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Contents Women-Owned Businesses ••••••••••••••••••••3 Suzi Ireland, Lifeways ••••••••••••••••••4 Cissy Smith, Redefined Style • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 5, 19 Julie Clark, The Outdoorsman • • • • • • • • • • • • • 7, 9 Judy Sparks, Nyssa Tractor • • • • • • • • • • • 8, 9 Barbara Waldo, Waldo Real Estate • • • • • • • • 11, 18 Leanna Bentz, Saint Alphonsus — Ontario • • • • • • • • 12 • • • • • • 13 Julia Bishop, Biz Zone Stacey Spelman, Chamber • • 14, 15, 19 Laura Killion, Killion’s Steakhouse • • • 16 Elisha Andrews, CT Derm 17, 19

ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

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We Make Time for You!

Celebrating Women Today 2012

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Women-Owned Businesses: Trends and Statistics [http://www.census.gov/econ/s bo/] For the 2007 SBO Census, women-owned was defined as a woman or women owning 51% or more of the company. A review of the literature and data demonstrates that women-owned businesses are a robust and growing segment of the overall small business community. Women consistently have been launching new enterprises at twice the rate of men, and their growth rates of employment and revenue have outpaced the economy. Nationally, there are 8.3 million women-owned businesses representing 29 percent of all companies in the United States. In the decade from 1997-2007, the number of women-owned businesses outpaced the growth of other business types, increasing by 54 percent, growing at nearly twice the rate of all U.S. firms, 43.8 percent vs. 22.2 percent. The survival rate of women-owned businesses is 78.2 percent. See tables 1 and 2 (right). In general, women tend to start businesses with smaller amounts of capital. They rely less on external sources of capital, such as business loans, and rely more on personal sources of capital, such as personal savings accounts. Some analysts perceive that women’s reliance on personal sources of capital may contribute to a feeling of being both personally as well as professionally SEE TRENDS | PAGE 18

2007 Census Survey of Business Women-Owned Percentage Share Ownership 2012 estimated data Businesses of All Businesses Number of Businesses Number of Employees Total Revenue

8.3 million 7.7 million $1.3 trillion

29% 6.3% 3.9%

All Businesses 28.5 million 122.2 million $32.8 trillion

Table 2 2007 Census Survey of Business Ownership 2012 estimated data

Women-Owned Businesses, Idaho

Number of Businesses

108,900

36,500

Percentage Share of All Businesses Statewide Number of Employees Total Revenue

32.4%

25%

98,400 $14,889,000

33,500 $4,264,300

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541-889-8087

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ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, there are over 27 million small businesses in the U.S. One of the fastest BUSINESS growing segments CONNECTION of small business owners in the U.S. Andrea Testi are women, making the success of women-owned businesses, key to growing our economy. Every five years, in years ending with 2 and 7, the U.S. Census completes an extensive Survey of Business Owners (SBO) that examines businesses by the gender of the business owner. This is the only comprehensive, regularly collected source of information on the economic and demographic characteristics of businesses across the country by gender, ethnicity, race, and veteran status. The most recent SBO was conducted in 2007. It takes approximately four years for the data to be compiled and fully released. When released the data can then be analyzed by different characteristics to provide a current understanding of women-owned businesses and to highlight interesting and unique findings. The 2012 SBO has yet-tobe conducted due to pending funding decisions. Statistics in this article are based on actual data from the 2007 SBO and its 2012 estimates.

Table 1


Lifeways employee feels rewarded by making a difference

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ARGUS OBSERVER

ONTARIO

WILLIAM LOPEZ | ARGUS OBSERVER

Suzi Ireland, LIfeways Facility Operations Manager, stands outside the Lifeways in Ontario. Ireland has been an employee for Lifeways for 13 years.

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For longtime Lifeways employee and Facility Operations Manager Suzi Ireland, her work is challenging, nearly constant and yet very rewarding. Through her work with Lifeways, Ireland oversees and manages the ground work, construction, repairs and maintenance for 19 facilities, 30 fleet cars, as well as homes and apartments in both Malheur and Umatilla counties. “I work with a lot of contractors and sub-contractors,” Ireland, who has been a Lifeways employee for 13 years, said. “I’m actually working with some architects right now.” Ireland said her job as an operations manager is very fast-paced and challenging at times because of a high number of projects going on at once. “It does feel, at times, that there’s so many irons on the fire,” she said. “But it can also make you reach a little higher too.” The busy schedule is a good fit for

her, though, Ireland said. With her job, whether it’s a project, a remodeling job or a new building, she gets to witness something from start to finish, which is gratifying to her. She said another satisfying aspect of her job, especially with the housing and apartments Lifeways now provides, is the company is truly making a difference and helping people, she said. That’s a very important part of Lifeways, in general, she said. “I’m very lucky because I’m able to do a job that I love and for a company I enjoy working for,” Ireland said. The Ontario native lives on a ranch and said that she’s lived in Ontario nearly her entire life. She has two grown sons, Beau Ruiz and Cody, a daughter-in-law, Rikki, and an 18-month-old granddaughter, Raelee. “My granddaughter is the apple of my eye,” Ireland said. Ireland enjoys spending as much time with her family as she can, as well as reading, gardening and cooking.

Crystal Wilson, Receptionist; Dawn Talbott, Office Coordinator.

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ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

WILLIAM LOPEZ

  

121 S. Main • Payette • 208-642-3232 Mon- Fri 8-6 • Sat 8 -5:30 www.truevalue.com

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876 SW 4th Ave., Ontario, Oregon % 541-889-8012 www.ontariochamber.com

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Opening consignment boutique the right fit for Smith SHERI BANDELEAN ARGUS OBSERVER

PAYETTE

SEE SMITH | PAGE 19

SHERI BANDELEAN | ARGUS OBSERVER

Cissy Smith proprietor of Refined Style in Payette came out of retirement to open a consignment shop in downtown Payette because she didn’t just want to sit around during her retirement.

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ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

After retiring and moving back to Idaho from California eight years ago, Cissy Smith decided she just couldn’t sit around and decided to open a consignment boutique, Refined Style, in Payette. Originally from Boise, Smith planned to settle down in Boise and wanted to buy a Victorian home there but couldn’t find any in her price range. She decided to look in other areas nearby and ended up in Payette. “I couldn’t even buy my grandmother’s house, which was on the market at that time,� Smith said. Before opening the shop, Smith commuted back and forth from Payette every day to help take care of her younger brother who was in hospice. While doctors initially said he would only live a couple of years at the most, he lived for five. “After he passed away, I felt like I really needed to do something,� Smith said. “I just didn’t want to sit around my home missing him.� Many times Smith stopped at a shop in Payette, but it was always closed. One day, Smith asked the owner if she could rent part of the shop for a clothing boutique and then keep it open five days a week

for him, to which he agreed. Smith kept her boutique along with his furniture shop open for him for a couple of years. Eventually, the owner of the furniture store lost the building, and the owners took it back, but they were going to just close it up. After some negotiating, Smith said she was able to talk the owners into selling the building to her at a reasonable price. “I thought it would be such a shame to just close it up,� she said. “It’s such an old building. It was built in 1906.� Refined Style was opened in June of 2010 as a women’s clothing boutique and gift shop but also carries baby and children’s wear, men’s wear and furniture. The shop has a full selection of the latest trends, from casual to formal. Smith said she isn’t really a social person, but this shop has brought that out of her, and she enjoys talking to the customers and treats them like friends. “I like to get to know my customers,� Smith said. Refined Style is open from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and from noon until 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. If a person is looking to consign clothing


ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

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Clark has done it all at Outdoorsman in Ontario LARRY MEYER ONTARIO

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— Julie Clark

Owner of The Outdoorsman

and current location is on the corner of East Idaho and Northeast Second Street. Clark began working in the office, doing the bookkeeping and working with the computers. After the store opened in the old Les Schwab location, Clark’s duties expanded. “I did pretty much of everything,� she said. “The staff was much smaller.�

LARRY MEYER | ARGUS OBSERVER

Julie Clark, owner of the The Outdoorsman in Ontario, stands at the gun counter in the store.

SEE CLARK | PAGE 9

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ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

When Julie Clark applied for a job at The Outdoorsman in Ontario, then situated along North Oregon Street, it was not her expectation that it would become her career and that she would eventually own the business. Now, more than 25 years later, Clark is the “complete� owner of the store with her husband, and working at her fourth location, which she firmly vows is her last. She started working at the original location with Miriam Jones and Dean Boylan, then moved with store next door, where Fit For Life is now, and later the store was moved to the former Les Schwab location, on the south side of East Idaho Avenue, for a time. Its last

We go above and beyond what the chain stores will do for you. We do a lot of special orders.

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Sparks finds success in Nyssa family business JESSICA KELLER ARGUS OBSERVER

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JESSICA KELLER | ARGUS OBSERVER

Judy Sparks stands in front of a row of tractors at Nyssa Tractor, a tractor salvage and repair business, which she co-owns with her husband, Gary Sparks. The business has turned into a family venture as the couple’s two sons, Steven and John, now also work at the company. Sparks said she feels blessed to be able to see her family every day and have them working with her.

Sterling Bank salutes women in business

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ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

NYSSA

When Judy Sparks married her husband, Gary, it was his dream to open a tractor salvage and repair business, which they did, Nyssa Tractor, in the late 1980s. “Once I got married, we just worked together,� she said. Sparks’ role at Nyssa Tractor is well-defined: she does the books and manages the accounting end of the business, and that suits her very well because she has always liked the accounting side. “It kind of worked out because that wasn’t Gary’s real strong suit,� Sparks said. “So we’ve always been partners in how we’ve worked.� Yet, Sparks said when she graduated from Northwest Nazarene University, then a college, with a business degree she had no idea she would end up where she has. “I always knew I wanted to be in the business world,� Sparks said. “I never thought I would become a business owner.� She said her children literally grew up at the business. When they first started she would bring her sons, Steven and John, to work and set them up in playpens and high chairs. When they were 8 or 9, they swept floors and did other small

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tasks, which, she said, they didn’t enjoy at the time but now appreciate it as adults because they have an established work ethic. Sparks still sees her sons at the business every day: Steven is the head of sales and John is a mechanic. “It’s very much a family business,� she said, adding she and her husband feel blessed their sons wanted to join them. Still, when her sons were very young, Sparks said it was sometimes tough. “I used to juggle a lot,� she said. Things have gotten easier through the years, however. “I don’t have to be here as many hours,� she said, adding during the slower times of the year she sometimes only works 20 hours a week – in the afternoons, using the mornings to either run errands for the business or do other activities. Before, Sparks said, when the company was newer and she was keeping the books and serving as a receptionist, she put in many 40- or 50-hour weeks. Something new at the business, Sparks said, is her office, which was built upstairs for her. For 20 years, she said, she shared a desk with her husband, which often got cramped SEE PAGE 9

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FROM PAGE 8

CLARK: Enjoys hunting and fishing FROM PAGE 7

Not that she does any less even with a larger staff, including a bookkeeper. While still keeping an eye on the books, Clark said she also works out on the floor and does cleaning. “I work at night at home ordering and checking the books,” she said, commenting there are fewer interruptions. “I’m just a hard a worker.” Clark jokes that she stayed with the business for such a long time because she “couldn’t stay away,” and said an aunt also worked at her job for a long time as well, suggesting longevity runs in the family. On a more serious note, “I knew my job, and I do it well,” she said. “I just stayed with it.”

Clark said she attended a little bit of college, but had a lot of onthe-job training, and, through the 9 years, learned the whole business., Clark started buying into the business about 10 years ago, she said, and bought more shares every year. “It was an opportunity,” she said, adding the other owners did not actively take part in the business. “They were silent owners.” Clark, who does a lot of fishing and hunting, said, “(The store) fits within our lifestyle.” Great customer service, friendly staff, a lot of inventory that is kept up to date and competitive prices keep people coming through the doors, she said. “We go above and beyond what the chain stores will do for you. We do a lot of special orders.”

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280 S. Oregon, Ontario 541-889-8693 Pictured left to right: Jennifer Hendry, Mary Clark, Kristie York, Debbie Blackaby XNLV54535

ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

for space. “I’m just tickled to death to not be in the everyday grind downstairs,” she said. Sparks said her husband, who does the purchasing for the company and handles the management end, is on the road frequently during the year, and he makes most of the major decisions in the business but asks Sparks’ opinions before going forward, and they also bounce ideas off each other. “I would say that this was my husband’s dream, and I helped him with that dream, and it became our dream,” Sparks said. She said she has played a definite role in its success, and she is proud to be co-owner of the largest tractor and farm-equipment repair and salvage business in the Pacific Northwest. Sparks said she is very proud that their business is so successful and the fact they get to help farmers be successful, as well, is very rewarding to her. “I was born and raised on a farm,” she said. “That’s just a world that I’m comfortable in.” The business location is a reflection of the Sparks’ success. Sparks said when they first moved to their property outside of Nyssa in 1990, much of the land was just sage-

brush. Now it is filled with tractors and tractor parts – all evidence of their growth through the years. And, while Sparks said she knows at some point she and her husband will eventually decide “enough” and choose not to expand further, she doesn’t know when that will happen. “We haven’t reached that point,” she said. “We’re still continuing to grow.” Sparks also said she hasn’t reached the point where she is ready to turn over the company’s books and finances to somebody else. She said she is confident in her job and really enjoys it. Sparks said, growing up, she was a shy and insecure girl and uncertain about her abilities. She said she used to think she would grow up to be a secretary and actually worked in an accountant’s office performing secretarial work in high school. That, she said, is where she discovered her interest in finances and led to her career. Sparks said if she had to give advice to any young girl who was questioning what they were going to do or go in life, she encourage them to try different ideas or avenues. “I would tell young girls don’t be afraid, to try it,” she said, adding the worst thing they can discover is something wasn’t right for them.


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You want Idaho’s premier team in your corner. ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

As the region’s largest provider of cancer services and a nationally recognized leader in cancer research, St. Luke’s MSTI offers you the leading local expertise to treat your cancer, ease your symptoms and side effects, and strengthen you physically, mentally, and emotionally. We bring you 18 oncologists with specialties in chemotherapy and radiation therapy at five treatment centers, as well as access to national clinical trials. We also work in close collaboration with the region’s best breast surgeons and your primary care provider. We go beyond medicine too, with supportive care like nutrition services, rehabilitation, psychological and genetic counseling, and integrative therapies such as massage and gentle yoga. Cancer is a tough road, and we will be by your side throughout your journey, with the latest, most effective treatment and supportive care, designed just for you.

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11

Barbara Waldo, co-owner of Waldo Real Estate and Field Waldo Insurance, talks with real estate agent Carol Eldred at the Ontario branch.

For Waldo, life is a mix of business and pleasure WILLIAM LOPEZ ARGUS OBSERVER

VALE

In 1965, at the age of 15, Barbara Waldo, Parma, started working at her parents’ insurance company in Vale, and, now, 47 years later, she’s still in the business and going strong. Waldo and her husband, Dave, bought the business from her parents in the late 1970s, and she serves as co-owner and general manager of Waldo Real Estate, as well as co-owner of Field Waldo Insurance. “I was born and raised into this business,” Waldo said. Waldo said her duties vary greatly, but she typically takes care of the company’s employees, manages of-

I really love working with the people in our offices, and we have a great group of realtors. I love getting up in the morning and knowing I have a positive staff to share the day with.

HELPING PEOPLE

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— Barbara Waldo Co-owner of Waldo Real Estate

fices and handles several business decisions. She also assists principle brokers and agents on the real estate side of the business. “I really love working with the people in our offices, and we have a great group of realtors,” Waldo SEE WALDO | PAGE 18

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WILLIAM LOPEZ | ARGUS OBSERVER

What path are you on?


ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

LARRY MEYER ARGUS OBSERVER

ONTARIO

Leanna Bentz, marketing director of Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center-Ontario, started out studying business with a minor in health care at Oregon State University, but ended up switching her major and mino because she felt health care was where her passion lay. Bentz grew up in Gresham but moved to Ontario because she had become engaged to Paul Bentz. They have been married about and two and a half years. Both were involved in student government while in high school and met during an Oregon Association of Student Councils camp one summer. Having kept in touch, the two started dating after they were in college, she at OSU and he at Western Oregon University, about 19 miles apart. “We drove that road many times,� Bentz said. Bentz has worked at Saint Alphonsus-Ontario for about three

and a half years. “I started as an intern and got hired fulltime after three weeks,� Leanna Bentz said. “I worked with Mary Buchanan (her predecessor in marketing).� Buchanan now works in marketing at St. Alphonsus in Boise. “I talk to her almost every day,� Bentz said. “She was a great mentor.� Together they worked together on a number of functions, including the Chamber of Commerce, blood pressure checks, the Winter Wonderland Parade, and other community projects and events. “It was a nice introduction for me to the community,� she said. Bentz studied business with a minor in health care until her junior year, but didn’t feel that business was as satisfying as health care, she said. She switched to health care administration with a minor in business, emphasizing marketing. “�My first health class, I absolutely loved,� Bentz said. “That was a good move for me.�

LARRY MEYER | ARGUS OBSERVER

Leanna Bentz, marketing director at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center-Ontario, stands outside her office with a poster for Saint Alphonsus Fruitland Health Plaza, which she has been busy with promoting.

She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in health science. Bentz said she likes the outreach program and the public health aspect of her job. “Marketing in health care is different than (marketing in) other

businesses,� she said. “The focus is on helping everyone to have healthy lifestyles.� Bentz said she likes working for a faith-based organization, as well. “I enjoying working for a greater cause in helping people,� she said.

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Bentz mixes health care, marketing at Saint Alphonsus-Ontario

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Julia Bishop’s life as a business owner has evolved over time CHERISE KAECHELE ARGUS OBSERVER

FRUITLAND

13

CHERISE KAECHELE | ARGUS OBSERVER

Julia Bishop, co-owner of the Biz Zone in Fruitland, provides her customers with their printing needs. Starting a business, she said, was not such a struggle because she allowed the business to evolve with the needs of her customers.

know her customers. “You get to know the people in the community. They become more than just customers,� Bishop said. When Julia is not working, she enjoys doing crafts, beading with her children, painting and sewing, she said. “I dabble in everything.� Currently, Bishop is heading a committee to bring back Fruitland Family Fun Days. “There’s not a lot of things for young children to do in the community. I don’t want to see Family Fun

Days go away,� she said. There is a lot to do with the committee though. She has six volunteers helping her with organizing the event but they are starting at ground zero with no money. They have to figure out how to keep the event going, she said. She would like input from the community about what they would like to see at the event and if they’re interested in entertaining. Bishop asked for anyone who can help to call the Biz Zone. XNLV53956

    



      

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OFFICE (208) 452-5757 t CELL (208) 739-2288 t FAX (208) 452-7530

       

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ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

For Julia Bishop, co-owner of The Biz Zone in Fruitland, her career as a businesswoman has evolved by rolling with the punches and responding to the demand of customers. Bishop, who owns the print store with her husband, Fruitland Mayor Ken Bishop, had a lot of experience working in the medical field in the customer service aspect. Ken Bishop had a background in chemical engineering. Yet, they opened a ministorage business that quickly evolved and grew, and now the pair own two businesses that continue to expand. Julia Bishop lived all around the world because of her upbringing in the military. She graduated from Ontario High School and continued to move, later living in Alaska and Boise. She married Ken, who was raised in Fruitland, and the pair decided to stay in the area. In 2004, the Bishops opened the ministorage business and when customers came in asking them if they had the resources to do something specific, the two figured, “why not?� Their printing business began by

printing in black and white. Soon, the business grew in the same way their ministorage business had grown, Bishop said. She said owning a business and having it be successful wasn’t difficult because it had been evolving. There was no set plan to the business originally, and that seemed to work for them. “We bought things along the way to increase what we offer. It wasn’t a struggle,� Bishop said. However, despite the business going well, Julia admitted she would have never opened a business on her own. In fact, she said, she had originally wanted to stay at home. Julia and Ken have three children ages 10 years to 23 years old. The worst part of owning a business is missing out on a lot of things her children were involved in because of how much time it takes, Bishop said. Although, one of the best parts is being able to take off time without scheduling it ahead of time, she said. “It is nice we are the owners. If our kids have something to do, at least one of us can be there,� Bishop said. Another thing she loves about owning her business is getting to


14

CHERISE KAECHELE

I thought it’d be a good job me. I enjoy planning PAYETTE The Chamber of Commerce is the events, and I’m good at go-to place for people looking to it. ARGUS OBSERVER

You are invited to attend the Western Treasure Valley’s Premier Bridal Show. Come see EVERYTHING that says wedding: Gowns, cakes, make-up, hair, DJs, tuxedos. If you are planning a function of any type, there are many things to see that will be of interest to you for party planning Friday, November 9 1.o1. Saturday, November 10 ".o1.

Join us for

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ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

‘

Stacey Spelman fills many roles at Chamber

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move to the area, to find out what upcoming events are planned and the information outlet for many who have a question about the community. For Stacey Spelman, office manager at the Payette County Chamber of Commerce, she helps with all those things and more. Spelman has been working at the chamber for 19 months, and she applied for the position because she knew it required planning events and would have the customer service interaction that she enjoys the most.

— Stacey Spelman Payette County Chamber of Commerce office manager

“I thought it’d be a good job for me,� Spelman said. “I enjoy planning events, and I’m good at it.� The county chamber is responsible for planning the chamber auction, the awards banquet, the Bob McKinney Golf Tournament, the Tri-Cities breakfast for the kick-off of the Payette County Fair, the spring fair parade in Fruitland and SEE PAGE 15

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phone number or to get her opinion on a particular restaurant, she said. Spelman often gets phone calls from people interested in moving to the community who ask what the cost of living is and for suggestions on realtors. An atypical part of her job is working with new board members every other year and a new president, therefore a new boss, every year. There are 17 board members for the chamber, technically her bosses, yet it is the president who gets the final word, she said. She remains in contact with the board members, the president, and first and second vice president to help coordinate events, and ensure board members are attending ribbon cuttings and groundbreakings, events that she is responsible for planning. The board members, president and vice presidents, are all people XNLV55018

SEE SPELMAN | PAGE 19

15

ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

the monthly member meetings where she organizes who the speaker will be and who will cater the event, she said. Spelman said that she is also responsible for renting out the community center and must organize the weekends and events planned there to make sure not to overbook. The most difficult thing Spelman encountered when first hired was learning certain aspects of her job, she said. Spelman is responsible for payroll and taxes, something she never had to do at any previous jobs. Spelman is also responsible for the day-to-day operations required of a chamber, such as ordering office supplies, answering phone calls and recruiting new members, as well as retaining current members of the chamber and helping them utilize their membership. It’s not uncommon for people to call her and ask for a business


For Killion, owning a restaurant challenging, fun JESSICA KELLER

16

ARGUS OBSERVER

JESSICA KELLER | ARGUS OBSERVER

Laura Killion, co-owner of Killion’s Steakhouse in Ontario with her husband, Billy, enjoys the public relations aspect of her job, although she admits sometimes her feet ache after a day of waitressing.

Coming Soon in November!

Most days Laura Killion can be found exactly where she wants to be — working the dining room floor and taking orders at Killion’s Steakhouse, which she co-owns with her husband, Billy, and where she works as a waitress. She said she loves the job but hates how her feet ache at the end of a long day. Killion has a long history with the restaurant, which was previously the Sizzler until the Killions decided to remove the restaurant from the franchise. Killion actually began there as a waitress in 1987 when she was a nursing student at Treasure Valley Community College. She said, after a rough day at work during which Billy, then her boyfriend, yelled at her, she quit altogether to focus on obtaining her nursing license. “I didn’t come back until after we got married because he couldn’t yell at me then,” she said, joking. The strategy appears to have worked because when the former owners of the Sizzler Restaurant decided to retire, the Killions bought the restaurant in 1997, keeping the franchise name and association, as well as the land on which the

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ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

ONTARIO

restaurant is situated. Killion said it wasn’t her and Billy’s dream to one day own a restaurant, it just kind of happened and stuck. “We weren’t prepared, but we loved the restaurant,” Killion said. “We were here open to close.” Their daughters also spent a great deal of time at the restaurant, and one learned to walk there. Killion said one of the best things about the restaurant is the employees, many of whom have worked there for a long time. She also enjoys her role in the front of the business, taking orders and talking to patrons. Public relations, she said, is more her area, while her husband focuses on the management. “He’s much better with the details,” she said. “He just really knows the area, knows the community.” But, Killion said, she and her husband have a real partnership, and she has a large influence in the direction of the business. She said it was she who pushed for cutting ties with the Sizzler franchise and becoming Killion’s. While some customers have not responded well to all the changes, Killion likes it. “It just seems more fun and relaxed and more Ontario and not Southern California,” she said.

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Andrews happy managing health clinic, living in Idaho SHERI BANDELEAN ARGUS OBSERVER

FRUITLAND

SEE ANDREWS | PAGE 9

Great Services Come From Our Great People

SHERI BANDELEAN | ARGUS OBSERVER

Elisha Andrews, clinic manager at CT Derm enjoys her job and feels this job is the perfect fit for her as she loves helping people and making them happy.

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“Promoting and protecting the health of our community through collaboration, education, prevention and the delivery of compassionate care�.

ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

Elisha Andrews, clinic manager for CT Derm in Fruitland, is passionate about her work and loves working with people and making them happy. She came to work as a receptionist for Dr. Carl Thornfeldt 13 years ago and loved her job and working for him but felt she wanted to do more. “I felt there was more out there, and that I had more potential,� Andrews said. Andrews did leave her receptionist position to get more work experience, but she always aspired to manage a clinic. After a couple of years, Thornfeldt called Andrews and asked if she wanted to come back because there was an opening,

and Andrews accepted the offer. She served as Thornfeldt’s assistant 17 before becoming clinic manager five years ago. “This position fits me really well,� Andrews said. “I love working with people, and I love to help the employees.� While working for Thornfeldt, Andrews helped implement the Med Spa, which is a full service medical spa. “It was fun to fulfill a need for the community and to educate myself on the technology and watch it come to conclusion,� Andrews said. Originally from central California, Andrews moved to the Sand Hollow area with her family while in high school and graduated from New Plymouth High School. She now lives in Emmett with her


TRENDS: Women diversifying into different sectors

WALDO: Enjoys job

FROM PAGE 3

FROM PAGE 11

ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

liable and thus may contribute to the desire to spend 18 less in order to reduce risk exposure. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the SBA Office of Advocacy, half of new businesses survive five years, a third last 10 years, and less than quarter last 15 years. SBO data reported that 78.2 percent of women-owned businesses were still in business; demonstrating a significant sustainable impact on the economy. Women-owned firms are starting and growing businesses in all industries, diversifying into sectors previously described as ‘non-traditional’ for women. The industries with the highest concentration of women-owned firms are health care and social assistance 52.9 percent, educational services 45.2 percent, and other services to include beauty salons, personal and pet care services, and grant writing as examples 40.3 percent. The industries with the lowest concentration of women-owned businesses are mining, oil and gas extraction 15 percent, transportation and warehousing 11.4 percent, agriculture and forestry 10.3 percent, and construction 8 percent. The government contracting arena is highly competitive. In 2010 only 3.4 percent of federal contracting dollars were awarded to female entrepreneur; thus it is worthwhile to review the certification requirements and determine if this is a good fit for a women-owned business expansion. Being a certified women-owned business allows you to be registered in multiple resources where contracting officers can learn about your business. Many companies solicit business opportunities from womenowned businesses in order to fulfill quotas for contract set-asides. Additionally, there are many lending institutions that only work with certified busi-

ness owners; thus being formally certified can potentially provide an advantage when seeking financing. There are exciting things happening inside the world of women entrepreneurs. Whether you are writing a business plan, feasibility study, advertising and marketing campaign, or even deciding what kind of business to start, start by looking at what is already happening in the field or industry you are interested in. By studying industries, sales trends, and other important statistics, better business decisions can be made to start or grow a business. Business trends and statistics can give you a quick, overall glance at the viability of an industry, and how well women are already doing in that industry. Your local TVCC Small Business Development Center — BizCenter provides business advisory services, technical assistance, education and leadership development support spanning the full business spectrum, from start-up, to growth, to succession planning and closing. In the period covering 2007-2012 the TVCC BizCenter has provided advisory services to 368 women entrepreneurs whose businesses employed 472 employees and generated cumulative revenues of $14,613,312. To access the platform of services the TVCC BizCenter offers entrepreneurs and business owners in support of achieving their professional business and person objectives, call Debbie Jo at (541) 881-5772 for more information.

ANDREA TESTI is the Treasure Valley Community College Small Business Development Center director. She can be contacted at atesti@tvcc.cc

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said. “I love getting up in the morning and knowing I have a positive staff to share the day with.� Waldo Real Estate and Field Waldo Insurance have locations in Ontario, Nyssa, Vale and New Plymouth, Waldo said. The businesses have seen multiple changes throughout the years, Waldo said. “The changes are countless,� Waldo said. “There have just been so many. Just one big one, I guess, would be that several years ago everything was manual. Almost everything now is paperless, and all the information is online instead of in the manuals and books we had.� When not managing agents or handling day-to-day business dealings, Waldo and her husband enjoy entertaining guests and spending time with their children and grandchildren, she said. Waldo has four children, Dallas, Brad, Dana Christy and Deeanne Mosman, she said. Mosman and Brad Waldo currently work in the Waldo offices. Waldo also has six grandchildren she thoroughly enjoys spending as much time with as possible, she said. She spends much of her free time working on her yard at her family’s farm in Parma and simply enjoys life, she said.

...Empowering Women of Today

Kerri Sutton, Financial Advisor

125 N. Whitley Dr., Fruitland

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208-452-3039 XNLV53955


ANDREWS: Loves living in Idaho FROM PAGE 17

Back at the Payette County Chamber of Commerce office, Stacey Spelman, office manager, conducts business with Mandy Falk, vice president of Toombs Janitorial Service.

SPELMAN: Likes planning events FROM PAGE 15

in the community with other responsibilities, Spelman said. They have other jobs and other time commitments in addition to their responsibilities at the chamber. “I am the only person who is 100 percent there for the chamber,� Spelman said. “This is my job and responsibility.� Aside from her professional responsibilities with the chamber, Spelman recently had a baby. Her daughter, Rowan, was born on Sept. 21, and Spelman worked up until that day, she said. In fact, she had an event planned for the chamber on the day her daughter was born. Spelman worked from home while on maternity leave and is now back for three weeks with Rowan for half time. She will be back to full time status after the three weeks are over. “Having kids and working with

the chamber is harder because of my husband’s job,� Spelman said. “He’s gone overnight... he doesn’t work an 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. job.� Her husband, Joe Spelman, works for Schwanns and is responsible for an area that keeps him out late at night, and on certain nights of the week is too far to drive home due to his route.There are a lot of extra events that are after hours where she struggles to find someone to take care of her two children, both under the age of 2, she said. In other aspects, however, she has the flexibility to close the chamber door and go home if her children are sick or is able to bring the baby to work with her, like she is doing now, she said. Spelman enjoys the interaction she has with chamber members and those in the community and enjoys planning the major events for which the chamber is responsible.

SMITH: Works with one of her sons FROM PAGE 5

and the items are in good condition, Smith can help sell those items. Smith said she enjoys living in Payette and has four children,

Sharon Miles              

Paula Tankersley    

one who lives in Payette with her and also works at the shop and then two children who live in the Boise area. Her oldest son lives in New Orleans.

Debbie Jerman       

Mari Flores        

        

Dana Lirgg            

Melanie Martinez          

Malheur County Title Company, Inc. ! Bernie Kane

     

         



   

             

           

         

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CHERISE KAECHELE | ARGUS OBSERVER

her position and intends to continue working for Thornfeldt un19 til he retires. After Thornfeldt retires, which could be 10 years or more, Andrews said she doesn’t know what she will do, but she enjoys working in private practice. She feels she wouldn’t enjoy working for a big hospital. Health care keeps changing, she said, and she’s not sure what will happen but is open to the possibility of going back to school if necessary. “But this is where I’m at and I’m really happy here,� Andrews said. ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

husband, who is from New Plymouth, and her two children, a daughter, 14, who is a freshman in high school, and a son, 6. Andrews said she and her family love the outdoors. She goes hunting in the fall, snow skiing in the winter, prepares her garden in the spring and goes rafting in the summer before getting ready to hunt again. “Idaho has absolutely everything here,� Andrews said. “I just love it here.� Andrews said she is happy with


FRUITLAND PRIMARY CARE

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SaintY Alphonsus Group AACHIEVE CHIEVE YOUR OUR BES BESTMedical T HEAL HEALTH TH TODAY. TODAY.

ARGUS OBSERVER, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 / INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012

LET SSAINT AINT ALPHONSUS BE YYOUR OUR GUIDE. There are many health benefits to establishing a lifelong relationship with a Family Medicine provider. Our providers are experienced at caring for the medical needs of your whole family - kids and adults including physical, mental, and social health issues. Your provider can also be your health coach helping you meet goals, such as weight management, exercise, and better nutrition, moving you toward a healthier life and a healthier you.

FIND A PRIMAR PRIMARYY CARE PRO PROVIDER VIDER RIGHT FFOR OR YYOU OU

Mark Christenson, MD, FA FACP Internal Medicine Ontario

Zack Allen, PA-C Family Medicine, Urgent Care Fruitland

Mojgan Mohandesi, MD Family Medicine Ontario

Jenifer Greene, NP-C Family Medicine Fruitland

Lawrence Sladich, MD Family Medicine, Occupational Medicine Fruitland

Amber Hackenberg, PA-C Family Medicine Ontario

Jocele Skinner, Skinner, MD Family Medicine Fruitland

Belinda Heersink, NP-C Urgent Care Fruitland

John White, MD Family Medicine Fruitland

Cynthia Reed, NP-C Family Medicine Fruitland

For help finding a doctor in Fruitland or Ontario, or to schedule an appointment, please call (208) 367-DOCS 367-DOCS.

Micah Wilson, NP-C Family Medicine Ontario


Women Today 2012