ‘the opportunity to nurture our own learning’ and noted how ‘it really fits well with our value of Adventurous Learning’, helping ‘to open our minds to different subjects’. Mabel identified a connection to the eight cultural forces of Ron Ritchhart and said that her eyes had been opened to the way she learned. The girls also told the audience about their hopes of being able to leverage and integrate existing and future technologies around 3-D printing and coding into the project and about how exciting it is to have ‘the opportunity to look into our future in our learning while we are still students.’ The student panel concluded with the participants being asked what advice they had for the school leaders in the audience. Our girls’ suggestion that students be given the opportunity and resources to make discoveries for themselves was well received. Heather De Blasio Director of Learning and Teaching Excellence


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ADVENTUROUS LEARNERS GIFFONI FILM FESTIVAL

Victoria Moularadellis (Year 9) and Ashleigh De Silva (Year 10) were 2 of 3 successful South Australian student applicants who attended the annual Giffoni International Film Festival in southern Italy from 15-24 July. The girls applied for the opportunity through the Adelaide Kids Film Festival (AKFF) by entering one of the films they had made in the Multimedia course. They were also required to write an essay about their interest in film and explain why they would be good ambassadors. The Giffoni International Film Festival is the largest children’s film festival in the world. Over 3,000 children attend the festival from 45 countries and it attracts hundreds of filmmakers, directors, producers and actors. The students watch all the competitive films and participate in planned activities which include meetings with directors and film celebrities. Victoria and Ashleigh were part of an International

Jury which awarded the best feature film. During the Question and Answer forums, Victoria and Ashleigh were also selected to ask a question of celebrities, including Jennifer Anniston, Sam Claflin and Nicholas Hoult. As the teacher of Multimedia and Adelaide International Film Festival Director of School Submissions, I was privileged to chaperone the girls. Victoria and Ashleigh were wonderful ambassadors not only for AKFF but also for Wilderness School. They conducted themselves with great integrity and approached every opportunity with a positive attitude and an infectious sense of wonderment. Victoria and Ashleigh will be invited to be part of a student committee when we launch the Adelaide International Youth Film Festival at the Convention Centre next August. They will welcome students from all over the world as they experience the festival and all that Adelaide has to offer. Jayne Kelly Teacher of Multimedia

In the Term 3 holidays, we were 2 of 3 Australian ambassadors chosen to attend the 49th Annual Giffoni Film Festival in southern Italy. After being involved in the Multimedia course at Wilderness School, this opportunity arose through the Adelaide Kids Film Festival. Whilst in Italy for the 10 day festival, we stayed with Italian host families who welcomed us into their homes and immersed us in their culture. Each day we attended the festival where we viewed feature films as well as being given the opportunity to ask questions of the directors and actors in these films. This was a valuable and rewarding experience that opened our eyes to the infinite world of film. The international film festival showed us that film is a universal language that can communicate powerful and positive messages to its audience. This experience inspired us to continue to immerse ourselves in the exciting area of film and media. Ashleigh De Silva (Year 10) and Victoria Moularadellis (Year 9)


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

The World Scholar’s Cup is an international academic tournament founded by the CEO Daniel Berdichevsky, a former winner of the United States Academic Decathlon. His high school decathlon experience prompted him to establish this global competition that currently attracts thousands of students from all around the world for the purpose of sharing the love of learning and enrichment. The tournament is based on teams of three and contains four competitive events; Essay Writing, Team Debate, the Scholar’s Challenge and the Scholar’s Bowl. This year’s theme was An Imperfect World, with the six subject areas being Literature, Science, Art and Music, Special Area (Crime and Justice), Social Studies and History. I had the privilege of attending the 2016 Prague Global Round of the World Scholar’s Cup in July as an individual competitor. During the Adelaide regional round, together with my teammates Ashwini Ravindran and

Mahya Panakhahi, we had earned an aggregate score that had ranked us 2nd in the world among all the teams who participated in the regional rounds, spanning 50 countries. I only later found out that I had ranked in the top 20 of individual scores globally, leading to the offer of a scholarship to Prague. As I had travelled to Prague as a solo scholar, I was teamed up with two students from Israel and we became a mixed-country team. I found myself making friends with scholars from every region on the planet, with countries such as Japan, India, Brazil, Canada, the US, China, Slovenia and Kenya being represented. In total, there were 500 students from 30 countries - a real global community. The competitive events were all difficult and yet exciting and enjoyable. The Scholar’s Challenge was invented to really test a competitor’s understanding of the theme and its subjects and this year it was the hardest paper they had ever set. The Essay Writing event had


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WORLD SCHOLARS CUP

“The World Scholar’s Cup is not a competition for the top students to battle in the name of academic smarts in a high-pressure environment. It is a celebration of learning, fun and global connections, and that is what made it a significant experience for me.” six topics from each of the six subjects, from which I chose one and constructed a piece in 45 minutes. The team debate was my favourite competitive event- we debated three times, and had 15 minutes to establish our case once the topic was given. The topics were ‘That Dexter deserves to be given a Nobel Peace Prize’ (arguing affirmative), ‘That a vaccine against aging should be developed’ (arguing negative) and ‘That failed states need stronger leaders’ (arguing negative). For the Scholar’s Bowl, every team was given a clicker and we were required to press the button of the correct answer, earning points for being correct based on an ever-changing point scheme. Multimodal questions appeared on the screen and I remember having to pick which of the criminals in our syllabus would most likely wear the displayed T-shirt design, and having to identify the type of crime committed in a scene of Deadpool.

Non-competitive events included the Scavenger Hunt around Prague Old Town, the Scholar’s Boat Cruise on the Vltava River, the Scholar’s Show where I performed my slam poem, the Scholar’s Ball and the Scholar’s Cultural Fair. I was also quite honoured to carry the Australian flag for the flag marching ceremony at the conclusion of the tournament. The World Scholar’s Cup is not a competition for the top students to battle in the name of academic smarts in a high-pressure environment. It is a celebration of learning, fun and global connections, and that is what made it a significant experience for me. At the end of it, I came 6th overall as an individual scholar. I have now qualified to participate in the Tournament of Champions at Yale University in November this year. I thank all my teachers at this school who have encouraged me with my journey, and especially Ms Smith for introducing this wonderful opportunity.

Although our Wilderness team wasn’t able to travel together to the Global Round, I thank Ashwini and Mahya for their part in the initial round and their support. I hope that I will be able to participate in the final round of what has been a fulfilling, enriching and inspirational experience. Anthea Yew (Year 10)


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

2016 EXCHANGES

POSTCARDS FROM ABROAD THE 2016 DSG SOUTH AFRICAN EXCHANGE

The exchange was one of the most exciting, challenging times of our lives. We went to a school in Grahamstown called the Diocesan School for Girls where we boarded for 8 weeks. We had a sister who looked after us while we were at DSG, with whom we became very close. We also made friends who we will cherish forever. We attended classes, explored South Africa in the half term break and experienced life as a boarder. Each day presented new and exciting opportunities that allowed us to immerse ourselves in the school and their culture. Although the four of us went to DSG together, we each had different adventures as we went different ways with our host families for the

half term break. Eliza went to her exchange sister’s farm in Cape Town and Plettenberg Bay, Mimi went to Johannesburg, Kruger National Park and Cape Town, Millie went to Cape Town and Plettenberg Bay and Bella went to Johannesburg and Mozambique. We had the best time in South Africa and it was extremely sad to say goodbye to all the new friends we had made. However, it was only a short farewell to our host sisters who have now arrived in Adelaide and are staying with us in our homes, attending Wilderness and will be exploring parts of Australia with us in the next 9 weeks. Isabella Bradford, Mimi Stanbury, Eliza Waterhouse and Millie Goult (Year 10)

ACROSS THE SEA TO NEW ZEALAND BOARDING EXCHANGE Throughout our time in New Zealand, we have been fortunate enough to take part in many new and interesting experiences. Woodford is a lovely school with many kind and caring girls who have helped us to settle in.


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VISITORS FROM NEW ZEALAND We have been in Australia for nearly 3 weeks. Our experience here has been an amazing opportunity and we have loved every moment. It was not what we were expecting and we were surprised at the enormity of Adelaide which, for some of us, was the biggest city we have ever seen. The school and the boarding house are similar to Woodford but some aspects are quite different.

It has been an eye opening experience seeing how different two boarding schools can be from one another whilst still being quite similar. We are required to wake up at 7.00am each morning and be at breakfast by 7.30am dressed in school uniform, hand up electronics at 9.30pm, attend chapel and adjust to the difference in the lessons. We have been able to participate in some new subjects such as Food Technology where we have prepared some interesting snacks such as dumplings, chocolate dipped orange rind and brownies just to name a few. We have made lots of friends who we will look forward to communicating with in the future. The school has encouraged us to join in with some

Being asked to say ‘fish and chips’ and ‘Puka, I’m back’ and ‘six and seven’ with our New Zealand accent and worrying about the infamous ‘Redback Spiders’ has kept us entertained. The opportunities the girls have here are amazing and we are glad that we have had the chance to experience life at Wilderness. We have had fun getting up at 7.30 every morning, being able to go to breakfast in our pyjamas and enjoyed the whole boarding experience.

all and we have made many friends. We have benefited from this exchange and are very grateful to the boarders, the boarding staff and the School community for the opportunity. We will miss Wilderness School and Adelaide. Hanna Ellingham, Georgia Trent and Mikayla Kingston (Woodford House New Zealand)

We have enjoyed visiting the city of Adelaide which is very beautiful, and getting up close with some Australian animals. We have also had the opportunity to play in the School’s netball team and attend both of the netball practices weekly. The girls here have been lovely to us

of the sporting teams which we have thoroughly enjoyed as it has further developed our friendship with many other girls. Over 3,000 people were struck with an illness after the Havelock North water supply was contaminated. Luckily, we did not get sick. All schools in the Havelock area were closed for a few days, including Woodford, which left us with a 5-day weekend to enjoy. During this time, we did activities such as going to spas, the beach, the cinema, farming activities on a station and bike riding. The weekends have been full of excitement with many activities to participate in such as Laser Skirmish

and watching the school production of ‘The Lion King’. We are looking forward to the exeat next weekend as we will be skiing for a few days with some of the other boarders. Claudia Tiller (Year 10), Edwina Crozier and Emma Lane (Year 9)


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MEET THE SRC EXECUTIVE FOR 2017 Wilderness School actively cultivates leadership qualities in our girls. We aim to build the understandings and skills of leadership through the curriculum and the many, varied activities of school life in order to become respected leaders who act with integrity and model ethical behaviour. We are delighted to introduce our SRC Executive for 2017 along with the 2016 Semester 2 Junior School Representative Council.

MOLLY CHAPMAN SRC PRESIDENT

GEORGIA HONAN SRC VICE PRESIDENT

How will the Wilderness values play a role in your position of leadership? As President, I plan to lead by example. I want to represent Wilderness girls well, as an active citizen both in the School and wider community. I hope to be bold and courageous, seeking knowledge and adventure. And above all, I will be respectful and kind to everyone.

How will the Wilderness values play a role in your position of leadership? One of the most important qualities in being a leader is kindness, so respectful relationships will be a huge part of my role as Vice President. To be successful in this position, I will definitely need to be an adventurous learner and be willing to try new things. A part of this role is public speaking, so being true and courageous is also a necessity. I will be required to be a responsible citizen and uphold all four of the school values, inside and outside of the school environment.

What legacy would you like to leave at Wilderness? In 2017, I hope to foster an environment that supports individuality and self expression. I want all girls to feel safe knowing that they can be who they are and be celebrated because of it. I hope that this openness lasts beyond my time at Wilderness. What are three things we don’t know about you? I am the exact same height as Zac Efron. My favourite TV show is Parks and Recreation. I can quote (and sing) every single line from Pitch Perfect. Who inspires you and why? Honestly, I have to say Beyoncé because she is truly amazing. She is a vocal feminist, a proud campaigner for equality, a dominating force in her industry and an all round cool person. She proves just how powerful women can be.

What legacy would you like to leave at Wilderness? During my time at Wilderness, I have learnt that my passions are actually my strengths. This is a message I want to help embed into Wildy culture so that future Wildy girls will recognise this in themselves. What are three things we don’t know about you? My favourite movie is The Castle. I learnt to drive when I was eight (but I am currently finding the roads more of a challenge than the paddocks at home). I was born at 4am on the fourth day of the fourth month. Who inspires you and why? Malala Yousafzai inspires me. A fearless and determined leader, Malala started a movement promoting education for girls and has led it very successfully under great duress. Her commitment to her cause is truly inspiring, and she is an example to us all.


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SARAH MUIR VICE PRESIDENT NICOLA RICCI SECRETARY

How will the Wilderness values play a role in your position of leadership? I believe that the four core values of Wilderness school are the pinnacles that support the strong foundations of this community. I will try to base all of my decisions in my role around these four values to ensure that they are the best decisions for the school. What legacy would you like to leave at Wilderness? As the 2017 secretary, I hope to inspire all girls to follow their dreams and achieve their goals. I would like to create an environment in the School where all girls feel accepted and like they can follow their passions, and I hope this environment continues after next year. What are three things we don’t know about you? 1. I can recite every line of School of Rock, even when the movie isn’t playing. 2. I know how to make a nice mushroom risotto. 3. I have to eat tic-tacs in 2s, 3s or 5s. Who inspires you and why? Courtney Marks, the 2016 SRC secretary, is my inspiration for not only for my role next year but also for all aspects of my life. She is a very easy-going person who always tries her hardest and puts in her all.

JUNIOR SRC FOR SEMESTER TWO 2016 HARRIET CRAIG PRESIDENT

I am looking forward to celebrating the Junior School’s achievements in each week’s nomination at assembly on Friday. I am also looking forward to having a chance to make the Wilderness Junior School an even better place for everyone here and every one still to come. I believe a good leader should have respect for everyone they are leading and be inclusive towards everyone and include their ideas. A leader should be able to find the positive parts in a dark situation. Mrs Meaker inspires me because she is the leader of the Junior School and she has so many responsibilities that come with her rights. She is new to this job just like me, but is taking it on as she goes.

What I am looking forward to in having this role this semester is to work with the JSRC to try and make the Junior School a better place and improve my public speaking. Some qualities a good leader should have are respectful relationships and a true and courageous self because a good leader should be respectful to everyone they work with and be a true and courageous self to speak in front of a big audience and take risks. The person who inspires me is my Mum because she has always taught me to do things correctly and helped me with trying to do my best at school because she is always there for me.

MARTHA BEASLEY SECRETARY

I’m looking forward to improving my public speaking skills by speaking in assembly. I’m also looking forward to showing my leadership in all of my learning and to strive for accuracy. Finally, I’m looking forward to using all four School values in everything that I do as secretary. A good leader should always have a positive attitude towards all of their learning and should always be helpful. Also, you need to be able to find the best outcome in a situation. A big inspiration for me is Michelle Obama because she always believes in rights for women and feels passionate about her dreams. She is also a terrific leader. She taught me that even if you don’t have a position as a leader, you can still make amazing differences.


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FACULTY IN FOCUS PHYSICAL EDUCATION As Head of Physical Education and Sport at Wilderness, it is a great privilege to influence our students’ experiences in Physical Education, Health and Sport. The importance of providing a contemporary, positive and pertinent curriculum for the young women of Wilderness is not lost on me. Today’s young people (in our case, young women) are facing more health related issues than any other generation before them;

In 2014-2015, a staggering 63.4% of Australian adults were overweight or obese - well over half of our nation’s population. That’s almost two in three adults (Huffington Post, 2016).

According to Beyond Blue (2016), 1 in 16 young Australians is currently experiencing depression and 1 in 6 young Australians is currently experiencing an anxiety condition.

According to the ABS (2012), girls aged 5 to 14 years participate in approximately 10 to 15% less sport than boys of the same age. Further to this, less than 60% of girls in this age group participated in any out of school hours organised sport.

In 2013, almost 1 in 4 young people (24.3%) said they were sad, very sad or not happy when asked to report how happy they were with their life as a whole.

Screen time is at an all-time high with 92% of students aged 12-17 years watched television, used the internet, or played computer games for more than two hours a day (Healthy Kids NSW) Physical inactivity is estimated to be the main cause of approximately 21– 25% of breast and colon cancers, 27% of diabetes and approximately 30% of ischaemic heart disease (Australian Department of Health, 2016).

As Health and Physical Educators we have a challenge on our hands. As a faculty, our aims and ambitions for the Wilderness Physical Education and sporting programs are high. We are in a powerful position to influence our students’ view of physical activity, health and wellbeing. Amongst the 422 Australian athletes who represented Australia at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games there were 32 South Australian-born athletes. Of these, 3 were Wilderness Old Scholars;

Isobel Bishop (Water polo), Georgie Parker (Hockey) and Molly Goodman (Rowing). Upholding our School’s key values of ‘respectful relationships’ and ‘true and courageous self’, Georgie Parker portrayed the spirit, passion and selfless nature of a true Wildy girl when she took to Twitter shortly after Australia’s eliminating loss to New Zealand in Rio. ‘This hurts more than I could have ever imagined,’ she wrote. ‘Sorry Australia.’ Further to this, in Q&A responses on the official Australian Rio Olympics page, Georgie Parker and Isobel Bishop, both expressed their ‘love of sport’, Isobel stating that her love of Water Polo stemmed from the competitiveness and enjoyment she experienced when playing. Whilst having 3 old scholars represent our country on the Olympic stage is pretty ‘cool’, as a faculty we must measure ourselves in a number of


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ways. At the co-curricular level, our priority is to increase participation and enjoyment across all sports for all students. Whilst success through winning IGSSSA shields (Premierships) is important to us, fostering confident, resilient, respectful, courageous young women who have a love of physical activity is integral to our sporting programs. In our Physical Education program, we pride ourselves on providing pathways for our students beyond school, whilst our health curriculum aims to educate all girls about the importance of living healthy, happy lives. At SACE level we aim to provide students with contemporary experiences that equip them with life-long skills and knowledge to achieve positive SACE results and success in life beyond School. In recent years we have taken giant steps forward;

Since 2010 summer sport participation has increased from 156 (26 Teams) to 341 (40 teams) - more teams than any other IGSSSA school Since 2010 winter sport participation has increased from 254 (31 teams) to 407 (42 teams) - more teams than any other IGSSSA school Since 2012, we have improved our average winter ranking for Senior A & B teams from 5.8 to 3.4 (10 teams) In 2016 we had more teams in Senior A/B Winter Shield Finals than any other school (4 out of 8 finals) Since re-introducing Stage 2 Physical Education in 2014, Wilderness girls have achieved high levels of success at SACE level. Of the 30 students studying the subject across the two years, 8 girls have achieved A+ merits (approximately 25% of all

Merits awarded), with 90% of students achieving in the A band Since 2015, we have introduced Health at Years 7, 8 and 9 This year, Sports Science was introduced at Year 10 and chosen by 40 students. I will finish with a quote from Teri McKeever, U.S.A. Women’s Swimming Team Coach, 2012. She was the first woman to serve as the head coach of a U.S. Olympic Swimming Team. ‘I think sports gave me the first place where this awkward girl could feel comfortable in my own skin. I think that’s true for a lot of women; sports give you a part of your life where you can work at something and you look in the mirror and you like that person (Readers Digest, 2016).’ Brad Snell Head of Physical Education and Sport


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TEACHER FELLOWSHIP FROM THE WILDERNESS TO HARVARD ‘Professional development is about finding driftwood for your own internal artwork, not bringing back the beach’. - Tina Blythe Harvard Project Zero Classroom Senior Instructor & Program Designer

These are poignant words that will stay with us after our Harvard visit. Harvard gifted us with time; time to bravely consider who we are as educators. Time to engage in thinking and time to develop transformative educational practices. The Harvard University Project Zero Classroom (PZC) saw 370 teachers from 20 nations come together to understand ‘Cognition, Thinking and Understanding’. PZC asks, ‘What constitutes an effective and powerful learning experience in the 21st century? As we examine the shifting terrain of education, it is essential to be responsive to complex social developments and to create learning experiences that are engaging and exciting for all learners. How do we best prepare young people for a future that is hard to imagine? How do we teach for the kind of deep understanding that requires learners to solve complex problems? How do we ensure that the work we do is ethical, excellent and engaging? How do we encourage students to fall in love with learning?’

HGSE, 2016. These ponderings taken from the Harvard University, Project Zero website resonate with the many burning questions we ourselves have as educators, so we felt very passionate about attending the Project Zero Classroom and are extremely grateful for the support from the Catherine Ye Teacher Fellowship. Each day commenced with a plenary on current research led by educational leaders, followed by a range of minicourses and time for daily reflection. These experiences provided us with the frameworks and tools to examine our teaching analytically. The mini courses shared PZC current research projects, the most inspiring of which were; Out of Eden Learn; The Good Project and Agency by Design. Out of Eden Learn explores the work of National Geographic Fellow Paul Salopek. Paul is completing a 21, 000 mile journey of ‘slow journalism’, following the migratory pathway of our ancient human ancestors out of Ethiopia to Patagonia.

Project Zero has developed an online learning community that allows students to follow Paul’s journey and read about his experiences. It is designed to ‘foster cross-cultural inquiry and exchange among schoolaged children from all corners of the globe’ (Project Zero Classroom, 2016). It requires students to slow down and to make careful observations of their world, to listen to the stories of others and tell their own, make connections both within and beyond their own lives and foster a greater understanding of the perspectives of others. ‘The Good Project promotes excellence, engagement, and ethics in education….. Through Howard Gardner’s researchbased concepts, frameworks and resources, it seeks to help students reflect upon the ethical dilemmas that arise in everyday life and give them the tools to make thoughtful decisions.’ (The Good Project, 2016). We learnt about resources that will enable us to help our students considered their role as good citizens, good people and good workers, so that they can live more fulfilling lives and leave a positive lasting impact on our world. Agency by Design harnesses makercentred learning to explore a central idea through hands-on inquiry. We learnt how to use ‘parts, purpose and complexity’ to analyse a tape measure and the ways in which other objects could be discussed and explored to foster natural curiosity and discovery.


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We have returned home different teachers. More aware of how it feels to be a learner and more aware of how it feels to be seated within a classroom. This is because the pedagogical framework of PZC was about experiential learning, returning teachers to the classroom as students, where they could ‘experience learning as learners’ within a culture of thinking and developing deep understanding of the cultural forces at work in classrooms, where questioning and thinking are student centred. We were students and could learn how to use Harvard thinking routines not from a theoretical perspective, but from the practical perspective of experiencing how it feels to ‘learn through reflection on doing’. This approach has afforded us confidence to understand how slow looking, maker-centred learning, visible thinking and cultures of thinking can affect our classrooms. Moreover, it has given us the self-assurance to use these new practices with our girls to take their learning to greater depths. Our classrooms have come alive like never before in the few weeks since returning. Wilderness School has a tradition of ‘sharing’ knowledge and understanding so that students and staff ‘can be the best they can be’. With this in mind, we pondered how we could authentically share our experience. Our Harvard journey has so profoundly altered our practice because we have the conviction that comes from personal experience.

We sat in a classroom as a student and we felt the magic of cultures of thinking and visible learning. We struggled to see how we could share our learning journey with equal transformative potential by just talking about it. Then it dawned on us that perhaps our greatest contribution to Wilderness School would be to facilitate a pictures of practice classroom for teachers who, like us, could be gifted with time. Time to ‘experience’ new approaches to learning. Space to ‘practice and perfect’ new pedagogies. Safety with like minds to ‘push ideas and probe new practices’. A beach in our own school, where every teacher could routinely visit and take home some driftwood. We are excited to share our learning in a forum of shared growth. This will be a world class endeavour, as we are unaware of any other school that has a ‘teachers’ classroom’. This is authentic, 21st century learning, true to our values, with unlimited power to be a transformative vehicle for excellence in teaching and learning at Wilderness School and uniquely placing us on the educational world stage. Simone Burzacott-Gorman and Danielle Kemp


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VISITING AMERICAN TEACHERS FROM DANA HALL

During Term 3, Wilderness teachers and students were thrilled to welcome Mr Lindstrom and Ms Sorenson, two visiting American teachers from Dana Hall, an all-girls school in Boston. Their visit provided a wonderful opportunity for students in Ms Rooney’s Year 11 English as an Additional Language (EAL) class and Ms Douvartzidis’ Year 11 Mathematical Methods class to meet the teachers to discuss their respective online collaborative projects.

Miss Sorensen fascinated the Year 11 girls by discussing the ways in which Mathematics teaching in the United States differed from that in Australia. The girls were very excited to learn that in February next year they would be making email (followed by Skype) connections with the Dana Hall girls, followed by a collaboration based on Inferential Statistics. After surveys have been designed at both ends, each group will gather data from their international partners, which they will then analyse in their respective statistics projects. The girls in both schools are keen to ‘meet’ and learn about their future collaborators and to share their findings. The EAL girls reflected in their blogs on their collaboration with Dana Hall from last Term and how special it was to actually meet Mr Lindstrom and to plan future collaborative projects with his students.


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I am happy to have had this experience of studying with international students worldwide. Although we are in different time zones we still cooperated well. This study experience has given me the confidence to talk to students from different countries and study with people from different cultures. Emily Wang

At the start of Term 3, our EAL class met the ESL teacher from Dana Hall, Mr Lindstrom. He told us about his teaching experience in China during the holidays and the amazing Chinese dishes he had eaten. We are very excited to meet him and hope we can have more chances to collaborate with students in Dana Hall. Camellia Yin To work with my partner in Dana Hall more efficiently, we used Schoology to share our thoughts. Our English teacher Ms Rooney also helped my classmates and me to make a video, introducing ourselves to our Dana Hall partners. Surprisingly, the American students also responded with a video, introducing themselves. They were very friendly. I was impressed that an international connection can be contributed to so easily. During this collaborative task, I have successfully developed my intercultural understanding and my communication skills. Lily Chen

This has been an amazing experience to collaborate with girls from different parts of the world. As the girls in my group were from different countries, Japan and Mexico, we all had such different cultural backgrounds. This task really allowed us to make friends with people who will probably see things from different angles and have different perspectives. Although we are in different time zones and have a different school day, we overcame all these difficulties and did an awesome job. I appreciate this experience as I believe it has broadened my horizons and helped improve my ability to work with people from different parts of the world. The time difference is really not a barrier as long as we keep in touch with each other. Alice Wang We used Schoology to communicate, discuss and consider the topic of our iBook. Although there is a huge time difference between here and America, it was interesting and fun to talk with people from the other country and I now know more about their school. Because the American students had their end of year project, we didn’t really have enough time to chat. In our next collaborative project, I really want to talk with them deeply and to know more about their lives in America. I first thought that it would be too hard to communicate with people you have not met before. But now I realise that you just need to have the courage to say ‘Hi’. Flora Leung

In this amazing journey, I realised that I had gained knowledge and skills. Moreover, the biggest harvest is the precious friendships we have built. Thanks for this amazing journey. Facing different cultures was a big challenge and I have more courage to deal with communicating across cultures. I am glad that I am studying in Australia and have more opportunities to make friends all over the world. Jessie Zheng At the beginning of the term, Mr Lindstrom came to our school and joined our class for a week. He shared some of the experiences he and the Dana Hall girls had during the project. Their point of view on the film was slightly different from ours. This collaboration has broadened my experiences of participating in an international collaboration and enriched my knowledge about another culture. Thanks to this experience, I will be more confident and willing to do more international collaborations in the future. Nisi Jiang Due to our EAL collaboration, I made a new friend, Nuch, who was my partner. Actually, I felt very nervous and excited when I heard I would work with the students in the U.S.A. But, gradually I realised the meaning of ‘team cooperation’ and I contacted my partner Nuch on my own initiative through email. In the process of creating the iBook, we shared our information and work. Even though we had different ideas sometimes, it did still not affect our work and friendship. On the contrary, we gained different perspectives which were useful and interesting not only for our project but also in our lives. In short, through this collaboration, I have increased my selfconfidence and improved my sense of responsibility. I am looking forward to the next collaboration. Thanks for this experience. I think it will be very helpful in my future studies. Joyce Yang


Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

WELLBEING ON THE WORLD STAGE By applying a research-based approach to wellbeing, our focus is to teach girls the necessary skills to flourish. This is a key priority in the School’s Strategic Plan ‘…we will empower each girl with the necessary tools to flourish and live a life of promise, purpose and fulfillment’. The wellbeing of each student is central to the School’s mission, ‘To enable each girl to be the best that she can be throughout her life.’ The School’s values are the foundation for our wellbeing model (see Figure 1).

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Figure 1: Wilderness School Wellbeing Model.

This model, which builds a culture in which positive behaviour and developing a true self are taught, is embedded across the whole school because schools are now seen as institutions whose role extends beyond academic competence to further preparing the ‘whole child’ (Huitt, 2010). Wilderness has implemented a positive education program and has gathered data to develop a School wellbeing profile. As part of our Strategic Priority to build on our legacy of academic success to establish Wilderness School as a world class centre of educational excellence and innovation, I had the privilege of being invited to speak at the International Positive Education Network (IPEN) inaugural Festival of Positive Education conference in Dallas USA, from 17 July to 20 July, 2016 (www.ipen-festival.com). The conference was the first Festival of Positive Education in the world, bringing together over 950 delegates from 39 countries. Speakers included some the most influential leading researchers in the field of positive psychology/ education, such as Dr Martin Seligman (University of Pennsylvania), Sir Anthony Seldon (Vice Chancellor at the University of Buckingham), Professor Angela Duckworth (University of Pennsylvania), Professor David Cooperrider (Case Western Reserve University), Dr Scott Barry Kaufman (University of Pennsylvania), Professor Lea Waters (University of Melbourne),

Professor Felicia Hupport (University of Cambridge) and Professor Kristjan Kristjansson (University of Birmingham). It was an honour to be selected to present a workshop on our positive education model/program and the research being undertaken on student wellbeing at Wilderness School. My presentation was entitled, ‘Flourishing without limits: how implementing a wellbeing curriculum positively impacts student engagement’. It explored the nexus between teaching wellbeing skills and student engagement, reporting on a whole school improvement initiative (ELC to Year 12) that focuses on flourishing. Our wellbeing strategic approach was shared, with participants hearing about our school -wide positive education curriculum framework, data collected to measure the growth of student wellbeing and how we implement positive education. Positive education seeks to combine principles of positive psychology with best-practice teaching (with educational paradigms) to promote optimal development and flourishing (positive mental health) in the school setting (Norrish, Williams, O’Connon & Robinson, 2013). Schools play an increasingly important role in assisting youth to develop cognitive, social and emotional skills (Waters, 2011). Through our positive education program, we teach wellbeing skills


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to girls so they can grow and flourish in life; this has a direct impact on academic success and helps students to develop their strengths. There is substantial evidence from well-controlled studies that skills which increase resilience, positive emotions, engagement and meaning can be taught to schoolchildren (Seligman, Ernst, Gillham, Reivish & Linkin, 2009). Arguably, these skills can help develop a student’s sense of their ‘true self’ so they can ‘flourish without limits’. Flourishing can be seen as a psychological construct with three key components: rewarding and positive relationships, feeling competent and confident and believing that life is meaningful (Diener, et al., 2010). Wilderness School’s wellbeing model has been implemented since 2014 across the whole-school with the positive education curriculum being scoped and sequenced to the general capabilities from the Australian Curriculum. The wellbeing model has a whole-school focus on; • Universal implementation which provides the system and processes across the whole school to support flourishing of each student (e.g. House, Form, Pastoral Care, Leadership, Assemblies, Sports, Music, Clubs)

• Targeted group program interventions for students to learn specific skills to flourish (e.g. Gratitude, Stress Management, Social and Emotional Learning program - Kimochis, Wilderness Resilience Adolescent Program, MindfulnessBased Strength Program and Positive Coaching Program) • Individual students’ support services which provide further individualised and intensive support for students who have more emotional and behavioural challenges to flourishing (e.g. individual counselling and support) We are one of the first schools in the world to implement a school-wide, evidence-based positive education program and also to collect wellbeing data. We are a leader in the field and are adding to the science. It was a privilege to represent Wilderness School on the international stage and share our positive education program. I’m very grateful to Jane Danvers for the opportunity to speak at IPEN. It was such a delight to meet and network with colleagues from across the globe who are world class thought leaders and practitioners in positive education psychology. Trina Cummins Director of Wellbeing and Positive Education

References Diener, E., Wirtz, D., Tov, W., Kim-Prieto, C., Choi, D-Y., Oishi,S. et al. 2010, ‘New well-being measures: Short scales to assess flourishing and positive and negative feelings’, Social Indicators Research, vol. 97, no. 2, pp. 143–56. http:// dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11205-009-9493-y Huitt, W. (2010). ‘A holistic view of education and schooling: Guiding students to develop capacities, acquire virtues, and provide service.’ Paper presented at the 12th Annual International Conference sponsored by the Athens Institute for Education and Research (ATINER), May 24-27, Athens, Greece. Norrish, JM., Williams, P., O’Conner, M., Robinson, J. 2013, ‘An applied framework for positive education’, International Journal of Wellbeing, vol. 3, pp. 147–61. Seligman, M., Ernst, R., Gillham, J., Reivish, K., Linkin, M. (2009), Positive Education: Positive Psychology and Classroom Interventions, Oxford Review of Education, 35, 293-311. Waters, L. 2011, ‘A review of schoolbased positive psychology interventions’, The Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, vol. 28, pp. 75–90. http://dx.doi.org/10.1375/ aedp.28.2.75


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

WILDERNESS SCIENCE TAKES TO THE FIELD SAVING ENDANGERED PLANT SPECIES

Wilderness School has been given the responsibility of saving three endangered South Australian plants by the South Australian Government, through the Botanic Gardens and Seeds of South Australia.

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The three species are all native to South Australia, in particular to the area around Crawford, and are on the list of endangered plants. Wilderness has been given 100 seeds from the seed bank (there are only 200 seeds of each plant stored). The plants are; • Spyridium fontis – woodsii, which has been found in only one place in the world (within 10 km of Crawford) and is the most vulnerable of the plants • Senecio macrocarpus • Ozothamnus pholidotus. Year 6 students were taught how to propagate the three plants on a trip to the Botanic Gardens and, in the last week of Term 2, they planted out 30 seeds of each species. While these plants will initially be planted into a ‘tree orchard’ at school, the long term plan is for these plants to be replanted by students at Crawford when they are at Realise.

For this to happen, and to protect the plants as they are re-established, exclusion zones (designed to keep out rabbits and kangaroos) are being built at Crawford, in collaboration with the University of Adelaide and BioR, a not for profit conservation group aimed at reconstructing habitat for biodiversity. Additionally, the exclusion zones will be used by Year 9 students at Crawford for field experiments, where they will determine the most effective method of revegetation, as well as collecting data on birds and insects, thereby enhancing the Scope and Sequence of the Ecology Unit of the National Curriculum. Furthermore, the long term vision is to revegetate the grounds of Crawford, to enhance the experience for the girls and to meet our moral obligations as global citizens. It will be a real achievement to reintroduce endangered plants at Crawford, ultimately saving for posterity plants that are native to South Australia and which might otherwise become extinct. Dr Sally Nobbs Teacher of Science


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PARENTS & FRIENDS Wilderness School is unique in the way it was founded, and continues to develop, to enable each girl to be the best she can be throughout her life. An important element of the school is its focus on “A Thriving and Connected Community” where relationships with each other are valued and nurtured. This is undertaken by celebrating the life of our School – providing meaningful connections between our past, present and future, and by engaging all members of our community – instilling a sense of belonging, responsibility and united purpose. The Parents and Friends Association exists to further promote this sense of

MARY ANN MATTHEWS SCHOLARSHIP 2016 The Mary Ann Matthews Scholarship is offered annually to current Year 11 and 12 students. This scholarship allows a Wilderness girl to travel and undertake a challenging project or placement to broaden her perspective of the world. Congratulations to our successful applicant for 2016 - Grace Williams.

community amongst Wilderness School parents and between parents and staff of the School. This group of volunteers meet once a Term and host numerous events throughout the year. These events include the very well attended Welcome Drinks held at the start of Term 1. This event provides the opportunity for existing and new parents to meet and mingle with School staff and establish connections that can continue to grow throughout the year. Other events include Mother’s Day Walk raising money for breast cancer, Junior and Senior drama performances, musical and choral performances at Elder Hall, Multi Media evening, Junior School Sports Day, Junior School

Grace, who is currently in Year 12, will travel to Viti Levu, Fiji in December to volunteer with the Care and Community Village Project. This is sure to be an extraordinary experience. Mary Ann Matthews believed in learning through a more global outlook giving individuals an appreciation and respect for social, cultural and religious diversity plus a sense of global citizenship. This is an extraordinary opportunity for Grace Williams. We look forward to her sharing her travels with us in 2017. Jodie Escott Manager of Development and Community

Christmas concert and Year 12 Speech night. The Parents and Friends also support the “Raising Amazing Girls” program. This program has seen speakers from around the world share with Wilderness families and the wider community important information and insights into the world our daughters are entering and challenges they and parents face today and into the future. We hope you are able to join us, and other Wilderness families and friends at one of the many events in the Wilderness Term 4 calendar. Karen Gough P&F President 2016


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

FOUNDATION COCKTAIL EVENT ‘Cocktails and laughter, but what comes after?’ - Noel Coward, 1925 On Saturday 13 August, 2016 many in our Wilderness community attended the Wilderness School Foundation Cocktail Party. The Browns’ House and Newman Theatre were transformed into a 1920s establishment. Red festoon lighting, fire pits and award winning Gin Bars, Prohibition and Ounce, greeted guests on their arrival. ‘The Bloody Sicilian’ and ‘The Capone’ were popular cocktails during the evening. Our acclaimed and award winning Jazz Choir performed 2 brilliant pieces which provided just a taste of the entertainment. As people moved into Newman Theatre, they were given the chance to view an incredible redevelopment in a cabaret style atmosphere. For the first time, we captured stunning views across the Memorial Lawn, mood lighting and the very talented 7 piece band, Capitol Swing performed until the wee hours.

The backdrop to the band was the film ‘Casablanca’. Suited to the cabaret feel, the burlesque performer was simply beautiful. Olivia Stoeckel and the Wilderness Café did a stellar job catering with copious food for the entire night. This was our major fundraiser towards capital works. The Foundation Events Committee, with Jenni Guest as Chair, ensures that our events are planned and implemented with incredible detail, energy and fun. Each committee member deserves accolades and sincere appreciation for everything they do and their dedication. Hamish Mill, Auctioneer, Brock Harcourts led a highly successful and fast paced auction with an array of items donated by the School community. Lunch orders for a year from the Wilderness Café were certainly highly sought after!

A highlight of the evening was drawing our raffle. First prize was 2 return tickets flying Qatar Airways to anywhere in the world. Congratulations to School parent, Cheryl Marks. Qatar Sales Executive, Steve Eickhoff was joined by Jane Danvers to present the tickets to Cheryl. As the evening developed, the Photo Booth proved a popular attraction as did the dance floor with ‘Capitol Swing’ in full swing! We were fortunate to have many sponsors and donors to bring this fun and engaging evening to life. I would like to personally thank all of them for their incredible generosity. So, what does come after? The Cocktail Event raised almost $40 000. A fantastic result from a simply awesome night. Jodie Escott Manager of Development and Community

A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO Foundation Event Committee Members: Jenni Guest, Sim Cavill, Nicole Day, Julia Dowling, George Duncan, Annabel Duncan, Sam Elfenbein, Mary Gouskos, Karen Humeniuk, Donna Karytinos, Edwina Lumbers, Sarah Matthews, Lynda McAskill, Alice Newton, Vicki Neihus, Georgie Osborn, Rebecca Petrucco, Tracey Powell, Fiona Raptis, Kendall Seaton, Jo Wilson Sponsors:

KAREN & JAYSON GOUGH

JO & BEN WILSON

ANNA MAIOLO

MO & SIMON HARDY


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A. Steve Eickhoff, Cheryl Marks & Jane Danvers B. Flavella L’Amour – Burlesque Performer C. Donna Karytinos, Katrina Ng & Sue Dottore D. Jane Danvers & Vicki Niehus E. Jen Guest & Barry McGrath

F. Melissa Lea and David Walsh G. Wilderness Jazz Choir H. Marisa Unerkov, Jessica Le & Janet Stone I. Nick & Nikki Heywood-Smith J. Julia Dowling, Georgie Duncan & Fiona Raptis

K. Leigh Stone, Stuart Seeto & Paul Unerkov L. Kirsty & Timothy Last & Edwina Lumbers M. Gin Bar Mixologists N. Jack Dowling, Julian Newton, Ben Lumbers, Patrick Highfield & Nick Lee O. Nicole Day and Lynda McAskill


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Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

A four and a half hour flight from Alice Springs in a 4 seat Cessna aircraft was a poignant reminder of the vastness of our country and the effort required by some of our boarders to attend school at Wilderness. The flight, although quite challenging, was by far the preferred option to a two day drive by road. At the generous invitation of the Fulcher family, Jane Danvers, Briony Trotter and I were given the extraordinary experience of visiting a remote cattle station in the Northern Territory, home to Lucy Fulcher, one of our Year 9 boarders. The 7500 square km property ‘Wollogorang’, managed by Cameron and Felicity, straddles the border of

Queensland and the Northern Territory, with its northern boundary defined by the coast of the Gulf of Carpentaria. The advantage of elevation, and flying at a relatively low attitude, allowed us to fully appreciate the beauty and vastness of the landscape as our pilot attempted to point out the boundaries of the property as we approached the homestead landing strip. The chatter over the headset system let us know there was a welcome party waiting for us and that the strip had been prepared for landing to make sure it was clear of any hazards, such as wandering stock or native animals.

The Fulcher hospitality clicked in instantly as we and our bags were loaded into utes and dirt buggies for the short trip to the homestead. With its scattered iconic outhouses that reflect the history of the property, as well as the functional buildings that accommodate the permanent and transient workforce required for the operation of a property of such scale, we were instantly struck by the outback ambience of the home yard as the dogs offered their welcome. The blood red sunset provided a dramatic back drop for our arrival. Felicity’s gourmet management of the food store ensured we were welcomed and well catered for on arrival.


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3,000KM TO SCHOOL CONNECTED COMMUNITY Operationally the station was in ‘muster’ so the following morning we visited the yards to see the cattle mustered over the previous days drafted and loaded on the road train. We were each then taken for an aerial view of some of the landscape highlights of the property in the muster helicopter. Flying in an open, two passenger chopper between the cliffs of the gorges was an exhilarating experience. The afternoon brought a two hour drive to the coastal boundary of the property which revealed once again the remoteness and beauty that the top end has to offer. It was a special privilege to visit and to walk along our most northern coastline, an opportunity few people ever experience.

The two days spent with Lucy in her home environment will be a special memory for all of us. If you ever find yourself on the Savannah Way that links Cairns and Broome, you will find Wollogorang Cattle Company on the dirt section just over the NT/QLD border. So if you are up for a chat and a cup of tea and you drop that you have a ‘Wildy’ connection, you too could enjoy the top end hospitality of the Fulcher family. Rosie Broderick Head of Boarding


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Wilderness School’s mission is;

‘To enable each girl to be the best

WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY In our first interview we hear from Isobel Bishop (2009). A 2016 Olympic Water Polo player, Isobel found her love of the sport during her time at School. Now living in Sydney, Isobel studies Visual Communication at the University of Technology Sydney. She intends to pursue a career in digital design and advertising after her water polo career concludes. Dedication to her sport over many years has seen Isobel go from strength to strength in the pool. She won her place in the National Water Polo team to compete in the 2015 World University Games in South Korea which saw them claim gold, after an exciting finish when Australia defeated Canada in the final in a penalty shootout. Isobel has recently returned from the Rio Olympics and we are delighted she will be our guest speaker at the 2016 Speech Night.

ISOBEL BISHOP (2009) AUSTRALIAN OLYMPIC WATER POLO TEAM MEMBER


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she can be throughout her life.’ Wilderness School is proud to be able to celebrate the successes of all our past and present students and the many outstanding achievements of our Wildy women. Leading the Way offers you an insight into some of our amazing old scholars’ lives, beyond the Wilderness School gates.

an early dinner as I then head off to training again at night for another couple of hours. Do you have a mantra / philosophy? It is not just what you do, but how you do it. When ignited your passion for Water Polo? I began playing Water Polo at school while, as many do, I was also playing Lacrosse, Netball and Rowing. I would say my passion ignited when I realised just how much the sport offered me outside anything else I was doing. It challenged me, provided me with lifelong friend and made me work hard for a common goal which created a bond you rarely find outside of team sport. I guess a bonus was getting to travel the world with friends from all around Australia. What does a typical day look like for you? I wake up at 4.00am and train for about 2.5 hours, then I eat a massive breakfast and head off to uni or work depending on the day. Following uni I will head home in the afternoon and do some study, see friends and cook

For me, it has always come down to being a good person. Dream big and follow that dream relentlessly, but don’t lose sight of who you are or what you stand for. Treat people as you would want to be treated. How do you juggle training and study? Time management, time management, time management! I can’t stress enough how organised you have to be. At different points in the year, my focus can switch as to what I need to prioritize, sometimes it’s training, sometimes it’s study and other times it’s family and friends. Be organised so you can be 100% present in what you’re doing and not thinking about the 10 other things you have to do that day. What advice would you give aspiring athletes Wilderness girls? Never take no for an answer. If you want something then do everything in your

power to make it work. Utilise everyone you have around you, ask for advice because without a doubt there will be people in this community who can help you more than you might realise. More often than not perseverance and resilience will see you through. How did being a Wilderness girl help you to reach the pinnacle of your sporting career? Wilderness does a wonderful job of helping to shape girls into strong independent women. I have learnt that you have to be assertive but with a certain amount of finesse in sport. One way that Wildy helps girls do this is by providing them with an endless number of role models. All you have to do is look around you, your teachers, your peers, your community and old scholars all have something to offer and if you utilise their help then your opportunities are endless. Another major benefit of being a Wilderness girl was how much they helped me in Year 12. As I was travelling with the Water polo team, I was only in class for less than half the year, so they helped me rearrange my studies to make sure I could do school and Water Polo seamlessly.


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WILDY WOMEN LEADING THE WAY

FELICITY HENNESSEY (2000) GENERAL MANAGER

MILLIE MICHAEL (2006) RADIO PRODUCER

DR JASMIN WHITTAKER (2007) B.ENG (HONS), PH.D.

Felicity has climbed the corporate ladder within the male-dominated agricultural industry. She has experienced a corporate collapse; conducted on the ground due diligence of a wool business in South Africa; negotiated the sales of a derivatives trading desk to a US corporate; implemented a national key account model; worked for one of the largest US pension funds in TIAA-CREF, managing properties across Australia and lived remotely in Moree NSW.

Since attaining a Bachelor of Media Degree at Adelaide University, Millie completed her cadetship with 5AA. She was immediately offered the position of Producer and Panellist for Lucy Cornes, Michael Keelan, Leon Byner and the Sports Show with Graham Cornes and Stephen Rowe.

Jasmin joined Collison & Co in 2015 and is currently undertaking a Masters of Intellectual Property at the University of Technology Sydney as part of her training to become a registered Patent & Trade Marks Attorney.

After considering ceasing her career, Felicity quickly found out how important her career is. She went on to expand a grain business in South Australia, which led to a move to Sydney leading a team through ownership change; building a unique finance product and becoming Acting CEO. Felicity is currently based in Sydney and is now General Manager for Ruralco Holdings Limited and completing an Executive MBA at Melbourne Business School.

During this time, she was also nominated for South Australian of the Year for her work with foster children. Before moving to Sydney, Millie produced the Nova Breakfast show for Lewis & Lowe. She is now the radio Producer for Sydney Breakfast Show Nova with Fitzy and Wippa which is heard nationally around Australia.

Prior to joining Collison & Co, Jasmin was awarded a Ph.D. from the Ian Wark Research Institute (now Future Industries Institute), University of South Australia, for work in the field of Materials Engineering. Her research was related to the study and development of novel polymerbased hybrid materials for biomedical applications. Her thesis was entitled ‘Engineered silk-based biomimetic hydrogels for cell growth’. Throughout her Ph.D. studies, Jasmin published a number of peer-reviewed research articles in international journals and presented her work at various national conferences. Jasmin has also studied at the University of Adelaide and obtained a Bachelor of Engineering (Chemical & Pharmaceutical) with Honours in 2012.


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The Annual Cocktail Catch-Up for the Wilderness Old Scholars Association was held on Friday 19 August. We returned to the picturesque Premiership Suite overlooking the iconic Adelaide Oval and it was a relaxed, casual evening.

MILLY TOOVEY (2007) CEO AND CO-FOUNDER Milly Toovey is based in The Hague, Netherlands. She has recently launched a social media platform dedicated to positive content. She has teamed up with Change.org, Rockefeller Foundation, Jane Goodall Institute, Huff Post’s Jay Shetty and more. It is positive and inspiring. Even Ashton Kutcher retweeted them! However, the most rewarding thing of all is having strangers from across the world letting Milly know that Boomcast gets them out of bed in the morning. These people are fighting loneliness and depression and are being connected with authentic, good souls who are there to inspire. Boomcast is available in the AppStore – check it out!

Thanks go to Preeya Adams from the Committee for assisting with the coordination of the night supported by forty old scholars including many new old scholars who had a great time meeting the community. We look forward to seeing many old scholars drop in for our last official event of the calendar. Dr Pooja Newman President Wilderness Old Scholars’ Association

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This new and exciting social platform is based on positive psychology. Boomcast is always inspired by stories of people doing good in this world. Milly would be honoured to share some incredible Wildy girls’ stories about the good they are doing in the world. The site has social entrepreneurs, people fighting cancer and more on www.boomcastapp.com/community/

C B Zoe Stuckings, Angelica Bollella & Lilly Dinh C Millie Maitland, Maria Pappas, Sarah Wormald, Morgan Price, Eliza Colley & Millie Shinkfield


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CLASS OF 2006 REUNION Late in August, a cohort of girls met at the Main Gate of Hawkers Road for the first time in 10 years. They enjoyed a tour of the School and then headed to The Kentish in North Adelaide for an evening of drinks and canapés. Many of the girls travelled from interstate and regional areas for a brilliant night of catch ups and reacquainting. Thank you to old scholar Mekhla Kumar. Her assistance and organisation made this fantastic evening possible.

A Kimberley Green, Brianna Hollitt, Elissa Dearman & Josie Kirk B Grace Smith, Marija Filipovic & Kristen Crowhurst

CLASS OF 1976 REUNION Forty years ago, these girls were at Wilderness School. Now they are old scholars and many of them meet regularly. On Saturday 10 September, they wandered around the grounds for a tour of the School. They were so impressed by the many changes, gardens and lawn areas. Following the tour, they met for dinner at The Publishers Hotel in Adelaide. Thank you to old scholars Penny Bowen and Annabel Blanch (Murray) who were integral in bringing these girls together for a sensational night. Some old scholars followed up the dinner with a ‘Boarders Catch Up’ on Sunday.

For reunion questions please contact Jodie Escott, Manager of Development and Community on jescott@wilderness.com.au

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OLD BOYS’ COCKTAIL PARTY The first day of spring and 22 Old Boys joined us in the Drawing Room for a cocktail party and tour of the Browns’ House. The pride and passion these men have for a School founded 132 years ago is quite simply wonderful. There was much conversation about the architects for the buildings, the beauty of the restored Browns’ House and the many memories reignited from the Archive Gallery. A number will soon be providing some memorabilia from their School days which will make a wonderful presentation in the Archive Gallery. We look forward to welcoming them back again soon.

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TASMANIAN REUNION We mixed things up in 2016 in Tasmania to reach as many girls as possible. Booie Hayward hosted two events to celebrate our Tasmanian old scholars. A dinner in Launceston on Saturday 10 September was followed by a lunch in Hobart on Sunday 11 September. Both events were well attended and there was a lot of chatter about our amazing School today and brilliant memories of days gone by. A big thank you to Lucy Headlam (Manifold) who was instrumental in bringing these reunions to life.

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B A Catherine Fairs-Morris, Natalie Glinka & Anne-Marie Vinar B Anne-Marie Vinar, Booie Hayward & Olivia Adams C Louise Forge Went & Helen Hayward

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1956 - 1962 MORNING TEA We love welcoming old scholars back to Wilderness School. On Tuesday 13 September, a beautiful sunny morning greeted twenty old scholars from the classes of 1956 – 62. They met in the recently restored Drawing Room where Foundation girls assisted with a lovely morning tea. Many of our guests wandered through the redeveloped Browns’ House recalling anecdotes and memories of their school days. The Archive Gallery was a popular rendezvous. A Micheleine Hannaford & Sue White B Bev Royal, Ros Blandy, Bev Anderson & Helen Farrelly

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D C Liz Manifold, Heather Clark, Jill Gray, Pam Hastings & Jan Tilley D Sue Bertschinger & Sue Robertson


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THE LAST ONE FOR THE YEAR!

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THURSDAY 27 OCTOBER | 6.00-9.00PM THE MAID HOTEL , 1 MAGILL ROAD, STEPNEY

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DRINKS AT THE MAID WE HOPE YOU ARE COMING

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FRONT BAR – SOUTHERN END FINGER FOOD WILL BE PROVIDED BY THE WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS' ASSOCIATION NO RSVP REQUIRED, JUST POP IN FOR A DRINK AND BRING ALONG YOUR CLASSMATES FROM YOUR YEAR.

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THE MAID WILL GENEROUSLY DONATE 10% OF ALL DRINK PURCHASES BACK TO THE WILDERNESS OLD SCHOLARS' ASSOCIATION.

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2016 Old Scholars’ Golf Day Monday 7 November, 2016 | 8.00 for 8.30am Royal Adelaide Golf Club | $70 per person (all inclusive) Please register by 24 October, 2016 Registrations are limited

Individual and team Stableford Competition with longest drive & nearest the pins Bookings and Enquiries to Vicki Thwaites E: vickt@tpg.com.au | M: 0438 355 673 NOTE: If the Adelaide Airport forecast temperature is 36 ° or higher, a 13 hole competition will be played.

AVIS SMART (NEE PRICE) (1928) CELEBRATING 105 YEARS Avis is now based in a nursing home and enjoying life and family. She was the first of three generations of Wilderness women, with her grand daughter Alexandra Smart (1999) and great grand daughters Phoebe Mawby Smart (2012) and Zoe Mawby Smart (2015) all attending Wilderness School. What an amazing journey! Many happy wishes for your 105th birthday on 29 September. You will always hold a special place in our Wildy heart.


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WEDDINGS ANNOUNCEMENTS ENGAGEMENTS Angela Perkins (2005) to Scott Seymour MARRIAGES Sarah Cowan (2002) married Nicholai Deduhin Joella Klein (2004) married Billy Nelson BIRTHS Alice Macgillivray (1997) - Skye Alice Jessica Bottrall (nee Gaylard) (2004) - Max Henry Airlie Grant (2008, Year 11) - Albie Alexander Rosemary Ulcoq (nee Gerlach) (1994) - Amelie Eliza Ali Mort (nee Koster) (2000) - Dougal

Top to bottom - Left to Right Sarah Cowan (2002) married Nicholai Deduhin - Sarah with Bridesmaids Niz Brennan, Rachael Tennant and Kathy Pham all friends from school. Joella Klein (2004) married Billy Nelson

WILDY BABIES

DEATHS Kathleen Howie (nee Bradbury) (1938) Joy Makin (nee Densley) (1943) Sue Clutterbuck (nee Westover) (1946) Marianne Coxell (nee Hyde) (1956 & 1957) Judith Pink (1964) Holly Thredgold (nee Slatter) (1991) Marian Bader - Former staff member for 23 years If you are an old scholar we would love to hear from you and share your milestones and celebrate your success. Please email your news and accompany a photo to communications@wilderness.com.au

Left to Right - Top to bottom Ali Mort (Koster) (2000) - Dougal Rosemary Ulcoq (Gerlach) (1994) - Amelie Eliza Airlie Grant (2008, Year 11) - Albie Alexander Jessica Bottrall (Gaylard) (2004) - Max Henry Alice Macgillivray (1997) - Skye Alice


Wilderness Times | Spring 2016

30 Hawkers Road, Medindie SA 5081 Phone + 61 8 8344 6688 www.wilderness.com.au CRICOS Provider Code: 00375B

WILDERNESS TIMES ISSUE 74  
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