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November 22, 2013

LIGHT UP THE

JBER’s installation Christmas tree lighting set for Dec. 5, near the Commissary, at 5 p.m. More on page B-3.

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NIGHT ARCTIC WARRIOR JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON’S SOURCE FOR NEWS

www.jber.af.mil

November 22, 2013

Volume 4, No. 45

Spartan riggers ready for success By Sgt. Eric-James Estrada 4-25th IBCT Public Affairs

Master sergeants David Barber (left) and Morgan Cabaniss, 673d Security Forces Squadron, pose for the camera on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson Nov. 18. Barber and Cabaniss rescued a wrecked trucker 100 miles north of the Arctic Circle, braving temperatures of 7 below with a severe wind chill. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Sheila deVera)

By Senior Master Sgt. Mike Hammond JBER Public Affairs A November hunting trip in the extreme North turned into a lifesaving opportunity in the blink of an eye for two master sergeants from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. It was a cold night, even by Alaska standards: 7-below temperatures with a 35-below wind chill factor. Air Force master sergeants

David Barber and Morgan Cabaniss, 673d Security Forces Squadron, were on the tail end of a long drive up the Dalton Highway – known locally as “Haul Road,” to join four friends in a caribou hunt. By 11 p.m., Nov. 2, the sergeants were about a hundred miles north of the Arctic Circle and a couple of hours from their rendezvous point when Cabaniss noticed something wrong. “We were going over Atigun Pass when

we came up on a trucker. He was going really slowly, and I could see his tail lights reflecting off the road behind him,” Cabaniss said. “I had just told Dave [Barber] that the road must be really slick, when the truck started to jackknife. We could see his tail lights and his headlights both pointing back at us!” Barber explained what happened next.

USARAK focuses on Ready and Resilient Campaign

XX See RESCUE, Page A-3 XX See RIGGERS, Page A-3

By Jim Hart JBER Public Affairs The class The stories seemed to be from horror films rather than war movies. Guts falling off stretchers, maimed bodies and ghastly images of remains frozen in their last moments of life; many screaming in agony, now silent. He recounted all their names. The brief was part of the 725th Brigade Support Battalion (Airborne)’s resiliency training. The stories were recollections from Army Lt. Col. Andrew DeKever’s tour in Afghanistan several years ago with the 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry). They were not fun “there I was” stories to share down at the Veterans of Foreign Wars hall; not even good ones to share with the family. Sadly, as he would find out, stories not terribly fun for anyone to listen to. DeKever told the class of how isolated he felt, even ostracized. At that time, he was a mortuary affairs officer. He didn’t fall under the dark spell of combat stress in the traditionally understood way, so several in his command dismissed his plight. He explained how he and his staff saw the gruesome results over and over again, month after month, searing horrible memories into their very being. “This has to end,” DeKever concluded. “Even if it ends badly,

Army Lt. Col. Andrew DeKever speaks to U.S. Army Alaska Soldiers during a Ready and Resilient Campaign briefing about suicide and PTSD. DeKever served as a mortuary affairs officer in Afghanistan several years ago and for a time had difficulty dealing with combat stress. (U.S. Air Force photo/Jim Hart)

it has to end.” As the brief continued, he explained his experiences, and a parallel story of a Soldier, Spc. Jacob Andrews, who did not survive his post-traumatic stress disorder. In DeKever’s words, Jake looked a little too far over the edge. In both cases, the stories illustrated shortfalls in each person’s command and social situation; each of the stories were drawing a road map for those in the class to know how serious even little things can be. The turning point for DeKever was a specialist in his section who recognized the signs and told a behavioral health practitioner. It’s something DeKever admits was very gutsy, but also something that saved his life. The discussion was very frank, even by military standards. DeKever’s story, and scores like his, are what the Army’s Ready and Resilient Campaign is meant to address. To incorporate resiliency training into the very fabric of the training matrix, rather than insert-

ing it haphazardly between ranges and during crisis periods; to synchronize the various agencies and programs into a tool commanders can more readily use. “It’s been effective for me and my family,” said Sgt. 1st Class John Ripple, master resiliency trainer with the 725th BSB. “Over the last couple years I’ve been faced with a lot of challenges – from my wife and son’s health to all kinds of different stuff in the Army. I try to apply some of this Comprehensive Soldier Fitness to my own situations, and it’s helped me.” The command Several weeks earlier, in the planning phase for 1st Squadron (Airborne), 40th Cavalry’s iteration of the Ready and Resilient Campaign, squadron commander Army Lt. Col. Richard Scott was looking at a monthly brief in which he and his staff pored over the Risk Working Group List. From this report, he saw trends and numbers, but he also saw

Inside Stay safe this Thanksgiving: A-2

Commissaries to start scanning IDs ........................ A-2 Four guides to success ............................................ A-2 Don’t be SAD this winter ........................................B-1 Military, Alaska Aces team up .................................B-1 Heroic Airmen perform daring rescue .....................B-4

“I will be sure always,” is the motto of the U.S. Army parachute rigger. Every rigger is Airborne qualified and by tradition required to be ready to jump any parachute, packed by any rigger. Parachute rigging in the Army has been around since the first Airborne unit was established in 1940. In those days paratroopers prepared and cared for their own parachutes. At the onset of World War II the Army created five airborne divisions and created support organizations with a mission to maintain airborne delivery systems. By 1950, Army riggers joined the Quartermaster Corps. The U.S. Army Quartermaster School has operated the parachute rigger course at Fort Lee, Va. since 1951. Like thousands before, Army 1st Lt. Kelsie Cabrera began her career as a rigger on the historic grounds of Fort Lee. “When I was at Fort Lee, I went through my basic officer course and I was assigned to the

names and the troubles vexing them – he saw souls attached to the statistics. He also saw a list of any program or assistance the individual troops have received or been referred to. The list includes everything from alcohol-related problems to suicide. Anything the command is aware of which is, even potentially, related to resiliency is there. He’s able to track trends all the way down to the platoon level in a unit of 575 Soldiers. It is from these stats and reports he was able to target specific areas he would like to remedy. While the list of individual effects would be long, his has a longer-term goal than just the one week of R2C – for him, it’s a matter of unit effectiveness, and one that will take much more time. While his squadron may be well-trained in their combat roles, many of his Soldiers are suffering from resilience-related issues. The way Scott sees it, the statistics show one-third of his unit is combat ineffective – something no

commander wants. “Our focus is to reduce this number and get more Soldiers to perform optimally and therefore increase unit readiness,” Scott said. “We are leveraging all our available resources on JBER to help us meet this goal. We are teaching and showing our Soldiers and leaders the tools and resources available to them. “One of the things that’s interesting is we spend 12 months to prepare for combat,” Scott said. ”But if you look at it conversely, we spend just a fraction of that time preparing our Soldiers and families to come back from combat. That is causing a lot of issues.” Scott also said his battalion has been leaning forward on resiliency over the last year or so, incorporating much of what R2C is advocating into their normal training and policy. It’s this kind of high-fidelity awareness that makes it advantageous for battalion and company commanders to select tailor-made training plans for their specific unit challenges. And that’s what U.S. Army Alaska did – but it didn’t happen in a vacuum. This kind of training program requires tremendous resources, and without coordination and planning it can become impracticable. The support and planning In mid-summer, USARAK started planning how to best train their Soldiers during R2C week. During phase one of R2C, they conducted an outreach to senior leaders to get an idea of what leadership was seeing. They also surveyed 2,000 leaders and 2,700 Soldiers about alcohol and indiscipline. The planning then continued with a “ready and resilient” team who then put together a concept of operations – essentially a course catalog. From this list of ready-made training modules, the commanders could then assemble a training

XX See R2C, Page A-3

AtHoc goes live on JBER

New notification system for emergencies, recalls, and bad weather is now on your NIPR desktop, Page A-3

ANCHORAGE, AK PERMIT NO. 220

PAID

PRESORTED STANDARD U.S. POSTAGE


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November 2013 November 22,22,2013

Arctic Warrior

Four guides to success

fails to deliver. Instead of keeping your expertise to yourself so you’re the only “go-to” guy or gal, share your strengths with others to widely spread your knowledge and abilities. We can all benefit from sharing with one another the tools and things that work for us. While I’ve come up with a few methods on my own, I’ve borrowed/stolen many more from the mentors, leaders and peers I’ve been fortunate enough to meet throughout my career. Because of this, my Airmen benefit not only from my strengths and abilities, but also from those of others as well. Look for areas in processes, programs, and individuals that can be improved. Be a mentor to your subordinates, a wingman to your peers, an advisor to your leaders, and all of the above to your family. Be honest with yourself and look within to identify areas needing improvement and then take action. Also, keep in mind that teamwork isn’t a one-way street. Ask others for their view. It’s always good to get an outside opinion. Be willing to learn from others to bolster your own weaknesses. Ultimately, the more sharing that occurs, the more successful the “team” can be.

Third Wing Command Chief Master Sgt. Jose Barraza, a native of Los Angeles, laughs as Airmen assigned to the 3rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron are announced winners of an F-22 Raptor load crew competition. (U.S. Air Force photo/Justin Connaher)

Commentary by Chief Master Sgt. Jon Jefferson 673d Communications Squadron Just like life, a military career is a journey. As we travel down the road of our career and life, we first need to have one or more destinations in mind. These destinations are the milestones and goals we set for ourselves. Without something to shoot for, progress is haphazard, slower than it should be, or nonexistent. That can lead to missing out on opportunities, dissatisfaction, or in the worst case an end to our career for not meeting expectations. During my career, my ability to regularly and consistently follow four principles or guides has allowed me to navigate through the challenges to reach many of my professional and life goals. The four principles are have the right attitude, be better each day, focus on the team, and find a balance Have the right attitude We need to approach each day with desire and effort, and in a positive manner. Treat your career as more than a job; embrace it as a culture. That means follow-

ing our military’s customs and courtesies, perpetuating its traditions, studying its history, and changing it when needed so it doesn’t stagnate. Honor those who came before you, share with those around you, and leave a stronger legacy for those who will continue on after you. The right attitude will see you through the hard times, magnify the good experiences, and enrich your life as a whole. Attitude is contagious. The wrong attitude is like a weight around your neck or a dark cloud that stretches out over those around you. It may not lead to failure, but at a minimum, it requires additional effort and time by you and others to overcome it. On the other hand, the right attitude will attract subordinates, peers, friends, and people who care about you to your side. With their help, you can join your abilities together to achieve and enjoy more, rely on each other when times are tough for either of you, and share in the joy of your or their success.

I’m not talking about taking a huge leap of knowledge or understanding but smaller, more subtle steps. It may be learning a topic you didn’t know before. It may be not repeating a mistake you made yesterday. It may be taking a step outside your comfort zone in order to broaden your experience. But we need to make small improvements regularly. It’s the only way to reach our potential in our current duty position, professional responsibilities, or life. It’s the only way to ready ourselves for more responsibility whether it comes with the next rank, with becoming a parent, or assuming a new role. And it’s the only effective way to prepare ourselves to be able to manage the unexpected. The long journey to success begins with a single step. And each step you take should be a purposeful one of gaining knowledge and experience. Focus on the team In our military careers, and I’d argue in our lives in general, true success comes not from individual achievement, but from what we accomplish together. It doesn’t mean much if you succeed, but your co-workers, section, organization, or family struggles or

Be better each day We each have the opportunity to learn something new every day. The key is to take advantage of this opportunity.

Find a balance This can be the most challenging of the principles due to the diversity and volume of demands on us. You need to find and maintain a balance in the different facets of your life. Make sure you devote enough time each to your career, your family, your community, and the one too many often forget about, to yourself. When looking within, develop yourself physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. You need to deposit enough in each internal and external “account” so you’re able to make withdrawals when needed. Do it frequently enough so none of the accounts reach a zero balance. If you’re able to make these life deposits, you’ll minimize the negative impact that can occur when one particular demand dominates your attention and energy to the exclusion of the others. Any facet in your professional and personal lives to which you don’t properly attend will degrade one or more of the others and ultimately hurt your quality of life and those around you. I encourage you to adjust your attitude, approach, focus and balance as needed. And I hope you willingly share with others what’s helped you to reach your own career and life goals so they can benefit from your experiences. We not only owe it to ourselves; we owe it to our families and our fellow Airmen, Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen and civilians of all ranks. It can be the difference between success and failure in our personal and professional lives.

Celebrate safely, responsibly this Thanksgiving weekend Commentary by Army Maj. Gen. Michael H. Shields U.S. Army Alaska Commanding General Thanksgiving is traditionally a time of celebration and gratitude. In that spirit, I would like to express to the Arctic Warrior family how grateful I am for your service and for the opportunity to lead you. The traditions behind Thanksgiving go back four centuries, but the holiday was officially established 150 years ago during the Civil War. President Lincoln issued a presidential proclamation in 1863 setting the date for Thanksgiving

in the hopes of fostering a sense of national unity between the northern and southern states. Then, as now, our Army family must celebrate this holiday during a time of extended conflict. It is fitting that November is Military Family Appreciation Month. Without our strong families, our military would not be capable of all they do. To all of our family members, Christy and I thank you for your service. You make a difference every day, and we are strengthened by your support, your resilience, and your selfless contributions to your community.

During the rush of the holiday season, I ask that each of you take a moment to reflect on the freedoms we enjoy as Americans and those who sacrificed to provide us with our liberty. I also ask that we remember the families of our fallen Soldiers and those who are still deployed around the world. Holiday weekends can rapidly turn to tragedy if we fail to maintain and enforce the high standards and values expected of us. The number one cause of holiday fatalities among Soldiers and their families is motor vehicle accidents. Most of these accidents result from driving while fatigued,

driving too fast, exercising poor judgment, and driving under the influence of alcohol. If each of us is committed to upholding our common values, these tragedies can be prevented. I expect every leader be personally involved in efforts to raise safety awareness. Engaged leadership at every level is the key to safety success. You must use your resources and influence to reach every single Soldier. It is vital our Soldiers understand their responsibilities to be safe, behave themselves and always live the Army Values. This holiday also affords lead-

ers opportunities to serve those they lead, especially single Soldiers who are away from their families. I enjoy seeing command teams serving at dining facilities during the Thanksgiving feast. I’ve done this many times myself and it has always been a rewarding experience. Christy and I hope you will all look after yourselves, your friends and family this holiday season. Treasure this time and celebrate responsibly. From our family to yours, happy Thanksgiving! Arctic Warriors! Arctic Tough!

Commissaries to begin scanning shopper ID cards at checkout DeCA Public Affairs news release Commissaries will soon begin scanning customers’ Department of Defense ID cards during checkout, as the Defense Commissary Agency continues its pursuit to deliver a 21st Century benefit. The commissary at Fort Lee, Va., became the first store to scan ID cards, Oct. 22, as the first part of an agency-wide roll-out to all stores that began Nov. 10, and will be completed by mid-January. The Schweinfurt Commissary at Askren Manor, Germany, will begin scanning ID cards Nov. 19, said store manager Marie Glaser, and the roll-out should be complete for every other commissary by mid-January 2014. According to store director Peter Sloan at the Ansbach Commissary at Urlas Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson/ 673d Air Base Wing Commander Col. Brian P. Duffy (USAF) Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson/ 673d Air Base Wing Vice Commander Col. William P. Huber (USA) Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson/ 673d Air Base Wing Command Chief Chief Master Sgt. Kevin L. Call Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson/ 673d Air Base Wing Public Affairs Officer Capt. Angela M. Webb (USAF)

Housing and according to the assistant store director Evelyn Hairston at the Bamberg Commissary at 6 94 G1 Warner Barracks, both AU commissaries will begin scanning ID cards Nov. 19, as well. H Commissary , MIT ON E S shoppers are used to T T G PA OR showing their ID cards GE to establish their eligibility to use the commissary. By scanning the ID at checkout, DeCA will no longer need to maintain any personal information on customers in its computer systems, such as the system used for customers who write checks. Scanning will also assist in improver ov

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ing the commissary benefit for all patrons, according to Joseph H. Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. “In addition to verifying customers as authorized commissary patrons, we’ll gain information that will give us a better understanding of our patrons, allowing the agency to provide the commissary benefit more effectively and efficiently,” Jeu said. Cross-referenced with other DoD data, the scan data will give DeCA useful information about patron usage, by military service, along with customer demographics that does not identify specific personal data of an individual. This will eventually help the agency identify shopping needs and preferences – information that is essential in today’s retail business environment. It will also allow more n

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ARCTIC WARRIOR The Arctic Warrior is published by Wick Communications, a private firm in no way connected with the Department of Defense, the Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army, under exclusive written contract with the Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson Public Affairs Office. This civilian enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the U.S. military services. Contents of the Arctic Warrior are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. government, Department of Defense, the Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by U.S. government, the Department of Defense, the Department of the Air Force, the Department of the Army, or Wick Communications of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made

available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. To advertise in the Arctic Warrior, please call (907) 561-7737. Editorial content is edited, prepared and provided by the Arctic Warrior staff. Editorial office and mailing address: JBER Public Affairs, 10480 Sijan Ave., Suite 123, Joint Base ElmendorfRichardson, AK 99506; telephone (907) 552-8918. Send emails about news stories and story submissions to david.bedard.1@us.af.mil. Deadline for article and photos is 4:30 p.m., Monday, for the week of publication. Articles and photos will be published on a space-available basis and are subject to editing by the Arctic Warrior staff. Submission does not guarantee publication.

accurate reporting to military services on commissary usage. The demographic information DeCA will use is strictly limited to card ID number, rank, military status, branch of service, age, household size and ZIP codes of residence and duty station. DeCA will not be using any personal information such as names, addresses or phone numbers. “The methods, processes and information we’ll use will not compromise our customers’ privacy, they can be sure of that,” Jeu said. “We’re putting technology to work to better understand our customers and ensure the commissary benefit continues to remain relevant to them now and in the future.” For more information on ID card scanning, visit DeCA’s Frequently Asked Questions page on ID card scanning. Deputy Public Affairs Director Bob Hall Public Affairs superintendent Senior Master Sgt. Michael Hammond Command Information Chief Jim Hart Public Affairs webmaster Ed Cunningham Arctic Warrior staff David Bedard - editor Chris McCann - community editor Staff Sgt. Blake Mize (USAF) - staff writer


November 2013 November22,22, 2013

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News

TFrom X RESCUE, Page A-1 “There was a turn in the road ahead of him, but he was jackknifed and slid right over the edge of the road and hit a snow bank. The truck came to rest with the cab in the snow bank and the back tires of the trailer on the road,” Barber said. “But he was right at the edge of about a 600-foot drop. “That snow was the only thing between him and the drop.” Barber stopped their vehicle about 80 yards from the wrecked semi, concerned they might join the driver in a long skid down the icy, treacherous road. While Barber quickly began putting on heavy winter gear that had been too bulky to drive with, Cabaniss sprang into action – running toward the accident. “I just did it; just went,” Cabaniss said. “I didn’t really think about it. And when I got to the edge of the road and looked down the embankment, I saw the door of the cab propped open. The trucker was wedged between the door and the side of his vehicle.” Barber said his friend’s next words made the danger clear. “We’ve gotta get him out of here – the truck may go down!” Cabaniss shouted. So Cabaniss went over the edge of the road and found himself in waist-deep snow without even hitting a solid surface below. He half-swam his way to the cab and helped the dazed and injured trucker out. Unfortunately, the trucker had not been fully geared up against the elements while

A tractor-trailer jackknifed on the Dalton Highway at Atigun Pass, Alaska, Nov. 2. In the vehicle behind the truck, two Air Force master sergeants were going hunting. They stopped and extracted the driver, who was perilously close to a 600-foot drop. (Courtesy photo)

driving, and the violent impact had tossed all the gear around the damaged cab. “He was freaking out. He only had jeans and a T-shirt on, and had managed to grab a boot and a tennis shoe when he came out of the cab,” Cabaniss said. “And he appeared shocked … he kind of froze up on me.” Aside from the trucker’s delayed ability to move, Cabaniss realized he would soon literally freeze up, based on the elements and lack of shoes and proper clothing. In addition, there was still a very real

TFrom X R2C, Page A-1

TFrom X RIGGERS, Page A-1

staffing horsepower and services of several entities from the 673d Air Base Wing to flesh out the training. To herd such a gathering of resources might present a monumental task – if they weren’t already working together, as the Joint Installation Prevention Team. The JIPT comprises representatives from Army Community Service, the Health and Wellness Center, the JBER hospital, Family Advocacy and many others. It’s this team Petersen turned to for resources. “Julia Petersen brought this challenge (R2C),” said Air Force Lt. Col. Dan Knight, JIPT team leader. “The (JIPT) was the perfect forum to introduce that, with all the key players there, which is what the prevention team is about. They were able to tap into all that expertise and help build that program, working with the USARAK-unique requirements and tailor programs to meet them.” “Even though services and service providers are known and try to get their information out, it’s hard to connect with (customers) and provide services that meet the needs and don’t conflict with training schedules already in place,” said Tamera Randolf, 673d Air Base Wing customer service officer. Randolf also said the training had a dual role – one was to get the training in, but also to introduce leaders to the services and providers so they know what tools they have available.

rigger school,” said Cabrera, who currently serves as the rigger platoon leader for 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division. “It was my first taste of rigging.” For Elizabeth, N.J. native Pfc. Thomas Perez, a rigger with the Centurion Battalion, being airborne was all he wanted to do when he joined the Army. “I wanted to be airborne, anything that had to do with airborne,” said Perez. “It was an exciting fulfillment for me. That’s what I always wanted to do and I’m glad that I made that decision.” For Centurion riggers there are multiple steps when it comes to packing a personnel parachute. For the main parachute there are 10 rigger checks and for the reserve there are 12 rigger checks. The procedure begins with laying out the parachute, ensuring the lines are in order, and inspecting for holes. As a rigger packs a parachute, an inspector observes and ensures the process is correctly performed. An “in-processor” and a final inspector further check the process and the parachute itself. “These parachutes are a life line every single time someone goes out an airplane,” said Cabrera, a native of Petoskey, Mich. A rigger’s job is one that goes beyond normal responsibility. For riggers, each day is not a training day; it’s a life or death day. “It’s a lot of responsibility. Every single one of those parachutes that goes out, we’re responsible for,” said Cabrera. “These are privates first class, specialists, who are packing life support equipment. They work with life support equipment every day. ... They train for it all the time. These guys [the riggers] aren’t training; they’re doing it on a daily basis.” After each rigger check, the inspector verifies they followed each of the steps. For every single one of those 10 steps an instructor will walk up and verify that they’ve done each one. At the end, once it’s all rigged up, and the inspector has done the 10th check, the parachute is passed off to the final inspector, who actually walks through with their

Looking ahead The Army’s Ready and Resilient Campaign integrates and synchronizes multiple efforts and programs to improve the readiness and resilience of the Army, including families, Soldiers and civilians. It’s a broad program that aims at problems ranging from sexual harassment to suicide. It is meant to start long-term solutions, and the lessons learned from this week will be watched by both USARAK and the air base wing. In the third phase, USARAK will review data and results, and commanders will adjust training accordingly. In all, the goal is to help people cope with the kind of soul-searing experiences DeKever spoke about – but in the healthiest way possible.

possibility the truck would slide off the drop – taking them both with it to their doom. “I told him the truck might go, and that got him moving a bit,” Cabaniss said. “So I helped pull him back through that deep snow and then we got him back to our vehicle to warm up. We put a jacket on him and gave him water.” Barber said the pair then drove about 10 miles back down the road, where they’d noticed a highway maintenance station with a pay phone.

Cell phone service was non-existent in the remote area. The trucker managed to dial a few numbers and they put out some calls on a citizen’s band radio, but no one answered in either case. About 35 minutes later, a Department of Transportation safety official finally came by the station and picked up the driver. It was the last the master sergeants saw of the man whose life they’d saved, but they contacted his employer and learned the driver is already back out on the road. “We found out this guy was one of the most experienced truckers operating in the area,” Cabaniss said. “That fact, plus the fact that besides us, no one else would have come by for 45 minutes or more, really made me realize that in Alaska, you have to always be ready to take care of yourself. “You can’t always just run outside and yell for help or make a phone call. His truck wasn’t running due to the wreck. In those temperatures, he probably wouldn’t have lasted the 45 minutes until someone else came by, especially not being dressed for the weather.” Barber said the experience reinforced the need to dress properly, have all emergency supplies, and be ready and able to help yourself or others should a situation take a turn for the worse. Cabaniss said he’s been up that route many times before and has never seen something like this happen, which could lead to a false sense of safety and security. “You just can’t get complacent here,” Cabaniss said.

Pfc. Thomas Perez, a rigger with the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, and a native of Elizabeth, N.J., tightens a Soldier’s parachute pack at the Joint Military Complex Nov. 5 for an airdrop training mission. (U.S. Army photo/Staff Sgt. Eric-James Estrada)

checklist ensuring everything is tucked in, the static line is stowed correctly and the log record book is filled out correctly. The final inspector also reviews anything on the outside of the parachute that a jumpmaster would inspect, such as the static line. “Its fun,” said Perez. “It’s a chance to put a piece of equipment on somebody’s back that you put your hard work and time into, and you’ve given it your all to make

sure that it is safe, it looks good, and it performs well.” When it comes to supporting the Spartan Brigade in airborne missions, riggers work together as a team to live up to the rigger motto, “I will be sure always.” “It was the most fun I had in the Army so far,” said Cabrera. “That’s why I’m here and why I come in every day because I love these guys and I love what they do.”

provides robust notification capabilities, everyone must remember their Wingman responsibilities to ensure the 100-percent solution. For the daily user, with the exception of the desktop alerts, users will only be notified on their personal phone lines for actual emergency situations such as, but not limited to, severe weather events, evacuation orders, specialized recalls, and active shooter alerts. “Ultimately, the goal of the installation command post is to provide a means of rapidly notifying JBER personnel during times of emergencies, through multiple avenues, and to accelerate the installation’s response,” Hovestadt said. Since its implementation at JBER, AtHoc has been put into practice during simulated emergency situations and wartime scenarios.

Air Force Lt. Col. David McCleese, 773d Civil Engineer Squadron commander and Emergency Operations Center director, said AtHoc is a vital tool in these circumstances. “Emergency notifications are important to ensure preservation of life and property,” McCleese said. “It allows us to quickly recover from whatever contingency is threatening the mission. It’s important we get the word out so everyone understands the character of an emergency so people understand where to go or not go.” For more information or to address AtHoc technical issues, contact the installation command post at 552-3000.

AtHoc emergency notification system goes live on JBER By Air Force Staff Sgt. John Wright JBER Public Affairs What do you do when you are on base and severe weather is fast approaching or a potentially life-threatening emergency situation is developing? Enter the Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson AtHoc Installation Warning System Alerts – a network-centric emergency massnotification system capable of alerting base personnel within minutes of an emergency from a single, centralized, web-based system. AtHoc, introduced at JBER in September, allows the installation command post to warn and provide instructions simultaneously to all government computers, telephones, building public address systems

and the outside ‘giant voice’ public address system. A small purple globe in the lower righthand toolbar on JBER computer workstations is the icon for the AtHoc system. Within the software, users can check for new alerts and update their information -- a step crucial to successfully receiving notifications, according to Richard Kohler, 673d Air Base Wing command post chief. Base personnel can update their information by using the AtHoc Interactive Warning System-Alerts self service module; right click on the purple globe icon at bottom of the screen and select “Access Self Service” and update accordingly. Air Force Master Sgt. Shawna Hovestadt, 673d ABW command post superintendent, pointed out that though the system

Editor’s note: information from Air Education Training Command Public Affairs contributed to this article.

Alaska Air National Guardsmen rescue four at Caswell Lake By Sgt. Edward Eagerton AKNG Public Affairs

Airmen with the Alaska Air National Guard’s 210th and 212th Rescue Squadrons rescued three adults and one child who had broken through ice and become hypothermic while four-wheeling at Caswell Lake, north of Willow Nov. 11. “The group had gone fourwheeling at Caswell Lake when they broke through ice,” said Air National Guard Maj. Keenan Zerkel, a senior controller with the 11th Air Force Rescue Coor-

dination Center. “I don’t know if they went into the creek or the lake, but they were cold and wet.” T h e 11 t h A i r Force RCC was notified by the Alaska State Troopers at 1:10 a.m. when the troopers determined they were unable to transport the distressed group out of their location. “The Alaska State Troopers sent two troopers on snowma-

chines to locate the group,” Zerkel said. “When they arrived, they found the group to be near hypothermic. At that point, they couldn’t get them out, and so they contacted us to support the mission.” The Alaska Air National Guard launched a HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter from the 210th Rescue Squadron with a team of Guardian Angels from the 212th

Rescue Squadron from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson to support the rescue mission. Using night vision, the rescue crew members navigated through the snowy night to Caswell Lake. Once on the scene, the Guardian Angels were lowered to the ground and hoisted the group one by one into the Pave Hawk. “They were recovered using a hoist because they were in rough terrain,” Zerkel said. “Inside the helicopter, they provided the group with warm fluids, blankets and heat.” The group of four was then

flown to Providence Alaska Medical Center and released to medical professionals at approximately 5:30 a.m. “The crew members did a superb job,” Zerkel said. “From being woken up in the middle of the night, to getting airborne so quickly, locating the distressed group in the dark and snowy conditions, and then bringing them back safely to the hospital, they are the definition of excellence.” The Alaska Air National Guard’s 210th and 212th Rescue Squadrons were awarded four saves for this mission.


Briefs & Announcements A-4

A-4 ARCTIC WARRIOR

Disposition of effects Army 2nd Lt. Brandon Peer, 1st Squadron (Airborne), 40th Cavalry Regiment, is authorized to make disposition of personal effects of Spc. Christopher H. Knickerbocker, 1-40th Cavalry, as stated in Army Regulation 638-2. Any person or persons having claims for or against the estate of the deceased should contact Peer at 384-2028. Disposition of effects Air Force 1st Lt. Kyle Maeger, 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, is authorized to make disposition of personal effects of Tech. Sgt. John Kallen, 611th CES, as stated in Air Force Instruction 34-511. Any person or persons having claims for or against the estate of the deceased should contact Maeger at 552-4489. Commissary hours The Commissary is open 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday. The commissary will be closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years. Veterinary hours change The Veterinary Treatment Facility is operating on winter hours. Though the VTF primarily works on military working dogs, the facility also provides services for active duty Soldiers, retirees, National Guard and Army Reserve Soldiers on active orders (greater than 30 days), and their dependents. The VTF is capable of providing care for most routine services, including vaccination and sick call. The VTF is open Monday to Wednesday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information and to make an appointment, call 3842865. Scholarship opportunity The Air Force Aid Society will be accepting applications for the Gen. Henry H. Arnold Education Grant for the academic year 2014 to 2015 until March 7. Eligible spouses and family members will have an opportunity to receive up to $2,000 to fund their college education. To apply, please visit www.afas. org/education-grants.

Furnishing Management The Furnishings Management Office offers 90-day loaner furniture. Appliances may be issued for the duration of the service member’s tour. FMO typically delivers items as far as Peters Creek or Rabbit Creek. Service members must make special arrangements beyond these areas. When requesting furniture, service members must provide a copy of their reporting orders. For JBER-Elmendorf, visit the Capital Asset Management Office at Building 6436, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., or call 552-2740. For JBER-Richardson, visit the Housing Management Office at Building 600, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., or call 384-2576. Hazard communication All workplace supervisors should be aware of the new, basewide, changes to the hazard communication program for hazardous materials, which is effective immediately. These changes have been introduced through various multimedia presentations sent out by both the 673d Aeromedical Squadron Public Health, and bioenvironmental engineering flights. Each industrial work area, Army or Air Force, is required to have an individual HAZMAT/ HAZCOM program established per Air Force Instruction 90-821, Hazard Communication and Occupational Safety. Training presentations have been emailed to all shop/flight supervision; which detail the numerous changes to be made. Compliance with these changes is mandated at a federal level by 29 Code of Federal Regulations 1910.1200, Occupational Safety and Health Standards. For an additional copy of the mentioned training, or for a more detailed explanation of all changes, call the Bio-environmental Flight at 384-0482. Rental Partnership The Rental Partnership Program at JBER is available to all eligible active-duty members and consists of two options. The first option, RPP Plus,

includes utilities and sometimes cable costs providing an easier budget with a set rental payment year round. The other option, RPP 5 Percent below market, saves the member five percent off the rental fee that other tenants pay however utilities are paid for by the tenant. Both options are made available with no deposits or fees to the member with the exclusion of pet fees as applicable. This program is designed to provide active-duty military personnel, enlisted and officers, accompanied and unaccompanied with affordable off-base housing. An allotment must be executed under either option of the RPP for the rental payments which is made directly to the landlord resulting in a more trouble free transactions. JBER-Elmendorf can see RPP officials at the Capital Asset Management Office, Building 6346, Arctic Warrior Drive, or call at 552-4328 or 552-4374 for further information and assistance regarding this program. At JBER-Richardson, visit the Housing Management Office, Building 600, Richardson Drive, or call at 384-3088 or 384-7632. MiCare registration MiCare, the online personal health record and secure messaging application, has been available to patients and medical group staff at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson since 2011. Patients can take advantage of the ability to communicate with their primary care clinicians online. Registered patients also have access to electronic records, allowing them to view and maintain their health records. Once registered, patients have the ability to participate in the study by completing a short series of surveys during the course of the next year. This provides an opportunity for all active-duty, retired and dependent patients to have an impact on shaping the future of Air Force health services. To register, visit the Military Treatment Facility, where enrollment specialists are available in each primary care clinic. All beneficiaries who are en-

INTRODUCING THE NEW

rolled in the family health, pediatrics, flight medicine and internal medicine clinics are eligible to participate. Patients need to show a military identification card and provide information, including name, social security number, birthday and email address. The enrollment specialist will enter the information and patients will receive an email which contains a link and instructions for completing the process. Article 139 claims A Uniform Code of Military Justice Article 139 claim is a claim against any service member for willfully damaging or wrongfully taking property while the service member is not on duty. Claimants are eligible to file an Article 139 claim whether they are civilian or military, a business, a charity, a State or local government. Claims covered by Article 139 are: • Claims for damage to property inflicted intentionally, knowingly, purposefully, and without a justifiable excuse. • Claims for property wrongfully taken. A wrongful taking in an unauthorized taking or withholding of property not involving a breach of a fiduciary or contractual relationship, with the intent to deprive the owner of the property temporarily or permanently. Claims not covered by Article 139 are: • Claims resulting from negligent acts such as normal “fenderbenders” or other such accidents; • Claims for personal injury or death; • Claims resulting from acts or omissions of military personnel acting within the scope of their employment (these may be payable as a tort claim); • Claims resulting from the conduct of Reserve Component personnel who are not subject to the UCMJ at the time of the offense; • Subrogation claims. That is a claim where your insurance company pays you and then seeks reimbursement; • Claims for theft of services. Claimants should submit claims within 90 days of the incident from which the claim arose

November 22, 2013

November 22, 2013

unless there is good cause for the delay. Your claim must be presented either orally or in writing. If presented orally, the claim must be reduced to a signed writing within 10 days after oral presentation. Claims should be filed by branch of service. For claims against Army members, contact the Army claims office in Bldg 600, Suite 313, at 384-0330. For claims against Air Force members, contact the JBER claims office in the People Center, Suite 330 at 552-3048. Claims relating to members of any other branch may be made at the Army claims office and will be forwarded to the proper service. Priority placement The Priority Placement Program and Executive Order 13473 provide non-competitive appointment for spouses of active duty service members, including full-time National Guard and Reservists, who are relocating to accompany their service member during a permanent change of station. The program allows spouses to register for Department of Defense positions and to be considered for jobs offered internally. Spouses are matched against potential positions, which meet their qualifications and preferences. Job placement will vary with each individual. The spouse remains eligible for a maximum of two years from the date of the PCS orders and are in the program for one year. Military spouses who have never filled a federal position can now register for PPP. This program had previously been limited to spouses on a current federal appointment or had a former federal position in the past. Military spouses can register at the Civilian Personnel Office at JBER-Elmendorf or the personnel office at JBER-Richardson. The JBER point of contact is Brenda Yaw at 552-9203. Arctic Watch The JBER Antiterrorism Office encourages all personnel to be vigilant against threats and report suspicious activities to iWatchArmy at 384-0824 or Eagle Eyes at 552-2256.

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November 22, 2013

A-5

FOR INFORMATION OR TO ADVERTISE CALL 907-352-2250

TO PLACE FREE AD: Here’s the Scoop: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7)

Must be in-state. One item per ad. 4 lines. Price must appear in ad. Must be $200 or less. Private parties only. No firewood, animals, rentals, employment, etc. 8) Items only for sale. 9) Limit 3 Free Ads per household per week.*

107 Homes for Sale /Wasilla

109 Homes for Sale/Mat-Su

200 Apts. for Rent/Palmer

LARGE 2BD HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS Open House Sat. & Sun noon - 7 p.m.

at 581 E. Mountain Ash Loop, Wasilla

Lovely & bright, 6 bd, 4 ba, M.I.L. area w/own kitchen, new gas boiler heat & carpet, beautiful wood accents, lots of storage, detached garage, $350,000.

or anytime by appt. 907-344-5354 or 907-229-7440.

r rt ou Suppo s! Troop

FSBO: 4 BD, 2.5 BA, 2 car gar.,

family room, 20x20’ workshop, paved drive, 1 acre. $257,900 MLS #13-13359 907-598-4401

OWN YOUR OWN

piece of Alaska!

5 acres with an unfinished, but livable home! The views are amazing. Bring your horses, your ATVs, your snow machines, skis or just hike in your back yard. Call Dody Kettler 232-7331.

5975WillowFishhook.com

150 Lots/Acreages

150 Lots/Acreages

Near hospital new carpet, unfurnished, D/W, N/P, FP, $925 + electric 907-229-0552 400 Employment

Matanuska Electric Association is currently recruiting for an Accounting Supervisor. This full-time regular position offers an exceptional benefit package.

Visit www.mea.coop to see the job bulletin and to apply online. MEA requires a postoffer substance abuse test. EEO/M/F/D/V employer.

Anchorage

Board of Directors

Alaska State Fair, Inc.,

LAND FOR SALE

HOLD YOUR HORSES...and snowmachines until you have seen this land! 89+ acres of Alaskan wilderness right here in the Anchorage Bowl. Choose a few of your close friends and partner this pristine view property as neighbors. Raise your horses & family and breathe fresh mountain air. King's Way near Paine Road in Bear Valley. $800,000.00. Call Dan at Bankers Realty (907) 242-4212

a private non-profit 501 ©3 corporation, is accepting applications to serve on Board of Directors. Please go to

www.alaskastatefair.org

for more information. Havemeister Dairy Experienced milker/herdsman needed. 907-745-2040

400 Employment

DEADLINE: Friday, 9:00 a.m. for following week DROP OFF: Mon-Fri 8am-5pm at 5751 E. Mayflower Ct., Palmer-Wasilla Hwy. FAX: 907-352-2277 • EMAIL: classads@frontiersman.com Ad Content: ________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Name: _______________________________________Phone: _______________ Address: ___________________________________________________________

* SORRY, WE CANNOT ACCEPT PHONE CALLS FOR FREE ADS Free Ads run in the Tuesday, Friday & Sunday Frontiersman, Wednesday Valley Sun, plus Thursday’s Anchorage Press and Friday’s Arctic Warrior

400 Employment

400 Employment

400 Employment

Health Care

Sales

Advertising Account Executive Join the Advertising Sales team representing the Anchorage Press, the Arctic Warrior, and the Mat-Su Frontiersman. We have an opening in the advertising sales department that offers an excellent career opportunity. As an Account Executive, you will be calling on local businesses to sell advertising space in our newspapers. This is a fast-paced job for people who like to work independently.

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST

Job opportunity in Palmer. Medical terminology/experience necessary. Job sharing approx 30 hrs/wk (Mon-Thurs). Resume to: PO Box 4729 Palmer, AK 99645

COMMUNITY HEALTH FELLOW Mat-Su Health Foundation in Wasilla, AK seeks a Community Health Fellow. This is a six month fellowship with a stipend of $20-$30 per hour DOE for up to 30 hours per week. A complete job posting is available at www.matsuhealthfoundation.org To apply, electronically submit the materials detailed in the job posting to Don Zoerb, Finance Director at matsuhealthfoundationjobs@gmail.com by 8 a.m. on December 16, 2013.

If you are self-motivated, detail oriented and enjoy helping businesses achieve their goals this may be your opportunity. The earning potential for this job is outstanding if you can communicate effectively and want to help others succeed. We offer a guaranteed draw to start and commission to reward success.

400 Employment

400 Employment

Youth Counselor

Family Centered Services of Alaska has rewarding and challenging opportunities working with children. Youth Counselors provide a therapeutic family environment, for up to 5 children with mental health issues, while working in our Foster Homes in Wasilla, Alaska. If you are seeking a challenging position that can absolutely make a positive change in a kid's life, we want to talk with you! These are entry level positions that require an Associate's Degree or equivalent work and/or educational experience in a human service field. Two years of experience working with children who experience a mental health disability is strongly preferred. These positions are Full Time (30-40 hrs/wk) and require a flexible schedule including evenings, weekends, & overnights. FCSA offers excellent starting pay. FCSA is an EEO employer. Submit a resume to: FCSA Attn: HR 1825 Marika Rd. Fairbanks, AK 99709 Fax: 907-451-8945 lhovde@familycenteredservices.com

We prefer prior sales experience, basic computer skills, and excellent communications skills.

CARRIERS WANTED

The newspapers are part of Wick Communications. The company offers comprehensive and affordable medical dental, and short-term disability insurance, 401K, as well as an array of other benefits.

Would you like to earn extra $$? Be your own day shift boss Newspaper delivery drivers wanted The Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman is seeking independent contractors to deliver the local newspaper which will be starting daytime distribution on Dec. 1. Carriers will be responsible for delivery of the Frontiersman on Tuesday and Friday afternoons and Saturday nights.

Candidates must have transportation, and a clean driving record.

Applicants must be at least 18 and have a valid driver license, dependable vehicle and proof of vehicle insurance. Route times average 2-4 hours per shift.

Send your resume to:

Steve Abeln Anchorage Press 540 East 5th Avenue Anchorage, AK 99501

Applications can be picked up at the Frontiersman. We are located on the Palmer-Wasilla Highway frontage road, 5751 E. Mayflower Ct., Wasilla.

Or email: Steve.Abeln@ AnchoragePress.com

you are their cure These kids and millions more have Juvenile Diabetes, a disease that threatens their lives every day. None of them can outgrow it. But we’re closer than ever to a cure.

Please, help us make life-saving research possible. Call 1.800.533.CURE or visit www.jdrf.org.

A CFC Participant. Provided as a public service.


A-6

WASILLA X-MAS BAZAAR

at Lake Lucille B&B

235 W. Lakeview Ave

515 Lost and Found 515 Lost and Found 515 Lost and Found 515 Lost and Found

LOST FEMALE PAPILLON

Sat. Nov. 16 10am-5pm Sun. Nov 17 10am-4pm Sat. Nov 23 10am-5pm

Save up 50% or more on all paper products. Great deals on hand painted furniture, antique quilts, santas, snowmen, & x-mas ornaments. 907-357-0352 400 Employment

LOST

BLACK & WHITE MUSCOVY DUCK Last seen on bike path N. Trunk Rd. across from Amberwood subdivision. 907-745-2618

HAVE YOU SEEN HIM?

Red/white, 7 yrs old, 6lbs. Pink collar w/ tags, Her name is Penny. Lost near Swd. Meridian/Bogard, Wasilla. Call 907-373-5676 or 907-903-0211.

400 Employment

400 Employment

400 Employment

652 Pets/Supplies ATTENTION Frontiersman Readers!

$500 REWARD!!

(No ??? Asked) American Bulldog TYSON is his name Male, White undocked tail and microchipped Missing since 7/11 @ Mi. 7 KGB Pls. Call 830-4222 or 414-9095 520 Personals

ROOMMATE NEEDED

$520/mo. + heat/gas 907-360-8783 610 Appliances

KRUPS BELGIUM WAFFLE IRON $25. 907-357-8120 615 Building Supplies

PROTECT YOUR ROOF FROM DAMAGE

It has been brought to our attention that a puppy scam is targeting animal lovers. Readers are asked to wire money to a seller who is either out of the country or out of state, with the promise that the seller will ship the animal once the wire transfer has been received.

BE AWARE

If you can not speak to a person locally through a phone call or email without verification, please make sure not to give out ANY personal information. We at the Frontiersman take every precaution to protect our readers and ask that they look for red flags and consider the following when purchasing an animal: • Purchase locally • Be wary of ads that do not list a telephone number, but an email address only • Have the animal examined by a vet before purchasing • Never wire money or send a check • Be sure to obtain the pet at the time of purchase.

626 Guns & Ammo 2013 FALL

637 Household

Alaska SPCA

CHRISTIAN PAINTING

Low Cost Spay Neuter Clinic 907-562-2999 549 W. Int’l Airport Rd, Anchorage

Electric Knife. Brand new. $8.50. 907-631-3773.

GUN SHOW

Disabled American Veterans Chapter 3

Lumen Christi HS 11/30-12/01 10-5 8110 Jewell Lake Rd., Anchorage Admittance - $5

227-1637 (Jim) 441-4770 (Craig)

33x20, Walnut Framed, Rev 4:9 ref. Valued at $150. $22. 907-631-3773 Huge white 4-drawer storage cabinet. $22. 907-631-3773.

FIREWOOD Tree length Birch Saw log Spruce Contact Bond Bros Logging at 715-4019

AK CAT RESCUE Cute, cuddle bugs for adoption! www.akcat.org Ask how you can get your momma cat spayed. (907)232-4444

Advocates for Dog and Puppy Wellness Offers microchippping at PetZoo, once a month. Keep your pet safe, w/ a HomeAgain microchip! Please check our website for the next event date www.Advocatesfordogandpuppywellness.org

Rescue Cats for Adoption

Fixed, with shots and Microchip Money back Guarantee Find out about our reduced adoption fees.

Call 980-8898 clearcreekkitties@gmail.com https://sites.google.com/site/clearcreekcatrescue/home

1-800-478-6242

617 Computers/ Electronics

TELL YOUR MOTHER-IN LAW THE GUEST ROOM IS TAKEN!

Metal Roofing & Building Components

22” DELL MONITOR

Alaska Dog & Puppy Rescue invites you to join our group and become a foster parent to a homeless dog.

530 E. Steel Loop, Palmer

746-7800

Locally Owned & Operated

$70. 907-357-8120

612 Auctions

612 Auctions

BUILDING AUCTION

Wed. Dec. 4 @ NOON 3461 W. Machen Rd, Wasilla (3) Metal Mini-Storage Buildings (3) Metal Pole-Shed Buildings, 16’x20’ Log Cabin, 1,416 Sq Ft House (2) Steel Framed Warehouses Espresso Stand, Business Sign For more information go to www.denaliauction.com

All supplies are provided - food, crates, toys, and blankets. YOU PROVIDE THE LOVE…

Alaska Dog & Puppy Rescue

745-7030

Spay-neuters, microchips, rabies, vaccinations, nail clips, MOA licenses Great prices year-round www.alaskaspca.org

652 Pets/Supplies 632 Fuel/Heating

652 Pets/Supplies

PROCTOR-SILEX

Classified Advertising (907)352-2250

• Snow Diverters • Snow Stops • Vented Soffits

XNLV119026

510 Holiday

November 22, 2013

adpr03@yahoo.com

$GYHUWLVLQJZLWKWKH&ODVVLÀHGV Really pays off!

Spaying and Neutering is Important to us! Bring us your puppies and we will spay your Momma dog at NO COST! For more info call Alaska Dog & Puppy Rescue (907)745-7030

ALASKA CAT Adoption Team

an all-volunteer nonprofit organization, is seeking additional foster homes and other volunteers to help this mission. Call 982-2228 or email acat@alaskacatadoptionteam.org "Mat Valley Kitties is in need of Foster Homes for Adult Cats. We can supply all the necessities, you just supply the love! Must have a quiet area separated from your pets. If you can help, please call Susan @ 841-7711. matvalleykitties.org

665 Tools CRAFTSMAN AIR COMPRESSOR 4 hp, 25 gal. Needs pressure switch, but will start/run w/ help. $50. 907-250-5001 695 Misc. for Sale

8 FOOT CANOPY

$100. 907-355-5360. 905 Auto Parts/ Accessories

TRUCK BED TOOL BOX

Chrome diamond plated. $100. 907-355-5360.

100 Real Estate for Sale

200 Real Estate for Rent

300 Business & Financial

400 Employment

500 Bulletin Board

600 Merchandise

700 Services

800 Recreation

900 Automotive


November 22, 2013

A-7

MILITARY APPRECIATION - $1500 DISCOUNT

“We love our patients!�

#alyeska GIRDWOOD, ALASKA

OPENING DAY: November 28

Keith C. Coombs, D.D.S., M.S.

your winter base camp

‡1HZDQGWUDQVIHUSDWLHQWVZHOFRPH ‡$FFHSWDOO,QVXUDQFHLQFOXGLQJ0LOLWDU\ ‡1RLQWHUHVWSD\PHQWSODQVDYDLODEOH ‡&RPSOLPHQWDU\FRQVXODWLRQ

4LJ4UBZ 1BDLBHF From

           

$9

per night

Package includes one-night stay MJGUUJDLFUT for twoQMVT3FTPSU$SFEJU. Subject to availability, taxes and fees. Price based on double occupancy.

Military Monday 907-563-3015

2HONE#IRCLEs!NCHORAGE

Now serving our Eagle River neighbors: 10928 Eagle River Rd. www.coombsorthodontics.com

December 2 FREE Lift Tickets 50% O Gear Rental Must present valid military ID ŠYvesGarneau

EARNING YOUR DEGREE DOESN’T MEAN SACRIFICING QUALITY TIME WITH FAMILY. As the top choice of education for service members, American Military University (AMU) understands the unique needs of today’s military spouse. If you’re seeking the knowledge and skills to boost your current career or to transition into a new ďŹ eld—we can help you get there.

Educational BeneďŹ ts for Military Spouses MyCAA offers eligible military spouses up to $4,000 to pursue education, training, licenses, certiďŹ cates, and degrees. AMU Offers: • 90+ Online Degree Programs • Waived Transfer Credit Evaluation and Technology Fee • Monthly Class Starts

(for spouses enrolled in MyCAA)

• Book Grant to Degree-Seeking Undergraduates

Take the next step to completing your degree by visiting AMUonline.com/warrior

To advertise in the Arctic Warrior, please call

907-561-7737

alyeskaresort.com 800-880-3880


A-8

November 22, 2013

CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE OF SOUTH ANCHORAGE

 2013 DODGE DART SE

• EPA ESTIMATED 36 MPG HWY • CD Player, iPod/MP3 Input • Electronic Stability Control

SAVE

2,790

$

OFF MSRP!

JUST $

199

• Sentry Key(R) Theft Deterrent System • Side Curtain, Front, and Rear Airbags • Anti-Lock 4 Wheel Disc Brakes • Electronic Stability Control • Block Heater

SAVE

2,590

$

OFF MSRP!

PER MONTH!

MSRP FACTORY REBATE

2013 JEEPÂŽ PATRIOT SPORT 4X4

$17,785 -$2,000

$

14,995 1

MSRP LITHIA DISCOUNT MILITARY REBATE*

$19,085 -$2,090 -$500

16,495 1 AT THIS PRICE

AT THIS PRICE

72 monthly payments of $199 at 3.15% APR, on approved credit with $2,250 cash or trade equity down. Price includes $200 doc fee. Plus tax, title, and license. Not all sales at MSRP. Illustration may depict vehicle with extra cost options.

$

*Dealer required to verify eligibility of military personnel. Price includes $200 doc fee. Plus tax, title, and license. Not all sales at MSRP. Illustration may depict vehicle with extra cost options.

ÂĽ

WE WILL BEAT ANY DEAL OR WE WILL PAY YOU 2014 JEEPŽ WRANGLER SPORT 4X4 • Freedom Top Black 3 Piece Hard Top • 3.6L V6 Engine • 6 Speed

2013 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4

• Electronic Stability Control/Traction Control • 6 Speed Automatic Transmission • Anti-Spin Rear Differential • Power Windows & Locks • 4.7 Liter V8 FFV Engine

$

SAVE

7,075

OFF MSRP!

JUST $

299

PER MONTH!

MSRP MILITARY REBATE* LITHIA DISCOUNT

$25,770 -$500 -$225

$

24,995

MSRP LITHIA DISCOUNT

$32,570 -$7,075

4 AT THIS PRICE

72 monthly payments of $299 at 3.15% APR, on approved credit with $5,819 cash or trade equity down. *Dealer required to verify eligibility of military personnel. Illustration may depict vehicle with extra cost options. Plus tax, title, and license. Not all sales at MSRP. Price includes $200 doc fee.

$

25,495 5 AT THIS PRICE

Price includes $200 doc fee. Plus tax, title, and license. Not all sales at MSRP. Illustration may depict vehicle with extra cost options.

WE SUPPORT OUR TROOPS WE SUPPORT FISHER HOUSE, BOSS, WARRIOR ZONE, JOINT BASE AGAINST DRUNK DRIVING, ARMED FORCES YMCA, AND JBER!

ASK US ABOUT FREE BASE PICKUP AND CHECK OUT OUR * MILITARY REBATES!

LITHIA CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE OF SOUTH ANCHORAGE

On Old Seward between Dimond and O’Malley T (866) 956-3549  SHOP ONLINE: www.LithiaCJDAlaska.com SALES MON - SAT SUNDAY

9AM - 8PM 11AM - 7PM

PARTS & SERVICES MON - SAT 7AM - 8PM SUNDAY CLOSED

ÂĽ Best price guarantee: Present any Alaska Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram dealer’s unexpired new vehicle advertisement, must be available for immediate purchase, no “One onlyâ€?, low-ball offers. Must be identically equipped, valid for in-stock vehicles only.**Sale prices valid through 11/30/13. Plus tax, title, and license. *Military rebates available on select vehicles, see dealer for details. Not all sales at MSRP. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Chrysler, JeepÂŽ and Dodge are registered trademarks of Chrysler, LLC, Auburn Hills, MI, U.S.A.


November 22, 2013

COMMUNITY

November 22, 2013

Don’t be

Seasonal affective disorder can be easily treated

D SA

ARCTIC WARRIOR

B-1

Volume 4, No. 45

during winter months

By Air Force Staff Sgt. Sheila deVera JBER Public Affairs

A

s the days get shorter during the cold, harsh winter months, some people develop more than just a simple case of the blues. Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, is a type of depression that affects a person during the same season each year. If you get depressed in the winter, but feel much better in spring and summer, you may have SAD, according to webmd.com. Often, due to a changing environment, seasonal disorder is mistaken for an adjustment disorder. The pattern can be similar, though adjustment disorder is more centered on the idea of location, work or stress-related issues and lasts as long as the stress exists. Seasonal is tied to the time of year and conditions. “Seasonal has to do with a form of major depressive disorder,” said Air Force Capt. Chad Killpack, 673d Medical Operations Squadron mental health clinical psychologist. “But it has a seasonal component to it.” People who live in places with long winter nights are at greater risk of SAD. Depressive symptoms increase as winter approaches, temperatures drop and days are shorter. Losing five minutes of sunlight per day is the main culprit during the winter, Killpack said. With a lack of sunlight, the brain has a difficult time figuring out the sleep-wake cycle - causing people to sleep more and have less energy. “When the lack of sunlight hits, it changes the brain chemistry and [a person] starts thinking depressive thoughts,” Killpack said. The 673d Mental Health uses the acronym ‘SIGECAPS’ to look for main symptoms of depression: • Sleep disturbance • Interest/pleasure reduction • Guilt feelings or thoughts of worthlessness • Energy changes/fatigue • Concentration/attention impairment • Appetite/weight changes • Psychomotor disturbances (agitation or lethargy) • Suicidal thoughts Having these symptoms tied to winter months is very likely due to seasonal depression, Killpack said. Statistically, seasonal affective disorder in the United States occurs in about five percent of adults older than 35 and is more common in women. Though SAD is common to adults, children can get SAD but often show different symptoms.

Air Force Capt. Joel Cartier, 673d Medical Operations Squadron social worker, uses a ‘happy light’ on Joint Base ElmendorfRichardson Nov. 13. Happy lights are used as a light therapy to combat seasonal affective disorder during the cold harsh winter months. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Sheila deVera)

“Children can still be diagnosed with seasonal disorder if it’s tied to winter months,” Killpack said. “It is less common for children, and their symptoms are more severe irritability and whining in winter than summer, unlike an adult’s typical depression.” If these signs exist in children, Killpack suggests parents see their primary care manager. owever, those who already have been diagnosed with major depressive disorder are more likely to get SAD. Symptoms of SAD tend to come back year after year or occur when families move from a warmer climate like Hawaii or Florida, with lots of sunlight to northern regions such as Alaska, where winter is much darker. To combat symptoms of SAD, Killpack suggests creating a bucket list for winter. “Get out and do things and find something you enjoy,” Killpack said. “Start planning ahead for activities in the winter prior to the season. “When we do things and be proactive, we tend to feel better. When we stay home, we isolate ourselves and don’t want to do

H

things, we tend to feel worse. So it’s a very straightforward way of treating depression and also seasonal depression.” For individuals who do not want to brave the cold, 20 minutes a day of light therapy can help combat seasonal depression. The light therapy can mimic the full spectrum of light similar to what the sun produces and is ideal in any location when there is not enough sunlight in the winter. Many retail stores in Alaska carry “happy lights” for anywhere from $40 to $200. “With less exposure to sunlight during winter, light therapy regulates my internal biological clock,” said Air Force Capt. Ian Isip, 673d Air Base Wing sexual assault response coordinator, who uses a light to prevent SAD symptoms. “It maintains the chemical balance in my body.” “The light boxes work great, but if you can get out for the day with direct sunlight on your face, it’s good.” Killpack said. “If you’re out but there is no sun, then taking Vitamin D and being active is also a good way to combat seasonal disorder. Regular exercise and proper nutrition will help.” Depending on a PCM’s recommenda-

Get out and do things, and find something you enjoy.

tion, vitamin D can be prescribed to military members and their families. It can also be found the vitamin aisles of many stores. Isip, a veteran of several Alaska winters, said he does one hour a day of light therapy and takes one vitamin D capsule a day. (This also helps his immune system against common colds. ) Broad-spectrum light therapy includes wavelengths which allow the skin to produce vitamin D. Exposure to sunlight accounts for more than 90 percent of the daily vitamin D requirement for most individuals, and when members have a vitamin D deficiency, it can play a role in SAD. Many doctors prescribe 500 to 1000 I.U. of vitamin D daily. The best and cheapest therapy is just getting into the sun and being active. “To keep myself busy during winter, I hit the gym a lot more [cardio, weightlifting and circuit training],” said Isip. “I also try to be more social, like attending different events.” full-package treatment such as light therapy, vitamin D, regular exercise and proper nutrition will help you fight feeling blue. “Don’t be afraid to go out this winter and enjoy the snow,” Isip said. “You don’t have to be a professional skier or snowboarder to enjoy it. Regardless of what you end up doing, please don’t forget to be safe.”

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Alaska Aces host military appreciation weekend

ABOVE LEFT: Lt. Gen. Russell Handy, Alaskan Command and 11th Air Force commander, performs a ceremonial puck drop before an Alaska Aces hockey game at Sullivan Arena in Anchorage Nov. 16. ABOVE: Marine Cpl. James Johnston, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Detachment Military Police Company D, 4th Law Enforcement Battalion, collects toys for Toys for Tots during intermission of an Alaska Aces hockey game at Sullivan Arena in Anchorage Nov. 16. LEFT: Military members from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, as well as new military recruits, display the United States flag during the playing of the national anthem before an Alaska Aces hockey game at Sullivan Arena in Anchorage Nov. 16. (U.S. Air Force photos/ Airman 1st Class Carly Kavish)


Matters of Faith B-2

November 22, 2013

B-2 ARCTIC WARRIOR

November 22, 2013

Significance of Hanukkah for service members Commentary by Chris McCann and Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) John Kaiser Hanukkah comes from the Hebrew word for “dedication,� remembering the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem after its desecration in 167 B.C.E. by the forces of the Seleucid Empire. After Alexander the Great’s conquest of much of the known world, his empire was divided between his four top generals. In 175 B.C.E., Antiochus IV ascended the Seleucid throne and in 168 the Seleucids sacked the Temple in Jerusalem. Many Jews had already become somewhat Hellenized due to Greek influence in the area, and Antiochus allied with them. Jewish worship was banned; study of the scriptures and Jewish law was punished by death. Greek philosophy had no use for Jewish thought which was considered superstitious and unscientific. Legend has it that Jews continued to gather to discuss scripture and tradition. But if a Greek happened by, they appeared to simply be playing a game – spinning a top and gambling. The dreidel was simply a subterfuge. The attempt to crush Jewish worship set off a revolt by a group of Jews that came to be known as the Maccabees – Hebrew for “hammers.� After eight major battles and several more small skirmishes, the Maccabees led the Jews to victory. The Greeks had slaughtered pigs, considered unclean in Judaism, on the sacred altar in the Temple. They had damaged and destroyed many of the other items, too. The Jews, still led by the Maccabees, cleaned and

(U.S. Air Force photo/John Pennell)

repaired as much as they could and prepared to rededicate the Temple. An important item in the Temple was the menorah – a seven-branched lamp with a cup of olive oil on each branch. It was kept lit except while being cleaned; but after the destruction of so much by the Greeks, only one flask of oil was found with the High Priest’s seal intact. Using impure oil would have been a grave error. Nonetheless, the Jews filled the menorah with the oil – just enough for one day’s light – and commenced the rededication of the Temple. Others went to work harvesting new oil that could be used. Miraculously, the oil from the one cruse burned for all of the eight days it took to gather more. The miracle has been celebrated ever since. While Hanukkah often falls near

Christmas and is sometimes seen as “Jewish Christmas,� traditionally only small gifts (or none at all) are given. Money is given to charity, and foods fried in olive oil are eaten to commemorate the miracle of the oil. Potato latkes are eaten with sour cream or applesauce, and jam-filled donuts, or sufganiyot, are a favorite of children. The Hanukkah candles (or cups of oil) are lit just before sundown, and the menorah (with eight branches, to commemorate the eight nights, plus a ‘servant’ candle placed higher or lower so as not to be mistaken for one of the eight) is displayed where the public can see it. (Often called a menorah, but ‘hanukkiyah’ is more technically correct.) The light from the hanukkiyah is not to be used for anything but enjoyment and publicizing the miracle. While the lights are

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burning, usually for about an hour, no one works â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially women. Why women? The book of Maccabees tells of a woman with seven sons; they were brought to the Temple where Antiochus IV ordered them to eat pork. One by one, the sons refused and were killed. When the youngestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turn came, Antiochus told the mother to save her son by telling him to eat the pork. Instead, she asked the son what he wanted to do; he said he would rather die than give in to the evil king. He was killed, and the mother was thrown from the wall of Jerusalem. Another woman, Judith, from the village of Bethulia, is said to have snuck out of her besieged city and plied General Holofernes with cheese and wine; when he was asleep, she beheaded him and took the head to the village where she hung it from the wall. The Greeks, frightened by the viciousness of a Jewish woman, could only imagine what the men would do, and abandoned their siege. We pause our lives to recall the miracles and to honor the contributions of these womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dedication to God. Many cities have a large menorah in the public square, often where the community Christmas tree is, in a multi-faith display. While Hanukkah is always on the Hebrew date Kislev 25, the Hebrew calendar has a variable number of days, so the festival swings between early November and late December by the Gregorian calendar. Jews around the world, from Alaska to Afghanistan, will light menorahs this year starting at sundown Nov. 27. (2013 is the only year in which the first day of Hanukkah falls on Thanksgiving; the conjunction will not occur again for almost 80,000 years.) In 2013 it is important that we remember Hanukkah, not just for religious reasons. Historically, the Maccabean Revolt is the first war recorded in history that was fought not for territorial expansion, but solely for religious freedom. That alone makes it significant for Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines for we are sworn to defend the Constitution of the United States. The First Amendment of the Constitution guarantees freedom of religion which allows people the opportunity to find light in the darkness. Hanukkah is also important for Christians, because we read in John 10:22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then came the Feast of Dedication at Jerusalem. It was winter, and Jesus was in the temple area walking in Solomonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Colonnade.â&#x20AC;? This passage indicates that Jesus, as an observant Jew, celebrated the festival of rededication, Hanukkah, which marked a military campaign that was fought for religious freedom. As we know from Luke 7:9 and Acts 10, Jesus has a high regard for faithful, Godfearing military members.

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Community Happenings November 22, 2013

November 22, 2013

B-3

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ARCTIC WARRIOR

Friday Indian Heritage Month The Equal Opportunity office hosts Margaret Nakak at the Talkeetna Theater on JBER-E for the American Indian Heritage Month observance from 1 to 2 p.m. Nakak, an actress who works at the Native Heritage Center, will speak. For information, call 552-2056. Resource Roundup U.S. Army Alaska hosts this roundup of resiliency agencies at Buckner Physical Fitness Center from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. More than 20 agencies will be in one location to help service members and families learn to bounce back. For information call 552-3642. Saturday and Sunday Arts and Crafts Emporium The Dena’ina Center hosts this showcase for Alaska artists and crafters to display and sell their work from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Find that special gift for you or a loved one. For information, visit anchoragemarkets.com. WedneSday Polka Party 2013 The Polish-American Club of Alaska invites you to Finlandia Hall for a polka party with live music. The potluck dinner begins at 6 p.m. followed by dancing from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. Bring a dish to share; beverages available for purchase. For information, call 227-3736. nov. 29 Holiday tree lighting Anchorage’s Town Square hosts Santa and his reindeer for the lighting of the tree. A concert at 5 p.m. sings in the season and the lighting ceremony starts at 5:30, followed by Santa and the reindeer. Free cocoa and cookies available. For information visit anchoragedowntown.org. nov. 30 Police Navidad Join the Anchorage Police Department Employees Association for a showcase of public safety, entertainment, games and crafts in a festive environment at the Dena’ina Center. Cultural displays are just part

of the holiday fun from 10 a.m. through 5 p.m. For information, visit policenavidad.com. dec. 1 Chanukkah Celebration The Lubavitch Jewish Center of Alaska hosts this celebration at 5th Avenue and F Street. Rehearsal starts at noon; dinner is at 4 p.m. For information, call 279-1200. Scout Day at the Zoo Celebrate Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and American Heritage Girls with archery, animal encounters, and a scavenger hunt. Crafts and games are fun and work toward patch and badge materials. For information visit alaskazoo.org. dec. 3 through Jan. 12 Wonderland of Toys The museum’s atrium becomes a dazzling tableau of toys, dating back to the 1800s. From carousel horses to tin soldiers, the history of toys is on display at the Anchorage Museum. For more information, visit anchoragemuseum.org or call 929-9200. dec. 5 JBER tree lighting The JBER installation holiday tree lighting ceremony happens at 5 p.m. outside the Commissary. The event will feature Santa Claus, music and refreshments. For more information call 552-4422. dec. 6 and 7 Eagle River festivities Eagle River hosts the Merry Merchant Munch from 2 to 6 p.m. Dec. 6 and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 7, with horse-drawn sleigh rides and carolers and merchants competing to create the best holiday munchies. The annual tree lighting from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Dec. 6 features elementary school choirs and Santa and his reindeer. For information, visit www. cer.org. dec. 7 UAA Craft Fair More than 90 Alaska artists and crafters present high-quality, unique items handmade in Alaska. Speak directly with the artist

and find a one-of-a-kind gift for this holiday season. The fair is hosted at the UAA Student Union building from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For information, visit belong. uaa.alaska.edu or call 786-6152. Native People’s Bazaar The Alaska Native Medical Center hosts this festival of traditional Native art and crafts. Vintage and collectors items will vie with modern masks, baskets, dance fans, ivory, and much more. For information call 729-1120. dec. 8 Holiday concert Ring in the sounds of the season with the Anchorage Museum’s annual holiday music celebration. This Anchorage tradition kicks off at 1 p.m. and wraps up at 3 p.m. For information, visit anchoragemuseum.org. dec. 14 Manhattan Transfer Everyone’s favorite Christmas albums come to life as the Manhattan Transfer visits the Alaska Center For the Performing Arts at 7:30 p.m. With a dozen Grammy awards, and miillions of albums sold, they’re one of the most innovative vocal gorups in pop music. For information call 272-1471. ongoing Wildlife Wednesdays The Alaska Zoo Gateway Lecture Hall hosts lectures beginning at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, focusing on a different wildlife research topic. These lectures are aimed toward an older audience, such as university students or adults with an interest in science. Partners include fish and game authorities. Lectures are free through April 9, and coffee and tea are always available. For information, call 3416463 or email slhartman@alaskazoo.org. AER scholarships Army Emergency Relief is taking applications for scholarships. Scholarships are available for children or spouses of active duty, retired and deceased Soldiers. Applications and instructions are available at aerhq.org. For information, call 384-7478.

Hap Arnold Grants The General Hap Arnold Education Grant Program is taking applications through March 7. These $2,000 grants are given to dependents of Air Force members; for more eligibility information, or to fill out an application, visit www.afas.org/educationgrants. Protestant Women of the Chapel meetings Wo m e n a r e i n v i t e d t o meet with Protestant Women of the Chapel. Bible study happens Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m. at Soldiers’ Chapel on JBER-Richardson. For more information, email jber.ak.pwoc@gmail.com or call 384-1461. Night at the Fights Boxing matches happen every Thursday night at the William A. Egan Civic Center. Get your boxing fix; doors open at 6:30 p.m. and fights start at 7:30. For information, visit thursdaynightfights.com. If being ringside isn’t enough, email jimpatton@gci.net to fight in a “grudge match.”

Chapel services Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. – Soldiers’ Chapel 10:30 a.m. – Elmendorf Chapel 1 Monday through Friday 11:40 a.m. – Soldiers’ Chapel Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday 11:30 a.m. – Elmendorf Chapel Center Thursday 11:30 a.m. – Hospital Chapel

Confession 30 minutes before Mass at the chapel in which Mass is being celebrated, or anytime by appointment. Call 552-4422 or 384-5907

Protestant Sunday Services

Model railroading The Military Society of Model Railroad Engineers meets at 7 p.m. Tuesdays and 1 p.m. Saturdays in basement Room 35 of Matanuska Hall, 7153 Fighter Drive. Anyone interested in model railroading is invited. For information about meetings, work days, and shows, call 952-4353, visit their site at www.trainweb.org/msmrre or email bjorgan@alaska.net.

Joint Liturgical Service 9 a.m. – Elmendorf Chapel 2 Traditional Service 9 a.m. – Elmendorf Chapel 1 Contemporary Protestant Service 11 a.m. – Soldiers’ Chapel Gospel Service Noon – Elmendorf Chapel 1 Contemporary Protestant Service 5 p.m. – Elmendorf Chapel 1

Borealis Toastmasters Conquer your fear of public speaking with Toastmasters. This safe, friendly club helps build confidence through speeches, presentations, feedback and listening in a supportive environment. The club meets every Thursday in Room 146 of the BP building from 7 to 8 p.m. For information, call 575-7470.

week for single Airmen living in the dorms. There are also free homestyle meals Fridays at 6 p.m. For information, call 552-4422.

Wired Cafe for Airmen The Wired Cafe is located at 7076 Fighter Drive, between Polaris and Yukla dormitories. The cafe has wireless Internet and programs throughout the

Storytime for Toddlers Pre-school-aged children can join zoo staff for stories about a particular animal species, followed by meeting the animal, beginning at 10:30 a.m. Mondays at the coffee shop greenhouse. New encounters and books are added all the time; all toddlers are welcome. For information email camp@ alaskazoo.org.

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B-4 B-4

November 22,2013 2013 November 22,

Arctic Warrior

Heroic Airmen rescue family from log cabin fire Otter Lake cabin conflagration brings out the best in JBER Airmen By Air Force Staff Sgt. Zachary Wolf JBER Public Affairs Flames spread on the floor and start climbing up the walls. Everyone inside is asleep, unaware of the danger that they are in. A dog barks and scratches the bed in the back room where a pregnant woman and another mother sleep by their children. They wake up to a horrible realization -- the fire has spread and they are trapped in the back room. A group of friends of the 673d Force Support Squadron decided to rent cabins at Otter Lake for a family event, to relax after a long week at the dining facility that was busy due to Red Flag-Alaska. Luckily two Airmen were awake and noticed a glow coming from a cabin. Tech. Sgt. Daniel Park, 176th Force Support Flight shift supervisor, and Senior Airman Gary Heath, 673 FSS storeroom operations technician, had stayed up around the bonfire while all the other families went back to their cabins to get some sleep. “I saw a glow and I just knew something was out of place,” Park, said. When they got closer, they knew what that glow was and went to action. They bashed in the front door and went in; the fire flared. They pulled Staff Sgt. Kevin Warren, 703rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, from the front room; he had been trying to get through to the back room where his wife and daughter were. “We couldn’t get past the fire to the door that separated the two rooms so we both left the cabin and went to other cabins to find fire extinguishers,” Park said. After an unsuccessful search for the extinguishers, Heath and Park ran back to the cabin that was on fire and tried the side windows. Giving up, Heath ran around back where the window was open and the children had already been lowered to the ground. Kat Warren was the last one in the cabin but the window wouldn’t accommodate her

A JBER firefighter walks past the door of a cabin that burned Sept. 3 near Otter Lake. JBER Airmen rescued the family who was inside sleeping when the fire broke out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Ty-Rico Lea)

pregnant belly. Park pulled the window back forcing it to open wider as Heath helped Mrs. Warren, the pregnant mother, out the window. “I talked to Kat and she said as I was pulling her out, the fire was already hitting her feet,” Heath said. While Kat was being pulled to safety, another Airman noticed the fire. Senior Airman Nathan Bonner, 673 FSS fitness specialist, woke up to screams. “I heard Kevin screaming after they (Heath and Park) pulled him out and that’s when I got up and realized something was wrong,” Bonner said. “I heard him screaming his wife and daughter’s name over and over again and I didn’t even hesitate; I didn’t even put a shirt or shoes on, ran right to the front door through the fire to the back room to make sure everyone was out.” After Bonner got out of the house, he called 911 while Heath attempted to use a fire extinguisher to quench the flames, but had no effect. Emergency personnel were already on the way when Bonner called. “I knew who was in there, it’s a human life, I would have done it for anyone; burnt feet is better than having someone dying in

a fire,” Bonner said. No one was seriously injured in the fire but Trooper, the dog, that initially warned the campers in the back room, didn’t make it. Bonner said that the only thing he regretted while he ran into the burning cabin was that he didn’t look under the bed for Trooper. “It’s funny how it happened because none of us were planning on going in,” Bonner said. “We all decided to go last minute. If we hadn’t gone, it could have ended up completely different; it could have ended up a lot worse.” Park, Heath and Bonner shared the same sentiments in explaining why they did this. “You weren’t really in fear for yourself at all; it was fear for everyone else’s life,” Heath said. This wasn’t the first fire Heath has run into to save a life. During his deployment from 2011 to 2012, Heath ran into a burning building to save the life of a civilian. “To be honest, you are not thinking it at the time, but it would be way worse to realize that you didn’t do something when you could,” Heath said. All three Airmen had singed hair, but otherwise were unharmed.

“It’s your character; it’s who you are, when it happens,” Heath said. “You don’t think ‘Hey this is something I am going to do or this is something I’m not; you either do it or you don’t. You won’t know if you are that type of person until you are in that situation.” That type of person is one their commander is proud of. “Our Airmen embody the Air Force core value of ‘service before self’ and demonstrated their heroism in helping to save these members’ lives,” said Air Force Capt. Heather Simone, 673d Force Support Squadron sustainment services flight commander. “I definitely applaud their efforts and it is no surprise they acted in such a manner; they are exemplary Airmen and I’m proud to serve with them.” All three Airmen agreed the incident has brought them closer together. “It’s a bonding experience to know that you are surrounded by people that would do the same good deed you would,” Heath said. “It was more the realization that we all put others before ourselves, and share that character; that is what brought us closer,” Park added.

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B-6

November 22, 2013

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November 22, 2013

B-7

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B-8

November 22, 2013

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November 22, 2013

B-9

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Lighthouse Christian Fellowship â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a Family Church with Passion, Purpose, and Power!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having served 21-years in the USAF, I understand the unique personal and internal challenges of military life. As a pastor, I have the joy of seeing many families put Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s principles to work in their lives, on the job, in their relationships, and in their finances. As they grow in faith, they are experiencing powerful resultsâ&#x20AC;?.

Dr. Ken Friendly, Pastor D

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B-10

November 22, 2013

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Warrior 112213