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COCHISE COUNTY

Living Well 2021

Your Health and Wellness Resource A product of Herald/Review Media


Delivering Quality Care Cochise County Over 55 Years.

At Canyon Vista Medical Center we believe you don’t have to leave town to get great healthcare. Backed by a modern, full-service medical facility and a long tradition of serving this community, our experienced team of physicians, nurses, specialists and support staff are equipped with the technology and expertise to provide your family with the area’s highest level of quality care.

Admissions & Registration .................................................... 520.263.2001 Advanced Wound Care Center ............................................. 520.263.3770 Behavioral Health Services ................................................... 520.263.3130 Billing .................................................................................... 520.263.3800 Bone & Joint Institute .......................................................... 520.263.2663 Laboratory Services ............................................................. 520.263.2350 Medical Records ................................................................... 520.263.3360 Outpatient Surgery Center .................................................. 520.263.2500 Radiology .............................................................................. 520.263.3900 Rehabilitation Services .......................................................... 520.263.3700 Women & Children’s Services .............................................. 520.263.3300

Call or visit our website to schedule an appointment.

520.263.2000 | CanyonVistaMedicalCenter.com 5700 East Highway 90 | Sierra Vista, AZ 85635


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WHAT’S INSIDE MENTAL HEALTH

MEN’S HEALTH

Working from Home....................................6

Men and Alcohol Abuse..........................28

How to Find a Therapist.............................7

Is Male Menopause Real?.......................29

Children and Mental Health.....................8

EYE CARE

Boost Your Mental Health.........................9

Vision Therapy Basics...............................30

WOMEN’S HEALTH Well Woman Exams.................................. 11

Eye and Vision Myths...............................31 A Window to Your Health......................32

Weight Loss After 40................................ 12

FINANCIAL HEALTH

What Does your Thyroid Do?................ 13

Effective Credit-Building Tips...............33

BETTER SLEEP Sleep Matters............................................... 15 Sleep and the Heart.................................. 16

DIET & EXERCISE Why Drink Water?...................................... 17 Take Your Legs to New Levels..............19 Plant-Based Eating.................................... 20 Stick with Your Exercise Plan................ 21

Paying the Right Debts First..................34 Be Aware of Elder Fraud..........................35 Make Retirement Money Last...............36

YOUR HEALTH Family Health History...............................37 Practice Sun Safety....................................38

HEART HEALTH Reducing Risk of Stroke .........................43 Basic Heart Health Tips............................44

FITNESS FOR SENIORS

Quit Smoking..............................................45

Tap into the Fountain of Youth............ 24

PET CARE

Learn Chair Yoga........................................ 25

Grooming Tips............................................46

DENTAL HEALTH

LOCAL PROVIDERS

Children’s Dental Awareness................ 26

Expert Columns............................18, 22, 23

The Truth About Sugar............................ 27

Practitioner Profiles...................................39

Publisher: Jennifer Sorenson Design: Bethany Strunk Multimedia Sales Manager: Alycia McCloud

Advertising Representatives: Maritzha Diaz, Branden Sanchez, Steve Reno, Tammy Dalton Stories and photos by Green Shoot Media

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LIVING WELL 2021

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Mental Health

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Working from Home

he onset of the COVID-19 pandemic catapulted many working professionals into a whole new universe: working from home. All of a sudden, workers who had never done their jobs remotely found themselves balancing childcare, chores and other daily burdens they usually had taken care of for them while at the office. With this extra stress, mental health has become a big topic for employees and employers alike. The numbers don’t lie: A vast majority of workers (80%) would consider quitting their position for a job that focused more on employees’ mental health, according to

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a recent study published by TELUS International.

The Problem Their research indicates that 75% of U.S. workers have struggled at work due to anxiety caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and other recent world events. Here are a few of the survey’s most important findings that seem to be attributing to this decline in mental health for work-from-home professionals: • 4 out of 5 workers find it hard to “shut off” in the evenings. • Over half of respondents have taken a “mental health day” since they started

working from home, due to the pandemic. • Ninety-seven percent say that vacation days while working from home are important for “recharging” — another way of saying “mental health.” • Half of the respondents cite that their sleep patterns have been interrupted due to COVID-19, and 45% say they feel less healthy mentally while working from home.

Find Your Flexibility Flexible schedules are actually one of the benefits of working from home, and many professionals say flexibility is the most important factor for them in

considering a new role. Many workers found that during the heights of the pandemic, that work days actually became longer. A joint study by Harvard and New York University analyzed more than 3 million responses since the coronavirus began, and found that the workday is nearly an hour longer because of the pandemic. More meetings are driving fatigue and making professionals unable to be productive. If you’re considering a new role or trying to improve your current one, talk with your boss about a more flexible schedule that may give you some of your time back. m


How to Find a Therapist

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inding a qualified therapist can help you cope with mental health issues and grow as a person.

It can be overhwelming, especially if you’re already dealing with mental health problems. Friends, colleagues and health care providers can all help you find a qualified therapist with whom you can connect. Think about and make sure you can clearly articulate your questions and goals, Healthline says, so that you can make sure you and your therapist are a good match and can agree on an appropriate treatment plan. Here are three other ways Healthline suggests for you to find a good therapist to help you on your road to a healthy outlook on life.

Use an Online Database Several mental health organizations maintain searchable databases of licensed therapists. It can be as easy as searching by your ZIP code or even filtering by specialty, such as marriage counselors or therapists who focus on substance abuse.

School, Work & Church You also can reach out to your community organizations. If you’re a student, your school or university may

have resources you can use for free. Some workplaces also offer employee assistance programs that are both free and confidential for you to use. If you’re involved in a religious community, there may be faith-based resources you can use for low or even no cost. Some groups may offer therapies related to certain issues, such as domestic violence, sexual abuse or eating disorders. Look for local advocacy groups or organizations to get help today.

Online Help Especially during the COVID pandemic, some people are uncomfortable visiting health care offices. That’s OK. There’s an app for therapy, too. Some insurances and practices now have a significant telehealth practice, sometimes with copays and fees waived during the pandemic. Healthline also recommends apps like Talkspace and Betterhelp that will allow you to find therapists you can access online. Fees range from $35 to $80 for weekly sessions. The right therapist — one with a good connection with you and in touch with your issues — can make a huge difference in your mental health journey. Even though it’s overwhelming, take the first step. m

When to Get Emergency Help One in five adults, about 43 million people, experience mental health issues in a given year, the National Mental Health Institutes says. The consequences of not getting help are severe. A mental health crisis is any situation in which a person’s behavior puts them at risk of hurting themselves or others, NAMI says. Some warning signs include: • An inability to perform daily tasks. • Rapid mood swings, an increased energy level, inability to stay still, suddenly depressed or withdrawn, or suddenly happy or calm after a period of depression. • Increased agitation, verbal threats, violent, out-of-control behavior. • Abusive behavior to themselves or others. • Isolation from work, school, family or friends. • Loss of touch with reality. Any mention of suicide should be taken seriously. Common warning signs include: • Giving away possessions. • Talking as if they’re saying goodbye. • Taking steps to tie up loose ends. • Making or changing a will. • Stockpiling pills. • Getting a weapon. • Preoccupation with death. • Sudden cheerfulness or calm after a period of despondency. • Withdrawal from friends, family and normal activity. If you think that someone is thinking about suicide, start the conversation. Be frank, and ask if they’ve been thinking about suicide. If the answer is yes, call a therapist immediately. Take away any potential means of action by removing weapons and medications. Call the National Suicide Prevention line at 800-273-8255.

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Children and Mental Health C hildren can suffer from a full range of mental illnesses, just like adults.

It can be difficult to tell if a child’s behavior is a sign of mental illness. In general, the National Institute of Mental Health says, if a child’s behavior lasts for a few weeks or more, causes distress for the child or their family and interferes with their school, consider seeking help. Seek help immediately if a child’s behavior is unsafe or if the child talks about wanting to hurt themselves or others.

Signs of Mental Illness in Children It’s important to remember that some of these are normal childhood behaviors. If you are concerned, it’s worth talking to your pediatrician for peace of mind. Here are some signs that should cause concern: • Frequent tantrums or being intensely irritable. • Complaining about frequent stomachaches or headaches without a medical cause.

• Not being interested in playing with other children.

• Often talking about worries or fears.

• Sleeping too much or too little, having frequent nightmares or seeming sleepy during the day. • Struggling academically or having difficulty making friends.

• Spending more time alone and avoiding social activities with friends or family. • Engaging in self-harm behaviors, or risky or destructive behaviors.

Mental Health Assessments Health care professionals can help you understand what’s behind your child’s behavior and give you a treatment plan. A comprehensive assessment may include talking to the child’s parents about their developmental history, temper, relationships, medical history, interests, abilities and prior treatments. They’ll also gather information from school. Of course,

they’ll also talk to the child to get their take and experiences.

Choose a Mental Health Professional Your pediatrician may have recommendations, or you can talk to friends or family. It’s important to choose a mental health professional who has experience treating your child’s particular problem. Here are some questions you might ask: • Do you use treatment approaches supported by research? • Do you involve parents in the treatment? • Will there be homework between sessions? • How will progress from treatment be evaluated? • How soon can we expect to see progress? • How long should treatment last? m

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LIVING WELL 2021


Journaling for Mental Health

Journaling is the same thing as keeping a diary. It’s a way to let out your thoughts and feelings without judgment, punishment or fear. Writing down your thoughts and feelings can help you understand them more clearly and can help you gain control of your emotions. Here are some tips on how to journal for mental health from the University of Rochester Medical Center. Try to journal every day. Set aside a few minutes that you can dedicate to your writing. Make it easy. Always keep a pen and paper with you. Consider keeping your journal on your smartphone or tablet so that you’ll always have it with you. Write — or even draw — whatever feels right. You don’t have to follow any certain structure. Your journal is your private place to express whatever feelings you have. Let your words and ideas flow and don’t worry about spelling or grammar. Benefits of Journaling: Journaling can help you manage anxiety, reduce stress and cope with depression. Writing down your thoughts and feelings can help you prioritize your problems, fears and concerns. It will also help you track your symptoms so that you can recognize triggers and learn to better control them. Your journal is also a place for positive self-talk that can buoy your mood. It can help you identify the negative thoughts and behaviors that affect your mood. Use your journaling time as your personal relaxation time. Consider it your time to de-stress. Combined with Other Stress-Reducers: Journaling is a powerful tool when combined with other techniques to building better mental health. You can also relax or meditate every day, eat a healthy diet, drink plenty of water, get regular exercise, get plenty of rest and stay away from drugs and alcohol. Bring your journal with you when you visit your health care provider to help clarify your symptoms and moods. A therapist or doctor can help you identify negative patterns in your life and keep your mental health journey on track.

Boost your Mental Health A

ccording to the National Institute of Mental Health, seasonal affective disorder is a type of depression that comes and goes with the seasons. Starting in the late fall and early winter and going away during the spring and summer. For most, mental health can be even tougher during the winter months but there are ways you can help build your confidence and beat the blues.

Run in the Cold Your motivation and drive to workout drop with the temperature during the winter and fall months. Running during the winter can help boost your confidence and help you realize you are much stronger than you think you are. Keeping up with a normal schedule can help you fight off the winter blues. Most people stop and hibernate during the winter months which can create some symptoms of depression. Keep yourself moving with workouts, setting goals and challenges for yourself.

Find an Inspiring Quote or a Song Words can be powerful and very motivating if you find the right words to motivate you. Find an inspiring quote or mantra that you can repeat to yourself when days

or workouts get difficult. Find a song to empower you through the tough days. Create various playlist for yourself during different situations. For example, create a playlist of songs that give you energy for your workout or songs that relax you and help you focus on reading.

Create Goals Creating goals for yourself to accomplish can help build moral and confidence in yourself when you are at your low points. If you don’t workout often start out with simple goals such as running half a mile or wake up every morning at 8 a.m. Your goals can even be something as simple as portioning your food better, losing five pounds or doing 10 push-ups every morning. Use your goals to slowly build your confidence and mental toughness.

Don’t make Excuses Winter and fall depression can get to you at times and even motivate you to make excuses to keep you from working out. Discipline yourself and maintain that discipline. The best way to maintain your discipline is to just get up and do it. Create your goals, find your inspiration and stop making excuses for yourself. m

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WE are HERE for YOU! From our physician-led clinics to hospital services like 24/7 Emergency Medicine, Inpatient Care, Diagnostic Imaging, Therapies, Pediatrics and Cardio-Pulmonary care, the Copper Queen Community Hospital is ready to take care of you and your family. Bisbee Primary Care Clinic Monday - Friday: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 7 Bisbee Road, Bisbee, AZ (520) 432-2042

Palominas Primary Care Clinic

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Douglas Primary Care Clinic Monday - Friday: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. QuickCare: Monday - Friday 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. 100 E Fifth Street, Douglas, AZ (520) 805-6800

Tuesday - Friday: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. QuickCare: Monday 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. 10524 E. Highway 92, Palominas, AZ (520) 366-0300

Bisbee Emergency Department

Tombstone Primary Care Clinic

Douglas Emergency Department

Monday - Friday: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 7 N San Diego St, Tombstone, AZ (520) 432-2042

Copper Queen Community Hospital 101 Cole Avenue, Bisbee, AZ (520) 432-5383

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Caring people... caring for people


Well Woman Exams M ost people know they should get an annual physical exam with their primary care physician. Women also get another annual exam, usually called the well woman exam, pelvic exam or gynecological exam. Sometimes it’s performed by your PCP, but more often it’s given by a gynecologist. Keep reading to learn more about well woman exams.

When to Start Wellness Visits It’s a good idea to get your first well woman exam between 13 and 15, Planned Parenthood says. Your doctor may just talk with you and then do a regular physical exam. If you’re worried about

your period, if it’s been heavy, painful or irregular, now is the time to talk about it. The doctor or nurses may check on height, weight and offer vaccines, like the HPV vaccine.

Be honest with your car providers about if you’re sexually active. This will let them know if you need STD testing. They may also talk with you about birth control.

Ages 21-39 Around 21, you should start getting regular pelvic exams and Pap tests. Pap tests look for abnormal cells on your cervix that could lead to cervical cancer. During this test, the doctor or nurse will put a metal or plastic speculum into the vagina

and open it. They’ll then use a tiny spatula or brush to collect cells from your cervix. Those cells will go to a lab to be tested. You’ll also need a routine clinical breast exam every one to three years, Planned Parenthood says. During your visits, the health care provider may talk about healthy relationships, mental health, emotional health and more. Answer their questions honestly; it’s important to have good communication with your providers so they can provide you with the best care.

After 40 As you age, your provider may add more tests, such as mammograms, that are

Women’s Health required on a regular basis. Mammograms are X-rays of the breast that can show early signs of breast cancer. Try not to get your mammogram the week before you get your period or during your period, as your breasts may be tender and the mammogram will be more uncomfortable than usual. On the day of your exam, don’t wear deodorant, perfume or powder as these products can show up white on the X-ray. m

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Weight Loss after 40 I t’s not your imagination. Those extra pounds get extra stubborn after you turn 40. Here are some reasons you might be fighting the battle of the bulge extra hard as you get older.

Hormones As women approach menopause, hormones — the chemical messengers that control most bodily functions — start to fluctuate, Healthline says. It can cause a slew of changes, including decreased bone density, less lean muscle mass, a lower sex drive and mood changes. The good news is that this phase of life will soon end. Just continue to eat well, get plenty of rest and exercise regularly. This, too, shall pass.

Slower Metabolism Your metabolism slows down as you age, meaning your resting metabolic rate gets slower. You may also start to carry more fat around your waistline. Combat this by staying as active as you can. Experts at Healthline recommend a combination of strength training and 
cardio.

Insulin Resistance Your aging body may also start to ignore insulin, the hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels. This makes your blood sugar higher, which makes you hungrier 12

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and more susceptible to cravings. This is one reason you may start packing on unwanted pounds and it can leave you at greater risk for Type 2 diabetes. Keep your meals a healthy mix of carbohydrates, protein and fat — without loading up on carbs too much — to fight this trend.

Under Pressure Women in middle age are also often in the middle of a sea of stress. They’re managing their own busy families, often balancing the needs of aging parents with their responsibilities to their older children. Black women, in particular, are under heavy stress loads, Healthline says, and that stress causes your body to produce more cortisol, the fight-or-flight hormone. Cortisol drops your blood sugar, making you want to eat more. Talk to your health care provider about managing your stress levels.

Sleep Patterns A lot of women report trouble sleeping as they get older, Healthline says, and sleep disruption gives you less energy to exercise, less energy to manage your life and can have an adverse affect on all aspects of your health. Try to establish a soothing bedtime routine — with no electronics — and avoid caffeine and alcohol before bed. Those can cause hot flashes and night sweats, which can, in turn can disrupt your sleep. m

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What Does your Thyroid Do?

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here’s a small, butterfly-shaped gland at the base of your neck that makes a hormone that travels to your blood in all parts of your body, controlling your body’s metabolism. Women are more likely than men to develop thyroid disease; one in eight women will develop thyroid problems in their lifetime.

Symptoms of 
Thyroid Problems Depending on if your thyroid is producing too much or too little hormone, you may feel restless or tired, or you may lose or gain weight. You can also have problems with our menstrual periods, problems getting pregnant and problems during pregnancy. Sometimes, thyroid problems are mistaken for symptoms of menopause.

Hypothyroidism This is when your thyroid doesn’t make enough hormone. Hypothyroidism can slow your body down. The most common

cause of hypothyroidism is Hashimoto’s disease, when the immune system mistakenly attacks the thyroid. This condition also can be caused by hyperthyroidism treatment, radiation treatment and thyroid removal.

Hashimoto’s disease and postpartum thyroiditis.

Goiter

Hyperthyroidism Also called overactive thyroidism, this is where your thyroid makes more hormone than your body needs, speeding up your body’s functions. The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is Graves’ disease, an immune system disorder that is most common in women under 40.

A goiter is an enlarged thyroid gland. It can happen for a short time and may go away on its own, or it may be a symptom of another thyroid disease, such as Graves’ 
disease. Usually, the only symptom of a goiter is a swelling in your neck, but it can also cause a tight feeling in your throat, coughing or problems breathing or swallowing.

Thyroiditis

Thyroid Nodules

Inflammation of the thyroid, or thyroiditis, happens when the body’s immune system makes antibodies that attack the thyroid. Causes of thyroiditis include autoimmune diseases, genetics, viral or bacterial infection, and certain types of medications. Two common types of thyroiditis are

When only one part of the thyroid gland swells, it’s called a thyroid nodule. It may be solid or filled with fluid or blood. Nodules affect four times as many women as men. Most nodules don’t cause symptoms and aren’t cancerous, but you can have several nodules on one thyroid. m

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Better Sleep

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SLEEP MATTERS

hen it comes to your immune health, sleep can play an important role in how your immune system performs.

Getting too much sleep doesn’t seem like it will prevent you from getting sick, but too little sleep has shown to negatively affect a person’s immune system. Making sure you get good quality sleep during the winter months can help give you a better fighting chance against the cold or flu.

Cytokine Production and Sleep The Sleepfoundation.org says that, without sufficient sleep, your body makes fewer cytokines, a type of protein that targets infection and inflammation, effectively creating an immune response. Cytokines are produced and released during sleep;

if you aren’t sleeping you’re losing out. The Sleep Foundation recommends getting at least seven to eight hours of sleep to avoid getting sick and staying healthy. Sleeping seven to eight hours a night will also help from other health issues including heart disease, diabetes and obesity.

Naps are the Best If you are a health care worker or work in a profession that works nights, long hours or odd shifts and you feel you aren’t getting adequate sleep then naps are the best next thing for you. The Sleep Foundation says taking two naps that are no longer than 30 minutes each — one in the morning and one in the afternoon — has been shown to help decrease stress and offset the negative effects that sleep deprivation has on the immune system. If you are unable to sleep for a half-hour during

the workday, sleep for 20 minutes during your lunch break and another right before you eat dinner.

What Makes you Sleep Good sleep is important to your health and immune health. If you find yourself having a hard time falling asleep, there are some tricks and things you can do to help you fall asleep. Lowering the temperature in your bedroom can help you fall asleep. Your body temperature changes and cools when you lie down. Setting your room temperature between 60-67 degrees could help. Another way to help you fall asleep is by making your room completely dark and turning on some relaxing music. Research has shown that darkness boosts the production of melatonin, the hormone essential for sleep. m

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Sleep and the Heart

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ne of the best ways to protect your heart and your health is to sleep well at night.

Just because your body is able to operate on six to seven hours, doesn’t mean it’s necessarily healthy for you to do so. Sleep is essential for the performance of your body and the effect that sleep has on your heart. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Helpguide.org share guidance on how to maintain a happy and healthy heart.

Quality and Quantity According to the CDC, the average adult needs at least seven hours of sleep each night. More than one in three American adults say they don’t get the recommended amount. Adults who sleep less than seven hours each night are more likely to say they have other health problems. Health problems associated with sleep issues are high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and obesity.

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LIVING WELL 2021

You may not feel the effects of lack of sleep instantly, but over time, not getting good sleep will hurt your heart health. Lack of sleep can also affect your mental and physical health. According to Healthguide.org, sleep impacts productivity, emotional balance, immune function and even your weight.

Sleep Deprivation Do you find yourself yawning through the day, clinging to a few cups of coffee to make it through work? You may think it’s common for everyone, but the truth is you may not realize how sleep deprived you are. Signs of sleep deprivation are less obvious than you may think. If you are wondering if you are sleep deprived, here are some signs according to Helpguide.org: •Y ou need an alarm clock to wake up on time. •Y ou have a hard time getting out of the bed in the morning.

• You feel sluggish in the afternoon. • You get sleepy in lectures, meetings or warm rooms. • You get drowsy after heavy meals or while driving. • You need to nap to get through the day.

Getting better sleep The CDC shares tips on how to get better good quality sleep: • Stick to a regular sleep schedule. Go to bed at the same time each night and get up at the same time each morning. • Get enough natural light, especially earlier in the day. Try going for a morning or lunchtime walk. • Get enough physical activity during the day, but don’t exercise within a few hours of bedtime. • Keep your bedroom cool, dark and quiet. Applying these tips will help you get better sleep. m


Diet &

Exercise

Why Drink Water?

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ll life on Earth relies on water. Drinking water everyday consistently can bring added benefits to your life and your health. Drinking water every day can make you feel better throughout the day.

Limiting the amount of sugar you drink can help you prevent these kinds of diseases and help you lose weight.

How Water Helps Your Body

Drinking too many sugary drinks can lead to significant health problems in the future. Sugary drinks are anything sweetened with added sugars. Sodas, fruit drinks, sport drinks, energy drinks and coffees are considered sugary drinks.

Water not only keeps you hydrated and feeling good, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says water also helps your body by keeping your temperature normal, lubricating your joints, protecting your spinal cord and other sensitive tissue and gets rid of wastes through urination, perspiration and bowel movements.

The CDC says people who often drink too many of theses sugary drinks are prone to face health problems such as weight gain, kidney disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes and more health issues.

Your body needs water more if you live in hot climates, are more physically active, sick or running a fever and having diarrhea or vomiting. Water ­ and helps your body in so many ways —

Rethink the Drink

does more for your body than sugary drinks such as sodas and energy drinks can do for you. You may feel awake and good as you drink the sugary drinks, but unlike with water, the feeling from sugary drinks doesn’t last.

Healthy Drink Options Sometimes you need to ease yourself into the habit of drinking water if you’ve spent all your life drinking sugary drinks. Try these tips from the CDC to help ease yourself into drinking more water and less sugary drinks. Try plain black coffee or teas, sparkling water, seltzers or flavored waters if you want some hydration with a little more flavor than water. You can also drink 100% fruit or vegetable juice to get some of that flavored hydration. m

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EXPERT

EXPERT | PHYSICAL THERAPY Kelsey Sutherland, PT, DPT, Cert. DN One of the best things about being a Physical Therapist is that there are many different routes to take within the profession. There are specialties ranging all the way from neurological injuries to athletes, pediatrics to geriatrics, oncology to pelvic floor, and everywhere in between. However, most people are surprised and confused when I mention Pelvic Floor therapy. Pelvic Floor PT is not a phrase that’s thrown around much, even in the health care world. In fact, many patients and health care providers don’t even know that it exists! Quite honestly, until I went to PT school, I had also never heard of Pelvic Floor PT. I decided to undergo the education and certifications required to treat these pelvic floor conditions once I learned how rewarding and life-changing it can

ASK THE EXPERT

be for my patients.

Kelsey Sutherland, PT, DPT, Cert. DN

So, what is the pelvic floor anyway? Simply put, it’s the group of muscles that control the bowel and bladder functions, as well

Doctor of Physical Therapy, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

as support the reproductive organs. These muscles are located in the pelvis and are involved in most of our daily activities, both

Bachelor’s of Science Biology, Louisiana Tech University

as well. Treatment is very individualized for each patient. So, how to know if you might need Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy? Take a

Herman and Wallace PRI Certified Pelvic Floor Therapist, Level I and II Certified in Dry Needling - AAMPT

under voluntary and involuntary control. For example, when you sneeze, your pelvic floor should activate to prevent any bladder or bowel leakage, as well as when you cough or laugh. When you jump rope, go for a run, or even stand up from your chair, your pelvic floor should be engaged. However, there are times when the pelvic floor should relax, and some people struggle with this look at the list below:

• If you leak urine or feces when you cough, laugh, jump, sneeze, stand, walk, etc. • If you leak when you do high level activities, such as lifting weights or running • If you constantly run to the restroom because you have trouble “holding it” • If you leak after you use the restroom or have difficulty emptying bowel/bladder • If you feel like you can’t control when and where you pass gas • If you struggle with constipation • If you’ve said, “I’ve had kids, it’s normal for me to leak a little!” • If you regularly wake up more than once a night to use the restroom • If you have pain or difficulty with intercourse or other sexual functions • If you have pelvic/anorectal/genital pain • If you have tailbone pain • If you struggle with abdominal pain or core strength, especially after pregnancy • If you’re interested in wellness before, during, and after pregnancy • If you’ve undergone surgery in or near the pelvis (prostate procedures, hysterectomies, etc.) and things don’t “work” quite like they did before

If you feel like you may need pelvic floor therapy, but your specific issue isn’t listed above, there’s a good chance I can still help! These are just some examples of common issues Pelvic Floor therapists treat, but the above list is certainly not exhaustive. As a Pelvic Floor PT, my job is to listen to your specific concerns and problems and formulate an individualized treatment plan that best fits your needs. If you’ve heard that Kegels is all you need to strengthen your pelvic floor, there is definitely more to the story. In fact, most patients have been doing Kegels wrong, and this exercise can actually cause some conditions to worsen. Treatment can include a wide range of options, such as biofeedback, tissue mobilization, goal-specific exercises, behavior modification techniques, patient education, and even dry needling. There is no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to Physical Therapy, and that is especially true when it comes to the pelvic floor. And if this sounds a little more intimate and personal than “traditional PT,” you’re right. However, Pelvic Floor PT is not meant to add to your stress or anxiety. So, if some questions or techniques make you uncomfortable, treatment is adjusted accordingly to fit your needs. Therapy should make life better! If you feel like any of this information resonates with you, I’d love to help. Come see me so I can help you reach your goals!


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o one likes leg day at the gym. For many reasons, however, you should be focusing on working your leg muscles while you’re working out. A strong lower body can help to prevent injury and manage chronic conditions such as arthritis and diabetes. Stronger legs can make your cardio workouts easier to complete, as well. Toned leg muscles keep your body balanced, so don’t forget to consistently work on your glutes, quads and hamstrings. Once you appreciate that your legs contain your largest and most important muscles, you can start incorporating fun-to-do exercises that will result in big-time benefits to your overall health.

Take your Legs to

New Levels

Here are some of the greatest benefits of leg workouts, according to a recent report by Healthline. • Build muscle. • Tone and sculpt legs. • Strengthen core muscles. • Burn calories and promote weight loss. • Improve overall fitness. • Reduce joint pain. • Strengthen bones. • Engage major muscle groups. • Alleviate lower back pain. • Boost cognitive function. • Create an aligned, balanced and symmetrical body. • Improve mobility, stability and range of motion. • Manage stress. • Improve posture. Read on for a couple of the most effective leg exercises, and remember to always practice safety in the weight room or at home.

Squats

Leg Press

One of the best leg exercises you can do is the squat. When performing a squat, try to squat straight up and down to focus the most on using your quadriceps to get maximum results. You can do squats with a barbell, dumbbells or just your body weight.

The leg press is highly effective in working your quads, glutes and hamstrings. Make it a staple of your weekly workout to see big results in your lower body.

Start at a lower weight until you have the form down, and then move up to get more results. Once you master the squat, try jumping squats. Stand with your feet shoulder width apart and lower into a squat position until your thighs are parallel to the floor. Then, jump up as high as you can and try to land softly to avoid injury. Repeat this for at least 12 reps and do at least three sets, taking a 30-second break between sets.

Find the press machine at your local gym and start by setting the weight low. Sit down and press your feet squarely on the footplate, making sure your lower back stays pressed against the bench pad. Release the safety and bend your knees to lower the platform. In a steady motion, push the platform back up to the top without locking your knees. Repeat for 12 reps and three sets, taking breaks if needed. Always remember to exercise caution when you are working out. Without proper form, you can risk injury and may not be getting the most out of your workouts. Seek out a local personal trainer who can help you put together a structured, safe workout plan. m

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Find a Local dietitian When looking for professional help with putting together a personalized dietary plan, it’s important to find someone who can give you one-on-one attention. That’s because everyone’s bodies and dietary needs are different, and require varying strategies. Here’s why going with a local professional makes the most sense: • They are able to deliver customized, in-person service. • They depend on your business and will go above and beyond to keep their company open.

Plant-Based Eating

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hether you’re looking to lose weight or just eat healthier, a plant-based diet could be the solution for you. A plant-based, or plant-forward, diet focuses on foods primarily from plants. This includes fruits and vegetables, nuts, seeds, oils, whole grains, legumes and beans. “It doesn’t mean that you are vegetarian or vegan and never eat meat or dairy,” writes licensed dietitian and nutritionist Katherine D. McManus for Harvard University. “Rather, you are proportionately choosing more of your foods from plant sources.”

Benefits Documentaries about plant-based diets, including Forks over Knives and Cowspiracy, have led to a rise in popularity of plant-based eating. A plant-based diet has been shown to have positive effects for weight and cardiac health, and the environment. Kaiser Permanente physician Benjamin Ha reports that he has seen patients reverse health conditions such as type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, and dramatically reduced their need for prescription medications. “I am convinced that a wholefoods, plant-based diet is an effective and evidence-based intervention that physicians should recommend to all patients to improve health and wellness,” he said. 20

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How to Start You may choose to incorporate more plantbased foods into your diet or go vegan altogether. Whichever diet you choose, you can transition your eating habits slowly. EverydayHealth.com offers the following descriptions of various diet options. Vegetarian diet: includes cheese, eggs, milk and plant-based protein but not meat, such as chicken, pork and beef. Instead of meat. Vegan diet: an exclusively plant-based diet with no animal products, including milk, cheese and honey, and exclusively eat plants as part of a vegan lifestyle. Raw vegan diet: a vegan diet with only raw plant-based foods. Flexitarian diet: a flexible diet with primarily plant-based foods, reduced meat intake and some animal products. Ha recommends a gradual shift to plantbased eating. He tells patients to start by eating more of four food groups — fruits, vegetables, whole grains and beans — and less of four other groups — animal protein, dairy, processed foods and oil/fried foods. Writing for Permanente Journal, Ha says, “I clarify with patients that my intention is not to convince them to become a vegan or vegetarian, but to encourage them to focus on eating more unprocessed plant-based foods.” m

• They are knowledgeable about local food options, particularly the seasonality of locally grown fruits and vegetables. But how do you find a good local dietitian, especially if you’re starting from the beginning? Read on for tips on landing the perfect local professional for your health needs.

Ask Your Friends Referrals are the best way for local companies to grow. Use your social media following to see if anyone has had success using a local dietary professional. Weight and overall health are hot topics that generally generate a lot of response on social media, so if you’re comfortable talking about it online, you may be able to find strong referrals. You can also find local groups committed to overall wellness, or ask the workers at your local gym. Oftentimes, they are highly connected to other professionals in the health and wellness space.

Research Their Qualifications When shopping for a new dietitian, be sure to interview a few before making your final decision. Reputable professionals will be honest when it comes to their experience and the type of qualifications they possess. If they have a website or LinkedIn profile, you should be able to get a sense of the extent of their experience and knowledge through some online research.

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Stick with your Exercise Plan

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any people have great success starting an exercise plan. It’s sticking with it that becomes difficult. If you’re having trouble following through, you’re not alone. Here are some statistics from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: • Less than 5% of adults participate in 30 minutes of physical activity each day. • Only one in three adults receive the recommended amount of physical activity each week. • More than 80% of adults do not meet the guidelines for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities. • More than 80% of adolescents do not do enough aerobic physical activity to meet the guidelines for youth. Busy schedules or poor overall health can make exercise more challenging. Fortunately, there are many tips and tricks to maintaining a consistent plan.

Common Benefits

Everyone already knows there are many great reasons to exercise. Consistent, rigorous exercise can improve energy, sleep and overall health. It’s also been proven to stave off stress and anxiety. The good news is that regular exercise doesn’t have to be all or nothing. You don’t have to spend hours in a gym or force yourself into painful activities to see the benefits of exercise. The current recommendations for most adults is to reach at least 150 minutes of moderate activity per week. You’ll reach these goals by exercising for 30 minutes, five times a week.

Making Exercise a Habit

Integrating exercise into your daily routine requires the right mindset and discipline.

ortant to When setting expectations, it’s imp goal, the more r you s remember the more ambitiou d days faile few A . difficult it will be to achieve us into a lead can cise of not getting enough exer downward spiral. , achievable A better approach is to start with easy tions on fica exercise goals. Use triggers like noti you to ind your phone or an alarm clock to rem know it, you re get active throughout the day. Befo is easy to that ine you’ll have a regular exercise rout stick to on a daily basis. ess by rewarding Don’t forget to celebrate your succ ts that you yourself. Pick healthy habits or trea ivational enjoy as a reward. Write yourself mot Consider notes or emails to keep you going. cise routine to involving friends in your new exer help push you forward. m

Get local help with your Medicare questions. I’m Jenifer Patterson, a licensed sales agent in Cochise County. When it comes to Medicare, it’s important to consider all of your options. What works well for your neighbor may not be the best fit for you. I know the ins and outs of Medicare, and I’m ready to answer your questions and help you find a plan that fits your needs. Take advantage of my knowledge and experience to: • Take the confusion out of Medicare • Get help comparing plans

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EXPERT

EXPERT | FAMILY MEDICINE Your Health Means Everything: Taking Care of Yourself in a Post-Pandemic World By Karen Reed, CNO/Clinical Leader, Canyon Vista Medical Center Life has changed in ways both big and small over the last year. Plans were suspended and priorities shifted as we cautiously made our way through a situation that we had never experienced, much less imagined would happen. As we get closer than ever to putting the COVID-19 pandemic behind us – thanks to wider vaccine distribution and safe practices to slow the spread of the virus – many of us are looking forward to getting back to the things we’ve been missing – planned vacations on pause, suspended social gatherings, even just dropping by a friend’s or loved one’s for a coffee catch-up.

There is one priority, however, that we have all shared during the pandemic that should remain high on your list: your health. If there is one thing we have collectively learned over the last year it is that – in short – your health means everything.

We have put a lot of time and energy into protecting ourselves and others from COVID-19, and that is very important and worthwhile. But taking care of your health means a lot more than successfully staying virus-free. It means taking charge of your health so you can stay on top of any issues that arise before they become serious. It means not delaying the care you need to feel better and get healthier so you can fully enjoy all of those things we’ve been missing lately. Here are some of the most important ways you can keep your health a priority in the months and years to come.

Schedule screen time No, not that kind of screen time. We’re talking health screenings that are important road markers on your health journey – like annual mammograms if you’re a woman who’s 40 and up, annual colonoscopies if you’re 45 and older and low dose CT screening if you’re a current or former smoker. Screenings like these can help detect cancer early and allow for easier and more effective treatment. And remember, if you’re at higher risk, you may need to start annual screenings like mammograms and colonoscopies earlier. Talk to your doctor about your risks and the right timing for you. It’s no surprise that American Cancer Society researchers estimate that almost 1.9 million new cancer cases will be diagnosed in 2021, and the ACS is projecting an increase in late-stage diagnoses and preventable cancer deaths due to delayed care. If you’ve been putting off your screening during this last year, now’s a great time to get it on the calendar and get the peace of mind it can bring.

Check in with a check-up Like regular screenings, annual well visits with a trusted primary care provider play a key role in your overall health and well-being. That goes for all ages. They help you and your provider establish a trusting and informed relationship that can help you both stay up to date on your unique health needs and stay on top of any issues that may arise. Knowing your family medical history and health risks, your provider

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EXPERT can help you keep track of those annual screenings, as well as any potential issues to watch out for.

Don’t gamble with your health Emergencies are called emergencies for a reason. When one puts your health at immediate risk, it is vital that you get the care you need as soon as possible. Don’t wait, because an emergency will not wait on you. If you’re experiencing chest pain or any emergency, minutes do matter. It is critical that you get to the hospital and get the care you need right when you need it.

Live healthy Creating good habits and routines can go a long way towards keeping you healthy and ready to embrace all life has to offer. Eating healthy, engaging in regular physical activity, getting enough sleep, reducing stress and taking care of your mental health all have major benefits for your health, and can help reduce your risk for certain diseases. If you’re struggling in any of these areas or just aren’t sure where to get started, talk with your primary care provider. They can help you with advice or point you in the direction of any specialized care you may need to feel your best.

Your health affects every other aspect of your life. Without it, it’s a lot more difficult to enjoy the people and things in your life that bring you joy. So, don’t make it wait. Get the care you need. Start a new healthy habit. Schedule that check-up and screening. Take care of your health. It means everything.

If you are looking for a provider, need to schedule a screening or looking to make an appointment, Canyon Vista Medical Center can help. Call 520.263.2005 or visit canyonvistamedicalcenter.com to get connected with the care you need.

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Fitness

L

for Seniors

s t h H m d f w c

C A s t m c O y d

I t

A

Tap into the Fountain of Youth

long with a balanced diet, exercise may be a key to the fountain of youth for seniors.

According to the American Association of Retired Persons, physical activity helps maintain healthy blood vessels that provide good circulation to the body and brain. Committing to practicing an active lifestyle is a beneficial way to sharpen both your mind and overall health. If you’re ready to take control of your fitness but are hesitant to join a gym, you may find several types of exercise to perform at home. From walking around your neighborhood to incorporating physical challenges into your daily routine, seniors gain immense health benefits from small changes. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that older adults follow these guidelines to keep their bodies fit

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and working efficiently. • Three hundred minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity. • Vigorous aerobic exercise should be performed for 150 minutes per week. Suppose you have lived a mostly sedentary lifestyle. In that case, it’s essential to speak with your medical provider before beginning a new exercise routine. They can monitor your fitness levels and advise you toward exercises that you can perform safely. Check out how exercise may be the secret to tapping into the fountain of youth.

Keep Skin Youthful One of the many changes that come with age includes a faltered skin appearance. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, this occurs as the outer skin

layer thins, even though the number of cell layers remains unchanged. An active lifestyle promotes increased blood flow, which sends more oxygen and eliminates waste, enhancing skin cells, keeping them healthy and vital. Additionally, sweating allows our pores to open to stop waste and toxins from becoming clogged.

Boosts Metabolism The Mayo Clinic defines metabolism as the process by which your body converts what you eat and drink into energy. As we age, the amount of muscle tends to decrease, and fat becomes more prevalent. Weight gains and high-body fat can result in serious health issues like diabetes and heart disease. Exercise is key to maintaining a healthy weight and regulating metabolism during the senior years. m


Learn Chair Yoga L ooking for a unique way to stay in shape? How about yoga? 
The American Osteopathic Association states that yoga is a relevant exercise that builds strength, awareness and harmony in both the mind and body. However, for seniors with limited mobility, many of the movements can be dangerous or impossible. Fortunately, fitness experts developed a form of workout conducted from the safety of a chair. Chair yoga is an excellent way for older Americans to gain many of the traditional style’s same health benefits. In addition to pain management, the exercises stretch muscles, lowers blood pressure, improves circulation and reduce stress and anxiety. One factor to keep in mind is that your yoga routine should not cause pain or discomfort. If you find yourself unable to reach the range of motion as recommended,

complete the movement only to where you are comfortable. As you improve your flexibility, these motions will become easier to achieve. Check out how to gain the health benefits from your living room with these impactful workouts.

Eagle Arms

Seated Mountain This pose will engage your core but requires perfect posture and a focus on breathing. First, take a deep breath while sitting up straight and extending your spine. You want to keep your legs at a 90-degree angle, with your knees directly over your ankle. As you exhale, push down in the chair with the lowest part of your tailbone and roll your shoulders down your back. Suck your stomach in while breathing out and lift your toes to firmly drive the four corners of your feet into the floor.

If you suffer from sore joints, this exercise is a great way to create relaxation as it stabilizes your shoulders. From your chair, stretch your arms out to your sides as you inhale. While you breathe out, bring them in front of you and swing your right arm under your left. Grab your shoulders to mimic that you’re hugging yourself. Next, lift your elbows higher and exhale. Then, roll your shoulders down, relaxing them away from your ears and take a few breaths while holding this pose. m

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Dental Health

Children’s Dental Awareness

E

fficient oral care begins in infancy and carries on into the toddler years to establish good habits.

As a parent, you should remain diligent in promoting proper brushing techniques, correcting missteps and replacing a child’s toothbrush as the bristles become damaged. February is National Children’s Dental Awareness Month (NCDHM). Take advantage of the movement by committing to practicing better oral management to enhance your children’s overall health. The history of NCDHM dates to 1941, where it began as a one-day event in Cleveland, Ohio. The American Dental Association (ADA) first officially recognized the program in 1949 and ultimately changed it to a week-long celebration in 1955. It was 1981 when the observance shifted into a month-long celebration, as it remains today.

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Check your community for participating dentist offices that may offer free screenings, tours and presentations. Encourage your children to get excited about classroom projects like coloring contests, essay writing and health fairs. Learn how to get kids on board with better oral health with these tips from the ADA.

Make it Fun Young children may need encouragement to practice the chore of brushing teeth. Incorporate these fun ideas into their routine. llow them to choose their toothbrush •A and favorite flavor of toothpaste. •R ead books or watch videos on the correct techniques. •L et them set a two-minute timer to ensure their brushing is sufficient.

•R eward children for excellent oral care with healthy snacks or small treats such as stickers. If your child is hesitant or afraid of visiting their dentist, make sure to plan a fun trip after the appointment to make it less intimidating.

Improve Their Diet If you allowed a child to plan their meals, you would expect plenty of candy, ice cream and juices. It’s your responsibility to ensure they consume balanced meals and save the sweet stuff as good behavior rewards. Try to avoid allowing them drinks like soda, teas and juices as they are typically loaded with sugar. However, when they inevitably do get their favorite sugary beverage, include a glass of water afterward to help wash it away from their teeth. m


The Truth about Sugar A

ccording to the Addiction Center, nearly 75% of Americans overeat sugar and can be classified as having an addiction. Too much of the sweet stuff has been linked to obesity, diabetes and heart disease. Sugar can also dramatically impact your oral health through a compound of actions. When you consume sugary drinks or foods, plaque bacteria use the sweetener to produce acid that attacks the enamel, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). Once this protective tooth covering is compromised or cracked, a trip to the dentist is the most efficient solution. If you must drink soft drinks throughout the day, the ADA recommends drinking a cup of water along with it. Take control of your oral health by adding tooth-friendly options into your diet and ditching the sugary contents.

Drink, Don’t Sip You may think that sipping a drink helps your teeth by adjusting for the incoming sugar. However, slowly consuming a beverage will allow the bacteria to eat the sweetener, promoting erosion and creating cavities. Do your best to finish the drinks in one sitting rather than sipping on it over time.

Eating Tips If you enjoy a healthy relationship with the occasional soft drink, learn how to consume it while preventing its destructive tendencies. When you do ingest sugary beverages or foods, make sure to do so with a balanced meal. As you eat, the mouth produces saliva, which reduces the effects of acid production. Saliva is also excellent for dislodging food particles that may otherwise remain stuck in your mouth.

Limiting snacks between meals is another good habit to begin. When deciding what to eat, consider something nutritious and chew sugarless gum afterward to promote saliva buildup.

Foods and Beverages to Include When you’re adjusting your diet to achieve a cleaner mouth, make sure to add plenty of healthy fruits and vegetables. You can also add quality sources of protein like lean beef, fish or poultry. Vegetarians can get nutrients from foods like dry beans, peas and legumes. Filling up with healthy foods can help you feel fuller longer and avoid snacking. m

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Men’s Health

Men and Alcohol Abuse

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Is Male Menopause Real? W they age.

hile menopause is more widely known, men also experience the effects of changing hormone levels as

Its official name is andropause, but in popular culture, it has been dubbed “manopause.” Tied to a drop in testosterone levels, andropause has led men to report similar symptoms to those women experience during menopause or perimenopause.

The Science There are some important differences between “manopause” and menopause. While women experience a rapid decline in estrogen levels, men experience a much slower decline in testosterone, which can last for decades, and most older men have normal levels of testosterone, according to the Mayo Clinic. Scientists are studying andropause, and there is some debate in the scientific community about whether it can be directly compared to menopause. What’s clear, however, is that before the age of 40, men experience “a progressive reduction in testosterone and bioavailable testosterone levels,” as well as a protein that binds them and carries them throughout the body, writes UCLA medical professor Stanley G Korenman in the Western Journal of Medicine. “I dislike the term ‘male menopause’ because of its reference to cyclicity, and I have adopted ‘manopause’ as an umbrella term to describe age-related alterations whose exact nature is still to be determined.”

sleep, breast swelling or tenderness, swelling in the ankles and increased blood clotting due to high red blood cell counts, according to Harvard Medical School. One study was halted because of cardiac issues in patients, and scientists are still studying the effects of testosterone on the risk of prostate cancer. For men with low testosterone, the benefits of testosterone therapy usually outweigh the risks. For other men, the decision is not so clear. According to Harvard Medical School, “It offers men who feel lousy a chance to feel better, but that quick fix could distract attention from unknown long-term hazards.” m

Research has shown that mean may also experience a decline in estrogen levels around the same time, which contributes to symptoms.

Symptoms 
and Treatment Men experience sleepiness, muscle loss, less interest in sex, erectile dysfunction, mood changes, loss in muscle volume and bone density and increased body fat. Doctors treat andropause with topical or injected testosterone replacement therapy, diet and exercise, and mental health treatment. Testosterone therapy does come with some risks. A relatively small number of men experience acne, disturbed breathing during

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Eye Care

Vision Therapy Basics

I

f you have ever been skeptical about performing eye exercises to improve your sight, talk to your doctor about vision therapy. This can be a simple way for you to address your vision issues before turning to surgical alternatives. It is a safe and drug-free program developed for people who must relearn aspects of vision rather than strengthening muscles. The process is beneficial to both adults with limited eyesight and children whose vision affects the way they learn. Another advantage of the proven programs is that most insurance providers cover some or all the costs. Talk with your provider to determine if your policy includes this type of treatment or find out how you can add it to your coverage. If you’re on the fence about giving the therapy a shot, learn the benefits you can expect and enjoy a clearer perspective on life.

Eye Health: Fast Facts

What is Vision Therapy The American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus defines vision therapy as an attempt to develop or improve visual skills and abilities. Impactful exercises focus on increasing visual comfort, ease and efficiency while changing vision processing or interpretation of information. During therapy, experts concentrate on three different categories: •O rthoptic vision therapy. This contains a series of exercises, usually weekly or over several months, performed at an optometric office. The process includes measuring eye deviations and managing treatments for intermittent symptoms. •B ehavioral vision therapy. Patients practice eye exercise to improve visual processing and visual perception.

• 81% of Americans say they are knowledgeable about eye/ vision health. Still, only one in five correctly identified the leading causes of blindness in the U.S. — glaucoma, agerelated macular degeneration and diabetic eye disease. • 6 3% of adults are unaware that vision problems don’t always cause symptoms before the disease impacts their eyesight.

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• About two in three Americans falsely believe vision loss is inevitable with age.

• Reflective error treatment. Doctors focus on the prevention or correction of errors like nearsightedness. Based on your eyes’ integrity, an ophthalmology expert can design the strategy you need for improvement.

Does it Work? The Optometrists Network reports that vision therapy is a proven science with more than 260 published articles on its effectiveness. The system involves training the brain to improve on 17 vital visual skills necessary for reading, writing, learning and sports performance. Enhancing the eye-brain concentration connections is a beneficial treatment that impacts someone at any age. Discuss with your eye doctor to find out more about therapy sessions in your area and if your situation can improve with treatment. m

• Poor eyesight can lead to psychological problems such as isolation and depression. • Diabetic retinopathy will affect about 13.2 million people by 2050, increasing from 7.7 million in 2010. • In 2010, about 2.7 million people in the U.S. aged 40 and under had glaucoma. By 2050, the number is expected to increase to 5.5 million. • About one-third of Americans develop some form of vision-reducing eye disease by age 65.

• Many forms of glaucoma have no warning signs. You can lose your vision before even realizing you’re affected. • Vision problems can quickly aggravate because the brain adapts to the loss, making it more challenging to notice a decline. • Nearly 90% of Americans with age-related macular degeneration are white. • A frican Americans are six to eight times more likely to get glaucoma and go blind from it than white Americans.


Eye and Vision Myths Y

ou have probably heard multiple facts about your eyes throughout your life. Many popular theories have been disproven thanks to modern advances in the visual field.

Knowing the difference between fact and fiction can help you have healthier eyes while taking effective preventive measures to keep them that way. Take a look at these common misconceptions regarding vision, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Baby’s Eye Color Cannot Be Predicted

Your child’s eye color is not decided by the shade of his parents’ irises. Research shows that at least 16 genes play a role in developing a baby’s eye tone. It’s also a misconception that all infants are born with blue eyes. While their shades may appear lighter, it is caused because the cells are unable to develop melanin. Within about 12 months, the pigment production begins to grow, sometimes causing the iris to become darker.

Only Boys Can Be Colorblind

While men are at a higher risk for color blindness, women are also susceptible to the condition. Most people with the issue are born with partial or a total lack of cones in the retina, which is prominent when distinguishing different shades. Another misunderstanding is that those who are colorblind only see in black and white. Most see partial tones but find it challenging to distinguish between greens and reds. There are severe cases where some report only seeing various shades of gray.

Eating Carrots Will Improve Eyesight

Once your vision has been compromised, no amount of fruits or vegetables will help restore the damage. However, a healthy diet is crucial when preventing eye problems. Try to fit in plenty of vitamin A into your eating habits. Foods to include are leafy greens, brightly colored vegetables and fish.

Watching TV

You were probably told that watching television or sitting too close to the box would inhibit your vision. While it can cause headaches from eye strain, it’s not been proven that it causes longterm damage. However, if you notice a child prefers to sit nearby the tube, it may be an early sign of nearsightedness as they have trouble focusing on nearby objects. m

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A Window to Your Health

R

egular eye exams are not only beneficial for discovering visual problems, but they can also show concerning health issues throughout your body. As an optometrist performs their inspection, they are granted a view of blood vessels, nerves and connective tissues. These intricate details can reveal patterns that lead to the discovery of severe disease. When you’re committed to getting your eyes examined, finding a specialist is the first step. If you don’t already have a family optometrist, speak with your regular physician for a referral. It’s also a good idea to talk with your loved ones who

have a relationship with an expert who provides a positive experience. Once you’re established with a physician, they can schedule an appointment and create a schedule for future visits. It’s essential to follow their guidelines for your health care. Learn some of the common diseases discovered during eye exams, as reported by the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Brain Tumor During an examination, doctors sometimes notice a transmission to the eye that is caused by increased pressure in the brain, often

caused by tumors. They can detect the potential tumor’s severity by analyzing changes to the optic nerve that may be swollen. Symptoms like side vision, recent double vision, or changes in your pupil’s size may be other signs that immediate care is required.

Diabetes Early stages of diabetes are often noticed during a visual examination. Your eye is filled with tiny blood vessels. One sure sign is when they begin leaking yellow fluid or blood; getting on top of this disease as soon as symptoms start gives patients an advantage to maintain it or eliminate it.

High Blood Pressure The blood vessels in the back of your eye can also signal high blood pressure if unusual bends, kinks or bleeding are found. Fortunately, the disease can be easily treated with medicine. However, if left without attention, your vision may be compromised by glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration. While these symptoms don’t automatically mean that your health is at risk, it’s a good idea to seek assistance from a professional. If there is a problem, they can work out a solution or treatment plan to ease your conditions. m

• Eat a well-balanced diet rich in leafy greens and other vegetables, fruit and omega-3s. • Wear sunglasses that block 99% to 100% of both UVA and UVB rays. • Wear safety glasses or goggles when needed at home, at work and at play. • Rest your eyes regularly when using the computer for extended periods of time. • Have a regular eye exam to guard against eye disease and ensure your eyewear prescriptions are up to date. If you’re age 40 or older, scheduling an eye exam every one to two years is especially important to guard against age-related eye diseases and vision loss.

Follow these simple tips to help protect your sight at any age, and see us for comprehensive eye care focused on preserving healthy vision.

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Financial Health v

What Does Your Credit Score Mean?

Effective Credit-Building Tips

T

he question of your credit profile will come up in numerous scenarios throughout your lifetime. When you show a lender that you are responsible for repaying financial commitments, your chances for loan approval and competitive interest rates increase. In some industries, an employer may also look into your credit history to discover your qualifications about managing finances and assets. If you’re unsure of where you stand, ask for a free copy of your credit report. The Federal Trade Commission enacts the Fair Credit Reporting Act to ensure that nationwide credit reporting companies must provide Americans with a copy once per 12 months. Reach out to outlets like Equifax, Experian and TransUnion for yours. After analyzing your report, it’s vital to address the

discrepancies that you discover. Negative marks, even erroneous ones, can remain on your profile for multiple years, severely inhibiting your score and financial reputation. Once you cleaned up mistakes that accrued along the way, here are some tips to boost your score.

Pay Bills on Time Making payments on time, every time is crucial to impacting your credit score positively. You should make a budget based on your pay periods and have a plan in place on how to spend the money. Rather than waiting for the due date, try to transfer what you owe a few days before the due date or as soon as you receive your paycheck. Of course, this can be risky as you never know when a financial emergency will occur, so be diligent in building a fund that’s intended to cover unexpected expenses.

Make More 
 Frequent Payments In addition to paying on time, consider making more frequent payments to pay down debts faster. While hitting the minimum requirements will prevent negative marks on your credit, you can expedite the payoff process by actively cutting down the total owed.

Keep Credit 
Cards Open Even when you make timely payments on credit cards, having high outstanding balances can lead lenders to disqualify a loan. Once you pay the card off, keep the account active and use it for small items that you can quickly pay off on the due date. Things like filling up your gas tank or buying a few groceries each month will show healthy credit activity and show that you’re responsible for your finances. m

You may have two credit scores, one called a FICO score and the other a VantageScore. The FICO score dates from the mid-1980s, while the VantageScore is a more modern invention designed to produce a more consistent score across the three credit reporting 
agencies.

FICO Scores FICO scores, named for the Fair Isaac company that started them, range from 300-850. There’s no definition of a good or bad score, but you can generally consider the mid-600s the dividing line between better rates and terms.

VantageScores Vantage Scores, on the other hand, range from 501-990. Super prime borrowers have a score from 901-990, and they get a lender’s best rates and terms for credit. Prime plus borrowers, with a score from 802-900, get good rates and terms. Prime borrowers score from 701-800 and get generally reasonable rates and terms. Nonprime borrowers score from 601-700 and high-risk borrowers get from 501600. High-risk borrowers are generally not offered credit.

How It’s Calculated Both VantageScores and FICO scores weigh your payment history and the number of new credit inquiries in your history when they calculate your score. VantageScores, however, emphasize how much of your available credit you use. FICO scores emphasize the length of your credit history and the types of credit you’re using.

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Paying the Right Debts First

W

debts. If you’re serious about making the commitment to begin restoring your financial health, you may have to sacrifice a few things from your daily life, including:

hen building your nest egg is challenging due to a lack of extra money after paying monthly expenses, it’s imperative to create a strategy to cut down debts. Unfortunately, it’s not always easy to understand which financial commitments should be eliminated first.

• Avoid eating out. • Skip an out-of-town 
vacation. •P ut buying a new wardrobe or extravagant items on the back burner.

With the right approach, you can cut out high-interest fees, lower your balances and get yourself in better monetary shape with more saving power. The first step in getting out of debt is making a list of all the debtors you owe. Perform an analysis of your mortgage, car loans and any existing credit cards. In addition to documenting your balances, you must also understand the interest rates on the accounts. Don’t automatically assume that knocking out the highest monthly fee will be the most effective move in your financial plan. The journey to living debt-free can take time. Find out more about two strategies from

Preparing a budget and sticking to its guidelines is an excellent strategy to save money and focus on paying down debts. InCharge Debt Solutions that are effective for managing debts.

Debt Avalanche When using this method, people must focus on paying off debts with the highest interest rates first. To be successful with the process, you should be able to make your payments without disrupting monthly installments and other outstanding

Debt Snowball On the other side of the spectrum, the debt snowball plan means paying off your most expensive obligations regardless of the interest rates. This method effectively eliminates high costs and uses the money you’re saving toward the next highest debt. It can provide instant gratification and a mental boost as you begin checking financial responsibilities off your monthly bills. m

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Be Aware of Elder Fraud B eing the victim of elder fraud can be financially crippling for those in retirement or nearly eligible. Protect your savings by educating yourself about risks and scams perpetrated against senior citizens. According to the National Council on Aging (NCOA), about 90% of all reported elder abuse cases were committed by an older person’s family members. Some of the ways seniors are taken advantage of: • Depleting a joint checking account. • Direct theft. • Promising but not delivering care in exchange for payment. Learn more about a few of the most common financial scams Americans are exposed to during their elder years, as reported by the NCOA.

Medicare/Health Insurance Scams As seniors become eligible to receive Medicare benefits, criminals take advantage by impersonating representatives and asking for personal information. In some cases, fraudsters will even set up makeshift clinics and offer phony services. After retaining your financial data, they can erroneously bill Medicare and keep the money for themselves.

sellers not only may pose legal problems but comes with a greater risk: buying pills made from unsafe substances.

Also, the illegally obtained medications may not be as advertised, leaving seniors without their life-saving prescriptions and risking severe health conditions.

Phone Scams Across America, senior citizens make twice as many purchases over the phone than the national average. Scammers may pose as telemarketers with unbelievable deals, inquiries for a charitable donation or investment opportunities. They will generally ask an older adult to wire money to obtain the service they are promoting. Unfortunately, with no face-to-face interaction or paper trail, finding the culprits is nearly impossible after the scam has been realized. In many cases, con artists share info about people they deem as “easy targets” with other criminals, making you exposed to increased fraud attempts.

Sweepstakes Scams

Counterfeit Prescription Drugs

Another scam to watch for is receiving notification that you are a sweepstakes or lottery winner. Scammers contact seniors with good news about a prize but require a payment to unlock their 
winnings.

Many find themselves scouring the internet for more affordable prices on their prescription medicines to save money. Buying prescription medications through questionable online

You may even receive a good-faith check as “proof.” Unfortunately, after a few days, the deposited check is found fraudulent by the bank, and the criminal has already received compensation. m

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Make Retirement Money Last W hile retirement should be an exciting journey, for some, financial stresses can negatively impact their lives. Even after a lifetime of responsibly saving and preparing for the future, unexpected issues can arise to thwart the best-laid plans. Learn how to make your money last and grow while you enjoy your golden years without returning to the workforce. When finding financial freedom during your retirement, you should analyze how much money you can afford to spend annually. The American Association for Retired Persons (AARP) urges seniors to consider these two factors about their income:

risky investments that can cripple your finances if they don’t pay off in your favor. Here are some other tips from the AARP to ensure that your retirement is secure.

Creating a Budget Your preferred lifestyle will be a significant factor when determining an adequate budget. Here is an excellent way to calculate your income from savings and investments. • Add up the value of spendable assets and calculate both retirement and non-retirement savings. Sources should include bank accounts, mutual funds and current stocks.

• Your personal savings and investments.

• Next, you should subtract a cash cushion intended to cover emergency expenses.

•Y our guaranteed income from other sources.

• Finally, take four percent of the remaining capital.

Once you find the right number for your spending allowance, adjust your expenses to fit the plan. Be cautious when making

The balance you calculate will be the amount you can afford during the first year of retirement. Use this strategy in the

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upcoming years but remember to include an increase for inflation.

Reduce Expenses If your allowable spending amount isn’t enough to live out the retirement you had in mind, consider trimming the fat on unnecessary expenses. You can save a significant amount of money by selling vehicles that you rarely use. Instead of using your cash to license and maintain the extra car, put it in a high-interest return savings account. Many decide to sell their family home and downsize into something smaller and more affordable during their retirement. You can add the profit you make from selling the house toward your savings or pay off debts like credit cards and loans. m


Your Health v

Family Health History I

t is important to know your family health history to keep record of disease and health conditions passed down in your genes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shares tips to help you collect your family history.

Talk to your doctor about all the information you have acquired about your family. Even if you don’t have the whole history, at least you have a starting point for tests to screen.

Why is it Important?

Collecting your family health history may seem like a difficult task to complete but it can be as easy as asking family at family gatherings.

Family health history is important because most families have history of at least one chronic disease such as cancer, heart disease or diabetes. If you have a family member with a disease, then more than likely you or your children can possibly have the disease.

Collect information from all of the family members that you can about health conditions or diseases that they or past family members have had. You’ll want to include information on major conditions, causes of death, age at diagnosis and ethnic background.

Having your family health history can help you adjust your life and health habits early so that you can lead the healthiest life you can. The CDC says that healthy living habits can reduce your risk for diseases that run in your family. Screening tests, such as

How to Collect my Family Health History

blood sugar testing, mammograms and colorectal cancer screening, help identify early signs of disease.

Planning Pregnancy If you or your partner are planning pregnancy, knowing both of your family’s health histories would be beneficial to you and your partner. Check with your family to know ahead of time if there are any history of complications in pregnancy such as birth defects, developmental disability, or new born screening disorder. If those disease do run in your family there is a high chance that you could have a baby with these diseases. Screen tests for both potential parents and not just the mom. Talk to your doctor about your health history to find out what tests and treatment options you have before getting pregnant. m

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Practice Sun Safety S

pending time outside is a great way to be physically active, reduce stress and get vitamin D, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But too much sun can come with a cost: skin cancer. Most skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet light, which is made of an invisible kind of radiation that comes from the sun, tanning beds and sunlamps. These UV rays can damage skin cells and leave you with serious health issues. Fortunately, there are many ways to curb the onset of skin cancer. As the pool season winds down and you enjoy the final months of milder fall temperatures, it is vital that you protect your skin from the sun.

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How to Protect Your Skin From the Sun You can reduce your risk of sun damage and skin cancer by staying in the shade. You can find shade under an umbrella, tree or other shelter. If you plan to spend time in the sun for an extended period of time, your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing. When possible, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants and skirts. You can also try to wear a T-shirt or a beach cover-up if you’re planning on enjoying the beach. Clothes made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection, and opt for darker colors for optimal protection.

Wear a Hat Many people wear hats to give them more protection. The CDC recommends hats

with brims all the way around that shades your face, ears and the back of your neck. A tightly woven fabric offers the best protection versus straw hats that will let sunlight through. If you wear a baseball cap, don’t forget to cover the exposed parts of your head, including your ears, with sunscreen.

Choosing the Right Sunscreen When choosing a sunscreen, put on broad spectrum sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB rays and has an SPF of 15 or higher before you go outside. You should always apply sunscreen in a thick layer that covers all exposed skin. Looking to take your youngsters outside to enjoy the sun? Remember that sunscreen is not recommended for babies who are six months old or younger. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends keeping infants out of the sun during midday and using protective clothing if they have to be in the sun. m


INTERNAL MEDICINE

GERIATRIC MEDICINE

GENERAL SURGERY

FAMILY MEDICINE

PRACTITIONER PROFILES Family Medicine 5750 E. Hwy 90, Suite 375 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 Hours: 8 am—5 pm 520.263.3762

Blair Goodsell, DO

Sherry Hron, FNP

SVMedicalGroup.org

General Surgery 75 Colonia de Salud, Suite 200 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 Hours: 8 am—5 pm Phone: 520.452.0144 Roland Haj, DO

Andrew Adams, MD

Jody Jenkins, MD

Douglas Opie, DO

Cherokee Carrillo, PA-C

SVMedicalGroup.org

Dr. Monica Vandivort, MD Medical Director for Haven Skilled Nursing Facility Graduating from the University of Kansas School of Medicine in 1989 Dr. Monica Vandivort, is a Board Certified Geriatric Medicine Specialist. Currently the Medical Director of Haven Health of Sierra Vista, a Skilled Nursing Facility, focusing on quality care, physical, occupational and speech thereapy. Dr. Vandivort continues her dedication of over 31 years of expertise to our community. Dr. Vandivort’s unique bedside approach to those needing care outside of the traditional Dr.’s office, allows her to provide attention to each patient and to strive to bring them the expert care for their individual needs.

INTERNAL MEDICINE

Roberto Molina, MD 520.263.3764

Haven of Sierra Vista 660 S. Coronado Drive Sierra Vista

www.havenhg.com (520) 459-4900

CARDIOLOGY

Fadi Fahad, MD 520.263.3765

5750 E. Hwy 90, Suite 200 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 Hours: 8 am—5 pm

SVMedicalGroup.org

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OBSTETRICS

Obstetrics & Gynecology

5750 E. Hwy 90, Suite 300 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 Hours: 8 am—5 pm 520.263.3620

SVMedicalGroup.org

ORTHOPEDICS

Sidney Semrad, DO, FACOOG

Mary Schlotterer, MD

Misty Decker, CNM, RNC-EFM

Liz Ramchandani,WHNP

Welcoming Scott Slagis, MD, FACS to the Copper Queen Clinic Family! Dr. Slagis is an Orthopedic Surgeon visiting the Bisbee and Douglas Clinics three times a month. He is both Board Certified in both Orthopedic Surgery and Internal Medicine. He recently retired from Tucson Orthopaedic Institute.

Douglas Clinic (520) 805-6800 Bisbee clinic (520) 432-2042

ORTHOPEDICS

Orthopedics: Spine ~ General ~ Total Joint ~ Sports Medicine 5750 E. Hwy 90, Suite 200 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 Hours: 8 am—5 pm Phone: 520.263.3761

SVMedicalGroup.org Randall Roy, MD. Jared Haymore, PA-C. Laurence Susini, MD. McKay Tingey, PA-C. Max Berdichevsky, MD. Dean Marturello PA-C. Brian Daines, MD.

OPTOMETRY

Stephen D. Phillips, O.D.

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Education

B.S. Pacific University O.D. Pacific University College of Optometry

At Phillips Eye Care, we utilize the latest equipment, technology and techniques to diagnose, monitor and treat a wide variety of eye disease including glaucoma, cataract, macular degeneration, and monitoring diabetic patients. In addition, we have a large selection of designer eyewear and contact lenses to choose from.

960 East Fry Blvd Sierra Vista, AZ (520) 515-EYES (3937)


PHYSICAL THERAPY PHYSICAL THERAPY PHYSICAL THERAPY PHYSICAL THERAPY

T O M G O U L D I N G , P T, D P T

Clinic Owner •

Arizona School of Allied Health Sciences, A.T. Still University— Doctorate of Physical Therapy

California State University, Long Beach—Masters of Physical Therapy

California State University, Fresno—Bachelor’s of Science, Biology with Physiology emphasis

ApexNetworkPT.com

Dr. Goulding has been practicing physical therapy in Sierra Vista since 2001, working in various settings such as inpatient rehab, acute care, wound care, aquatics (certified) and outpatient orthopedics.

For appointments, call 520-335-1615

A N D R E W W. M I L L I G A N , P T, D P T, O C S , C S C S Clinic Owner •

Doctor of Physical Therapy Degree: Rocky Mountain University, Provo UT (2010) Master of Physical Therapy Degree: Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff AZ (1995) Bachelor of Exercise Science Degree: Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff AZ (1993) Board Certified, Orthopedic Clinical Specialist (OCS) Dr Milligan specializes in Orthopedic and Sports Medicine rehabilitation. He has 27 years of service in the US Army (Active and Reserve). LTC Milligan is an Iraq war veteran and is currently assigned to the 7450th Medical Backfill Battalion in Aurora, CO.

• • • •

ApexNetworkPT.com For appointments, call

520-586-3663

K e l s e y S u t h e r l a n d . P T, D P T, C e r t . D N Doctor of Physical Therapy, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Bachelor’s of Science - Biology, Louisiana Tech University Herman and Wallace PRI Certified Pelvic Floor Therapist, Level I and II Certified in Dry Needling - AAMPT Dr. Sutherland was born and raised in West Monroe, Louisiana. She graduated as a Doctor of Physical Therapy from LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, Louisiana in 2020. She moved to Sierra Vista, Arizona in late 2020, as her husband is in the U.S. Army and is working at Fort Huachuca. She specializes in pelvic floor rehabilitation, although she continues to treat general orthopedics, as well. Dr. Sutherland is also Certified in Dry Needling through the American Academy of Manipulative Therapy. She enjoys living in Sierra Vista, as she and her husband love the outdoors. She frequently spends her weekends hiking and camping in the surrounding areas.

ApexNetworkPT.com For appointments, call 520-335-1615

TO D D W I L D E , P T, D P T

Assistant Clinic Manager–Sierra Vista, AZ •

Doctor of Physical Therapy, University of New England, 2016

Bachelor of Science, Exercise Science, Brigham Young University, 2012

Dr. Wilde has been working with ApexNetwork since 2016 and has been treating a broad spectrum of diagnoses. He has become clinic specialist in treatment of vestibular related vertigo. Last year he assumed the role of Assistant Clinical Manager and enjoys spending time with his wife and 4 kids when he’s not rigorously training on the bicycle.

ApexNetworkPT.com For appointments, call 520-335-1615

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R PODIATRY

PODIATRY Jarrett Hamilton, DPM, FACFAS

5750 E. Hwy 90, Suite 200 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 Hours: 8 am—5 pm

PRIMARY CARE

PRIMARY CARE

PRIMARY CARE

SVMedicalGroup.org

42

April Power

Edward Miller, DO

Family Nurse Practitioner

Gynecology

Karen English, MD, FAAP

Sean Spurr, DO

Pediatrics

Internal Medicine

Christian E Laguillo, MD

Carlos Pena

Family Medicine

Heidi Lodge, MD

Monday - Friday:

8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Physician Assistant

QuickCare Hours:

Nicole Chavez

Monday - Friday:

9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Internal Medicine

Family Nurse Practitioner

Roland Snure, MD

Pearlie Wilson-Natal

General Surgery

Family Nurse Practitioner

Douglas Primary Care Clinic 100 5th St, Douglas, AZ 85607 (520) 805-6800

Welcoming Jonathan Sinnott, FNP-C to the Copper Queen Clinic Family! Jonathan Sinnott, FNP-C accepts patients of all ages at the Tombstone Clinic. He recently retired from the U.S. Army (Fort Huachuca). He received Medical Training from Worchester State College Hawaii Pacific University.

Tombstone Clinic (520) 432-2042

Welcoming Soni Stake, MD, MHP to the Copper Queen Clinic Family! Dr. Stake accepts patients, ages 15 and up, at the Palominas Clinic as a Primary Care Physician. She completed medical school at the University of Texas, San Antonio and completed her residency at Wayne State University, Michigan. She received her Masters of Public Health at the University of Arizona.

LIVING WELL 2021

Palominas Clinic (520) 366-0300


Reducing risk of stroke M

so Health.gov stresses getting your high blood pressure checked regularly.

What is a stroke?

Other risk factors for stroke are smoking, drinking too much alcohol, use of illegal drugs, diabetes and high cholesterol, to name a few.

aintaining a healthy lifestyle will also help you reduce the risk of stroke. Health.gov shares information on what a stroke is and what you can do to reduce the risk of you or a loved one having a stroke.

Health.gov defines a stroke — sometimes called a “brain attack” — as when blood flow to part of the brain is blocked, which can hurt or kill cells in the brain. Strokes are the leading cause of death in adults. Strokes can cause lifelong damage such as: • Trouble thinking and speaking.

Signs Strokes usually happen unexpectedly and with little to no warning. Health.gov shares signs you can watch for: •S udden dizziness, loss of balance or trouble walking.

• Trouble controlling or expressing emotions.

•S udden confusion, trouble speaking or trouble understanding.

Are you at risk?

•S udden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.

PRIMARY CARE

The number one risk factor for stroke is high blood pressure. There are no signs or symptoms for high blood pressure,

Tombstone Primary Care Clinic Erik Arellano, MD Family Medicine

Jonathon Sinnott

Family Nurse Practitioner

(520) 432-2042

REHABILITATION

•S udden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg. Especially on one side of the body. •S udden, severe headache with no known cause.

If you or someone in your family has a stroke, call 911 right away. The chances of you or your loved surviving and recovering depends on how fast emergency help arrives. m

Bisbee Primary Care Clinic Peggy Avina, MD Family Medicine

Laurie Thomas, MD Family Medicine

Joanne Cardinal, MD Monday - Friday: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 7 N San Diego St, Tombstone

v

Talk to your doctor about how often to check your blood pressure and whether measuring at home is right for you.

• Paralysis

If you are afraid you are at risk of having a stroke, here are the biggest risk factors.

Heart Health

Suzanne Daly, MD

Gastroenterology One Monday a month

Roland Snure, MD

General Surgery Last two Wednesdays a month

Edward Miller, DO,

Gynecology Every Thursday Monday - Friday: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 7 Bisbee Road (520) 432-2042

Family Medicine

Bisbee Primary Care Clinic Tombstone Primary Care Clinic For appointments call 520-432-2042

Rehabilitation Services

Speech Therapy ~ Physical Therapy ~ Occupational Therapy

Mission: Our team of master and doctorate trained therapists strive to improve your lifestyle with: ~ Hands-on techniques ~ Individualized programs ~ One-on-one focused care

Specialties Aquatic Therapy Neurological disorders Balance/Vestibular Pediatrics Voice and swallowing disorders Orthopedics: Non and post operative care

5750 E Highway 90, Suite 100 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635

520.263.3700 CanyonVistaMedicalCenter.com

LIVING WELL 2021

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Heart Healthy Shopping List Vegetables and Fruits

Try to eat a variety of vegetables and fruits. Here is a list of specific vegetables and fruits you can consume that will help the health of your heart, according to Health.gov:

S

o d

I t h H

• Fresh vegetables such as tomatoes, cabbage and carrots.

Basic Heart Health Tips A

s you get older your risk for heart disease increases. You need to take big steps to actively monitor your health and change your lifestyle to a healthier one.

weight lifter to create a healthier lifestyle. Health.gov says adults need at least two and a half hours of moderate aerobic activity each week. This can include fast walking, dancing and biking.

Health.gov shares basic heart health tips to help you and your loved ones lower your risk for heart disease.

Begin by working out for at least 10-20 minutes a day. Increase the time as you adjust your schedule and your body to physical activity.

Eat healthy Changing your diet can be one of the most difficult ways to lower your risk of heart disease — difficult because you may be accustomed to eating certain foods and certain spices on your foods for years. As you get older these foods can be a danger to your life paired with stress and sleep habits. Start by eating the right foods. A hearthealthy diet is low in saturated and trans fats, added sugars and sodium. Heart-healthy foods are high in fiber, such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables. You can find all these types of foods at your local grocery stores.

Get Active Becoming more active can also help to lower your risk for heart disease. You don’t have to become a professional

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• Leafy greens for salads, like romaine lettuce, spinach and kale. • Canned vegetables that are low in sodium. • Frozen vegetables without added butter or sauces, like broccoli, cauliflower or peas. • Fresh fruits such as apples, oranges, bananas, pears and peaches. • Canned, frozen or dried fruit without added sugars.

Dairy

The best heart healthy dairy products are fatfree or low-fat options. Search for these kinds of products listed below. • Fat-free or low fat (1%) milk.

Encourage Healthy Habits

• Fat-free or low-fat plain yogurt.

Take a look at your life and monitor what unhealthy habits may cause heart problems in the future. Break away from habits such as smoking, alcohol or stress.

Grains

Quitting smoking helps lower your risk of heart disease and heart attack. Secondhand smoking can be just as harmful to you as well. Ask guests to smoke outside and try to avoid being around people that will smoke without considering your health. Drink alcohol in moderation and manage stress properly. Stress is one of the leading causes of heart disease, depression and high blood pressure. Practicing deep breathing techniques and meditation are good ways to manage your stress and relax 
yourself. m

• Fat-free or low-fat cheese.

When searching for breads, cereals and other foods that contain grains, be sure you see whole wheat or another type of grain listed in the ingredient list. Look for products that say 100% whole grain. • Whole-grain bread, bagels English muffins and tortillas. • Whole-grain hot or cold breakfast cereals with no added sugars. • Whole grain rices such as brown or wild rice, quinoa or oats. • Whole-wheat or whole grain pasta and couscous.

Proteins Foods such as seafood, poultry and lean beef are all good proteins that promote a healthy heart. Other proteins that are very good for you are beans and peas, eggs and tofu.

Y t g p q c s h l

N f n


Quit Smoking S moking is one of the most harmful things you can do to your body. Quitting is one of the best things you can do for your health. If you or a loved one is trying to quit smoking, here is some helpful guidance and tips from Health.gov.

Can I quit?

causes strong urges to smoke. To help motivate you, use some of these tips to help you according to Health.gov: • Make a list of reasons to quit. •A sk family or friends for support. •T alk to your doctor about counseling or medicines that may help you quit.

You are not the only person to begin quitting smoking for good. There are millions of people who have successfully quit smoking, some after countless years. To quit smoking you must first know how it is affecting you or your loved ones.

You will feel the benefits of smoking as soon as you stop smoking. You will breathe easier, your sense of taste and smell will improve and you’ll find yourself having more energy throughout the day.

Nicotine is the addictive drug found in tobacco products. The nicotine in cigarettes is what

Your lungs and body will feel stronger once you’ve quit smoking.

Health Benefits

Quitting smoking also will help you live a longer, healthier life. Once you’ve quit smoking, your risk of having a heart attack or stroke vastly goes down when paired with a healthy diet and exercise. Quitting smoking will also help you lose or gain weight according to what you want. You’re more likely to begin other life-changing activities once you’ve quit smoking, such as working and eating better.

Does smoking 
affect others? Secondhand smoke is defined by Health.gov as the mix of smoke that comes from your

cigarette and the smoke that you breathe. Secondhand smoking is very dangerous for you and others around you. According to Health.gov, in babies and children, secondhand smoking can cause: • Sudden infant death syndrome. • Pneumonia. • Bronchitis. • Severe asthma attacks. • Ear infections. Smoking can also cause heart disease, stroke and lung cancer in adults breathing in secondhand smoke. m

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LIVING WELL 2021

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Pet Care Grooming Tips

R

egular pet grooming can help your feathered and furred friends feel and look their best. A schedule of thorough grooming can keep skin conditions, parasites and other conditions at bay.

Dog Coats First, you need to understand your dog’s coat. Some dogs have a single coat, where the fur all over the dog is essentially the same, be it long or short, curly or straight. Other breeds have a double coat, where the outer layer is thicker and the undercoat is made of thinner, more lightweight hair. Coats can also be long, medium or short. Once you know what kind of coat you’re dealing with, you can set up a regular schedule of brushing. Medium- and longcoated dogs need regular brushing to avoid matting. Double-coated dogs usually blow their coat — or shed the whole thing — a couple of times a year. They’ll need special attention and extra brushing at this time.

Bathing It’s tempting to use human shampoos on our dogs. But don’t. The needs of dog skin and fur and human skin and hair are very different. Choose a dog shampoo that’s best for your breed — turn to the experts at your local pet store if you need to — and consider using a conditioner, too, if your pup is prone to dry skin. 46

LIVING WELL 2021

Nail and Paw Care

keep her looking and feeling her best.

Dogs also need their nails and paws cared for. This means regular nail trimming using clippers or grinders and caring for their pads. Don’t allow your dog to walk on exceedingly hot or cold surfaces. Touch it with your hand and, if it hurts you, remember that it’ll also hurt them.

If you notice your cat itching or chewing her skin more than usual or see bald patches, it’s time to set a vet visit.

Dental Hygiene Lastly, don’t forget your pup’s chompers. Regularly brush your dog’s teeth and take them to the vet for professional cleaning. February is National Pet Dental Health Month and many vets will offer specials on cleaning at this time.

Cat Grooming Tips Everyone has seen a cat give itself a bath, but our feline friends still need some help from us in keeping clean and healthy. Not all cats will go quietly into a bath, however, and fighting with your kitty can result in injury for your or your cat. In that case, schedule an appointment for professional grooming.

Brushing Your Cat Regular brushing removes dirt, grease and dead hair from your cat. It also stimulates blood circulation and improves the condition of your cat’s skin. Try to set up one or two brushing sessions per week to

Ear Care Check your cat’s ears once a week for wax, debris and signs of infection. On the outer ear, look for a smooth, solid covering of hair with no discharge, redness or swelling. Any of those signs warrants a vet visit. The inner ear should be pale pink with no debris or odor. To clean your cat’s ears, place a little bit of liquid ear cleaner onto a clean cotton ball or piece of gauze. Gently wipe away debris or earwax from the inside of the ear by lifting it away rather than rubbing it farther into the ear. Don’t try to clean the delicate ear canal.

Nails and Paws Your cat’s paws should be kept clean at all times. Keep your floors and other surfaces clean and free of chemicals to help with that, and also regularly wipe the cat’s paws to keep them clean. To trim your cat’s nails, choose a quiet room and put your cat comfortably on your lap. Gently take a paw and massage and a little press so that the nail pops out. Trim the white part of her nail — avoid the pink part, which contains blood vessels. Trim her nails every 10 days to two weeks. m


Family Practice

Obstetrics & Gynecology

Orthopedics/ Sports Medicine

General Surgery

Podiatry

520.263.3762

520.263.3620

520.263.3761

520.452.0144

520.263.3761

MOB2, Suite 375 Blair Goodsell, DO Sherry Hron, FPN

MOB2, Suite 300 Misty Decker, CNM, RNC-EFM Liz Ramchandani, WHNP Mary Schlotterer, MD Sidney Semrad, DO, FACOOG

MOB2, Suite 200 Max Berdichevsky, MD Brian Daines, MD Jared Haymore, PA-C Dean Marturello, PA-C Randall Roy, MD Laurence Susini, MD McKay Tingey, PA-C

MOB1, Suite 100 Andrew Adams, MD Cherokee Carrillo, PA-C Roland Haj, DO Jody Jenkins, MD Douglas Opie, DO

MOB2, Suite 200 Jarrett Hamilton, DPM, FACFAS

Internal Medicine

Interventional Cardiology

Urology

Wound Care

520.263.3764

520.263.3765

520.263.2690

520.263.3770

MOB2, Suite 200 Roberto Molina, MD

MOB2, Suite 200 Fadi Fahad, MD

MOB1, Suite 200 Peter Niemczyk, MD

MOB1, Suite 150

Call or visit our website to schedule an appointment

SVMedicalGroup.org Medical Office Building 2 (MOB2) | 5750 E Highway 90 | Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 Medical Office Building 1 (MOB1) | 75 Colonia de Salud | Sierra Vista, AZ 85635


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