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MAY 2012

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO

The Daily Herald

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HEALTHY HABITS

How to use diet to supplement your workout

EYE CARE

Image screening for diabetic patients

CHIROPRACTIC TREATMENTS Helping to relieve pain


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THE DAILY HERALD

Research indicates ‘freshmAn 15’ is a myth

The comeback of the

plus-size model

College freshmen may not gain 15 pounds their first year after all.

undreds of new students enter college each September. One long-standing assumption about college freshmen is their propensity to gain weight — on average 15 pounds over the course of their initial year in college. As it turns out, a new study pokes holes in that assumption and goes on to point out the truth about freshman weight gain. A study by research scientist Jay Zagorsky from Ohio State University’s Center for Human Resource Research debunks the myth of the “freshman 15,” stating that the average weight gain is between 2.4 pounds for women and 3.4 for men. In total, no more than 10 percent of all college freshmen who were examined in the study actually gained 15 pounds. Some even lost weight. The results of this study were published in Social Science Quarterly. The study pointed to aging and becoming young adults as the culprit behind the weight gain, not necessarily the

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late-night pizza study sessions or cafeteria grub. The study also looked at same-aged people who were not in college, and most gained the same amount of weight during the period of time they could have been college freshmen. While students may not gain 15 pounds their freshman year, college-age people do gain about 10 to 12 pounds over the fouryear school period. Again, this is attributed to natural body changes associated with moving from adolescence into adulthood. Students concerned about weight gain in excess of the 2 to 3 pounds per year can employ these strategies to keep weight gain at a minimum. • Limit alcoholic beverages, which tend to be high in calories and add weight fast. • Plan for some daily exercise, even if it’s just strolling the quad. • When selecting foods from the cafeteria, fill half of your dish with vegetables and then a quarter with whole grains and a quarter with lean meat whenever possible. • Limit consumption of packaged, processed foods, which are high in salt and calories. • Go sparingly on drive-thru foods. • Keep healthy snacks on hand in your dorm room so you won’t have to head out when hunger pangs strike. • Utilize the campus gym if there is one. • Take a class as part of your electives that includes physical activity, like a sport. • Surround yourself with friends who have like-minded fitness goals.

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urvaceous figures were once coveted before it became in vogue to be thin to meet the concept of modern-day beauty. Although waif models still dominate the runways at major fashion shows, it seems that the plus-size figure is once again being recognized and embraced by the fashion community — and the world. Big and beautiful Sir Peter Paul Rubens was a 16th and 17th century Flemish painter perhaps best known for selecting women with curvaceous, voluptuous figures as the subject matter of his work. Before the 20th century, historians say that women who were considered attractive displayed bodies ripe with curves. During the periods of time many refer to as the Middle Ages and beyond, plus-size figures were coveted. Paintings and sculptures of this time — those even outside of Ruben’s domain — clearly show chubbier figures, which were considered to be appealing. That’s because one’s weight was often a sign of his or her social status. Wealthy people were able to afford and indulge in the fattening foods that would pack on the pounds. Therefore, poor people who also may have been thin were not seen as attractive. Today these Rubenesque figures are regarded as being too fat in areas of the world where food is plentiful. In fact, the tides may have turned completely. Where weight was once a sign of opulence, today obesity is largely a problem of the lower class. But in countries where starvation still occurs, heavier women are often considered as being more beautiful. Thin is in? Estimates suggest that 8 million Americans have an eating disorder, although this number may be higher because many people with an eating disorder fail to disclose it or seek treatment. A study by the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders reported that 5 to 10 percent of anorexics die within 10 years after contracting the disease; 18 to 20 percent of anorexics will be dead after 20 years and only 30 to 40 percent ever fully recover. Although anorexia, bulimia and other disorders are classified as mental illnesses, there

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are some women (and men) who have attested to the fact that media portrayals of thinness as a sign of beauty have impacted their body images on various levels. Many health experts have stated that the proliferation of eating disorders and depression over body image is largely influenced by the media. Studies have indicated that two out of five women and one out of five men would trade three to five years of their life to achieve their weight goals. And 80 percent of women who answered a past People magazine survey responded that images of women on television and in the movies make them feel insecure. The rise of plus-size While no doctor or health expert will tell you it is healthy to be obese, the fact remains that every person’s body is different. There are healthy women who wear a size 4 and healthy women who wear a size 14. More and more people are beginning to embrace their bodies as they are, and that switch has given rise to an increase in the number of plus-size models and personalities appearing in major campaigns. Model Crystal Renn is just one proponent of the movement for all sizes to be viewed as beautiful. Renn, who authored the 2009 “Hungry: A Young Model’s Story of Appetite, Ambition and the Ultimate Embrace of Curves,” nearly lost her life due to anorexia and other extreme measures she endured to walk the catwalk with a fashionthin body. Renn, who fluctuates between a size 10 and a size 16, once weighed 95 pounds, but now speaks out against pressure to be a certain weight to be seen as beautiful. Ford Models has a Ford+ division that caters especially to promoting women who do not meet the standards of traditional stick-thin models. While these women may still not be considered plus-size according to everyday standards (plus size in the modeling industry is between a size 8 and 12), they do present a more well-rounded example of the female body on the runway. Today, the plus-size segment of Ford has expanded in number from its inception and has regular bookers. Furthermore, these plus-size models are being hired for mainstream fashion designers, not just those geared toward plus-size clothing. Renn joins Whitney Thompson, Marquita Pring, Gitte Lill, Natalie Laughlin, Tara Lynn, and Alyona Osmanova as some of the most recognizable names in plus-size modeling. Although it’s not likely that fat will be the new thin, more media outlets and facets of the fashion world are showcasing a wider variety of body types today.


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THE DAILY HERALD

What to do

when beginning an exercise regimen

Establish your goals. The goal of most people beginning a new exercise regimen is to lose weight. However, there are other incentives as well. For example, some people might be starting to train for a marathon or another sporting event. Whatever the reason, know why you’re getting started, as such goals can help you monitor your progress as the year goes on.

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t the dawn of a new calendar year, many people decide it’s time to turn over a new leaf and shed those extra pounds that accumulated over the previous 12 months. The resolve to lose weight is perhaps never stronger than at the beginning of a calendar year, when the holiday season has passed but those added inches on the waistline remain.

Though it’s noble to want to lose weight and improve health, regardless of what time of year it is, there are precautions men and women should take before beginning a new exercise regimen. Visit your physician. It’s best to get a full physical before beginning an exercise regimen. A full physical can reveal if you have any health problems that might limit what you should and shouldn’t be doing at the gym. If anything turns up, your physician can develop a plan of attack for you to address the issue. If nothing turns up, then your doctor will probably give you the green light to go forward with few, if any, limitations.

Conduct a self-assessment. Once you’ve visited the doctor and received the goahead to start working out, do an honest self-assessment to see where you are in terms of fitness. Walk a mile and time yourself. Do as many push-ups and sit-ups as possible, but be careful to stretch and not push yourself. This self-assessment should not be demanding. Instead, the goal is to gauge where you are and how your body feels when doing some simple exercises.

Listen to your body. Exercising after a long hiatus from routine exercise won’t be easy, and your body is likely going to tell you that through certain aches and pains, if not nausea, dizziness or shortness of breath. If any of these symptoms appear, take a break. This could be your body telling you that you’re asking too much and you need to take your foot off the gas pedal for a little while. Consider hiring a professional trainer. Many people are overwhelmed when entering a gym after a long time away. If you find yourself intimidated or simply don’t know where to begin, hire a personal trainer. Many charge by-the-session, so you can learn which machines to use and how to use them after a session or two and then continue working out on your own. If joining a gym as a new member, the gym might offer a couple of complementary personal training sessions. If so, take full advantage of this offer. When beginning a new exercise regimen, don’t forget to let caution reign until your body has adjusted to this healthy lifestyle.

FITNESS

Healthy habits

How to use diet to supplement your workout

out, even if those workouts are in the wee hours of the morning. Working out on an empty stomach can cause feelings of lightheadedness. In addition, many people are sluggish if they exercise on an empty stomach, which can make workouts less effective. If eating before a morning workout isn’t your thing, consider going with a small snack before beginning your routine. If even that is not ideal, then consider a snack before bedtime. However, this option won’t necessarily prove effective, as your body might just consume all of the energy this snack provides while you’re asleep.

Start slowly. Caution should reign supreme when beginning an exercise regimen. Diving into the deep end at the onset increases the risk of injury, which could limit activity for months to come. First get your body acclimated to exercise, then gradually challenge yourself as you see fit. Leave time to recover. Though it might feel rejuvenating to get back to exercising, it’s important for everyone, but especially those who are just starting, to allow themselves some time to recover. Allow your muscle’s and joints to recover between workout sessions. Frequency of sessions can increase as your body gets acclimated, but at first allow a day or two between sessions so your body can recover.

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A healthy breakfast is a great way to supplement a workout routine.

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en and women who have successfully adopted healthy lifestyles know full well that combining exercise with a healthy diet is the key to getting and staying healthy. Simply visiting the gym won’t work if it’s not coupled with a healthy diet. But many people incorrectly assume that a healthy diet is one devoid of taste. That simply isn’t true. In fact, a healthy diet does not necessarily restrict foods, but how frequently some of those riskier foods can be consumed. The following are some of the steps men and women can take to ensure their workouts aren’t losing their effectiveness due to unhealthy eating habits.

Start the day off with a healthy breakfast. Many foods make healthy breakfast options, including fruit and whole-grain cereals. Unfortunately, on-the-go men and women often reach for what’s readily available, and what’s readily available isn’t necessarily healthy. Avoid breakfast sandwiches that are high in fat and calories, and avoid eating fried foods for breakfast. For those men and women who prefer to workout first thing in the morning, keep in mind it’s important to eat before working

Reassess your snacking habits. If greasy potato chips or sleep-inducing baked goods like brownies are your idea of the perfect snack, then it’s time to reassess your snacking habits. Snacks should not induce sleep, but provide a little extra energy and reduce any hunger pangs. Fresh fruit, yogurt, energy bars, and even whole-grain crackers with a little peanut butter each make for a healthy snack that won’t zap you of valuable energy during the day. Let food help your muscles recover. Some people feel they might negate the positive effects of their workout if they eat immediately after exercising. That’s not necessarily true. In fact, foods that contain protein and carbohydrates can actually help your muscles recover after a workout. Yogurt (Greek yogurt is packed with protein), fruit, dried fruit, and nuts make great post-workout food options, and none will negate the effect of that grueling workout you just finished. In general, the longer you wait to eat after exercising, the longer it will take your muscles to recover.

Stay hydrated. Water is an essential part of a healthy diet, and it’s even more essential before, during and after a workout. When exercising, your body will lose a significant amount of water, which can cause the body to dehydrate. Drink water before and after your workout, and don’t forget to focus on staying hydrated during your workout as well. Daily exercise is essential to longterm health. But all those hours in the gym won’t pay off if they’re not combined with healthy eating habits.

9 ways to eat better

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Calories burned during daily

LITTLE-KNOWN FOOD CONTRIBUTORS TO IS pg7 GLUTEN-FREE THE WAY TO BE? PG9 HEALTHIER WAYS TO COOK COMFORT FOODS pg10 Fresh salmon the new fast food pg11

HEALTH HEALTHY HABITS: HOW TO USE DIET TO pg22 SUPPLEMENT YOUR WORKOUT ROUTINE What to do when beginning an exercise pg22 regimen

GETTING EYE CARE pg12/13 WHERE IT IS NEEDED MOST

Popular HEALTH MYTHS PG15 debunked lead exposure puts adults, children at risk DESICCANT NOT SO DANGEROUS LUNG CANCER REMAINS THE DEADLIEST OF ALL CANCERS CHIROPRACTIC TREATMENT CAN HELP RELIEVE PAIN

pg16 PG17 pg18 pg20


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Exploring natural remedies

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s prevalent as prescription medications are, all-natural remedies for common illnesses and conditions are still a viable alternative to prescription medications for many people. But are these allnatural options safe? In 2011, Apple founder Steve Jobs lost his battle with pancreatic cancer. Reports indicate that Jobs, a devout Buddhist, delayed surgery and other traditional treatments for almost a year while he participated in holistic treatments for the cancer. Some of these included juice fasts, bowel cleansings, acupuncture, herbal supplements, and even a vegan diet. Eventually, Jobs had surgery, but some experts feel he waited too long. Although conventional care is often an effective means to treating illnesses and other conditions, there are many doctors who agree that implementing natural remedies at times can be safe and effective. Furthermore, not all natural remedies are without merit, and

Nervousness and anxiety

Try lettuce, chamomile, valerian, and rose petals.

Infections

Honey has long been used to heal and as an antibacterial and antifungal remedy.

Itchiness

Witch hazel, jewelweed and aloe vera are effective.

Feminine issues

Parsley, basil and goldenseal can alleviate symptoms associated with menstruation.

Antibiotics

Oregano and garlic are purported to have antibiotic qualities and can fend off harmful bacteria.

Pain relief

Use omega-3 fatty acids, green tea, ginger root, and tumeric.

daytime drowsiness

Do you find yourself reaching for a can of soda or a cup of coffee during the day to banish fatigue? Many do. But you may want to grab a bottle of water instead. Research indicates that lack of water is the No. 1 trigger of daytime fatigue.

ways to eat better now

Doctors, fitness professionals and nutritionists all have ideas on what men and women should and should not eat. Choosing the right foods can help save waistlines and lives. The country is growing larger, and that has nothing to do with the population. Individuals are heavier than ever before. About one-third of Americans are considered obese. No state in the U.S. has an obesity level less than 20 percent. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that 36 states had a

some traditional medicines are actually derived from natural, plant-based ingredients themselves. According to surgeon and author, Dr. Walter C. Thompson, “Herbal medicine is safe because it’s natural. After researching the literature, one can truly say that, at the very least, herbal medicine is safer than conventional drugs.” Those thinking about incorporating natural remedies into their health regimen can consider the following options in the chart provided. Many natural foods are effective in preventing and fighting cancer as well. Although natural remedies can be effective, it’s important for pregnant women to avoid any herbs and plant supplements until discussing the risks/ benefits with their doctors. Also, some natural remedies can interact with prescription drugs or increase their potency, so it’s important to talk to a doctor about any plans.

prevalence of 25 percent or more; 12 of these states (Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia) had a prevalence of 30 percent or more. The obesity story is much the same in Canada, although residents of that country are slightly less obese than Americans. Statistics Canada states that from 2007 to 2009, 24.1 percent of adults in Canada were obese. Women have higher levels of obesity than men

in both countries. Although it is widely known that eating a healthy diet and exercising frequently are the key ways to maintain a healthy weight, it’s easy to fall into bad habits. Some men and women find it difficult to avoid temptation and stay on track with diet. But balance and portion control are great ways to enjoy food without gaining weight. Here are some tips to live by.

Therefore, not only can drinking adequate supplies of water keep you refreshed, it can also help to keep you more awake — even during a boring business meeting.

OPTIONS FOR GOOD HEALTH NUTRITION - ACUPUNCTURE - CHIROPRACTIC

Barfield Chiropractic Health Center Our family providing good health for yours since 1912.

Dr. Paul H. Barfield Chiropractic Physician

252-537-2764

Hours: Mon., Tues., Wed. & Fri. 8:30 a.m. - Noon and 1:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

1280 Julian R. Allsbrook Highway Roanoke Rapids, NC 27870


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Chiropractic treatments can help relieve pain

nyone who has ever suffered back pain, whether that pain is mild, moderate or severe, understands just how unpleasant it can be. Back pain can make life extremely difficult, affecting everything a person does, including performance at work, time spent with the kids or even sleeping at night. For those with back pain, chiropractic care might be the best way

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to relieve that pain. A nonsurgical treatment of the disorders of the nervous system and/ or musculoskeletal system, chiropractic medicine focuses on spinal manipulation and the treatment of the structures surrounding the spine. Understanding chiropractic care can help men and women dealing with pain better determine if it’s for them.

What conditions do chiropractors treat? A chiropractor can treat a number of conditions, but most treatments focus on a handful of common and often painful conditions. Those conditions include: - joint pain in the arms and legs - mid- and lower back pain - neck pain - headaches What do chiropractic treatments entail? Many people with lower back pain find such pain so unbearable that they seek the help of a chiropractor. Despite that, many more people remain wary of visiting a chiropractor for myriad reasons. But chiropractors can effectively treat pain in a number of ways.

the back could be irreparably damaged. Those fears were common during the early years of chiropractic treatments, but now many medical doctors will work in tandem with a chiropractor to ensure patients are getting the correct and most effective treatments. That said, there are some potential side effects to chiropractic treatments. Once the spine has been adjusted, some people might feel minor pain or discomfort, and headaches and fatigue are possible as well. However, such side effects typically subside within a day of receiving treatment. In some instances, a herniated disc might result after an adjustment is used to treat neck or back pain. Should that occur, a patient will likely experience pain, weakness and Are there side effects to chiropractic treatments? numbness in the buttocks and down the Perhaps the reason some people are hesitant legs. Bladder and bowel control might be affected to visit a chiropractor as well. However, such is the fear that, should something go awry, instances are rare.

A chiropractic treatment is commonly referred to as a spinal manipulation. During a treatment, the chiropractor will move a joint beyond its usual range of motion. The joint might be moved through twisting, pulling or pushing, but it won’t be moved beyond the range of motion it’s designed to move. Those being treated for the first time should expect to hear some popping or cracking during the treatment. The goal of a spinal manipulation is to improve functionality while reducing nerve irritability and restoring range of motion in the back. In addition to spinal manipulation, a chiropractor might try other types of treatments, including: - ultrasound - the application of heat or ice - certain strength and onditioning exercises - relaxation therapy

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Use a smaller plate. This will trick the eye and brain into thinking you are eating a lot. A large plate seems empty with smaller portions, prompting many men and women to eat more than is necessary. Using a smaller dish can give the impression of eating from an overflowing dish.

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Make vegetables a priority, not an afterthought. Fill up on vegetables and make meat and other higher-calorie foods the afterthought, instead of vice-versa. In fact, two-thirds of your dish should be consumed by vegetables, with the remaining portion for a protein or starch.

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Avoid family-style meals. That means placing large serving dishes full of food directly on the table. It encourages going in for seconds when you really may not be hungry. It takes the brain at least 20 minutes to register feeling full. So serve yourself from the stove and wait to see if you’re still hungry before going back for more.

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Switch to skim products. It is widely known that dairy products are an important component of healthy living. However, whole-milk varieties tend to be heavy on calories and saturated fat. Opt for skim milk whenever possible. Today, there are ultra-pasteurized varieties of skim milk that are creamy and filling.

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Rely on seafood protein. Eating fish once or twice a week is an excellent way to cut calories and enjoy a food that is rich in essential fatty acids.

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Experiment with herbs, not salt. A lot of sodium in a diet may not be good for blood pressure and it can lead to water retention. Instead, reach for herbs to add flavor to foods. Keep a fresh selection of parsley, chives, cilantro, basil, and other herbs at the ready and chances are you won’t even miss the salt.

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Go sparingly on dressings and sauces. You can quickly turn a healthy salad into an unhealthy meal if you drizzle on too much creamy salad dressing. Studies show that some fast food salads have more fat than other fast food fare, including hamburgers. Opt for the dressing on the side, or select among fatfree alternatives. Use only about 1 to 2 teaspoons for flavor.

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Indulge once in a while. Depriving yourself of everything that is tasty can lead to binge eating or overeating. Just remember to keep the portions of sweets or fattening foods modest and try not to over-do it the rest of the day.

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Don’t forget the exercise. The American College of Sports Medicine offers benefits of exercise beyond simply helping you to lose weight: • Lowers risk of heart disease by 40 percent. • Lowers risk of breast cancer by 20 percent. • Lowers risk of depression by 30 percent. • Lowers risk of hypertension by 40 percent. • Lowers risk of type 2 diabetes by 58 percent.

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health, mind & body

Calories burned during daily 240 cals.

Clean rain gutters and burn 372 calories in one hour.

300 cals.

160 cals.

200 cals.

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ome people think they have to spend hours at the gym sweating on the treadmill or elliptical trainer in order to burn calories and lose weight. As it turns out, the things you do every single day could be burning more calories than you realized. Some discipline with your diet and certain healthy habits can make the difference for those attempting to lose weight. Getting eight hours of sleep can burn more than 300 calories for the average person. But there’s a good chance you are interested in what activities you can do while awake to help burn calories. Courtesy of Discovery Health and Harvard Medical School, here are common everyday activities and how many calories can be burned depending on weight. These figures are based on a person weighing around 150 pounds and a duration of one hour of activity.

Supermarket shopping: Pushing a wagon around the supermarket for an hour can burn 240 calories or more. Up the ante by bagging groceries yourself and packing and unpacking them from the car.

Raking leaves: If you spent time manually raking leaves this past fall, you were doing something good for your body. In addition to working several muscle groups, you may have spent 300 calories. Dusting: Spring cleaning is right around the corner, and that can be good news for your health. Dusting alone can burn as much as 160 calories.

Cooking: Here’s a reason to get fired up about cooking. Making a simple meal can add up to 200 calories lost. Just don’t sabotage those lost calories by cooking up a

THE DAILY HERALD

460 Moving: Packing and moving may cals.

350 cals.

450 cals.

400 cals.

seem like a big task one rarely looks forward to, but carrying boxes can burn 460 calories an hour. Packing, moving and unpacking yourself may be the diet plan you’ve been seeking. Painting: Perhaps you’ve been procrastinating on that house painting project. Here’s inspiration to break out the rollers and brushes. Spending an hour painting can burn 350 calories. After several hours applying a primer and then top coat, you may find you painted yourself thinner.

Community service: If you want to help the environment and your health, spending time picking up trash from a park or seaside can shed some serious calories — 450 an hour. Playing with kids: Engaging in some fun family time can burn around 400 calories. Plus, it’s a great way for parents and children to bond.

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Radon can also be found in homes when it pushes its way through cracks in floors or gaps around service pipes or in suspended floors. Testing a home for radon is inexpensive and won’t take much time. Additional causes of lung cancer include air pollution, asbestos and even age. Older people are more likely to be diagnosed with lung cancer, as are those with a family history of lung cancer. Does lung cancer have symptoms?

health, mind & body swollen lymph nodes. When determining if a patient has lung cancer, a doctor will also enlist the help of a pathologist to study cell or tissue samples. These cells or tissues can be collected in a number of ways, and a doctor might order more than one test. Bronchoscopy: A thin, lighted tube is inserted through the nose or mouth into the lung, allowing a close exam of the lungs and the air passages that lead to them. A cell sample can be taken with a needle, brush or other tool.

The deadliest form of cancer for men and women alike, lung cancer is perhaps so deadly because it does not often have many symptoms in its early stages. While some symptoms might manifest themselves in the early stages, most will wait until the cancer begins to grow before they make their presence felt. As the cancer grows, the following symptoms might appear:

Sputum cytology: Sputum, or thick fluid, is coughed up from the lungs and then checked for cancer cells.

More information about lung cancer is available from the National Cancer Institute at www.cancer.gov.

• a cough that continues to worsen or won’t go away • constant chest pain • coughing up blood • a voice that grows hoarse • frequent infections of the lungs, including pneumonia • constant feelings of fatigue • unexplained weight loss

Each of these symptoms can occur even if a person does not have lung cancer. However, men and women who experience any of the above symptoms should consult their physicians immediately.

Thoracentesis: A long needle is used to remove fluid called pleural fluid from the chest, and that fluid is then checked for cancer cells. Thoracoscopy: A surgeon makes several small incisions in the chest and back, then looks at the lungs and nearby tissue with a thin, lighted tube.

ROANOKE VALLEY CANCER CENTER Proudly serving the Roanoke Valley with outstanding and compassionate care.

Radiation theRapy FoR CanCeR patients

How is lung cancer diagnosed? In many cases, individuals will experience one of the aforementioned symptoms of lung cancer and then visit their doctors. Such a visit should be made immediately, and men and women should expect certain tests to be performed upon visiting their doctor. In addition to ordering some blood work, a doctor will likely perform a physical exam to check for general signs of health and listen to breathing. During the physical, the doctor is likely to check for swollen lymph nodes, fluid in the lungs and a swollen liver. A doctor will also order X-ray pictures of the chest to detect if there are any tumors or an abnormal fluid buildup. A CT scan, which takes pictures of the tissue inside the chest, will likely be taken as well. These pictures can show if there is a tumor, abnormal fluid or

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Pictured left to right: Michelle Pratt, RT-R; Cindy Stephens, Administrative Assistant; M.C. Thannikkary, M.D.; Dennis Owens, M.S. Medical Physicist; and Rae White, RT-R

212 Smith Church Road • Roanoke Rapids, NC

(252) 537-1717


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LUNG CANCER remains the deadliest of all cancers

THE NAME NEWSPAPER

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ccording to the National Cancer Institute, lung cancer will claim the lives of more than 150,000 Americans before the end of 2011. In Canada, where the national population is considerably smaller than that of the U.S., lung cancer will still take a heavy toll, causing more than 20,000 deaths according to the Canadian Cancer Society. Meanwhile, Cancer Research UK reports that within in the United Kingdom lung cancer accounts for roughly 6 percent of all deaths, and 22 percent of all deaths from cancer. Each of these figures illustrates the prevalence of lung cancer across the globe, and the deadly toll it takes on an annual basis. While many are quick to assume they will be immune to lung cancer if they simply avoid smoking tobacco, the disease is much more complex than that and understanding it could mean the difference between life and death.What causes lung cancer?

While the NCI reports smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, that doesn’t mean nonsmokers or those who quit smoking still aren’t at risk. In fact, many additional factors can increase a person’s risk of lung cancer. Secondhand smoke has long been known to be very harmful, and no one, not even children, is immune to its effects. The American Cancer Society notes that, in the U.S. alone, roughly 3,000 nonsmoking adults will succumb to lung cancer each year because of secondhand smoke. Choosing not to smoke is a good decision, but being around smokers and breathing in their smoke could prove just as deadly as smoking. The less a person is exposed to tobacco smoke, the lower their risk for lung cancer. Another risk factor for lung cancer is radon, a radioactive gas that cannot be seen, smelled or tasted. Radon forms in soil and rocks, and men and women who work in mines could be exposed to radon.

THE DAILY HERALD

Little-known

food contributors to heart disease

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ed meats, hydrogenized oils — these are the foods we associate with heart disease and high cholesterol. But a few other things many people eat rather frequently could be contributing to future heart problems.

Sugary items

White pasta and breads

The average American eats the equivalent of 21 teaspoons of added sugar a day, which is two to three times the amount they should, according to an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers found that individuals who consumed the most sugary products had the lowest HDL, or good cholesterol, and the highest blood triglyceride levels. Eating large amounts of sugar can then be a major risk factor for high cholesterol and heart disease.

Researchers have found that eating a diet high in refined grains, including those in most store-bought pastas and white breads, can double the risk of heart disease. These foods are those that have a high glycemic index, or GI. Foods with a high GI quickly release sugar into the bloodstream. Doctors have found a correlation between high GI and heart disease, mainly in women, according to research at the University of Milan. The study questioned 32,578 women and 15,171 men. Those who consumed the largest concentration of high GI foods were 2.24 times more likely to develop heart disease than those with the lowest.

Nutritionists advise that, when choosing grain products, it is important to select those made from whole grains. Not only do these products provide the nutritional benefits of whole grains, including fiber, they also help reduce cholesterol and the risk for heart disease.

While many people associate sugary snacks, beverages and sugar itself with dental decay or unnecessary calories, these items also impact cholesterol levels.

In its 2010 guidelines, the American Heart Association recommended limiting added sugar in the diet to no more than 100 calories a day for most women and 150 calories for most men. That’s 6 teaspoons for women and 9 for men. To put those guidelines in perspective, consider that a 12-ounce can of soda has between 8 and 10 teaspoons. In addition, many processed foods contain sugar even if sugar’s inclusion seems foolish. Some restaurants and food manufacturers have admitted to adding sugar to foods — especially those geared to children — to make them taste better and be more appealing. Therefore, sauces, ready-made dinners and other items may have sugar, and the consumer may not know it without reading the nutrition label.

Also, it’s important to note that beverages are the leading supplier of added sugar for many people. Simply reducing the amount of juices, sports drinks and sodas in your diet can greatly reduce sugar consumption.

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health, mind & body

THE DAILY HERALD

HEALTH TIPS HOW TO SURVIVE A HEART ATTACK ALONE: Without help, a person whose heart stops beating properly and who begins to feel faint, has only about 10 seconds left before losing consciousness. However, victims can help themselves by coughing repeatedly and very vigorously. A deep breath should be taken before each cough. The cough must be deep and prolonged, as when producing sputum from deep inside the chest. And a cough must be repeated about every 2 seconds without let up until help arrives, or until the heart is felt to be beating normally again. Deep breaths get oxygen into the lungs and coughing movements squeeze the heart and keep the blood circulating. The squeezing pressure on the heart also helps it regain normal rhythm. In this way, heart attack victims can get to a hospital. — To get rid of lice safely on children or animals and leave the hair soft and shiny, simply use cheap hair conditioner containing coconut oil or paraben wax. Apply thickly and leave on for 20 minutes. Using a tight comb, brush through the hair thoroughly, pulling off the lice. Dip the comb regularly in water containing tea tree oil. Then rinse off the hair with water. Optionally apply a strong tea made by boiling feverfew leaves in water for 20 minutes. Cool and use as a final rinse. Tea tree oil and lavender essential oil may also be added to the cooled feverfew tea. Do not rinse off. — Feeling tired and sluggish? Your polarity may be reversed! Causes include wearing a watch on your left wrist, exposure to electro-magnetic fields such as a clock radio beside your bed or working at a computer, dehydration, and iron or potassium deficiency. — How do you correct your polarity? Drink a glass of water. Fold your arms in front of your chest. Press the pulse points of your wrists together so each hand is holding onto a forearm. Hold this position for 1-5 minutes until you feel a noticable shift in your body. ( It may feel like you are shorter or heavier or more bottomheavy. ) You will notice a rise in your energy level after about 10 minutes

THE DAILY HERALD

DesiccanT P not so dangerous

arents fret over many of the items kids come into contact with, particularly small objects that can present choking hazards or items that may be poisonous. One common thing that often turns up in a home are packets of silica gel. Silica gel is a desiccant, which means it is designed to draw moisture out of something to keep it fresh. Silica packets are often found tucked into new shoes or handbags, and small pouches of silica gel may be in the vitamin bottles in the medicine cabinet. Silica gel can absorb up to 40 percent of its weight in moisture. It is used to protect items where extreme temperature changes may cause moisture or condensation buildup, which can damage the products. Silica products also may be used to dry out closets or wet

health, mind & body

areas of the home, such as basements. Containers full of silica gel are used to absorb moisture from the air. Silica gel is also used at some industrial factories or other businesses to help with spill clean-up. The pellets are tossed onto a spill, which then absorb the moisture and make for an easier job of cleaning. Individuals may have noticed that silica gel packets have the warning “do not eat” printed right on the packaging. They tend to resemble the individual packets of sugar found at restaurants, so it may be easy for children and adults to mistake them for something edible. What if a packet of silica gel did end up in the mouth? What would be the ramifications? Rest assured that, although the experience may be uncomfortable, silica is not very harmful. If granules of silica gel

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ended up on the tongue or in the mouth, the product would suck out all of the moisture from the mouth, making it extremely dry and uncomfortable. Chances are there would be attempts to spit it out promptly. Should it be ingested, there could be dry eyes, dry throat, stomach upset, and aggravation of the mucous membranes, according to Discovery Health. It wouldn’t completely suck the moisture out of the body in such a small dose, however. Many household items feature posted warnings to protect the health of children and adults. Some things can be very dangerous if used in the wrong way, while others are less dangerous. But from a safety standpoint, it can be important to heed all warnings to avoid injury or illness.

Trying to lose weight? Try this! Keep a little journal for one week and write down everything you eat. If it goes in your mouth record it! You may be surprised by how much you actually consume and where you overindulge. You may want to bring your ‘food dirary’ to a nutrition expert to see where you can make changes. Record your exercise too! This simple act of recording could stop you from grabbing extras and inspire you to exercise.


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health, mind & body

Lead exposure puts adults, children at risk

in soil is the risk it poses to kids, who can inhale the lead even if they’re just playing in the yard. Household dust is another source of lead. Dust contains the lead from deteriorating exterior paint or soil brought into the home from the outside. Perhaps the scariest source of lead is drinking water. Homes might have plumbing with lead or lead solder, putting residents at risk of lead poisoning. Lead cannot be seen or tasted and it’s also aroma-free, so concerned homeowners should contact their local health department and request their water be tested. Until then, use only cold water for drinking and cooking, and run the water for 15 to 30 seconds before drinking it. as best to shower before coming from work and separate work clothes from the rest of your clothes and the family’s clothes when doing laundry. Additional sources of lead are old painted toys and furniture; food and liquids stored in lead crystal or lead-glazed pottery or porcelain; and hobbies, such as making pottery or stained glass, that used lead.

Lead in the soil outside a home could put children who play in the yard at risk of lead exposure.

E

xcessive exposure to and absorption of lead can cause lead poisoning, a harmful condition that can result in lots of suffering for adults and children alike. While many people are aware of lead poisoning, few might understand its prevalence and just how big a risk it can pose. Gaining a greater understanding of lead poisoning can help adults protect themselves and their children from this potentially debilitating condition.

Where is lead found?

Lead can be found in many places, including your home. Homeowners who own a home built before 1978 likely have or had lead-based paint somewhere in their home. Beginning in the 1978, the United States federal government banned lead-based paint from housing. However, homes built prior to that faced no such restrictions. Another place lead can be found is in the soil around the home. The soil gets lead from a host of sources, including exterior lead-based paint and leaded gas used in cars. What’s especially troubling about the presence of lead

How do I know I’m at risk?

A home with lead-based paint does not necessarily mean the home is a hazard. To determine if you and your family is at risk, testing on both the family and the home is necessary. The levels of lead in a child’s blood typically increase rapidly from six to 12 months of age, and often peak somewhere between 18 and 24 months. Blood tests can detect high levels of lead, and are most important for children between ages 1 and 2 and children and family members who have been exposed to high levels of lead. A home inspection can be done in one of two ways, be it a paint inspection or a risk assessment. A paint inspection won’t determine if the paint is hazardous, but it will determine the lead content of each different type of painted surface throughout the home. A risk assessment determines if there are any sources of lead exposure and will also suggest a course of action to address these hazards. Homeowners should not do a home inspection on their own. Hire a qualified professional to do the job. The National Lead Information Center (1-800-424-LEAD) can help homeowners find a trained and qualified professional in their area.

THE NAME NEWSPAPER

How can you protect your family from lead exposure?

Individuals can take several steps to protect their families from lead exposure. In addition to home inspection and blood testing, the following are some of the ways to protect men, women and children from lead exposure.

IS GLUTEN- FREE disease but do experience sensitivity to gluten-containing products — everything from gastrointestinal discomfort to migraines and fatigue. According to experts from the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America, much still remains unknown about gluten sensitivity, but it is clear that gluten sometimes triggers an immune response like an enemy invader in some people today. As a result, many find that avoiding gluten helps mitigate symptoms.

• Clean floors, window frames and window sills on a weekly basis preferably with a mop, sponge or paper towel soaked in warm water. If possible, use an all-purpose cleaner or a cleaning product made specifically for lead. • Be thorough when rinsing mops and sponges after cleaning dirty or dusty areas. • Make sure kids wash their hands frequently, and especially before they eat and go to sleep. • Make sure kids’ play areas are clean, and be sure to wash toys and even stuffed animals regularly. • Avoid tracking soil into the home by removing shoes before entering.

BUILDING BRIGHTER FUTURES FOR OUR CHILDREN

Experiences during early childhood literally shape the structure of the brain. Because today’s children are tomorrow’s leaders, parents and workers, everyone has a stake in making sure that all children have the experiences they need to thrive. Smart Start brings together all the people involved in a young child’s life—families, teachers, doctors, caregivers, social workers, and many others—to ensure every child has all they need for healthy growth and development. Child care, family support and health services for children ages 0-5 and their families are available, so that all children enter school healthy and ready to succeed. Together training and technical assistance are provided to child care programs to ensure quality education for our youngest children.

Halifax - Warren Smart Start Partnership for Children, Inc. 1139 Roanoke Avenue • PO Box 339 Roanoke Rapids, NC 27870 Phone: (252) 537-5621 Fax: (252) 537-9732 Email: smartstart@hwss.org

Need help finding child care? Call our Regional Child Care Resource and Referral Center: 1-888-285-0849

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the way to be?

• Clean up paint chips immediately.

More information about lead exposure is available at www.epa.gov.

health, mind & body

THE DAILY HERALD

F

Traditional breads are something that will have to be removed from one’s diet to be gluten-free.

rom restaurants to food packaging, it is difficult to escape the gluten-free craze that is sweeping the country. Whether as their own dietary preference or for a specific health reason, many people are eschewing gluten products and leaving other people wondering if they should, too.

Gluten is a type of protein that is found in grain products, including wheat, barley and rye, among other carbohydrates. Not all cereals and grains contain gluten, so it’s important to note that gluten and grain are not synonymous. Gluten is not the grain itself, but a component that gives certain grain products their chewy, bending texture. It’s also what contributes to the rising process of doughs brought on through the kneading of the dough. Gluten is tough, which is why doughs and bagels containing gluten have a dense, thick composition. Products that have gluten removed tend to be sticky and goopy in consistency and without shape.

Individuals with a condition called celiac disease cannot properly digest gluten. According to the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse, celiac disease is an immune disease in which people cannot eat gluten because it will damage their small intestine. The disease is hereditary and, despite millions of confirmed cases, many more people are unaware that they even have celiac disease. Many other people do not suffer from celiac

Although there are people who have legitimate reasons to avoid gluten, many are jumping on the gluten-free bandwagon simply because they believe gluten could be something evil lurking in their foods. A paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine may be at the root of this newfound fear of gluten. The paper advised that several diseases may have a root cause with gluten. Some of these diseases include:

• irritable bowel syndrome • cancer • rheumatoid arthritis • anxiety and depression • dementia • epilepsy • canker sores • anemia

The trouble with healthy people removing gluten from their diets is that it can cause some deficiencies. The body actually requires grains to receive the daily recommended value of certain vitamins and nutrients. These include calcium, riboflavin, folate, thiamin, iron, and fiber. Gluten, being a protein, is also a viable protein source for the body. Individuals who are vegetarians often get protein through legumes and grains. Adopting a gluten-free diet in addition to being vegetarian removes another protein source.

While there is no actual danger to eating gluten-free, doctors advise ensuring you’re getting the adequate vitamins and nutrients through other sources to compensate for the lack of nutritional value from grains.

Traditional pastas are also off-limits. People can try substituting rice noodles for wheat noodles in recipes.

Although most traditional breads are off-limits to those with gluten sensitivity, there are many products being marketed mainstream that are made with rice or potato flour instead. Cereals made from corn and rice are good alternatives to those made with gluten-containing grains.

Although many people are adopting glutenfree lifestyles, removing the protein from your diet is only medically necessary at this point if you suffer from celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.

Those adopting a gluten-free diet should be careful to read product ingredients to determine if gluten is present. While key words like wheat, oats, barley, and rye indicate gluten, malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein are also indicators that gluten is in the food.

Gluten is not exclusive to foods, either. Beer contains wheat, so it will also have gluten. Choose wines or other liquors instead. Also, some products, like lip balm, also contain gluten. Therefore, it’s best to be aware of all gluten sources and not assume it is only relegated to foods.


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health, mind & body

THE DAILY HERALD

Healthier ways to cook comfort foods

health, mind & body

THE DAILY HERALD

Popular health myths debunked

Choose leaner meats. Substitute lean cuts of meat or alternatives to reduce the fat and calories. For example, ground turkey can be substituted for ground beef in many cases.

Reduce the cheese. Cut down on the amount of cheese in a recipe. In a dish like lasagna, add vegetables to the recipe to beef it up instead of extra cheese. When using cheese, opt for lowor no-fat varieties. Use stocks for flavor. Soup stock can be used to flavor everything from rice to mashed potatoes, instead of relying on butter or heavy gravies. Select whole-wheat breads. A lot of extra calories are consumed when loading up on breads that are essentially devoid of nutritional benefits. When selecting breads and doughs, go for whole-wheat products that will offer more fiber.

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ith the arrival of the colder weather, people often turn to hearty foods to fill up and keep the body warm. Too often, however, so-called comfort foods tend to be big on fat and calories as much as they are big on flavor. With a few small ingredient changes, comfort foods can be both delicious and healthy.

Did you overindulge at dinner, or do you have indigestion? Have a ‘shot’ of apple cider vinegar. It will aid in digestion and bring you relief. Also use apple cider vinegar on your salad to help digest your food and release the vitamins to be absorbed in your body.

Just think of all those hearty and filling foods you enjoy when winter arrives. The stews, casseroles, pastas, and soups that make cold days bearable are often not the healthiest choices a person can make. The average two-cup bowl of beef chili, for example, comes in at 595 calories and 25.9 grams of fat, according to Calorie King. That’s before the addition of sour cream, cheese or bread is included. One entree of Lasagna Classico from the popular chain eatery Olive Garden weighs in at 850 calories and 47 grams of fat. Unlike the salads and sandwiches of warmer weather, comfort foods tend to be built on meats, cheeses and carbohydrate-rich ingredients. Indulging too often can mean quick weight gain and extra fat the body simply does not need. However, you do not have to give up on your favorite comfort foods; simply find ways to make them healthier.

Opt for low-fat dairy. When a recipe calls for cream or whole milk, substitute skim milk and see if you can notice the difference. In many cases, the change in flavor will be negligible. Stock up on nonstick sprays. Lightly mist foods with some non-stick spray instead of coating pans and ingredients in a lot of oil to cut down on calories. Use vegetables and legumes to make a meal more hearty. Stews, soups and other comfort foods can be enhanced with mushrooms, beans or other filling items at a fraction of the fat and calories of adding meats or cheeses. Bake or grill instead of fry. Many popular comfort foods, like fried chicken, can be made healthier simply by changing the cooking method. Make popular recipes healthy by baking them instead of frying them. Fill up first. If you want to enjoy comfort foods as-is, fill up first on salad or soup before having a portion of the selected comfort food. This way you’re less likely to overeat on the fattier dish but will still feel satiated. Use fruit in place of oil. In cake mixes and other desserts, applesauce or another pureed fruit or vegetable can often replace oil without drying out the end product. Comfort foods are common when the mercury drops. Making some easy changes to some favorite recipes can mean enjoying these hearty meals without paying the price in extra fat and more calories.

Well-meaning parents or grandparents often tell children not to do somethingwith the warning that a serious health implication could result. Kids often take their elders at their word. But some of these warnings bear more truth than others. Here’s the scoop on some of the more common misconceptions.

MYTH:

MYTH:

MYTH:

MYTH:

MYTH:

Swallowed chewing gum stays in the stomach for seven years.

If you keep your eyes crossed too long, they will get stuck that way.

Going outside with wet hair will make you sick.

Covering your head is most important because you lose 75 percent of your body heat through it.

Don’t swim right after eating

While chewing gum cannot be digested and is meant to be chewed and not swallowed, accidentally swallowing a piece here and there won’t cause major issues. That’s because the gum will simply pass through the digestive system whole and come out with stool. If a large amount of gum is swallowed in a short period of time, then there could be issues, including constipation and intestinal blockage in children.

The muscles in the eye are just like any muscles elsewhere in the body. Although they may tire and get sore, they are relatively resilient and can take a lot of wear and tear. Crossing your eyes may tax these muscles, but you won’t do any permanent harm. Rest assured that crossing the eyes will not leave them stuck that way.

Although you will feel colder stepping outside with a part of your body wet, it won’t make you more susceptible to catching a cold. Researchers at the Common Cold Research Unit in England once tested a group of volunteers who were given the cold virus. One half of the group stayed in a warm room, while the others took a bath and stood wet in a hallway for a half hour. The wet group didn’t catch more colds than the dry.

This calculation is more for an infant whose head makes up a greater percentage of his or her body. In an adult, the figure is closer to 10 percent. Heat can escape from any exposed area of the body. Therefore, it is helpful to bundle up all areas of the body when spending time outdoors in the cold weather.

The basis of this mantra is that when digesting food, the digestive system pulls blood away from the muscles and the idea is that you could cramp up and drown. While you may have less energy to swim vigorously, chances are you won’t be so weak as to drown. Although many health myths prevail, knowing the truth can help parents educate their children better about which behaviors are safe and which are risky.

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health, mind & body

Rural Health Group medical locations ... Rural Health Group at Henderson 100 Parkview Drive West in Henderson 252-438-3549 Rural Health Group at Jackson 9425 NC Hwy 305 in Jackson 252-534-1661 Rural Health Group at Lake Gaston 108 North Mosby Avenue in Littleton 252-586-5411 Rural Health Group at Norlina 110 Division Street in Norlina 252-456-2009 Rural Health Group at Rich Square 200 South Main Street in Rich Square 252-539-2082 Rural Health Group at Roanoke Rapids 2066 NC Highway 125 in Roanoke Rapids 252-536-5000 Rural Health Group at Scotland Neck 919 Jr. High School Road in Scotland Neck 252-826-3143 Rural Health Group at Twin County 204 Evans Road in Hollister 252-586-5151 Rural Health Group at Whitakers 105 SE Railroad St. in Whitakers 252-437-2171 Other offices with specified services ... Rural Health Group at Weldon Weldon Elementary School 805 Washington Avenue in Weldon Clinic 252-536-0116 School office 252-536-4815 Rural Health Group at Roanoke Rapids – WIC 116-A West 3rd St. in Roanoke Rapids 252-535-4845 Rural Health Group HOPE (Health Outreach & Patient Education) 100 Parkview Drive West in Henderson 252-536-5910

Shedding light

THE DAILY HERALD

on ‘the biggest disease no one has ever heard of’

CMT

A

llison Moore, founder of the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF), has made it her life’s mission to educate people about a neurological condition known as CMT after experiencing suddenonset CMT in 1997. The disease was triggered from a chemotherapy drug in her cancer treatment. A new federal grant issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will now enable Moore and her HNF associates to push the boundaries on awareness and research surrounding CMT through several initiatives. CMT is a progressive disease that deteriorates the nerves in the hands, feet, legs, and arms. Patients may develop muscle deformities that impair movement and can necessitate the use of everything from leg braces to wheelchairs. Until now there has been little discussion of CMT and doctors have been lax in diagnosing the disease early — particularly because they have been in the dark. “Many people don’t know how to deal with CMT because they know nothing about it,” says Moore. The new grant has paved the way for the creation of The National CMT Resource Center (Help4CMT.com) among other programs. This comprehensive online resource fills the gap in CMT advocacy and information dispersement

by being the first forum to connect individuals, doctors, researchers, and the general public in a unique way. The site offers a selection of resources, information and educational/training materials on Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease and the latest options for symptom management. It can also serve as a way for those with the condition to connect to offer support and encouragement, or be put in touch with those who may offer assistance. From “Living With CMT” to a page for kids, The National CMT Resource Center targets often underserved groups in disseminating information about a relatively unknown disease outside of its base of people affected. Although estimates say that around 2.6 million people worldwide have CMT and that it is the most common inherited neuropathy, knowledge of CMT on a global, even national, scale is limited. Despite its similarity to the better-known multiple sclerosis, CMT has yet to have the same level of media chatter as some other more widely recognized causes. Apart from actress Julie Newmar (the original Catwoman) there have been few high-profile people to become the faces of the disease — something that tends to “wake up” the public. Thanks to the CDC grant, The National CMT Resource Center is set to change all that

— spreading the word across the globe. The added bonus is that all of these resources are provided for free. Another offering made possible by the grant is the CMT and Disability School Outreach Program. This enables educators and children to learn about CMT and be mindful of individuals with the disease or other disabilities. Youth-geared information teach lessons on empathy. Plus the book, “Arlene on the Scene” serves to open the lines of communication about CMT or disability as part of inclusion education. “Through our School Outreach Program we offer educational materials and a live author presentation aimed at increasing understanding of disability in a fun, interactive way,” says Carol Liu, a member of HNF. “Our classrooms today are filled with a wide variety of strengths and needs, abilities and challenges. This calls for an increased understanding of disability and difference on the part of students.” The grant is likely to open even more doors to help catapult CMT awareness all around the globe. More information can be found at Help4CMT.

THE DAILY HERALD

FRESH SALMON

health, mind & body

Atlantic salmon recipes make four-meals-in-one Simple Salmon Bisque

the new fast food for multi-tasking moms Fresh salmon is the answer for time pressed moms and can help address the growing obesity issue in children, says Holly Clegg, recognized author, chef, and working mother. “Working moms are facing huge challenges getting healthy food quickly on the table for their families,” says Clegg. “We know that fresh salmon itself can multi-task: it’s a super health food, it’s fast, and you can make more than one meal at once. “Fresh salmon from Maine and Atlantic Canada is one way to attack the myth that fast means unhealthy,” says Clegg. “It’s high in protein and it contains key vitamins and minerals, so you know it’s a great food to serve your family. And with very little planning you can cook one meal and make three more out of it, minimizing mom’s time in the kitchen.” Clegg adds that salmon is a natural source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which recent studies have shown to be critical for vision and improved brain development in infants. Pregnant women, nursing moms, as well as developing children, will benefit from salmon’s “brain food” qualities. Clegg, known as the “Queen of Quick” and author of a best-selling cookbook series, takes every opportunity to show moms, who are often in charge of meal planning and preparation, how to boost their families’ menu with what she called the new ‘super fast food.’ Her recipes are simple to prepare and use everyday ingredients. Using a basic salmon recipe for one meal, Clegg shows moms that by cooking extra they can prepare three other unique and delicious recipes like salmon salad, bisque, and sliders. Clegg is eager to help as child obesity rates continue to rise. With parents working more hours, it leaves them with less time to shop for healthy food options and to prepare healthy meals. Time-pressed families are relying more on fast food and packaged food, which tend to be high in fat and calories, just to get food on the table quickly, she says. “Working moms are under so much pressure from so many sources — if we can provide them with ways to juggle all those demands and know they are keeping their family healthy, then hopefully we’re taking some of that pressure off,” says Clegg. “The great thing about fresh salmon is how easy it is to get it fresh,” says Clegg. “If you buy salmon from Maine and Atlantic Canada you know it was literally swimming just a couple of days earlier, and that’s hard to beat.”

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Makes 3 (1-cup) servings 1 2 2 ½ ¾ ¾ 2 ¼ 1 First make enough glazed salmon for all recipes; serve four fillets for dinner; then use the leftover salmon for lunches and dinners later.

Glazed Salmon Makes 4 servings

¼ cup honey 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce 2 tablespoons lime juice 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 4 6-ounce salmon fillets (Atlantic Canada or coast of Maine) 1. In small bowl, whisk together honey, soy sauce, lime juice, and mustard. Marinate salmon in sauce in refrigerator for several hours, or until ready to cook. 2. In nonstick skillet coated with nonstick cooking spray, cook salmon on each side, 3-5 minutes, until golden brown, crispy, and just cooked through. Transfer salmon to platter. 3. Add remaining honey glaze to skillet, and simmer, stirring, until mixture comes to boil. Return the salmon to the pan, heat thoroughly, and serve immediately. Nutritional information per serving Calories 273, Protein (g) 35, Carbohydrate (g) 19, Fat (g) 6, Calories from Fat (%) 20, Saturated Fat (g) 1, Dietary Fiber (g) 0, Cholesterol (mg) 88, Sodium (mg) 400 Diabetic Exchanges: 5 very lean meat, 1 other carbohydrate

Strawberry & Kiwi Mixed Green Salad Topped with Salmon Makes 6-8 servings 8

cups mixed greens (Bibb, red leaf, spinach) 1½ cups sliced strawberries 2 kiwis, peeled and sliced 1 tablespoon sesame seeds 1 green onion, chopped 1 ⁄3 cup raspberry vinegar 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard ¼ cup canola oil 1. In large bowl, mix together greens, strawberries and kiwi. 2. In small bowl, whisk together sesame seeds, green onion, vinegar, Dijon mustard, and oil. Refrigerate vinaigrette until ready to use. 3. When ready to toss salad, add dressing gradually, top with pre-cooked salmon and serve immediately. Nutritional information per serving (without salmon): Calories 106, Calories from fat 65% Fat 8g, Saturated Fat 1g, Cholesterol 0 mg. Sodium 42mg. Carbohydrate 8g, Dietary Fiber 3g, Sugars 4g, Protein 2g, Dietary Exchanges: ½ fruit, 1½ fat

½

tablespoon canola oil tablespoons finely chopped onion tablespoons all-purpose flour cup low-sodium, fat-free chicken broth cup fat free half-and-half cup skim milk teaspoons no-salt tomato paste cup white wine or chicken broth cup cooked, skin removed, flaked salmon fillet (Atlantic Canada or coast of Maine) teaspoon dried dill weed leaves Salt and white pepper to taste

1. In large nonstick pot, melt butter and sauté onions about 3 minutes, until tender. 2. Add flour, stirring one minute. Gradually, stirring constantly, add broth, half-andhalf, milk and tomato paste. Bring to boil, reduce heat, stirring until mixture starts to thicken. Add wine and continue cooking until thickened. 3. Add flaked salmon, dill weed, and season to taste. Nutritional information per serving: Calories 214, Calories from fat 308% Fat 7g, Saturated Fat 1g, Cholesterol 27mg, Sodium 141mg, Carbohydrate 16g, Dietary Fiber 0g, Protein 19g, Dietary Exchanges: Dietary exchanges: ½ starch, ½ fat free milk, 2 lean meat

Salmon Sliders

Cooked salmon from Maine/Atlantic Canada Mini buns Sliced cucumber Dill Sauce (recipe follows) 1. Cut buns in half and layer salmon, sliced cucumber and dill sauce (see recipe).

Dill Sauce 1 2 1 2

cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt tablespoons light brown sugar tablespoon vinegar teaspoons dill weed

In small bowl, mix together all ingredients.


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health, mind & body

THE DAILY HERALD

Getting eye care where it is needed most

Jimmy T. Le, Eyepacs program coordinator, right, trains the staff at the Roanoke Rapids’ office of the Rural Health Group on the drs camera they will use when screening diabetes patients for retinopathy, which is any disease of the back part of the eye.

Rural Health Group brings retinopathy image screening to diabetic patients by Kris Smith News Editor

Diabetic patients in the Roanoke Valley now have a better chance of fighting vision problems. “Last year, we saw 3,500 diabetes patients and of those only 9 percent had eye exams,” shared Kesha Rooks, director of Case Management at the Rural Health Group. Retinopathy is any disease of the back part of the eye and includes bleeding or leaking of fluid in the eyes, according to Dr. Jorge Cuadros, O.D., Ph.D, CEO of Eyepacs — Picture Archive Communication System — ­ and director of Informatics Research at UC-Berkeley. Chronic, uncontrolled blood sugar levels in diabetics tend to lead to vision trouble, or diabetic

eye disease. Cuadros and colleague Jimmy T. Le, Eyepacs program coordinator, were recently in the Roanoke Valley making rounds to the health group’s clinics to inform and train staff on the retinopathy screening process. “The K.B. Reynolds Charitable Trust provided part of the money” for the nine cameras, one for each Rural Health clinic, said Brian Harris, executive director of the Rural Health Group. “As the safety net provider in the region, we are committed to providing services to the under served.” It is roughly a three-prong low-cost solution for helping diabetics with vision trouble or preventing vision issues. It involves screening during primary care appointments, a special camera, and cost-free, secure transmission of information. “Consult moved into primary care is key to catching issues early,” said Cuadros, adding screening during primary visits also allows for no extra cost to the patient. The second prong is the “drs camera.” It is a digital camera that captures an image of the back of the eye to allow for further analysis, as compared to a doctor doing a physical exam. “If images are not taken, then the potential for missing signs of issues is much greater,” Cuadros said. After the images are taken, they are sent through a license free, securedinternet line to specialists for further analysis. An official report goes back to the physician within 48 hours and usually within 24 hours — “In urgent cases results come back quicker,” Cuadros said. “We chose this technology because over 40 percent of our diabetes patients are uninsured and do not have access to retinopathy screening,” Harris said.

health, mind & body

THE DAILY HERALD

“Our patients’ financial constraints drove us to acquire this program.” Glenda Branch, nurse practitioner, was the first at the Roanoke Rapids clinic to try the camera out from a patient’s perspective. “It was comfortable, just a flash with a green dot,” she said. “I would do it again, and recommend it to others.” No dilation is usually required, Cuadros said, adding retinopathy screening doesn’t take the place of a regular eye exam, and it is not for screening glaucoma. Cuadros did say this type of screening has aided diabetic patients and helped find eye problems associated with cardiovascular disease, congestive heart failure and brain tumors. Rooks said the Rural Health Group “wants to screen patients before they get the disease. We want to focus on the whole person, we don’t want to leave anything out — a one-stop shop for providing primary care.”

Kris Smith | The Daily Herald This is the digital image produced by the drs camera upon screening for retinopathy.

Retinopathy treatment Cuadros said if a patient has symptoms already, then usually it is too late to restore vision entirely. “When new blood vessels grow is when it needs to be treated,” he said. The main treatment is laser. Another treatment is

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injections, which keep normal blood vessels from growing and decreases leakage of fluid. In comparison Cuadros said, “The injections are not so much a good enough treatment to replace the laser option.” Cuadros advised patients to get checked once a year in order to find problems early enough to treat it. Eyepacs Approximately 11 years ago, Cuadros said he dreamed up the Eyepacs software for his dissertation at school. He explained it is a license-free internetbased program that allows clinics to connect at no cost. “After my dissertation, The California Health Care Foundation put in $2.5 million to secure it (Eyepacs),” Cuadros said. It is used mostly for diabetic eye disease. The software helps get the images from the primary care physician to the specialist via an encrypted or secured transmission online; Cuadros said regular email is not private enough to use, adding other ways of communicating the images would cost ten times as much. There are about 200 clinics using Eyepacs in rural and community areas in five states, and in Canada and Mexico.


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health, mind & body

THE DAILY HERALD

Getting eye care where it is needed most

Jimmy T. Le, Eyepacs program coordinator, right, trains the staff at the Roanoke Rapids’ office of the Rural Health Group on the drs camera they will use when screening diabetes patients for retinopathy, which is any disease of the back part of the eye.

Rural Health Group brings retinopathy image screening to diabetic patients by Kris Smith News Editor

Diabetic patients in the Roanoke Valley now have a better chance of fighting vision problems. “Last year, we saw 3,500 diabetes patients and of those only 9 percent had eye exams,” shared Kesha Rooks, director of Case Management at the Rural Health Group. Retinopathy is any disease of the back part of the eye and includes bleeding or leaking of fluid in the eyes, according to Dr. Jorge Cuadros, O.D., Ph.D, CEO of Eyepacs — Picture Archive Communication System — ­ and director of Informatics Research at UC-Berkeley. Chronic, uncontrolled blood sugar levels in diabetics tend to lead to vision trouble, or diabetic

eye disease. Cuadros and colleague Jimmy T. Le, Eyepacs program coordinator, were recently in the Roanoke Valley making rounds to the health group’s clinics to inform and train staff on the retinopathy screening process. “The K.B. Reynolds Charitable Trust provided part of the money” for the nine cameras, one for each Rural Health clinic, said Brian Harris, executive director of the Rural Health Group. “As the safety net provider in the region, we are committed to providing services to the under served.” It is roughly a three-prong low-cost solution for helping diabetics with vision trouble or preventing vision issues. It involves screening during primary care appointments, a special camera, and cost-free, secure transmission of information. “Consult moved into primary care is key to catching issues early,” said Cuadros, adding screening during primary visits also allows for no extra cost to the patient. The second prong is the “drs camera.” It is a digital camera that captures an image of the back of the eye to allow for further analysis, as compared to a doctor doing a physical exam. “If images are not taken, then the potential for missing signs of issues is much greater,” Cuadros said. After the images are taken, they are sent through a license free, securedinternet line to specialists for further analysis. An official report goes back to the physician within 48 hours and usually within 24 hours — “In urgent cases results come back quicker,” Cuadros said. “We chose this technology because over 40 percent of our diabetes patients are uninsured and do not have access to retinopathy screening,” Harris said.

health, mind & body

THE DAILY HERALD

“Our patients’ financial constraints drove us to acquire this program.” Glenda Branch, nurse practitioner, was the first at the Roanoke Rapids clinic to try the camera out from a patient’s perspective. “It was comfortable, just a flash with a green dot,” she said. “I would do it again, and recommend it to others.” No dilation is usually required, Cuadros said, adding retinopathy screening doesn’t take the place of a regular eye exam, and it is not for screening glaucoma. Cuadros did say this type of screening has aided diabetic patients and helped find eye problems associated with cardiovascular disease, congestive heart failure and brain tumors. Rooks said the Rural Health Group “wants to screen patients before they get the disease. We want to focus on the whole person, we don’t want to leave anything out — a one-stop shop for providing primary care.”

Kris Smith | The Daily Herald This is the digital image produced by the drs camera upon screening for retinopathy.

Retinopathy treatment Cuadros said if a patient has symptoms already, then usually it is too late to restore vision entirely. “When new blood vessels grow is when it needs to be treated,” he said. The main treatment is laser. Another treatment is

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injections, which keep normal blood vessels from growing and decreases leakage of fluid. In comparison Cuadros said, “The injections are not so much a good enough treatment to replace the laser option.” Cuadros advised patients to get checked once a year in order to find problems early enough to treat it. Eyepacs Approximately 11 years ago, Cuadros said he dreamed up the Eyepacs software for his dissertation at school. He explained it is a license-free internetbased program that allows clinics to connect at no cost. “After my dissertation, The California Health Care Foundation put in $2.5 million to secure it (Eyepacs),” Cuadros said. It is used mostly for diabetic eye disease. The software helps get the images from the primary care physician to the specialist via an encrypted or secured transmission online; Cuadros said regular email is not private enough to use, adding other ways of communicating the images would cost ten times as much. There are about 200 clinics using Eyepacs in rural and community areas in five states, and in Canada and Mexico.


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health, mind & body

Rural Health Group medical locations ... Rural Health Group at Henderson 100 Parkview Drive West in Henderson 252-438-3549 Rural Health Group at Jackson 9425 NC Hwy 305 in Jackson 252-534-1661 Rural Health Group at Lake Gaston 108 North Mosby Avenue in Littleton 252-586-5411 Rural Health Group at Norlina 110 Division Street in Norlina 252-456-2009 Rural Health Group at Rich Square 200 South Main Street in Rich Square 252-539-2082 Rural Health Group at Roanoke Rapids 2066 NC Highway 125 in Roanoke Rapids 252-536-5000 Rural Health Group at Scotland Neck 919 Jr. High School Road in Scotland Neck 252-826-3143 Rural Health Group at Twin County 204 Evans Road in Hollister 252-586-5151 Rural Health Group at Whitakers 105 SE Railroad St. in Whitakers 252-437-2171 Other offices with specified services ... Rural Health Group at Weldon Weldon Elementary School 805 Washington Avenue in Weldon Clinic 252-536-0116 School office 252-536-4815 Rural Health Group at Roanoke Rapids – WIC 116-A West 3rd St. in Roanoke Rapids 252-535-4845 Rural Health Group HOPE (Health Outreach & Patient Education) 100 Parkview Drive West in Henderson 252-536-5910

Shedding light

THE DAILY HERALD

on ‘the biggest disease no one has ever heard of’

CMT

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llison Moore, founder of the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF), has made it her life’s mission to educate people about a neurological condition known as CMT after experiencing suddenonset CMT in 1997. The disease was triggered from a chemotherapy drug in her cancer treatment. A new federal grant issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will now enable Moore and her HNF associates to push the boundaries on awareness and research surrounding CMT through several initiatives. CMT is a progressive disease that deteriorates the nerves in the hands, feet, legs, and arms. Patients may develop muscle deformities that impair movement and can necessitate the use of everything from leg braces to wheelchairs. Until now there has been little discussion of CMT and doctors have been lax in diagnosing the disease early — particularly because they have been in the dark. “Many people don’t know how to deal with CMT because they know nothing about it,” says Moore. The new grant has paved the way for the creation of The National CMT Resource Center (Help4CMT.com) among other programs. This comprehensive online resource fills the gap in CMT advocacy and information dispersement

by being the first forum to connect individuals, doctors, researchers, and the general public in a unique way. The site offers a selection of resources, information and educational/training materials on Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease and the latest options for symptom management. It can also serve as a way for those with the condition to connect to offer support and encouragement, or be put in touch with those who may offer assistance. From “Living With CMT” to a page for kids, The National CMT Resource Center targets often underserved groups in disseminating information about a relatively unknown disease outside of its base of people affected. Although estimates say that around 2.6 million people worldwide have CMT and that it is the most common inherited neuropathy, knowledge of CMT on a global, even national, scale is limited. Despite its similarity to the better-known multiple sclerosis, CMT has yet to have the same level of media chatter as some other more widely recognized causes. Apart from actress Julie Newmar (the original Catwoman) there have been few high-profile people to become the faces of the disease — something that tends to “wake up” the public. Thanks to the CDC grant, The National CMT Resource Center is set to change all that

— spreading the word across the globe. The added bonus is that all of these resources are provided for free. Another offering made possible by the grant is the CMT and Disability School Outreach Program. This enables educators and children to learn about CMT and be mindful of individuals with the disease or other disabilities. Youth-geared information teach lessons on empathy. Plus the book, “Arlene on the Scene” serves to open the lines of communication about CMT or disability as part of inclusion education. “Through our School Outreach Program we offer educational materials and a live author presentation aimed at increasing understanding of disability in a fun, interactive way,” says Carol Liu, a member of HNF. “Our classrooms today are filled with a wide variety of strengths and needs, abilities and challenges. This calls for an increased understanding of disability and difference on the part of students.” The grant is likely to open even more doors to help catapult CMT awareness all around the globe. More information can be found at Help4CMT.

THE DAILY HERALD

FRESH SALMON

health, mind & body

Atlantic salmon recipes make four-meals-in-one Simple Salmon Bisque

the new fast food for multi-tasking moms Fresh salmon is the answer for time pressed moms and can help address the growing obesity issue in children, says Holly Clegg, recognized author, chef, and working mother. “Working moms are facing huge challenges getting healthy food quickly on the table for their families,” says Clegg. “We know that fresh salmon itself can multi-task: it’s a super health food, it’s fast, and you can make more than one meal at once. “Fresh salmon from Maine and Atlantic Canada is one way to attack the myth that fast means unhealthy,” says Clegg. “It’s high in protein and it contains key vitamins and minerals, so you know it’s a great food to serve your family. And with very little planning you can cook one meal and make three more out of it, minimizing mom’s time in the kitchen.” Clegg adds that salmon is a natural source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which recent studies have shown to be critical for vision and improved brain development in infants. Pregnant women, nursing moms, as well as developing children, will benefit from salmon’s “brain food” qualities. Clegg, known as the “Queen of Quick” and author of a best-selling cookbook series, takes every opportunity to show moms, who are often in charge of meal planning and preparation, how to boost their families’ menu with what she called the new ‘super fast food.’ Her recipes are simple to prepare and use everyday ingredients. Using a basic salmon recipe for one meal, Clegg shows moms that by cooking extra they can prepare three other unique and delicious recipes like salmon salad, bisque, and sliders. Clegg is eager to help as child obesity rates continue to rise. With parents working more hours, it leaves them with less time to shop for healthy food options and to prepare healthy meals. Time-pressed families are relying more on fast food and packaged food, which tend to be high in fat and calories, just to get food on the table quickly, she says. “Working moms are under so much pressure from so many sources — if we can provide them with ways to juggle all those demands and know they are keeping their family healthy, then hopefully we’re taking some of that pressure off,” says Clegg. “The great thing about fresh salmon is how easy it is to get it fresh,” says Clegg. “If you buy salmon from Maine and Atlantic Canada you know it was literally swimming just a couple of days earlier, and that’s hard to beat.”

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Makes 3 (1-cup) servings 1 2 2 ½ ¾ ¾ 2 ¼ 1 First make enough glazed salmon for all recipes; serve four fillets for dinner; then use the leftover salmon for lunches and dinners later.

Glazed Salmon Makes 4 servings

¼ cup honey 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce 2 tablespoons lime juice 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 4 6-ounce salmon fillets (Atlantic Canada or coast of Maine) 1. In small bowl, whisk together honey, soy sauce, lime juice, and mustard. Marinate salmon in sauce in refrigerator for several hours, or until ready to cook. 2. In nonstick skillet coated with nonstick cooking spray, cook salmon on each side, 3-5 minutes, until golden brown, crispy, and just cooked through. Transfer salmon to platter. 3. Add remaining honey glaze to skillet, and simmer, stirring, until mixture comes to boil. Return the salmon to the pan, heat thoroughly, and serve immediately. Nutritional information per serving Calories 273, Protein (g) 35, Carbohydrate (g) 19, Fat (g) 6, Calories from Fat (%) 20, Saturated Fat (g) 1, Dietary Fiber (g) 0, Cholesterol (mg) 88, Sodium (mg) 400 Diabetic Exchanges: 5 very lean meat, 1 other carbohydrate

Strawberry & Kiwi Mixed Green Salad Topped with Salmon Makes 6-8 servings 8

cups mixed greens (Bibb, red leaf, spinach) 1½ cups sliced strawberries 2 kiwis, peeled and sliced 1 tablespoon sesame seeds 1 green onion, chopped 1 ⁄3 cup raspberry vinegar 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard ¼ cup canola oil 1. In large bowl, mix together greens, strawberries and kiwi. 2. In small bowl, whisk together sesame seeds, green onion, vinegar, Dijon mustard, and oil. Refrigerate vinaigrette until ready to use. 3. When ready to toss salad, add dressing gradually, top with pre-cooked salmon and serve immediately. Nutritional information per serving (without salmon): Calories 106, Calories from fat 65% Fat 8g, Saturated Fat 1g, Cholesterol 0 mg. Sodium 42mg. Carbohydrate 8g, Dietary Fiber 3g, Sugars 4g, Protein 2g, Dietary Exchanges: ½ fruit, 1½ fat

½

tablespoon canola oil tablespoons finely chopped onion tablespoons all-purpose flour cup low-sodium, fat-free chicken broth cup fat free half-and-half cup skim milk teaspoons no-salt tomato paste cup white wine or chicken broth cup cooked, skin removed, flaked salmon fillet (Atlantic Canada or coast of Maine) teaspoon dried dill weed leaves Salt and white pepper to taste

1. In large nonstick pot, melt butter and sauté onions about 3 minutes, until tender. 2. Add flour, stirring one minute. Gradually, stirring constantly, add broth, half-andhalf, milk and tomato paste. Bring to boil, reduce heat, stirring until mixture starts to thicken. Add wine and continue cooking until thickened. 3. Add flaked salmon, dill weed, and season to taste. Nutritional information per serving: Calories 214, Calories from fat 308% Fat 7g, Saturated Fat 1g, Cholesterol 27mg, Sodium 141mg, Carbohydrate 16g, Dietary Fiber 0g, Protein 19g, Dietary Exchanges: Dietary exchanges: ½ starch, ½ fat free milk, 2 lean meat

Salmon Sliders

Cooked salmon from Maine/Atlantic Canada Mini buns Sliced cucumber Dill Sauce (recipe follows) 1. Cut buns in half and layer salmon, sliced cucumber and dill sauce (see recipe).

Dill Sauce 1 2 1 2

cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt tablespoons light brown sugar tablespoon vinegar teaspoons dill weed

In small bowl, mix together all ingredients.


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health, mind & body

THE DAILY HERALD

Healthier ways to cook comfort foods

health, mind & body

THE DAILY HERALD

Popular health myths debunked

Choose leaner meats. Substitute lean cuts of meat or alternatives to reduce the fat and calories. For example, ground turkey can be substituted for ground beef in many cases.

Reduce the cheese. Cut down on the amount of cheese in a recipe. In a dish like lasagna, add vegetables to the recipe to beef it up instead of extra cheese. When using cheese, opt for lowor no-fat varieties. Use stocks for flavor. Soup stock can be used to flavor everything from rice to mashed potatoes, instead of relying on butter or heavy gravies. Select whole-wheat breads. A lot of extra calories are consumed when loading up on breads that are essentially devoid of nutritional benefits. When selecting breads and doughs, go for whole-wheat products that will offer more fiber.

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ith the arrival of the colder weather, people often turn to hearty foods to fill up and keep the body warm. Too often, however, so-called comfort foods tend to be big on fat and calories as much as they are big on flavor. With a few small ingredient changes, comfort foods can be both delicious and healthy.

Did you overindulge at dinner, or do you have indigestion? Have a ‘shot’ of apple cider vinegar. It will aid in digestion and bring you relief. Also use apple cider vinegar on your salad to help digest your food and release the vitamins to be absorbed in your body.

Just think of all those hearty and filling foods you enjoy when winter arrives. The stews, casseroles, pastas, and soups that make cold days bearable are often not the healthiest choices a person can make. The average two-cup bowl of beef chili, for example, comes in at 595 calories and 25.9 grams of fat, according to Calorie King. That’s before the addition of sour cream, cheese or bread is included. One entree of Lasagna Classico from the popular chain eatery Olive Garden weighs in at 850 calories and 47 grams of fat. Unlike the salads and sandwiches of warmer weather, comfort foods tend to be built on meats, cheeses and carbohydrate-rich ingredients. Indulging too often can mean quick weight gain and extra fat the body simply does not need. However, you do not have to give up on your favorite comfort foods; simply find ways to make them healthier.

Opt for low-fat dairy. When a recipe calls for cream or whole milk, substitute skim milk and see if you can notice the difference. In many cases, the change in flavor will be negligible. Stock up on nonstick sprays. Lightly mist foods with some non-stick spray instead of coating pans and ingredients in a lot of oil to cut down on calories. Use vegetables and legumes to make a meal more hearty. Stews, soups and other comfort foods can be enhanced with mushrooms, beans or other filling items at a fraction of the fat and calories of adding meats or cheeses. Bake or grill instead of fry. Many popular comfort foods, like fried chicken, can be made healthier simply by changing the cooking method. Make popular recipes healthy by baking them instead of frying them. Fill up first. If you want to enjoy comfort foods as-is, fill up first on salad or soup before having a portion of the selected comfort food. This way you’re less likely to overeat on the fattier dish but will still feel satiated. Use fruit in place of oil. In cake mixes and other desserts, applesauce or another pureed fruit or vegetable can often replace oil without drying out the end product. Comfort foods are common when the mercury drops. Making some easy changes to some favorite recipes can mean enjoying these hearty meals without paying the price in extra fat and more calories.

Well-meaning parents or grandparents often tell children not to do somethingwith the warning that a serious health implication could result. Kids often take their elders at their word. But some of these warnings bear more truth than others. Here’s the scoop on some of the more common misconceptions.

MYTH:

MYTH:

MYTH:

MYTH:

MYTH:

Swallowed chewing gum stays in the stomach for seven years.

If you keep your eyes crossed too long, they will get stuck that way.

Going outside with wet hair will make you sick.

Covering your head is most important because you lose 75 percent of your body heat through it.

Don’t swim right after eating

While chewing gum cannot be digested and is meant to be chewed and not swallowed, accidentally swallowing a piece here and there won’t cause major issues. That’s because the gum will simply pass through the digestive system whole and come out with stool. If a large amount of gum is swallowed in a short period of time, then there could be issues, including constipation and intestinal blockage in children.

The muscles in the eye are just like any muscles elsewhere in the body. Although they may tire and get sore, they are relatively resilient and can take a lot of wear and tear. Crossing your eyes may tax these muscles, but you won’t do any permanent harm. Rest assured that crossing the eyes will not leave them stuck that way.

Although you will feel colder stepping outside with a part of your body wet, it won’t make you more susceptible to catching a cold. Researchers at the Common Cold Research Unit in England once tested a group of volunteers who were given the cold virus. One half of the group stayed in a warm room, while the others took a bath and stood wet in a hallway for a half hour. The wet group didn’t catch more colds than the dry.

This calculation is more for an infant whose head makes up a greater percentage of his or her body. In an adult, the figure is closer to 10 percent. Heat can escape from any exposed area of the body. Therefore, it is helpful to bundle up all areas of the body when spending time outdoors in the cold weather.

The basis of this mantra is that when digesting food, the digestive system pulls blood away from the muscles and the idea is that you could cramp up and drown. While you may have less energy to swim vigorously, chances are you won’t be so weak as to drown. Although many health myths prevail, knowing the truth can help parents educate their children better about which behaviors are safe and which are risky.

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health, mind & body

Lead exposure puts adults, children at risk

in soil is the risk it poses to kids, who can inhale the lead even if they’re just playing in the yard. Household dust is another source of lead. Dust contains the lead from deteriorating exterior paint or soil brought into the home from the outside. Perhaps the scariest source of lead is drinking water. Homes might have plumbing with lead or lead solder, putting residents at risk of lead poisoning. Lead cannot be seen or tasted and it’s also aroma-free, so concerned homeowners should contact their local health department and request their water be tested. Until then, use only cold water for drinking and cooking, and run the water for 15 to 30 seconds before drinking it. as best to shower before coming from work and separate work clothes from the rest of your clothes and the family’s clothes when doing laundry. Additional sources of lead are old painted toys and furniture; food and liquids stored in lead crystal or lead-glazed pottery or porcelain; and hobbies, such as making pottery or stained glass, that used lead.

Lead in the soil outside a home could put children who play in the yard at risk of lead exposure.

E

xcessive exposure to and absorption of lead can cause lead poisoning, a harmful condition that can result in lots of suffering for adults and children alike. While many people are aware of lead poisoning, few might understand its prevalence and just how big a risk it can pose. Gaining a greater understanding of lead poisoning can help adults protect themselves and their children from this potentially debilitating condition.

Where is lead found?

Lead can be found in many places, including your home. Homeowners who own a home built before 1978 likely have or had lead-based paint somewhere in their home. Beginning in the 1978, the United States federal government banned lead-based paint from housing. However, homes built prior to that faced no such restrictions. Another place lead can be found is in the soil around the home. The soil gets lead from a host of sources, including exterior lead-based paint and leaded gas used in cars. What’s especially troubling about the presence of lead

How do I know I’m at risk?

A home with lead-based paint does not necessarily mean the home is a hazard. To determine if you and your family is at risk, testing on both the family and the home is necessary. The levels of lead in a child’s blood typically increase rapidly from six to 12 months of age, and often peak somewhere between 18 and 24 months. Blood tests can detect high levels of lead, and are most important for children between ages 1 and 2 and children and family members who have been exposed to high levels of lead. A home inspection can be done in one of two ways, be it a paint inspection or a risk assessment. A paint inspection won’t determine if the paint is hazardous, but it will determine the lead content of each different type of painted surface throughout the home. A risk assessment determines if there are any sources of lead exposure and will also suggest a course of action to address these hazards. Homeowners should not do a home inspection on their own. Hire a qualified professional to do the job. The National Lead Information Center (1-800-424-LEAD) can help homeowners find a trained and qualified professional in their area.

THE NAME NEWSPAPER

How can you protect your family from lead exposure?

Individuals can take several steps to protect their families from lead exposure. In addition to home inspection and blood testing, the following are some of the ways to protect men, women and children from lead exposure.

IS GLUTEN- FREE disease but do experience sensitivity to gluten-containing products — everything from gastrointestinal discomfort to migraines and fatigue. According to experts from the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America, much still remains unknown about gluten sensitivity, but it is clear that gluten sometimes triggers an immune response like an enemy invader in some people today. As a result, many find that avoiding gluten helps mitigate symptoms.

• Clean floors, window frames and window sills on a weekly basis preferably with a mop, sponge or paper towel soaked in warm water. If possible, use an all-purpose cleaner or a cleaning product made specifically for lead. • Be thorough when rinsing mops and sponges after cleaning dirty or dusty areas. • Make sure kids wash their hands frequently, and especially before they eat and go to sleep. • Make sure kids’ play areas are clean, and be sure to wash toys and even stuffed animals regularly. • Avoid tracking soil into the home by removing shoes before entering.

BUILDING BRIGHTER FUTURES FOR OUR CHILDREN

Experiences during early childhood literally shape the structure of the brain. Because today’s children are tomorrow’s leaders, parents and workers, everyone has a stake in making sure that all children have the experiences they need to thrive. Smart Start brings together all the people involved in a young child’s life—families, teachers, doctors, caregivers, social workers, and many others—to ensure every child has all they need for healthy growth and development. Child care, family support and health services for children ages 0-5 and their families are available, so that all children enter school healthy and ready to succeed. Together training and technical assistance are provided to child care programs to ensure quality education for our youngest children.

Halifax - Warren Smart Start Partnership for Children, Inc. 1139 Roanoke Avenue • PO Box 339 Roanoke Rapids, NC 27870 Phone: (252) 537-5621 Fax: (252) 537-9732 Email: smartstart@hwss.org

Need help finding child care? Call our Regional Child Care Resource and Referral Center: 1-888-285-0849

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the way to be?

• Clean up paint chips immediately.

More information about lead exposure is available at www.epa.gov.

health, mind & body

THE DAILY HERALD

F

Traditional breads are something that will have to be removed from one’s diet to be gluten-free.

rom restaurants to food packaging, it is difficult to escape the gluten-free craze that is sweeping the country. Whether as their own dietary preference or for a specific health reason, many people are eschewing gluten products and leaving other people wondering if they should, too.

Gluten is a type of protein that is found in grain products, including wheat, barley and rye, among other carbohydrates. Not all cereals and grains contain gluten, so it’s important to note that gluten and grain are not synonymous. Gluten is not the grain itself, but a component that gives certain grain products their chewy, bending texture. It’s also what contributes to the rising process of doughs brought on through the kneading of the dough. Gluten is tough, which is why doughs and bagels containing gluten have a dense, thick composition. Products that have gluten removed tend to be sticky and goopy in consistency and without shape.

Individuals with a condition called celiac disease cannot properly digest gluten. According to the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse, celiac disease is an immune disease in which people cannot eat gluten because it will damage their small intestine. The disease is hereditary and, despite millions of confirmed cases, many more people are unaware that they even have celiac disease. Many other people do not suffer from celiac

Although there are people who have legitimate reasons to avoid gluten, many are jumping on the gluten-free bandwagon simply because they believe gluten could be something evil lurking in their foods. A paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine may be at the root of this newfound fear of gluten. The paper advised that several diseases may have a root cause with gluten. Some of these diseases include:

• irritable bowel syndrome • cancer • rheumatoid arthritis • anxiety and depression • dementia • epilepsy • canker sores • anemia

The trouble with healthy people removing gluten from their diets is that it can cause some deficiencies. The body actually requires grains to receive the daily recommended value of certain vitamins and nutrients. These include calcium, riboflavin, folate, thiamin, iron, and fiber. Gluten, being a protein, is also a viable protein source for the body. Individuals who are vegetarians often get protein through legumes and grains. Adopting a gluten-free diet in addition to being vegetarian removes another protein source.

While there is no actual danger to eating gluten-free, doctors advise ensuring you’re getting the adequate vitamins and nutrients through other sources to compensate for the lack of nutritional value from grains.

Traditional pastas are also off-limits. People can try substituting rice noodles for wheat noodles in recipes.

Although most traditional breads are off-limits to those with gluten sensitivity, there are many products being marketed mainstream that are made with rice or potato flour instead. Cereals made from corn and rice are good alternatives to those made with gluten-containing grains.

Although many people are adopting glutenfree lifestyles, removing the protein from your diet is only medically necessary at this point if you suffer from celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.

Those adopting a gluten-free diet should be careful to read product ingredients to determine if gluten is present. While key words like wheat, oats, barley, and rye indicate gluten, malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein are also indicators that gluten is in the food.

Gluten is not exclusive to foods, either. Beer contains wheat, so it will also have gluten. Choose wines or other liquors instead. Also, some products, like lip balm, also contain gluten. Therefore, it’s best to be aware of all gluten sources and not assume it is only relegated to foods.


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health, mind & body

THE DAILY HERALD

HEALTH TIPS HOW TO SURVIVE A HEART ATTACK ALONE: Without help, a person whose heart stops beating properly and who begins to feel faint, has only about 10 seconds left before losing consciousness. However, victims can help themselves by coughing repeatedly and very vigorously. A deep breath should be taken before each cough. The cough must be deep and prolonged, as when producing sputum from deep inside the chest. And a cough must be repeated about every 2 seconds without let up until help arrives, or until the heart is felt to be beating normally again. Deep breaths get oxygen into the lungs and coughing movements squeeze the heart and keep the blood circulating. The squeezing pressure on the heart also helps it regain normal rhythm. In this way, heart attack victims can get to a hospital. — To get rid of lice safely on children or animals and leave the hair soft and shiny, simply use cheap hair conditioner containing coconut oil or paraben wax. Apply thickly and leave on for 20 minutes. Using a tight comb, brush through the hair thoroughly, pulling off the lice. Dip the comb regularly in water containing tea tree oil. Then rinse off the hair with water. Optionally apply a strong tea made by boiling feverfew leaves in water for 20 minutes. Cool and use as a final rinse. Tea tree oil and lavender essential oil may also be added to the cooled feverfew tea. Do not rinse off. — Feeling tired and sluggish? Your polarity may be reversed! Causes include wearing a watch on your left wrist, exposure to electro-magnetic fields such as a clock radio beside your bed or working at a computer, dehydration, and iron or potassium deficiency. — How do you correct your polarity? Drink a glass of water. Fold your arms in front of your chest. Press the pulse points of your wrists together so each hand is holding onto a forearm. Hold this position for 1-5 minutes until you feel a noticable shift in your body. ( It may feel like you are shorter or heavier or more bottomheavy. ) You will notice a rise in your energy level after about 10 minutes

THE DAILY HERALD

DesiccanT P not so dangerous

arents fret over many of the items kids come into contact with, particularly small objects that can present choking hazards or items that may be poisonous. One common thing that often turns up in a home are packets of silica gel. Silica gel is a desiccant, which means it is designed to draw moisture out of something to keep it fresh. Silica packets are often found tucked into new shoes or handbags, and small pouches of silica gel may be in the vitamin bottles in the medicine cabinet. Silica gel can absorb up to 40 percent of its weight in moisture. It is used to protect items where extreme temperature changes may cause moisture or condensation buildup, which can damage the products. Silica products also may be used to dry out closets or wet

health, mind & body

areas of the home, such as basements. Containers full of silica gel are used to absorb moisture from the air. Silica gel is also used at some industrial factories or other businesses to help with spill clean-up. The pellets are tossed onto a spill, which then absorb the moisture and make for an easier job of cleaning. Individuals may have noticed that silica gel packets have the warning “do not eat” printed right on the packaging. They tend to resemble the individual packets of sugar found at restaurants, so it may be easy for children and adults to mistake them for something edible. What if a packet of silica gel did end up in the mouth? What would be the ramifications? Rest assured that, although the experience may be uncomfortable, silica is not very harmful. If granules of silica gel

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ended up on the tongue or in the mouth, the product would suck out all of the moisture from the mouth, making it extremely dry and uncomfortable. Chances are there would be attempts to spit it out promptly. Should it be ingested, there could be dry eyes, dry throat, stomach upset, and aggravation of the mucous membranes, according to Discovery Health. It wouldn’t completely suck the moisture out of the body in such a small dose, however. Many household items feature posted warnings to protect the health of children and adults. Some things can be very dangerous if used in the wrong way, while others are less dangerous. But from a safety standpoint, it can be important to heed all warnings to avoid injury or illness.

Trying to lose weight? Try this! Keep a little journal for one week and write down everything you eat. If it goes in your mouth record it! You may be surprised by how much you actually consume and where you overindulge. You may want to bring your ‘food dirary’ to a nutrition expert to see where you can make changes. Record your exercise too! This simple act of recording could stop you from grabbing extras and inspire you to exercise.


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health, mind & body

LUNG CANCER remains the deadliest of all cancers

THE NAME NEWSPAPER

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ccording to the National Cancer Institute, lung cancer will claim the lives of more than 150,000 Americans before the end of 2011. In Canada, where the national population is considerably smaller than that of the U.S., lung cancer will still take a heavy toll, causing more than 20,000 deaths according to the Canadian Cancer Society. Meanwhile, Cancer Research UK reports that within in the United Kingdom lung cancer accounts for roughly 6 percent of all deaths, and 22 percent of all deaths from cancer. Each of these figures illustrates the prevalence of lung cancer across the globe, and the deadly toll it takes on an annual basis. While many are quick to assume they will be immune to lung cancer if they simply avoid smoking tobacco, the disease is much more complex than that and understanding it could mean the difference between life and death.What causes lung cancer?

While the NCI reports smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, that doesn’t mean nonsmokers or those who quit smoking still aren’t at risk. In fact, many additional factors can increase a person’s risk of lung cancer. Secondhand smoke has long been known to be very harmful, and no one, not even children, is immune to its effects. The American Cancer Society notes that, in the U.S. alone, roughly 3,000 nonsmoking adults will succumb to lung cancer each year because of secondhand smoke. Choosing not to smoke is a good decision, but being around smokers and breathing in their smoke could prove just as deadly as smoking. The less a person is exposed to tobacco smoke, the lower their risk for lung cancer. Another risk factor for lung cancer is radon, a radioactive gas that cannot be seen, smelled or tasted. Radon forms in soil and rocks, and men and women who work in mines could be exposed to radon.

THE DAILY HERALD

Little-known

food contributors to heart disease

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ed meats, hydrogenized oils — these are the foods we associate with heart disease and high cholesterol. But a few other things many people eat rather frequently could be contributing to future heart problems.

Sugary items

White pasta and breads

The average American eats the equivalent of 21 teaspoons of added sugar a day, which is two to three times the amount they should, according to an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers found that individuals who consumed the most sugary products had the lowest HDL, or good cholesterol, and the highest blood triglyceride levels. Eating large amounts of sugar can then be a major risk factor for high cholesterol and heart disease.

Researchers have found that eating a diet high in refined grains, including those in most store-bought pastas and white breads, can double the risk of heart disease. These foods are those that have a high glycemic index, or GI. Foods with a high GI quickly release sugar into the bloodstream. Doctors have found a correlation between high GI and heart disease, mainly in women, according to research at the University of Milan. The study questioned 32,578 women and 15,171 men. Those who consumed the largest concentration of high GI foods were 2.24 times more likely to develop heart disease than those with the lowest.

Nutritionists advise that, when choosing grain products, it is important to select those made from whole grains. Not only do these products provide the nutritional benefits of whole grains, including fiber, they also help reduce cholesterol and the risk for heart disease.

While many people associate sugary snacks, beverages and sugar itself with dental decay or unnecessary calories, these items also impact cholesterol levels.

In its 2010 guidelines, the American Heart Association recommended limiting added sugar in the diet to no more than 100 calories a day for most women and 150 calories for most men. That’s 6 teaspoons for women and 9 for men. To put those guidelines in perspective, consider that a 12-ounce can of soda has between 8 and 10 teaspoons. In addition, many processed foods contain sugar even if sugar’s inclusion seems foolish. Some restaurants and food manufacturers have admitted to adding sugar to foods — especially those geared to children — to make them taste better and be more appealing. Therefore, sauces, ready-made dinners and other items may have sugar, and the consumer may not know it without reading the nutrition label.

Also, it’s important to note that beverages are the leading supplier of added sugar for many people. Simply reducing the amount of juices, sports drinks and sodas in your diet can greatly reduce sugar consumption.

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health, mind & body

Calories burned during daily 240 cals.

Clean rain gutters and burn 372 calories in one hour.

300 cals.

160 cals.

200 cals.

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ome people think they have to spend hours at the gym sweating on the treadmill or elliptical trainer in order to burn calories and lose weight. As it turns out, the things you do every single day could be burning more calories than you realized. Some discipline with your diet and certain healthy habits can make the difference for those attempting to lose weight. Getting eight hours of sleep can burn more than 300 calories for the average person. But there’s a good chance you are interested in what activities you can do while awake to help burn calories. Courtesy of Discovery Health and Harvard Medical School, here are common everyday activities and how many calories can be burned depending on weight. These figures are based on a person weighing around 150 pounds and a duration of one hour of activity.

Supermarket shopping: Pushing a wagon around the supermarket for an hour can burn 240 calories or more. Up the ante by bagging groceries yourself and packing and unpacking them from the car.

Raking leaves: If you spent time manually raking leaves this past fall, you were doing something good for your body. In addition to working several muscle groups, you may have spent 300 calories. Dusting: Spring cleaning is right around the corner, and that can be good news for your health. Dusting alone can burn as much as 160 calories.

Cooking: Here’s a reason to get fired up about cooking. Making a simple meal can add up to 200 calories lost. Just don’t sabotage those lost calories by cooking up a

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460 Moving: Packing and moving may cals.

350 cals.

450 cals.

400 cals.

seem like a big task one rarely looks forward to, but carrying boxes can burn 460 calories an hour. Packing, moving and unpacking yourself may be the diet plan you’ve been seeking. Painting: Perhaps you’ve been procrastinating on that house painting project. Here’s inspiration to break out the rollers and brushes. Spending an hour painting can burn 350 calories. After several hours applying a primer and then top coat, you may find you painted yourself thinner.

Community service: If you want to help the environment and your health, spending time picking up trash from a park or seaside can shed some serious calories — 450 an hour. Playing with kids: Engaging in some fun family time can burn around 400 calories. Plus, it’s a great way for parents and children to bond.

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Radon can also be found in homes when it pushes its way through cracks in floors or gaps around service pipes or in suspended floors. Testing a home for radon is inexpensive and won’t take much time. Additional causes of lung cancer include air pollution, asbestos and even age. Older people are more likely to be diagnosed with lung cancer, as are those with a family history of lung cancer. Does lung cancer have symptoms?

health, mind & body swollen lymph nodes. When determining if a patient has lung cancer, a doctor will also enlist the help of a pathologist to study cell or tissue samples. These cells or tissues can be collected in a number of ways, and a doctor might order more than one test. Bronchoscopy: A thin, lighted tube is inserted through the nose or mouth into the lung, allowing a close exam of the lungs and the air passages that lead to them. A cell sample can be taken with a needle, brush or other tool.

The deadliest form of cancer for men and women alike, lung cancer is perhaps so deadly because it does not often have many symptoms in its early stages. While some symptoms might manifest themselves in the early stages, most will wait until the cancer begins to grow before they make their presence felt. As the cancer grows, the following symptoms might appear:

Sputum cytology: Sputum, or thick fluid, is coughed up from the lungs and then checked for cancer cells.

More information about lung cancer is available from the National Cancer Institute at www.cancer.gov.

• a cough that continues to worsen or won’t go away • constant chest pain • coughing up blood • a voice that grows hoarse • frequent infections of the lungs, including pneumonia • constant feelings of fatigue • unexplained weight loss

Each of these symptoms can occur even if a person does not have lung cancer. However, men and women who experience any of the above symptoms should consult their physicians immediately.

Thoracentesis: A long needle is used to remove fluid called pleural fluid from the chest, and that fluid is then checked for cancer cells. Thoracoscopy: A surgeon makes several small incisions in the chest and back, then looks at the lungs and nearby tissue with a thin, lighted tube.

ROANOKE VALLEY CANCER CENTER Proudly serving the Roanoke Valley with outstanding and compassionate care.

Radiation theRapy FoR CanCeR patients

How is lung cancer diagnosed? In many cases, individuals will experience one of the aforementioned symptoms of lung cancer and then visit their doctors. Such a visit should be made immediately, and men and women should expect certain tests to be performed upon visiting their doctor. In addition to ordering some blood work, a doctor will likely perform a physical exam to check for general signs of health and listen to breathing. During the physical, the doctor is likely to check for swollen lymph nodes, fluid in the lungs and a swollen liver. A doctor will also order X-ray pictures of the chest to detect if there are any tumors or an abnormal fluid buildup. A CT scan, which takes pictures of the tissue inside the chest, will likely be taken as well. These pictures can show if there is a tumor, abnormal fluid or

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Pictured left to right: Michelle Pratt, RT-R; Cindy Stephens, Administrative Assistant; M.C. Thannikkary, M.D.; Dennis Owens, M.S. Medical Physicist; and Rae White, RT-R

212 Smith Church Road • Roanoke Rapids, NC

(252) 537-1717


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Chiropractic treatments can help relieve pain

nyone who has ever suffered back pain, whether that pain is mild, moderate or severe, understands just how unpleasant it can be. Back pain can make life extremely difficult, affecting everything a person does, including performance at work, time spent with the kids or even sleeping at night. For those with back pain, chiropractic care might be the best way

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to relieve that pain. A nonsurgical treatment of the disorders of the nervous system and/ or musculoskeletal system, chiropractic medicine focuses on spinal manipulation and the treatment of the structures surrounding the spine. Understanding chiropractic care can help men and women dealing with pain better determine if it’s for them.

What conditions do chiropractors treat? A chiropractor can treat a number of conditions, but most treatments focus on a handful of common and often painful conditions. Those conditions include: - joint pain in the arms and legs - mid- and lower back pain - neck pain - headaches What do chiropractic treatments entail? Many people with lower back pain find such pain so unbearable that they seek the help of a chiropractor. Despite that, many more people remain wary of visiting a chiropractor for myriad reasons. But chiropractors can effectively treat pain in a number of ways.

the back could be irreparably damaged. Those fears were common during the early years of chiropractic treatments, but now many medical doctors will work in tandem with a chiropractor to ensure patients are getting the correct and most effective treatments. That said, there are some potential side effects to chiropractic treatments. Once the spine has been adjusted, some people might feel minor pain or discomfort, and headaches and fatigue are possible as well. However, such side effects typically subside within a day of receiving treatment. In some instances, a herniated disc might result after an adjustment is used to treat neck or back pain. Should that occur, a patient will likely experience pain, weakness and Are there side effects to chiropractic treatments? numbness in the buttocks and down the Perhaps the reason some people are hesitant legs. Bladder and bowel control might be affected to visit a chiropractor as well. However, such is the fear that, should something go awry, instances are rare.

A chiropractic treatment is commonly referred to as a spinal manipulation. During a treatment, the chiropractor will move a joint beyond its usual range of motion. The joint might be moved through twisting, pulling or pushing, but it won’t be moved beyond the range of motion it’s designed to move. Those being treated for the first time should expect to hear some popping or cracking during the treatment. The goal of a spinal manipulation is to improve functionality while reducing nerve irritability and restoring range of motion in the back. In addition to spinal manipulation, a chiropractor might try other types of treatments, including: - ultrasound - the application of heat or ice - certain strength and onditioning exercises - relaxation therapy

THE DAILY HERALD

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Use a smaller plate. This will trick the eye and brain into thinking you are eating a lot. A large plate seems empty with smaller portions, prompting many men and women to eat more than is necessary. Using a smaller dish can give the impression of eating from an overflowing dish.

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Make vegetables a priority, not an afterthought. Fill up on vegetables and make meat and other higher-calorie foods the afterthought, instead of vice-versa. In fact, two-thirds of your dish should be consumed by vegetables, with the remaining portion for a protein or starch.

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Avoid family-style meals. That means placing large serving dishes full of food directly on the table. It encourages going in for seconds when you really may not be hungry. It takes the brain at least 20 minutes to register feeling full. So serve yourself from the stove and wait to see if you’re still hungry before going back for more.

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Switch to skim products. It is widely known that dairy products are an important component of healthy living. However, whole-milk varieties tend to be heavy on calories and saturated fat. Opt for skim milk whenever possible. Today, there are ultra-pasteurized varieties of skim milk that are creamy and filling.

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Rely on seafood protein. Eating fish once or twice a week is an excellent way to cut calories and enjoy a food that is rich in essential fatty acids.

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Experiment with herbs, not salt. A lot of sodium in a diet may not be good for blood pressure and it can lead to water retention. Instead, reach for herbs to add flavor to foods. Keep a fresh selection of parsley, chives, cilantro, basil, and other herbs at the ready and chances are you won’t even miss the salt.

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Go sparingly on dressings and sauces. You can quickly turn a healthy salad into an unhealthy meal if you drizzle on too much creamy salad dressing. Studies show that some fast food salads have more fat than other fast food fare, including hamburgers. Opt for the dressing on the side, or select among fatfree alternatives. Use only about 1 to 2 teaspoons for flavor.

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Indulge once in a while. Depriving yourself of everything that is tasty can lead to binge eating or overeating. Just remember to keep the portions of sweets or fattening foods modest and try not to over-do it the rest of the day.

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Don’t forget the exercise. The American College of Sports Medicine offers benefits of exercise beyond simply helping you to lose weight: • Lowers risk of heart disease by 40 percent. • Lowers risk of breast cancer by 20 percent. • Lowers risk of depression by 30 percent. • Lowers risk of hypertension by 40 percent. • Lowers risk of type 2 diabetes by 58 percent.

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health, mind & body

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health, mind & body

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Exploring natural remedies

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s prevalent as prescription medications are, all-natural remedies for common illnesses and conditions are still a viable alternative to prescription medications for many people. But are these allnatural options safe? In 2011, Apple founder Steve Jobs lost his battle with pancreatic cancer. Reports indicate that Jobs, a devout Buddhist, delayed surgery and other traditional treatments for almost a year while he participated in holistic treatments for the cancer. Some of these included juice fasts, bowel cleansings, acupuncture, herbal supplements, and even a vegan diet. Eventually, Jobs had surgery, but some experts feel he waited too long. Although conventional care is often an effective means to treating illnesses and other conditions, there are many doctors who agree that implementing natural remedies at times can be safe and effective. Furthermore, not all natural remedies are without merit, and

Nervousness and anxiety

Try lettuce, chamomile, valerian, and rose petals.

Infections

Honey has long been used to heal and as an antibacterial and antifungal remedy.

Itchiness

Witch hazel, jewelweed and aloe vera are effective.

Feminine issues

Parsley, basil and goldenseal can alleviate symptoms associated with menstruation.

Antibiotics

Oregano and garlic are purported to have antibiotic qualities and can fend off harmful bacteria.

Pain relief

Use omega-3 fatty acids, green tea, ginger root, and tumeric.

daytime drowsiness

Do you find yourself reaching for a can of soda or a cup of coffee during the day to banish fatigue? Many do. But you may want to grab a bottle of water instead. Research indicates that lack of water is the No. 1 trigger of daytime fatigue.

ways to eat better now

Doctors, fitness professionals and nutritionists all have ideas on what men and women should and should not eat. Choosing the right foods can help save waistlines and lives. The country is growing larger, and that has nothing to do with the population. Individuals are heavier than ever before. About one-third of Americans are considered obese. No state in the U.S. has an obesity level less than 20 percent. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that 36 states had a

some traditional medicines are actually derived from natural, plant-based ingredients themselves. According to surgeon and author, Dr. Walter C. Thompson, “Herbal medicine is safe because it’s natural. After researching the literature, one can truly say that, at the very least, herbal medicine is safer than conventional drugs.” Those thinking about incorporating natural remedies into their health regimen can consider the following options in the chart provided. Many natural foods are effective in preventing and fighting cancer as well. Although natural remedies can be effective, it’s important for pregnant women to avoid any herbs and plant supplements until discussing the risks/ benefits with their doctors. Also, some natural remedies can interact with prescription drugs or increase their potency, so it’s important to talk to a doctor about any plans.

prevalence of 25 percent or more; 12 of these states (Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia) had a prevalence of 30 percent or more. The obesity story is much the same in Canada, although residents of that country are slightly less obese than Americans. Statistics Canada states that from 2007 to 2009, 24.1 percent of adults in Canada were obese. Women have higher levels of obesity than men

in both countries. Although it is widely known that eating a healthy diet and exercising frequently are the key ways to maintain a healthy weight, it’s easy to fall into bad habits. Some men and women find it difficult to avoid temptation and stay on track with diet. But balance and portion control are great ways to enjoy food without gaining weight. Here are some tips to live by.

Therefore, not only can drinking adequate supplies of water keep you refreshed, it can also help to keep you more awake — even during a boring business meeting.

OPTIONS FOR GOOD HEALTH NUTRITION - ACUPUNCTURE - CHIROPRACTIC

Barfield Chiropractic Health Center Our family providing good health for yours since 1912.

Dr. Paul H. Barfield Chiropractic Physician

252-537-2764

Hours: Mon., Tues., Wed. & Fri. 8:30 a.m. - Noon and 1:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

1280 Julian R. Allsbrook Highway Roanoke Rapids, NC 27870


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health, mind & body

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What to do

when beginning an exercise regimen

Establish your goals. The goal of most people beginning a new exercise regimen is to lose weight. However, there are other incentives as well. For example, some people might be starting to train for a marathon or another sporting event. Whatever the reason, know why you’re getting started, as such goals can help you monitor your progress as the year goes on.

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t the dawn of a new calendar year, many people decide it’s time to turn over a new leaf and shed those extra pounds that accumulated over the previous 12 months. The resolve to lose weight is perhaps never stronger than at the beginning of a calendar year, when the holiday season has passed but those added inches on the waistline remain.

Though it’s noble to want to lose weight and improve health, regardless of what time of year it is, there are precautions men and women should take before beginning a new exercise regimen. Visit your physician. It’s best to get a full physical before beginning an exercise regimen. A full physical can reveal if you have any health problems that might limit what you should and shouldn’t be doing at the gym. If anything turns up, your physician can develop a plan of attack for you to address the issue. If nothing turns up, then your doctor will probably give you the green light to go forward with few, if any, limitations.

Conduct a self-assessment. Once you’ve visited the doctor and received the goahead to start working out, do an honest self-assessment to see where you are in terms of fitness. Walk a mile and time yourself. Do as many push-ups and sit-ups as possible, but be careful to stretch and not push yourself. This self-assessment should not be demanding. Instead, the goal is to gauge where you are and how your body feels when doing some simple exercises.

Listen to your body. Exercising after a long hiatus from routine exercise won’t be easy, and your body is likely going to tell you that through certain aches and pains, if not nausea, dizziness or shortness of breath. If any of these symptoms appear, take a break. This could be your body telling you that you’re asking too much and you need to take your foot off the gas pedal for a little while. Consider hiring a professional trainer. Many people are overwhelmed when entering a gym after a long time away. If you find yourself intimidated or simply don’t know where to begin, hire a personal trainer. Many charge by-the-session, so you can learn which machines to use and how to use them after a session or two and then continue working out on your own. If joining a gym as a new member, the gym might offer a couple of complementary personal training sessions. If so, take full advantage of this offer. When beginning a new exercise regimen, don’t forget to let caution reign until your body has adjusted to this healthy lifestyle.

FITNESS

Healthy habits

How to use diet to supplement your workout

out, even if those workouts are in the wee hours of the morning. Working out on an empty stomach can cause feelings of lightheadedness. In addition, many people are sluggish if they exercise on an empty stomach, which can make workouts less effective. If eating before a morning workout isn’t your thing, consider going with a small snack before beginning your routine. If even that is not ideal, then consider a snack before bedtime. However, this option won’t necessarily prove effective, as your body might just consume all of the energy this snack provides while you’re asleep.

Start slowly. Caution should reign supreme when beginning an exercise regimen. Diving into the deep end at the onset increases the risk of injury, which could limit activity for months to come. First get your body acclimated to exercise, then gradually challenge yourself as you see fit. Leave time to recover. Though it might feel rejuvenating to get back to exercising, it’s important for everyone, but especially those who are just starting, to allow themselves some time to recover. Allow your muscle’s and joints to recover between workout sessions. Frequency of sessions can increase as your body gets acclimated, but at first allow a day or two between sessions so your body can recover.

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A healthy breakfast is a great way to supplement a workout routine.

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en and women who have successfully adopted healthy lifestyles know full well that combining exercise with a healthy diet is the key to getting and staying healthy. Simply visiting the gym won’t work if it’s not coupled with a healthy diet. But many people incorrectly assume that a healthy diet is one devoid of taste. That simply isn’t true. In fact, a healthy diet does not necessarily restrict foods, but how frequently some of those riskier foods can be consumed. The following are some of the steps men and women can take to ensure their workouts aren’t losing their effectiveness due to unhealthy eating habits.

Start the day off with a healthy breakfast. Many foods make healthy breakfast options, including fruit and whole-grain cereals. Unfortunately, on-the-go men and women often reach for what’s readily available, and what’s readily available isn’t necessarily healthy. Avoid breakfast sandwiches that are high in fat and calories, and avoid eating fried foods for breakfast. For those men and women who prefer to workout first thing in the morning, keep in mind it’s important to eat before working

Reassess your snacking habits. If greasy potato chips or sleep-inducing baked goods like brownies are your idea of the perfect snack, then it’s time to reassess your snacking habits. Snacks should not induce sleep, but provide a little extra energy and reduce any hunger pangs. Fresh fruit, yogurt, energy bars, and even whole-grain crackers with a little peanut butter each make for a healthy snack that won’t zap you of valuable energy during the day. Let food help your muscles recover. Some people feel they might negate the positive effects of their workout if they eat immediately after exercising. That’s not necessarily true. In fact, foods that contain protein and carbohydrates can actually help your muscles recover after a workout. Yogurt (Greek yogurt is packed with protein), fruit, dried fruit, and nuts make great post-workout food options, and none will negate the effect of that grueling workout you just finished. In general, the longer you wait to eat after exercising, the longer it will take your muscles to recover.

Stay hydrated. Water is an essential part of a healthy diet, and it’s even more essential before, during and after a workout. When exercising, your body will lose a significant amount of water, which can cause the body to dehydrate. Drink water before and after your workout, and don’t forget to focus on staying hydrated during your workout as well. Daily exercise is essential to longterm health. But all those hours in the gym won’t pay off if they’re not combined with healthy eating habits.

9 ways to eat better

health, mind & body

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Calories burned during daily

LITTLE-KNOWN FOOD CONTRIBUTORS TO IS pg7 GLUTEN-FREE THE WAY TO BE? PG9 HEALTHIER WAYS TO COOK COMFORT FOODS pg10 Fresh salmon the new fast food pg11

HEALTH HEALTHY HABITS: HOW TO USE DIET TO pg22 SUPPLEMENT YOUR WORKOUT ROUTINE What to do when beginning an exercise pg22 regimen

GETTING EYE CARE pg12/13 WHERE IT IS NEEDED MOST

Popular HEALTH MYTHS PG15 debunked lead exposure puts adults, children at risk DESICCANT NOT SO DANGEROUS LUNG CANCER REMAINS THE DEADLIEST OF ALL CANCERS CHIROPRACTIC TREATMENT CAN HELP RELIEVE PAIN

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health, mind & body

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THE DAILY HERALD

Research indicates ‘freshmAn 15’ is a myth

The comeback of the

plus-size model

College freshmen may not gain 15 pounds their first year after all.

undreds of new students enter college each September. One long-standing assumption about college freshmen is their propensity to gain weight — on average 15 pounds over the course of their initial year in college. As it turns out, a new study pokes holes in that assumption and goes on to point out the truth about freshman weight gain. A study by research scientist Jay Zagorsky from Ohio State University’s Center for Human Resource Research debunks the myth of the “freshman 15,” stating that the average weight gain is between 2.4 pounds for women and 3.4 for men. In total, no more than 10 percent of all college freshmen who were examined in the study actually gained 15 pounds. Some even lost weight. The results of this study were published in Social Science Quarterly. The study pointed to aging and becoming young adults as the culprit behind the weight gain, not necessarily the

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late-night pizza study sessions or cafeteria grub. The study also looked at same-aged people who were not in college, and most gained the same amount of weight during the period of time they could have been college freshmen. While students may not gain 15 pounds their freshman year, college-age people do gain about 10 to 12 pounds over the fouryear school period. Again, this is attributed to natural body changes associated with moving from adolescence into adulthood. Students concerned about weight gain in excess of the 2 to 3 pounds per year can employ these strategies to keep weight gain at a minimum. • Limit alcoholic beverages, which tend to be high in calories and add weight fast. • Plan for some daily exercise, even if it’s just strolling the quad. • When selecting foods from the cafeteria, fill half of your dish with vegetables and then a quarter with whole grains and a quarter with lean meat whenever possible. • Limit consumption of packaged, processed foods, which are high in salt and calories. • Go sparingly on drive-thru foods. • Keep healthy snacks on hand in your dorm room so you won’t have to head out when hunger pangs strike. • Utilize the campus gym if there is one. • Take a class as part of your electives that includes physical activity, like a sport. • Surround yourself with friends who have like-minded fitness goals.

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urvaceous figures were once coveted before it became in vogue to be thin to meet the concept of modern-day beauty. Although waif models still dominate the runways at major fashion shows, it seems that the plus-size figure is once again being recognized and embraced by the fashion community — and the world. Big and beautiful Sir Peter Paul Rubens was a 16th and 17th century Flemish painter perhaps best known for selecting women with curvaceous, voluptuous figures as the subject matter of his work. Before the 20th century, historians say that women who were considered attractive displayed bodies ripe with curves. During the periods of time many refer to as the Middle Ages and beyond, plus-size figures were coveted. Paintings and sculptures of this time — those even outside of Ruben’s domain — clearly show chubbier figures, which were considered to be appealing. That’s because one’s weight was often a sign of his or her social status. Wealthy people were able to afford and indulge in the fattening foods that would pack on the pounds. Therefore, poor people who also may have been thin were not seen as attractive. Today these Rubenesque figures are regarded as being too fat in areas of the world where food is plentiful. In fact, the tides may have turned completely. Where weight was once a sign of opulence, today obesity is largely a problem of the lower class. But in countries where starvation still occurs, heavier women are often considered as being more beautiful. Thin is in? Estimates suggest that 8 million Americans have an eating disorder, although this number may be higher because many people with an eating disorder fail to disclose it or seek treatment. A study by the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders reported that 5 to 10 percent of anorexics die within 10 years after contracting the disease; 18 to 20 percent of anorexics will be dead after 20 years and only 30 to 40 percent ever fully recover. Although anorexia, bulimia and other disorders are classified as mental illnesses, there

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are some women (and men) who have attested to the fact that media portrayals of thinness as a sign of beauty have impacted their body images on various levels. Many health experts have stated that the proliferation of eating disorders and depression over body image is largely influenced by the media. Studies have indicated that two out of five women and one out of five men would trade three to five years of their life to achieve their weight goals. And 80 percent of women who answered a past People magazine survey responded that images of women on television and in the movies make them feel insecure. The rise of plus-size While no doctor or health expert will tell you it is healthy to be obese, the fact remains that every person’s body is different. There are healthy women who wear a size 4 and healthy women who wear a size 14. More and more people are beginning to embrace their bodies as they are, and that switch has given rise to an increase in the number of plus-size models and personalities appearing in major campaigns. Model Crystal Renn is just one proponent of the movement for all sizes to be viewed as beautiful. Renn, who authored the 2009 “Hungry: A Young Model’s Story of Appetite, Ambition and the Ultimate Embrace of Curves,” nearly lost her life due to anorexia and other extreme measures she endured to walk the catwalk with a fashionthin body. Renn, who fluctuates between a size 10 and a size 16, once weighed 95 pounds, but now speaks out against pressure to be a certain weight to be seen as beautiful. Ford Models has a Ford+ division that caters especially to promoting women who do not meet the standards of traditional stick-thin models. While these women may still not be considered plus-size according to everyday standards (plus size in the modeling industry is between a size 8 and 12), they do present a more well-rounded example of the female body on the runway. Today, the plus-size segment of Ford has expanded in number from its inception and has regular bookers. Furthermore, these plus-size models are being hired for mainstream fashion designers, not just those geared toward plus-size clothing. Renn joins Whitney Thompson, Marquita Pring, Gitte Lill, Natalie Laughlin, Tara Lynn, and Alyona Osmanova as some of the most recognizable names in plus-size modeling. Although it’s not likely that fat will be the new thin, more media outlets and facets of the fashion world are showcasing a wider variety of body types today.


MAY 2012

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Go Online to view this section!

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HEALTHY HABITS

How to use diet to supplement your workout

EYE CARE

Image screening for diabetic patients

CHIROPRACTIC TREATMENTS Helping to relieve pain

Health Mind and Body 2012  

Health related stories for the Roanoke Valley area.