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Page 12- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory


~INDEX~ All Saints’ Episcopal Church......................11 Calvary Baptist Church.................................7

New Testament Christian Church 615 Jackson Street, Roanoke Rapids, N.C. 27870 537-6677 - 537-8785

WHERE EVERYBODY IS SOMEBODY and JESUS CHRIST IS LORD Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship - 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Evening Worship - 7:00 p.m. (Classes for all ages)

Dale Morris, Minister

East Tenth Street Church of Christ..............2 First Baptist Church (Roanoke Rapids)..............2 First Baptist Church of Gaston.....................5 First Christian Church..................................8 Freedom Free Will Baptist Church..............3 Grace Baptist Church.....................................6 Halifax Baptist Church................................10 Lakeside Lutheran..........................................7 Maranatha Baptist Church..........................11 New Testament Christian Church.............11 Roanoke Salem Missionary Baptist.............6 Rosemary United Methodist Church..........6 Roanoke Rapids Church of Christ...............8 Smith United Methodist Church.................3 St. John the Baptist Catholic Church.........11 St. Matthews A.M.E. Church......................12 Victory Baptist Church..................................5

Page 11- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Page 2- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Church of Jesus Christ.................................10


Our Father which art in heaven. Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, forever. Amen. ~ Matthew 6: 9-13

Page 3- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Page 10- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

The Lord’s Prayer


About one-third of the planet, or roughly 2.1 billion people, are Christians. Each spring, this large subset of the population celebrates the religious miracle that is the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The Lenten season is one of the holiest times of the year on the Christian calendar. This is a period of 40 days and nights that begins with Ash Wednesday at the beginning of Lent and lasts through Easter Sunday. Many Christians celebrate Easter but may not know the significance or meaning behind certain days on the Lenten calendar. Here is a primer on the Lenten season for Christians and non-Christians alike. Ash Wednesday In the Roman Catholic Church, Ash Wednesday marks the first day of Lent, the season when one prepares for the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Ash Wednesday always falls 46 days before Easter and will vary according to the calendar. Ash Wednesday is a Holy Day of Obligation, which means parishioners are expected to attend mass to mark the beginning of the holy season. During the mass, celebrants receive ashes in the form of a cross on their foreheads. The ashes are made from burning the blessed palm fronds from last year’s Palm Sunday mass. In ancient times ashes were worn as a symbol of sorrow, repentance and acknowledgment of sins. Nowadays, ashes allow Christians to humbly display an outward sign that they are aware of their shortcomings and are cleansing their souls in the preparation for the celebration of Christ’s resurrection. Palm Sunday Palm Sunday marks the beginning of Holy Week and it is a day of obligation when Christians attend mass, and they receive fronds of blessed palms. Occurring a week before Easter, Palm Sunday commemorates the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem to celebrate the Passover. The gospels record the arrival of Jesus riding into the city on a donkey, while the crowds spread their cloaks and palm branches on the street and shouted “Hosanna to the Son of David” and “Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord” to honor him as their longawaited Messiah and King. Holy Thursday Holy Thursday is the Thursday preceding Easter Sunday. It marks Jesus Christ’s last supper with his disciples. His act of breaking bread and offering it as His “body” and sharing wine as His “blood” has become an integral part of the Christian mass. It is representative of Christ giving up His life in place of our sins. Good Friday Good Friday is also known as Black Friday but should not be mistaken with the post-Thanksgiving Black Friday. It is the day that Jesus had to march to his crucifixion site while carrying an extremely heavy wooden cross. Jesus was mocked, spit on, tortured, and forced to wear a crown of thorns during His journey after being arrested by Judas and then suffering at the hands of Pontius Pilate. After being nailed to the cross at His palms and ankles, Jesus suffered for

six hours before He died. Jesus died on the cross for the sins of the people. Easter Sunday The holiest day of the season is Easter Sunday. On this day, Jesus rose from His tomb. Mary Magdalene went to the tomb and found Jesus missing. Jesus then approached her and showed how he was again alive. His disciples were shocked at the appearance of his resurrected self, furthering their faith in him as the Son of God.

Explaining the Eucharist The Eucharist is one of the seven sacraments in the Catholic church. As part of the Eucharist, the Lord Jesus Christ is contained, offered and received under the appearances of bread and wine. Catholics believe Christ is truly present in the Eucharist and that the bread and wine are not just symbolic or a figure of Christ. Catholics believe the bread and wine changes from wheat and grape into the body and blood of Christ, a change referred to as transubstantiation. The Eucharist was instituted at the Last Supper, the night before Jesus’ crucifixion. The Biblical story of the Last Supper provides the basis for the Eucharist, which is often referred to as Communion. When Christ first instituted the Eucharist at the Last Supper, which was attended by His disciples, including one who Christ predicted would ultimately betray Him, He took the bread, blessed and broke it before instructing His apostles to eat it and know that it is His body. He then did the same with the wine, which he told His apostles was His own blood that was being shed so sinners could be forgiven. Today, young Catholics receive the Eucharist at what is commonly referred to as their First Communion or First Holy Communion. It is a festive day and one to be celebrated when a family member receives the Eucharist for the first time. Many families celebrate with parties where guests dress in formal attire. This dress code extends to the recipients of First Communion as well. Female recipients often wear a white dress with a veil to symbolize purity, while boys where white or blue suits, depending on the country where they live. It is tradition to give First Communion recipients religious gifts, including rosaries or prayer books. Some recipients are even given a crucifix to remind them of the sacrifice Jesus Christ made for them and the significance of the Eucharist they just received.

Page 9- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Page 4 The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Explaining the Christian holy season


Many of the major religions of the world have a lot in common. The similarities between Christians, Jews and Muslims, for instance, can be seen in the story of Abraham and Sarah. The history of the Jewish people begins in the Middle East during the Bronze Age. God spoke to a nomadic leader called Abram (later called Abraham) and promised him he would be the father of a great people. Abraham simply had to do exactly what he was told with unyielding faith. At this time and in this area of the world (what would be present-day Iraq) people believed in and worshipped many gods. But Abraham’s acceptance of the call of the one true God gave birth to monotheism. According to the book of Genesis, in the Christian Bible, God promises Abraham three things: 1. A relationship with God; 2. A son, and consequently numerous descendants; 3. Land. Sarah and Abraham were past childbearing age and did not know how it would be possible to have a child. Over time, Sarah grew weary with waiting and wanted to speed the process along so she told Abraham to sire a child with her handmaiden, Hagar. He did and the boy was named Ishmael. But Ishmael wasn’t the

true son. Sarah grew jealous from the relationship between Abraham, Ishmael and Hagar. Eventually, Sarah gave birth to her own son, the one promised to her and Abraham by God. He was named Isaac, as angels had instructed. Isaac means “laughter” in Hebrew. Sarah eventually asks Abraham to choose between her and Isaac and Ishmael, seeing as Isaac is the true descendant promised by God. Abraham complies and asks Hagar to leave with Ishmael. They wander away to find a new home. God gives Abraham another test, instructing him to sacrifice his son, Isaac. Though he struggles with this test, Abraham complies and takes Isaac to a mountain to complete the sacrifice. However, God intervenes at the last minute and provides a ram for Abraham to sacrifice instead. To Muslims, Abraham was known as Ibrahim and is an important prophet. In the Quran, Abraham is neither Jewish, Christian nor Muslim. Rather, he is a hernif, or someone who intrinsically knows there is really only one God. Abraham’s son, Ishmael, goes on to sire his own line of descendants and is regarded as the father of the Arab people. The story of Abraham and Sarah helped to establish a set of values and extreme trust in faith. It also illustrates some similarities between three seemingly different faiths.

Page 5- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Page 8- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Three religions converge on one story


Page 6- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Page 7- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory


Page 6- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Page 7- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory


Many of the major religions of the world have a lot in common. The similarities between Christians, Jews and Muslims, for instance, can be seen in the story of Abraham and Sarah. The history of the Jewish people begins in the Middle East during the Bronze Age. God spoke to a nomadic leader called Abram (later called Abraham) and promised him he would be the father of a great people. Abraham simply had to do exactly what he was told with unyielding faith. At this time and in this area of the world (what would be present-day Iraq) people believed in and worshipped many gods. But Abraham’s acceptance of the call of the one true God gave birth to monotheism. According to the book of Genesis, in the Christian Bible, God promises Abraham three things: 1. A relationship with God; 2. A son, and consequently numerous descendants; 3. Land. Sarah and Abraham were past childbearing age and did not know how it would be possible to have a child. Over time, Sarah grew weary with waiting and wanted to speed the process along so she told Abraham to sire a child with her handmaiden, Hagar. He did and the boy was named Ishmael. But Ishmael wasn’t the

true son. Sarah grew jealous from the relationship between Abraham, Ishmael and Hagar. Eventually, Sarah gave birth to her own son, the one promised to her and Abraham by God. He was named Isaac, as angels had instructed. Isaac means “laughter” in Hebrew. Sarah eventually asks Abraham to choose between her and Isaac and Ishmael, seeing as Isaac is the true descendant promised by God. Abraham complies and asks Hagar to leave with Ishmael. They wander away to find a new home. God gives Abraham another test, instructing him to sacrifice his son, Isaac. Though he struggles with this test, Abraham complies and takes Isaac to a mountain to complete the sacrifice. However, God intervenes at the last minute and provides a ram for Abraham to sacrifice instead. To Muslims, Abraham was known as Ibrahim and is an important prophet. In the Quran, Abraham is neither Jewish, Christian nor Muslim. Rather, he is a hernif, or someone who intrinsically knows there is really only one God. Abraham’s son, Ishmael, goes on to sire his own line of descendants and is regarded as the father of the Arab people. The story of Abraham and Sarah helped to establish a set of values and extreme trust in faith. It also illustrates some similarities between three seemingly different faiths.

Page 5- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Page 8- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Three religions converge on one story


About one-third of the planet, or roughly 2.1 billion people, are Christians. Each spring, this large subset of the population celebrates the religious miracle that is the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The Lenten season is one of the holiest times of the year on the Christian calendar. This is a period of 40 days and nights that begins with Ash Wednesday at the beginning of Lent and lasts through Easter Sunday. Many Christians celebrate Easter but may not know the significance or meaning behind certain days on the Lenten calendar. Here is a primer on the Lenten season for Christians and non-Christians alike. Ash Wednesday In the Roman Catholic Church, Ash Wednesday marks the first day of Lent, the season when one prepares for the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Ash Wednesday always falls 46 days before Easter and will vary according to the calendar. Ash Wednesday is a Holy Day of Obligation, which means parishioners are expected to attend mass to mark the beginning of the holy season. During the mass, celebrants receive ashes in the form of a cross on their foreheads. The ashes are made from burning the blessed palm fronds from last year’s Palm Sunday mass. In ancient times ashes were worn as a symbol of sorrow, repentance and acknowledgment of sins. Nowadays, ashes allow Christians to humbly display an outward sign that they are aware of their shortcomings and are cleansing their souls in the preparation for the celebration of Christ’s resurrection. Palm Sunday Palm Sunday marks the beginning of Holy Week and it is a day of obligation when Christians attend mass, and they receive fronds of blessed palms. Occurring a week before Easter, Palm Sunday commemorates the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem to celebrate the Passover. The gospels record the arrival of Jesus riding into the city on a donkey, while the crowds spread their cloaks and palm branches on the street and shouted “Hosanna to the Son of David” and “Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord” to honor him as their longawaited Messiah and King. Holy Thursday Holy Thursday is the Thursday preceding Easter Sunday. It marks Jesus Christ’s last supper with his disciples. His act of breaking bread and offering it as His “body” and sharing wine as His “blood” has become an integral part of the Christian mass. It is representative of Christ giving up His life in place of our sins. Good Friday Good Friday is also known as Black Friday but should not be mistaken with the post-Thanksgiving Black Friday. It is the day that Jesus had to march to his crucifixion site while carrying an extremely heavy wooden cross. Jesus was mocked, spit on, tortured, and forced to wear a crown of thorns during His journey after being arrested by Judas and then suffering at the hands of Pontius Pilate. After being nailed to the cross at His palms and ankles, Jesus suffered for

six hours before He died. Jesus died on the cross for the sins of the people. Easter Sunday The holiest day of the season is Easter Sunday. On this day, Jesus rose from His tomb. Mary Magdalene went to the tomb and found Jesus missing. Jesus then approached her and showed how he was again alive. His disciples were shocked at the appearance of his resurrected self, furthering their faith in him as the Son of God.

Explaining the Eucharist The Eucharist is one of the seven sacraments in the Catholic church. As part of the Eucharist, the Lord Jesus Christ is contained, offered and received under the appearances of bread and wine. Catholics believe Christ is truly present in the Eucharist and that the bread and wine are not just symbolic or a figure of Christ. Catholics believe the bread and wine changes from wheat and grape into the body and blood of Christ, a change referred to as transubstantiation. The Eucharist was instituted at the Last Supper, the night before Jesus’ crucifixion. The Biblical story of the Last Supper provides the basis for the Eucharist, which is often referred to as Communion. When Christ first instituted the Eucharist at the Last Supper, which was attended by His disciples, including one who Christ predicted would ultimately betray Him, He took the bread, blessed and broke it before instructing His apostles to eat it and know that it is His body. He then did the same with the wine, which he told His apostles was His own blood that was being shed so sinners could be forgiven. Today, young Catholics receive the Eucharist at what is commonly referred to as their First Communion or First Holy Communion. It is a festive day and one to be celebrated when a family member receives the Eucharist for the first time. Many families celebrate with parties where guests dress in formal attire. This dress code extends to the recipients of First Communion as well. Female recipients often wear a white dress with a veil to symbolize purity, while boys where white or blue suits, depending on the country where they live. It is tradition to give First Communion recipients religious gifts, including rosaries or prayer books. Some recipients are even given a crucifix to remind them of the sacrifice Jesus Christ made for them and the significance of the Eucharist they just received.

Page 9- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Page 4 The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Explaining the Christian holy season


Our Father which art in heaven. Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, forever. Amen. ~ Matthew 6: 9-13

Page 3- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Page 10- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

The Lord’s Prayer


~INDEX~ All Saints’ Episcopal Church......................11 Calvary Baptist Church.................................7

New Testament Christian Church 615 Jackson Street, Roanoke Rapids, N.C. 27870 537-6677 - 537-8785

WHERE EVERYBODY IS SOMEBODY and JESUS CHRIST IS LORD Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship - 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Evening Worship - 7:00 p.m. (Classes for all ages)

Dale Morris, Minister

East Tenth Street Church of Christ..............2 First Baptist Church (Roanoke Rapids)..............2 First Baptist Church of Gaston.....................5 First Christian Church..................................8 Freedom Free Will Baptist Church..............3 Grace Baptist Church.....................................6 Halifax Baptist Church................................10 Lakeside Lutheran..........................................7 Maranatha Baptist Church..........................11 New Testament Christian Church.............11 Roanoke Salem Missionary Baptist.............6 Rosemary United Methodist Church..........6 Roanoke Rapids Church of Christ...............8 Smith United Methodist Church.................3 St. John the Baptist Catholic Church.........11 St. Matthews A.M.E. Church......................12 Victory Baptist Church..................................5

Page 11- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Page 2- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

Church of Jesus Christ.................................10


Page 12- The Daily Herald - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - Church Directory

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