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L ALAND N D & LIVESTOCK LIVESTO FARMING, RANCHING AND THE COUNTRY WAY OF LIFE

November 21, 2013 | Vol. 4 Issue 11 | Pierre, South Dakota ECRWSS CARRIER ROUTE PRE-SORT

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Pictures of a lesser flood Bison tamers Corn crops taking different paths in Dakotas Next generation of biofuels is still years away

November 21, 2013 | Land & Livestock | 1

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Publisher Steven Baker 605-224-7301 ext. 111 publisher@capjournal.com

Editor Lance Nixon 605-224-7301 ext. 130 lance.nixon@capjournal.com

Advertising director April Thompson 605-224-7301 ext. 120 april.thompson@capjournal.com

Features The wild meets civilization in photos from Fort Pierre’s past................................9

Sales Julie Furchner 605-224-7301 ext. 142 julie.furchner@capjournal.com

Pictures of a lesser flood............................................................................................15

Angie Fillaus 605-224-7301 ext. 126 angie.fillaus@capjournal.com

Land & Livestock News

Classified sales

MSU investigating turning dead trees into biofuel...................................................4

Wanda Doren 605-224-7301 ext. 109 Elizabeth Schulz 605-224-7301 ext. 110

Designer Alyssa Small alyssa.small@capjournal.com Hjalmer Nordvold sits on a bison he tamed. (Courtesy of Faye Longbrake)

Concern about grassland damage from mud bogging.............................................5

Renewable accounts: keep your eyes on Washington................................................7

Preparation of turkey a day before a holiday meal..................................................8

McCrory gardens plant trials: some top picks back...............................................11

Corn crops taking different paths in Dakotas..........................................................14

Land & Livestock is a publication of the Capital Journal and is published monthly at 333 W. Dakota Ave., P.O. Box 878, Pierre, SD 57501 Content of Land & Livestock is protected under the Federal Copyright Act. Reproduction of any portion of any issue will not be permitted without the express permission of the Capital Journal.

Land & Livestock Classifieds

November 21, 2013 | Land & Livestock | 3

Next generation of biofuels is still years away........................................................20


Don’t Get Caught Without It!

MSU part of consortium receiving $10 million to investigate turning dead trees into biofuel

By Evelyn Boswell MSU News Service 333 W. Dakota Ave., Pierre, SD 57501 605.224.7301 A Wick Communications Company

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BOZEMAN, Mont. — A four-state team involving Montana State University has been awarded nearly $10 million to investigate the challenges of turning beetle-killed trees into biofuel. The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced the award Nov. 6, saying it would allow an academic, industry and government consortium led by Colorado State University to study the major challenges that limit the use of beetle-killed trees in the Rockies as biofuel. MSU’s portion will be almost $663,500. “Insect infestations have caused widespread forest mortality during the past decade in Montana and throughout the Rockies,” said Rick Lawrence, MSU professor and director of the Spatial Sciences Center. “The dead trees in many cases cannot be utilized economically, while at the same time posing a hazard, such as potentially increased fire risk.” U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack said that infestations of pine and spruce bark beetles have impacted more than 42 million acres of U.S. forests since 1996 and a changing climate threatens to expand the threat from bark beetle. “As we take steps to fight the bark beetle, this innovative research will help take the biomass that results from bark beetle infestation and create clean, renewable energy that holds potential for job creation and promises a cleaner future for America,” Vilsack said. “This is yet another reminder of the critical

investments provided by the Farm Bill for agricultural research, and I urge Congress to achieve passage of a new, long term Food, Farm and Jobs Bill as soon as possible.” MSU has two roles in the newly funded project, Lawrence said. He will be responsible for mapping dead trees throughout the northern Rockies to help determine how much beetle-killed wood is available for biofuel. He will also develop tools so scientists can rapidly detect outbreaks that will produce more dead wood. His work will involve ground surveys, remote sensing, geographic information systems and spatial modeling. He will help evaluate the history, current extent and logistics of using beetle-killed trees for biofuel. MSU Extension Forestry Specialist Peter Kolb will work with rural landowners, resource managers and communities to examine the practicality and ecological sustainability of woody debris acquisition and refinery locations. As forestry specialist and associate professor of forest ecology and management, Kolb said he helps professionals, producers and landowners incorporate the latest well-reviewed science, solve resourcerelated problems and remain economically competitive and ecologically sustainable. Thrilled that the grant was awarded, Kolb said, “Developing a realistic economically viable market that provides an alternative liquid fuel from what is currently mostly a waste product is a highly worthwhile project. This would help sustain our loggers, forest landowners

The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced the award Nov. 6, saying it would allow an academic, industry and government consortium led by Colorado State University to study the major challenges that limit the use of beetlekilled trees in the Rockies as biofuel. MSU’s portion will be almost $663,500. and mill infrastructure by helping them increase efficiency and make money out of what is now a cost. “The forest resources that exist across Montana are staggering when you consider materials that are currently a fire hazard such as enormous volumes of wildfire and beetle-killed trees, nonuseable woody debris left over from logging, and excessively dense forests resulting from the abnormally long cool-wet climatic period Montana experienced from 19401980 along with wildfire suppression,” Kolb added. Collaborators on the project said that converting beetle-killed wood into renewable fuel has many benefits. It requires no cultivation, for example. It circumvents food-versusfuel concerns and probably has a highly favorable carbon balance. However, challenges currently prevent widespread use. The beetlekilled trees are typically far from urban industrial centers and usually in steep mountainous terrain accessible only by narrow logging roads. Other barriers include the potential for environmental impacts, social issues and local policies about using beetle-killed wood and other forest residues. MSU researchers,

together with other scientists involved in the project, created the Bioenergy Alliance Network of the Rockies (BANR) to address those challenges. “The potential outcomes from the BANR grant could help our wood products infrastructure remain competitive on a world market and help conserve Montana forests by providing an economically viable means of minimizing climate changeinduced effects such as massive wildfires, insect pest outbreaks that can result in an overall loss of forested landscapes, quality watersheds, and conversion from forests to shrubfields and grasslands,” Kolb said. Lawrence said, “We will be working with a company named Cool Planet Energy Systems that has developed a system that can convert these trees to biofuels. Because their system can be deployed to the site of the killed trees, this approach has the potential to use these trees economically while helping reduce dependence on fossils fuels.” Partners in addition to MSU, CSU and Cool Planet Energy Systems are the University of Montana, the University of Idaho, the University of Wyoming, U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station and the National Renewable Energy Lab. The Rocky Mountain project is a Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP) through the USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture. NIFA has awarded six CAP grants since 2010. They have focused on woody biomass, switchgrass and perennial grasses, energy cane and sorghum.


Concern about grassland damage from mud bogging By ANDREA J. COOK Rapid City Journal

RAPID CITY, S.D. (AP) — Taking off across the prairie with your off-road outfit can be fun, but it can also damage sensitive grasslands left waterlogged by recent snow and rain. And that has U.S. Forest Service officials concerned. Off-roaders are welcome in the Railroad Buttes area of the Buffalo Gap National Grasslands about 15 miles east of Rapid City on South Dakota Highway 44, but some people are abusing the privilege, officials say. For instance, Forest Service officials recently found a pickup mired to the floorboards in a Railroad Buttes mud hole. Tire tracks from various vehicles have sliced deep gouges in the landscape. “It’s an area where we, in our forest plan, in our travel management, designated as an area where we would allow some of the off-road riding,” Fall River District Ranger Mike McNeill told the Rapid City Journal. The travel management plan was intended

to reduce some of the Robertson said, howevdamage done by off-road- er, that 99 percent of the ing by giving off-roaders a recreationists follow the place to go, but not when rules. It’s the one percent the soil is saturated. that cause issues. She “ M u d understands bogging is not both sides of c o m p a t i b l e “It’s an area the argument, with that objec- where we, as “they need a tive,” McNeill place to ride.” said. It’s also in our forest Grassland illegal. Anyone plan, in visitors typicaught mud- our travel cally stop at her ding on federal business for lands can face management, r e f r e s h m e n t s fines of up to designated as and gas. $5,000 and six an area where Roberston months in jail. said off-roaders Restitution fees we would are not the only to repair dam- allow some of ones causing age can also be the off-road problems on assessed. the grasslands. Signs advis- riding,” Game hunters ing off-road Fall River District and rock huntvehicles not to Ranger Mike ers will cut use the area McNeill across trails when it is wet or drive if they are posted, but don’t feel like some people walking, which ignore those contributes to signs, McNeill the damage. said. She added “It’s not widespread,” that people have been ridMcNeill said. ing out that way for years, Robin Robertson has but more people are visitowned the Country ing the area, which makes Corner convenience store a seemingly small probfor 15 years. Her family lem grow exponentially. runs cattle in the area and A Baja off-road area notices off-road vehicles about seven miles west chasing cattle away and of Interior on Hwy. 44 damaging the landscape. is also designated for

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Tracks made from off-road vehicles show through a dusting of snow at a popular mud bogging site near Railroad Buttes on Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. The area should only be used when dry to prevent damage to the landscape, according to the U.S. Forest Service.


off-road use. So far, offroad enthusiasts have not caused any significant problems in the area, according to Alan Anderson, Wall district ranger. Railroad Buttes receives more use because it is closer to Rapid City, but the area has fragile soils that can be damaged by off-road vehicles when it’s wet, Anderson said. “They can make a mess if they want to,” he said. Repeated misuse of those areas can create open ruts and tear up the grasslands, Anderson said. “If it’s muddy, we would like people to not go out there. That’s the bottom line,” McNeill said. There are roads and

Off-roaders are welcome in the Railroad Buttes area of the Buffalo Gap National Grasslands about 15 miles east of Rapid City on South Dakota Highway 44, but some people are abusing the privilege, officials say. tracks designated for travel on the grasslands, but travelers should consider the conditions before they use those routes this fall, Anderson said. Anderson also reminded hunters and recreational off-roaders that when they venture off those designated routes, “they are not only breaking the rules, but they have a good chance of getting stuck.”

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A truck drives along 160th Avenue near Railroad Buttes, a popular mud bogging location in the Buffalo Gap National Grassland, on Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Use by off-road vehicles when the soil is wet is tearing up the landscape. Posted U.S. Forest Service signs only permit use when the land is dry.

AP Photo/Rapid City Journal, Benjamin Brayfield

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Renewable accounts: keep your eyes on Washington The EPA’s reasoning behind the reduction is that the nation’s infrastructure and fleet cannot utilize the mandated level of ethanol. This is the blend wall issue again. I find the reasoning difficult to understand.

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potential impact of a 1.4 billion gallon waiver is significant and bearish for corn. The EPA’s reasoning behind the reduction is that the nation’s infrastructure and fleet cannot utilize the mandated level of ethanol. This is the blend wall issue again. I find the reasoning difficult to understand. There are more than 10 million flexible fuel vehicles in the nation. Most people don’t use higher blends of ethanol at the thousands of stations that have the product available. Continued competitive pricing of higher blends of ethanol would move a lot of fuel. There are a lot of heated conversations going on in Washington as groups make their case for different mandated levels. It makes sense for North Dakotans, especially those involved in agriculture, to pay close attention.

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that was passed in 2005 and 2007 to support the development of a domestic renewable fuel sector and the use of biofuels. This development is supported by mandating the use of biofuels by type and year through 2022. The RFS gives the EPA the flexibility to waive annually mandated levBy David Ripplinger els if they would cause Bioproducts and Bioenergy economic harm or if a Economist and Assistant domestic supply isn’t Professor, NDSU available. The EPA has Department of Agribusiness used this power in preand Applied Economics vious years because the amount of cellulosic I recently mentioned ethanol wasn’t availthat consumers should able in adequate quanbegin watching the price tities. However, it also of E85 and E10 as we has turned down waiver enter a period where requests, such as one fuels with higher blends made by the oil and gas of ethanol could have a industry in 2012. The lower cost on an energy industry claim was that equivalent basis. Prices the drought had reduced are now within a few the corn supply drasticents at my regular gas cally, and that without station in Fargo, a waiver, economand there is at ic harm would least one station result because of in town where higher food and E85 is sold at a fuel costs. significant disAbout a month count, which ago, the EPA’s is more than proposed 2014 enough for one RFS levels were to go out of his leaked. The memo or her way to David contains a 1.4 bilfuel a vehicle. lion gallon reducHow long this Ripplinger tion in mandated situation perrenewable fuel sists depends on a num- use, which in practical ber of factors. Among terms is corn ethanol. the most important One billion four hundred is an Environmental million gallons is a lot of Protection Agency (EPA) alcohol and requires 500 decision that is sched- million bushels of corn. uled to be made by the This is more than North end of the month. Before Dakota’s production in I get into the pending recent years. decision, a short refreshSome of this corn still er on the Renewable Fuel will be used to make Standard is in order. ethanol, used as feed, The Renewable Fuel exported or be in a bin Standard is a federal law a year from now. The

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Preparation of turkey a day before a holiday meal

Sharon Guthmiller SDSU Extension

together just before spooning into the turkey cavity. Stuff the cavity loosely (3/4 cup of stuffing per pound of bird) so it can heat more efficiently. Do not stuff poultry with cooked stuffing. And, do not stuff turkeys to be grilled, smoked, fried, or microwaved. Turkeys can be purchased prestuffed, but only from a USDA Inspected plant. However, they must be in frozen at time of purchase and remain frozen until they are cooked. When preparing the turkey that was stuffed at a USDA Inspected plant, do not thaw the turkey but go directly to cooking. The USDA recommends NOT buying retail-stuffed, uncooked turkeys from a store or restaurant. Stuffing works like an insulator, therefore it is important to follow guidelines.

Tips for preparing and cooking turkey the day before serving. Busy schedules define individual’s lives today. Preparing turkey one day before serving may be easier than the day it will be served. If you plan to prepare turkey a day ahead, follow these guidelines for cooling, storing and reheating turkey: Prepare and roast turkey according to food safety guidelines. After the turkey is roasted and removed from the oven, let the turkey set about 20 minutes to allow the juices to distribute throughout. Wash your hands with soap and water before beginning to slice the turkey. Slice breast meat. Wings and legs may be left whole. Turkey

should be placed in shallow containers (such as cake pans) to allow for faster cooling. Broth can be saved and refrigerated for making gravy. Loosely cover the sliced turkey meat and place in the refrigerator while still warm. Cover tightly when completely cooled. If cooking stuffing ahead of time, cook immediately when mixed, cool quickly in 2 inch depth containers, cover after cooled. Turkey that is prepared for serving the next day can be eaten cold or hot. If planning to serve hot, reheat the turkey in the oven set at a temperature no lower than 325° F. The internal temperature must reach 165° F. Use a food thermometer to check the internal temperature. Do no reheat turkey, stuffing or gravy slowly. If

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The holidays often involve preparing turkey. Planning ahead to safely prepare and roast a turkey will relieve some of the cooking stress associated with the holidays. When purchasing a fresh or frozen turkey, allow one pound of turkey per person. Frozen turkeys require several days to thaw. Thaw in the refrigerator (40 degrees or below), allow about 24 hours for every 4-5 pounds. If the turkey is partially frozen when ready to roast, place in water at 70° F or colder, changing the water every 15 minutes. Or, go directly to roasting. Do not stuff the turkey if it is still partially frozen. Oven temperature to roast turkey should not be set lower than 325° F. Whole turkey is safe when cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 165° F as measured in the innermost part of the thigh with a food thermometer. For optimal safety and uniform doneness, cook stuffing separately. However, if stuffing a turkey, it’s essential to use a food thermometer to make sure the center of the stuffing reaches a safe minimum internal temperature of 165° F. Even if the turkey itself has reached165 °F, the stuffing may not have reached a temperature high enough to destroy bacteria that may be present. Stuffing can act as an insulator to conducting heat, so temperatures must be measured to take the guess work out of cooking. If any meat, poultry or shellfish are used in the stuffing recipe, cook them thoroughly before stuffing the turkey. Keep the wet and dry ingredients of the stuffing separate, mixing them

reheated slowly, microorganisms that survived the normal cooking process, or contamination from handling the turkey before cooling, have ample time to grow and possibly produce toxins to make people sick. Reheating leftovers in a crockpot is not recommended. Keep the turkey moist during reheating by adding a small amount of water or broth and cover. If reheating turkey in the microwave oven, cover the food and rotate it for even heating. Allow standing time. Check the internal temperature with a food thermometer to be sure it reaches 165° F. Using a microwave to reheat is not recommended for large amounts, and can lead to uneven heating. If traveling with a precooked turkey, cooling the turkey as suggested above and use an insulated cooler with enough ice packs to keep the temperature of the turkey below 40° F. Reheat turkey to 165° F when you reach your destination. Gravy made the day before and refrigerated should be reheated to a rolling boil before serving it. After the meal is completed, either plan to freeze or eat leftover turkey within three to four days of the day it was originally prepared. Gravy and stuffing should be eaten within one to two days of original preparation date. After turkey, gravy and stuffing is removed from the oven, served or reheated, it should not sit at room temperature for more than two hours. For a complete booklet for turkey preparation, SDSU Extension publications Preparing Turkey for a Crowd: Plan Ahead and Preparing Your Thanksgiving Turkey Plus the Dinner Trimmings.


BISON TAMERS Hjalmer Nordvold and his brother, Orton Nordvold, are seated behind a team of bison broke to harness. The figure on the right in the background is Scotty Philip. CouRtesy of fAye longBRAKe

The wild meets civilization in photos from Fort Pierre’s past laNce.NixoN@capJoUrNal.coM

“When the buffalo became gentle enough to pull a cart in public, Scotty sold the team to a local promoter named Bob Yokum, who paraded them throught he streets of Pierre on occasion, thus creating lots of publicity,”

A note to the Capital Journal from Fay Longbrake

ing all over the area,” Longbrake said. “When old man Dupris died, by then everybody was tired of these buffalo roaming all over with cows. There were big cattle companies up there and it was hard to keep them separated.”

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November 21, 2013 | Land & Livestock | 9

Faye Longbrake had always heard the stories growing up of how her grandfather and his brother helped break buffalo to harness for the famous Scotty Philip, the Buffalo King. She’d even seen photos of her grandfather working bison and had a small reproduction of one of them. But until her elderly aunt, Caroline Marie Ross Wulf, went into a nursing home and past a couple large photographs on to her, she didn’t have the framed images that now grace her home in Dupree – one of her grandfather, Hjalmer Nordvold, astride a buffalo, and another of her grandfather’s older brother, Orton Nordvold, also working bison near Fort Pierre. Longbrake said the photos were probably taken in about 1905 or 1906 and shed light on the era of Scotty

Philips, the subject of a documentary by filmmaker Justin Koehler that was released earlier in 2013. But the photos also tell something about the end of the free range days of the bison – the animal that is the subject of a current resolution by U.S. Sen. Tim Johnson and his colleagues that designates Saturday, Nov. 1, as National Bison Day. Longbrake said although Scotty Philip is justly famous for his role in keeping the bison alive, much credit should go to the Dupris family, for whom the town of Dupree is named. Many South Dakotans know that the Dupris family captured five buffalo calves in the Slim Buttes area in 1881 and brought them back to their home on the Cheyenne River near Cherry Creek. “The buffalo roamed all over, there were no fences. So by the time old Fred Dupris died, buffalo were roam-

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By lAnCE nixon


10 | Land & Livestock | November 21, 2013

Consequently, Longbrake said, the Dupris family sold some of the bison to a man who’s now famous for his involvement with the animal. “They wanted to get rid of those buffalo. So they sold 90 head of the buffalo to Scotty Philip. The first thing he did was to enclose them.” For Longbrake, there’s also a family connection to the story. Scotty hired young local cowboys to gentle the buffalo and among several cowboys who broke the buffalo to drive in harness, or even ride with bridle and saddle, were two young brothers from Sansarc. They were Hjalmer and Orton Nordvold, whose parents had come from Norway. Hjalmer Nordvold was Faye Longbrake’s grandfather. “When the buffalo became gentle enough to pull a cart in public, Scotty sold the team to a local promoter named Bob Yokum, who paraded them throught he streets of Pierre on occasion, thus creating lots of publicity,” Longbrake wrote in a note to the Capital Journal. “The Philip sons, the Powell brothers, the Foreman boys and

another promoter named Red Fuller were others who drove and rode the gentled buffalo,” Longbrake wrote. “There are still some picture postcards in circulation of these young fellows driving buffalo through Pierre streets.” Longbrake said the National Bison Day observance was a fitting way to celebrate the Great Plains animal that has become a symbol of the American West. The resolution introduced by Johnson and his Senate colleagues says that the American Bison Society was formed on Dec. 8, 1905, by William Hornaday, Theodore Roosevelt and others in response to the near extinction of bison in the United States, and that the society sent 15 bison to the Wichita Reserve Bison Refuge on Oct. 11, 1907. The American Bison Society was re-established in 2005. As of 2007, the resolution says, there were 4,499 bison producers in the United States. Longbrake said it’s important to note that the survival of the bison is thanks in part to the people such as the Dupris family and Scotty Philip.

Faye Longbrake shows a portrait of her grandfather, Hjalmer Nordvold, astride a bison he helped train for riding for Scotty Philip.

Lance Nixon/Capital Journal

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McCrory gardens plant trials: some top picks back By David Graper SDSU Extension

Halloween is over but I don’t think it is time to be writing about snow, or seeing all the Holiday items out on the store shelves. It is still fall for several more weeks after all. So, rather than turn to writing about winter activities, I wanted to share some of the best performing bedding plants that we grew at McCrory Gardens this year to maybe keep your minds on green and growing things for just a little longer. We receive bedding plants and perennials from about a half dozen different plant companies. Each year we get to grow about 160 different trial plants. To be honest, I really love this part of what we do at McCrory Gardens, getting to see the new, up and coming plants and how well they grow here in Brookings. Today, I just want to share a few of my most highly rated plants that we grew this year. I will discuss a few more in a future column. But

for now, here are some plants that got my highest overall ratings, a score of 10 out of 10 in our trials. These are also plants that are fairly cold tolerant and may still look pretty good even by the end of October. The first ones are several cultivars of Lobularia maritima, or sweet alyssum. Sweet alyssum is usually used as an edging plant or a “spiller” in a container with its dozens of small stems, each displaying a dozen or more small flowers. It doesn’t grow very tall but can spread out to cover about a square foot of bed area, by the end of the season. They usually start blooming while still in the cell packs and they keep on blooming and growing until a really hard freeze takes them out. They also have a wonderfully sweet fragrance that is hard to miss when you walk by a bed or container in which they are growing. The first is called ‘Blushing Princess’. It is a vigorously growing plant worked very well in a large container or planted in the ground. The flowers are

Pennisetum Purpureum ‘Graceful Grasses Vertigo’.

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November 21, 2013 | Land & Livestock | 11

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UW, CSU team for allied battle against cheatgrass University of Wyoming Extension Service

Sweet Alyssum ‘Blushing Princess’.

12 | Land & Livestock | November 21, 2013

Courtesy of SDSU Extension

a lovely soft pink color and petunias really performed it bloomed in abundance well - Petunia ‘Flash Mob all summer and fall. ‘Snow Bluerific’ and ‘Ez Rider™ Princess®’ has the more Blue’. Since SDSU’s colors typical white flowers but are blue and gold, I am on an atypically always looking vigorous plant for good bluethat was continuflowered plants, See more at: ally loaded with which is actually http://igrow. flowers. ‘Frosty harder than you org/gardens/ Knight’ also had might think. I am gardening/ an abundance of still waiting for a mccrorywhite flowers but truly blue petugardens-planthad the added nia but these two trials-some-topbonus of a small come pretty close, white strip down even though the picks/#sthash. the side of each color is more purDbZYc89W.dpuf leaf. All three of ple or lavender these plants were than blue. ‘Flash Proven Winners Mob Bluerific’ selections. If you are look- had lovely blue-lavender ing to add a bit of white or flowers that faded to lavenlight pink to a container der-white in the center and or flower bed and need a throat. It was very floriferlow growing plant, I would ous and had well-branched highly recommend these plants. ‘Ez Rider™ Blue’ three cultivars of sweet had velvety purple, slightly alyssum. fragrant flowers that were Petunias are a staple of abundantly borne above most annual flower plant- the medium green foliings. There are hundreds of age. These were introducdifferent cultivars to choose tions from Burpee Home from. We had two petunias Gardening and Ball Seed that were also rated 10 out respectively. of 10, ‘Supertunia White One more plant for this Improved’ and ‘Cha-Ching week, mainly because it Cherry’. Both of these is still looking so good in plants were covered with the view from my window. flowers all summer and That plant is ‘Graceful fall but really stood out as Grasses Vertigo’, a Proven excellent plants. The white Winners® selection of Supertunia had nearly Pennisetum purpurem pure white flowers that that was fantastic. We used covered the well-branched this plant in several of our plants. The flowers were large containers. It grew to nicely fragrant too. ‘Cha- about 4’ tall and 4’ wide Ching Cherry’ was a show- and displayed gorgeous stopper. It had bright, dark, purplish foliage that cherry-red flowers that had was a standout throughout star-shaped stripes of light the growing season. The pink to white with a yel- foliage was the real attraclow throat. These plants tion here since none of were also Proven Winners the plants ever produced a selections. Two other flower stalk.

Cheatgrass is short, but the University of Wyoming is kneedeep in research projects in the battle against this invasive species. “Cheatgrass Management Handbook: Managing an invasive annual grass in the Rocky Mountain Region” is the latest product from The Rocky Mountain Cheatgrass Project – a partnership between the University of Wyoming and Colorado State University. Cheatgrass (downy brome) is a common factor connecting a number of resource concerns for producers and natural resource managers from sage grouse habitat to wildfire devastation. “It’s (the handbook) combining some ecological work and some economic analysis to try to determine the best management practices for cheatgrass management in both states,” according to Brian Mealor, UW Extension weed specialist. Mealor said cheatgrass research has been ongoing since the 1940s especially in the Great Basin area where it’s been a significant issue for a longer time. He’s been involved in UW’s efforts since hired in 2009, and said questions about cheatgrass management are predominant from around the state. “The past several years, it seems like across the state there’s been a more concerted effort to do more cheatgrass work,” said Mealor, an assistant professor in the Department of Plant Sciences in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. “Last year, we reinitiated what is called the Wyoming Cheatgrass Task Force.” The task force has statewide representatives from UW, the Wyoming Weed and Pest Council, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, the Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts and Wyoming State Forestry Division. The Bureau of Land Management is the organizing agency. Existing in the late ’90s and early 2000s then lapsing, the

task force has been rejuvenated. locations. The app, when ready next The partners are equipped with research, outreach opportunities spring, will require registration with a login and password. and a cooperative approach. “You can mark a GPS point “Our group feels like because cheatgrass is so widespread, with a smartphone and click we need to be strategic in how different categories. Then, it weapproach the problem,” automatically feeds into one big data base, and we explained Mealor. can draw that data “Understanding down,” explained areas of better “What we hope Mealor. “(Users recovery potential will) get instrucand areas that can to do is be able tions on how to do be protected from to increase that it. They’ll get some cheatgrass infesta- resolution of data. reference pictures tion probably makes He stressed the for different cover more sense than just categories and then doing these oppor- importance of tunistic small plot small local projects every time they upload data we’ll studies and small but also the see it when it comes plot trials.” in.” To better under- significance of the Mealor said stand which areas big picture. “If we spring is the easiof Wyoming should est time for people be treated, the uni- can tie those local to map cheatgrass versity is the lead projects together research facilita- in a way that makes because of its purple color when most tor in a project to other grasses are prioritize areas. more sense from a Current cheatgrass habitat standpoint, green. He encourdata includes only if and an agricultural aged anyone to participate in the it is or is not present mapping using the instead of severity standpoint and smartphone app. and complete distri- a conservation “This entire bution. standpoint, then cheatgrass pro“What we hope gram really has to do is be able to we think we’ll be originated from increase that resolu- better off,” clientele,” Mealor tion of data,” Mealor Brian Mealor, UW “We talk a lot said. He stressed Extension weed said. about producerthe importance of specialist driven research and small local projects state driven pribut also the signifiorities – that’s how cance of the big picthis whole program ture. “If we can tie started because those local projects that’s what people together in a way wanted us to do.” that makes more The handbook, B-1246, is availsense from a habitat standpoint, and an agricultural standpoint able for free download by going and a conservation standpoint, to www.uwyo.edu/ces and clickthen we think we’ll be better off.” ing on Publications on the leftMealor and graduate student hand side of the page. Type the Cara Noseworthy developed a bulletin title or number in the rapid assessment tool to help search field. Printed bulletins are tie local expertise to the larger available for $10. Click on the bulpicture and increase data mag- letin title and follow the prompts nitude. The tool began as infor- under Hard CopyPrice. For more information about mation collecting using paper forms and is being converted to UW’s cheatgrass research or data a smartphone application that collection through the smartphone app, contact Mealor at 307will help record the severity of cheatgrass infestations and their 766-3113 or bamealor@uwyo.edu.


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BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Corn production estimates are on different paths in the Dakotas, but farmers in both states say they’re pleased with their crops. U.S. Department of Agriculture production estimates for South Dakota’s corn crop have risen steadily this fall, from 731 million bushels in August to 769 million in September to 812 million this month. The expected record crop would be up 52 percent from last year. On the flip side, production estimates for North Dakota have been falling – from 418 million bushels in August to 400 million in September to 375 million this month. The crop would be down 11 percent from last year’s record. USDA did not publish estimates in October because of the 16-day partial shutdown of the federal government. North Dakota corn farmers enjoyed a record production year in 2012, largely because they did not deal with the devastating drought that other corn states including South Dakota

“We had a wet spring that delayed planting, then we had a very dry summer. Overall, our statewide yield will be average to slightly below average,”

Tom Lilja, executive director of the North Dakota Corn Growers Association

suffered through. This year, adverse weather has cut into production. “We had a wet spring that delayed planting, then we had a very dry summer,” said Tom Lilja, executive director of the North Dakota Corn Growers Association. “Overall, our statewide yield will be average to slightly below average.” That isn’t the case in many states this year. At least 18 states will set records for corn yields, or the amount of corn produced per acre, according to USDA. In South Dakota, the expected yield would be the second-highest on record in the state. “We had a good start, and a lot of those areas that were really hit hard by drought last year really got some timely rains,” said Keith Alverson, who farms

near Chester. “This year everything got planted and we got plentiful rain. “In the south, it was a disaster last year,” he said. This year, “everybody is pretty pleased.” The same holds true in North Dakota, despite the drop in production. “We’re not too far from average for North Dakota,” said Kim Swenson, who farms near Lakota. “It’s hard to think of it that way, since we had such a good year last year.” Jay Nissen, who farms near Larimore, said many producers dealt with dry and wet conditions at different times of the year. “Considering that we mudded the crop in, then went eight weeks without rain, we’re quite amazed we got the crop we did,” he said.

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PICTURES OF A LESSER FLOOD

Pierre photographer captured 1927 event on Bad River

Bad River flood in Fort Pierre in 1927. (Photos by Richard Miller)

By lAnCE nixon

laNce.NixoN@capJoUrNal.coM

Photographer as historian A number of those postcards washed up at the Capital Journal over the years, and so we print three of Richard Miller’s postcards from the flood of that year in today’s paper. As Marshall Miller notes, newspapers didn’t ordinarily have photographers at the time, so part of what a small-town photographer like his father did at the end of the 1920s was document in pictures what the town was experiencing. Richard C. Miller was a good fit for the job – a man who loved taking photographs with a camera that shot big 5-by-7 negatives. He was the son of a portrait photographer in Clark, S.D., who learned more about photography as a soldier during World War I as part of

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For Marshall Miller of Pierre, some old postcards with the stamp of his father’s studio on the front are a hint of what must have been going on in the life of Pierre photographer Richard Miller in the eventful year 1927. “He loved to take pictures,” Marshall said. “He’d take pictures of everything that moved, it seemed like, and then put them on postcards.” And what moved in May 1927, it appeared, was the Bad River in flood stage – providing enough devastation to produce several postcards.


Bad River flood in Fort Pierre in 1927. (Photos by Richard Miller)

the Signal Corps. Later, Richard Miller sold photography equipment along the Gulf Coast. But in 1921, he and his father came over to Pierre and bought a studio on the east side of Pierre Street. They stayed there until moving to a new location across the street in 1956. Marshall Miller recalls that even when he was growing up, part of the business model remained the same: Document important events or scenes from the area and sell the images as postcards. “I used to spend a great deal of my time when I was in high school just printing postcards. It was all done by hand,” he said.

16 | Land & Livestock | November 21, 2013

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Pierre and Fort Pierre have lived through some epic floods, with those on the Missouri River in 1952 and 2011 getting most of the attention in the history books. But the surge on the Bad River also caused quite a stir at the time. “HEAVY RAINFALL CAUSES BAD RIVER FLOOD,” trumpets the headline in the Daily Capital Journal of May 9, 1927, with the subhead leading the reader over to the story down the right side of the page: “BAD RIVER LEAPS OUT OF ITS BANKS – DRIVES MANY FROM HOMES – BIG MUDDY CONTINUES TO COME UP.” And yet a third deck: “RAILRAOD TRACKS

“Treacherous Bad River lived up to its Indian name Sunday when it suddenly overflowed its banks after a three-day’s rain and forced eight families living on the ‘Millett Bend’ to abandon their homes and seek refuge with the neighbors. The Fort Pierre tourist park, together with a portion of the road leading to the highway bridge across Bad River, were overflowed and the water rose to within a few feet of the track in a railroad trestle above the Millett bend,”

Report from the Daily Capital Journal

WASHED OUT BY HEAVY RAINFALL.” In a rare move for the Capital Journal of the time, the newspaper even prints a photo of flooding on page 6, the only photo in the entire newspaper. But it is actually a photo from July 1905 to remind readers of the Bad River flood-


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Bad River flood in Fort Pierre in 1927. (Photos by Richard Miller)

ing of that year hit a similar area, washing 41 houses out of the flats in a famous summer flood that year.

Living up to its name

Up the river The damage wasn’t limited to Fort Pierre. All railroad operations west of Fort Pierre came to a halt as the rampaging river washed out several hundred feet of track at Midland,

Snapshots of a busy year Marshall Miller said Richard Miller had plenty of other things to keep him busy in 1927. “That was a busy year for my dad. That was the year Charles Lindbergh came here, and he took a lot of pictures of that. There was the flood. And I was born in March of that year.” There were probably quite a few photos of that big event around the Miller studio, too.

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The rain which caused the May 1927 flood on the Bad River had been falling for more than three days when the Daily Capital Journal published its issue of Monday, May 9. A total of 3.17 inches had been recorded at the Pierre weather bureau since the previous Friday at that point. The wet weather extended far and wide; the same issue of the paper notes that Aberdeen had been swamped by heavy rainfall, while the Milwaukee Road tracks had been washed out near Presho, leaving many homeless. And in Fort Pierre? “Treacherous Bad River lived up to its Indian name Sunday when it suddenly overflowed its banks after a three-day’s rain and forced eight families living on the ‘Millett Bend’ to abandon their homes and seek refuge with the neighbors,” the Daily Capital Journal reported. “The Fort Pierre tourist park, together with a portion of the road leading to the highway bridge across Bad River, were overflowed and the water rose to within a few feet of the track in a railroad trestle above the Millett bend.”

Nowlin and Powell. Railroad bridges were washed out at Wasta, Midland and Wendt. “Highways were absolutely impassable west of Fort Pierre and telephone connections were poor,” the Daily Capital Journal reported, while several washouts had occurred on the gravel road between Pierre and Fort Pierre – mainly on the approaches to the Missouri River bridge. The Missouri River had risen to its highest mark since 1921, according to that May 9 report; but in the issue of May 10, the Daily Capital Journal reported that the Missouri River was now at its highest elevation since 1913. “BAD RIVER UP – MENACE TO ALL LOWLANDS,” reads one of the headlines of that day. But the flood is fast, as well as furious. By Wednesday, May 11, 1927, the newspaper was reporting the Bad River, or Teton, and the Missouri were receding: “MISSOURI AND TETON RIVERS RETURN TO BANKS AFTER DAYS OF THREATENING HIGH WATER – BAD RIVER FALLING.”

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Estate planning is something many avoid. Talking with loved ones and others about death and dying, inheritance and things like durable powers of attorney and advance health care directives can be uncomfortable and daunting. “Many people believe that estate planning is for the elderly or the wealthy or is not something they want to discuss because it focuses on decisions that can be difficult,” said Cole Ehmke, personal finance specialist with University of Wyoming Extension. “But no one knows what the future holds, so a plan is something everyone should have – particularly those who will leave dependents behind.” UW Extension has published an 11-bulletin series titled Planning Ahead, Difficult Decisions to help citizens understand the decisions and legal requirements. Ehmke and a team of UW Extension specialists, along with an estate planning expert, are confident the series will help anyone develop an estate plan and also help those who must carry out the plan of someone else. “Some of the bulletins are written to help people get started on planning and consider their options,” Ehmke noted. “Some are on topics that aren’t easy to find information on, especially specific information to Wyoming, such as the steps in probating a will.” Since estate plans work within a legal structure that can

The Planning Ahead, Difficult Decisions bulletin series, B-1250.1 through B-1250.11, includes 1. Introduction to estate planning, 2. Estate planning checklist: Information to assemble before consulting your attorney, 3. After death: What steps are needed?, 4. Wyoming wills: Some suggestions for getting the most from estate planning, 5. Death certificates, 6. A walk through probate, 7. Disinheritance, 8. The personal property memorandum, 9. Guardianships and conservatorships, 10. Advance health care directives, and 11. Durable power of attorney.

be perplexing, Ehmke said, the UW Extension team partnered with Aaron Lyttle to share insights that would help people move forward in their planning. Lyttle is an attorney with Long, Reimer, Winegar and Beppler in Cheyenne. “I’m sure that readers will appreciate the depth and extent of knowledge that Aaron has poured into the publications,” Ehmke said. The bulletins are not intended to provide legal or financial advice but rather to give readers a more informed understanding of issues they may want to discuss with family members, the executors of theirwills (whether family members or someone else) and estate planning professionals, Ehmke said. And for those on a tight budget, he noted, the publications may help them save money. For example, one of the bulletins focuses on information to assemble before consulting an attorney and another is titled Wyoming wills: Some suggestions for

getting the most from estate planning. “The series will be a good place to start for those wanting to understand the legal process and the options on a wide range of estate planning issues,” Ehmke said. “We then encourage them to set appointments with their legal, financial and insurance advisers.” The bulletins are available for free download by going to www. uwyo.edu/ces and clicking on Publications on the left side of the page. Type “Ehmke” in the Search Publications box. Hardcopies can be picked up for free at UW Extension offices across Wyoming. Addresses are available at http:// w w w. u w y o . e d u / c e s / county/ Hardcopies can also be ordered for $3 per individual bulletin or $25 for the entire 11-bulletin series. To order, email cespubs@uwyo. edu, or click on the title of one of the bulletins on the Web page and then click on Request Copy.


UW Extension releases guide to Community Supported Agriculture

University of Wyoming Extension Service Do you operate a Community Supported Agriculture venture or have an interest in starting one? Are you looking to diversify your farm or ranch? What if you want to run a farm but don’t have the means to buy hundreds of acres? A new University of Wyoming Extension bulletin introduces potential CSA operators, ag producers, students, teachers and others how to launch and operate a successful CSA business. “The concept of CSA is simple: individuals or families purchase ‘shares’ of a harvest, then receive food throughout the growing season,” said the publication’s chief editor, Cole Ehmke, agricultural entrepreneurshipspecialist with UW Extension. “The share is usually a basket, box or bag of produce –

and maybe other farm and ranch goods – picked up on a regular basis.” “CSA ventures help connect people to where their food is produced. They are increasingly a part of the food system in Wyoming and surrounding states,” said Ehmke, who, with a team of co-authors and advisers, wrote the Rural Guide to Community Supported Agriculture. “One of our goals was to create a comprehensive guide for those curious about what a CSA is and how it is run,” Ehmke said. The 113-page guide opens with an introduction to CSA and delves into the question: Is CSA right for you? It then goes into production (including highaltitude and organic); basket preparation and distribution; general management practices, including setting up shares, pricing and payment; and attracting, communicating with and keeping customers.

“For a producer, the CSA method of direct marketing, in which consumers pay the farmer at the beginning of the growing season, has some strong advantages,” Ehmke said. “Not only are they paid up front, when they need the money most, but they know in advance how much they will need to produce. They will alsolikely have gained a source of supporters and workers to help with farm tasks.” The publication offers many specifics, including how to maintain “financial health” and how to deal with common causes of conflict. There is also a chapter on Community Supported Agriculture in Wyoming. In addition to allowing entrepreneurs to start a business or ag producers to diversify their operations, Ehmke said, CSAs benefit many others, includingconsumers, workers, students interest-

“The concept of CSA is simple: individuals or families purchase ‘shares’ of a harvest, then receive food throughout the growing season,”

Cole Ehmke, agricultural entrepreneurship specialist with UW Extension

ed in agriculture and local economies. “The purchasers of CSA shares know exactly where their food is coming from and will likely have more fresh food, too, making it tastier and healthier,” he noted. “Shareholders get a good amount of local, seasonal produce at a fixed price.” Ehmke said CSAs often employ both volunteers (who typically receive produce in exchange for hours worked) and paid workers. Theymay also provide internship opportunities for students interested in agriculture. Unlike a traditional ranch or farm, which requires hundreds

tothousands of acres, a profitable CSA can operate on a very small plot of land – often less than an acre. This, Ehmke said, allows people without deep pockets to still get into farm ownership. Such ventures also enable local residents and farmers to cooperatively start and manage a CSA or for residents to set up a CSA and then hire a farmer to grow crops. Ehmke said those reading the publication will gain personal insight from nearly 20 people who operate or were associated with CSAs in Wyoming, Colorado and Idaho. The interviews, conducted in 2011 and 2012, helped the

publication team identify important topics to share with people considering a CSA. Rural Guide to Community Supported Agriculture is a joint endeavor between UW and the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, with cooperation from the Wyoming Rural Development Council and matching grant funds from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s FederalState Marketing Improvement Program. The bulletin, B-1251, is available for free download by going to www. uwyo.edu/ces and clicking on Publications on the left side of the page. Type B-1251 in the Search Publications box. Hardcopies can be ordered for $30 each. Email cespubs@uwyo.edu, or click on the title of one of the bulletins on the web page and then click on Request Copy.

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Next generation of biofuels is still years away Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — The first trickle of fuels made from agricultural waste is finally winding its way into the nation’s energy supply, after years of broken promises and hype promoting a next-generation fuel source cleaner than oil. But as refineries churn out this so-called cellulosic fuel, it has become clear, even to the industry’s allies, that the benefits remain, as ever, years away. The failure so far of cellulosic fuel is central to the debate over corn-based ethanol, a centerpiece of America’s green-energy strategy. Ethanol from corn has proven far more damaging to the environment than the government predicted, and cellulosic fuel hasn’t emerged as a replacement. “A lot of people were willing to go with corn ethanol because it’s a bridge product,” said Silvia Secchi, an agricultural economist at Southern Illinois University. But until significant cellulosic fuel materializes, she said, “It’s a bridge to nowhere.” Cellulosics were the linchpin of part of a land-

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mark 2007 energy law that required oil companies to blend billions of gallons of biofuel into America’s gasoline supply. The quota was to be met first by corn ethanol and then, in later years, by more fuels made with non-food sources. It hasn’t worked out. “Cellulosic has been five years away for 20 years now,” said Nathanael Greene, a biofuels expert at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “Now the first projects are up and running, but actually it’s still five years away.” Cellulosic makers are expected to turn out at most 6 million gallons of fuel this year, the government says. That’s enough fuel to meet U.S. demand for 11 minutes. It’s less than 1 percent of what Congress initially required to be on the market this year. Corn ethanol is essentially as simple to make as moonshine but requires fossil fuels to plant, grow and distill. For that reason, it has limited environmental benefits and some drastic side effects. Cellulosic biofuels, meanwhile, are made from grass, municipal waste or the woody, non-edible parts of plants — all of which take less land and energy to produce. Cellulosics

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AP Photo/Doug Dreyer

offer a huge reduction in greenhouse gases compared with petroleumbased fuels and they don’t use food sources. In Vero Beach, Fla., for example, agricultural waste and trash are being turned into ethanol. In Columbus, Miss., yellow pine wood chips are being

turned into gasoline and diesel. In Emmetsburg, Iowa, and Hugoton, Kan., construction is nearly complete on large refineries that will turn corncobs, leaves and stalks into ethanol. But despite the mandate and government subsidies, cellulosic fuels haven’t

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tion’s annual estimates of cellulosic fuel production have proven wildly inaccurate. In 2010, the administration projected 5 million gallons would be available. In 2011, it raised the projection to 6.6 million. Both years, the total was zero. The administration defended its projections, saying it was trying to use the biofuel law as a way to promote development of cellulosic fuel. But the projections were so far off that, in January, a federal appeals court said the administration improperly let its “aspirations” for cellulosic fuel influence its analysis. Even with the first few plants running, supporters acknowledge there is almost no chance to meet the law’s original yearly targets that top out at 16 billion gallons by 2022. “It’s simply not plausible,” said Jeremy Martin, a biofuels expert at the Union of Concerned Scientists. “2030 is the soonest you can anticipate it to be at that level.” The EPA is weighing how deeply to reduce targets for cellulosic fuels for next year and beyond. Biofuel supporters want higher targets to spur investment in new facilities. Opponents want low

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The industry was also dealt a setback by the global financial crisis, which all but stopped commercial lending soon after the biofuel mandates were established in 2007. Hundreds of companies failed that had attracted hundreds of millions of dollars from venture capitalists and government financing. Sometimes the microbes or chemical treatments used to break down the plant matter were too expensive or didn’t work fast enough. Other times, the problems were more prosaic. Range Fuels, based in Colorado, failed because money dried up before it could fine-tune the machine that fed wood chips into a gassifier. KiOR, a Texas company making cellulosic gasoline and diesel in Mississippi, was delayed recently by a power failure, sending its stock price plummeting. The company has since fixed the problem, and is shipping fuel. To supporters, these setbacks are neither surprising nor evidence of failure. Companies are trying to deliver enormous amounts of fuel using a complex, expensive process that has

never been tried before. “We may be three years late, but it doesn’t make any difference globally over the long term,” says Manuel Sanchez Ortega, chief executive of Abengoa, a Spanish engineering firm building a cellulosic ethanol plant in Kansas. “The first deepwater oil platform was not profitable. The first airplane was not profitable. The important thing is that it is working.” At 25 million gallons of annual output per plant, it would take the construction of 640 of these bio-refineries to meet the law’s original goal. Before investors trust the technology enough to finance construction of new facilities, several plants must work consistently at or near full capacity and show that they can make money for a year or more. To Martin, cellulosic fuels are too important to stop trying to perfect them. “The transition to looking beyond food for biofuels is as important today as it was in in 2007,” he said. “If we can’t do it as fast as we thought we could, it doesn’t mean we should give up.”

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SALE ENDS

$27,000

2014 FORD EXPLORER XLT AWD, HTD LTHR SEATS, CARGO RACK, BUMPER PROTECTOR SPLASH GRDS SILVER ,1,808 MI ............................................................................... $37,500 2009 GMC YUKON 4X4 PWR HTD LTHR SEATS, LOCKS, WINDOWS, SUNROOF, REAR DVD, PEWTER, 92,205 MI ................................................................................................... $22,000 2009 JEEP GR CHROKEE 5.8 HEMI V8, LIMITED PWR HTD LTHR SEATS, WINDOWS, LOCKS, NAV, MOONROOF, BLUE, 50,910 MI .......................................................................... $25,800 2008 FORD EXPEDITION XLT EL PWR LTHR SEATS, REAR ENTERTAINMENT, RUNNING BDS, BLUE, 122,272 MI ..................................................................................................... $14,500 2008 SATURN VUE AWD, PWR SEAT WINDOWS, LOCKS, LUGGAGE RACK, CD, REAR DEF, .. GOLD, 71,012 MI ....................................................................................................... $11,000 2005 FORD FREESTAR 2ND ROW BUCKET CLOTH SEATS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS TAN, 91,301 MI .....................................................................................................................$6,500 2004 GMC ENVOY SLT 4X4, PWR HTD LTHR SEATS, MOONROOF, RUNNING BDS, SILVER, 139,315 MI ...................................................................................................................$6,900 2003 CHEVY TAHOE LT PWR LTHR SEATS, RUNNING BDS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, RED 101,148 MI ...................................................................................................................$9,600 2002 GMC YUKON K1500 SLT 4X4, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, RUNNING BDS, GRAY, 131,448 MI .......................................................................................................................................$9,000

2008 MERCEDES-BENZ S Class Sedan, 4D S550 AWD, Bose/Harman Kardon Stereo, nav, Sunroof, Pwr Htd Leather Seats, Windows, Locks, White, 63,200 Miles.

$34,000

NEW PJ TILT DECK BUMPER TRAILERS 2012 PJ 83X18 5” CHANNEL TILT CARHAULER, 2” COUPLER, 2-3.5K AXLES ELE BRAKE, ..........$4,300 2013 PJ 83X20 5” CHANNEL TILT CARHAULER, 2” COUPLER, 2-5.2K AXLES ELE BRAKE, .......$4,900 2013 PJ 83X22 BUMPERPULL TILT CARHAULER 2-7K AXLES ELE/TORSION .........$5,850 2014 PJ 83X22 BUMPERPULL FULL POWER TILT 2-7K AXLES ELE/TORSION ........$6,500 NEW PJ BUMPER HITCH HEAVY DUTY UTILITY TRAILERS 2013 PJ 83X12 UTILITY TRAILER 1-3.5K AXLE REAR 4’ FOLD DOWN GATE 4’ ATV SIDE RAMPS ..........................................................................................................................$2,050 2014 PJ 83X14 UTILITY TRAILER 1-3.5K AXLE REAR 4’ FOLD DOWN GATE 4’ ATV SIDE RAMPS ..........................................................................................................................$2,100 NEW PJ DECKOVER BUMPERPULL TILT TRAILERS 2013 PJ 102X22 DECKOVER TILT ELE OVER HYD , 2-7K AXLES W-12V CHARGER ....$6,850

NEW PJ GOOSENECK FLATBED TRAILERS 2013 PJ 83X22 GN 6” CHANNEL CARHAULER, 2-8K AXLES ELE BRAKES, 2 FLIPOVER RAMPS SPARE TIRE BLACK ..........................................................................................$6,200 2012 PJ 102X28 GN FLATDECK 2-7K SINGLES 5’ DOVE W/FLIP RAMPS TOOLBOX SPARE TIRE BLACK ..................................................................................................................$6,650 USED CARS 2012 FORD MUSTANG GT AUTO, 5.0L V8, CONVERTIBLE, BLACK CLOTH INT, BLACK TOP 2014 PJ 102X32 GN FLATDECK 2-10K DUALS 5’ DOVE W/POP-UP CTR DOVE HD RAMPS DARK BLUE, 21,419 MI .............................................................................................. $31,000 TOOLBOX SPARE TIRE BLACK ......................................................................................$9,900 2008 MERCURY SABLE, PWR LTHR, WHITE, 121,231 MI ............................................$8,900 2008 FORD FUSION V-6, AWD, PWR HTD LTHR SEATS, SUNROOF, WHITE, 53,769 MI ...$15,100 NEW ALUMA ALL ALUMINUM TRAILERS 2008 FORD TAURUS LIMITED LTHR HTD SEATS, KEYLESS, MOONROOF, PWR TRUNK LIFT 2013 ALUMA 77X142 ALUMINUM UTILITY TRAILER 1-3000# AXLE TONGUE HANDLE BIGATE, SYNC, LITE GREEN, 89,873 MI ......................................................................... $11,000 FOLD TAILGATE 7712H BT 60017 .............................................................................$3,000 2008 PONTIAC G6 V6, 4 DR SPORT, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, RED, 84,287 MI ..........$9,600 2014 ALUMA 81X144 ALUMINUM TRAILER 1-3000# AXLE BI FOLD TAILGATE 8112BT 2006 FORD FIVE HUNDRED SLE 4 DR, PWR LOCKS, WINDOWS, MOONROOF, SEAT, GOLD, .......................................................................................................................................$3,150 91,699 MI ......................................................................................................................$7,900 2014 ALUMA 144” UTV ALUMINUM TRAILER TONGUE HANDLE PULL OUT RAMP 24” 2006 FORD FIVE HUNDRED SLE FRONT WHEEL DRIVE, 4 DR, PWR LTHR SEAT, RED, ROCKGUARD/STORAGE UT12 60017 3000# AXLE ....................................................$3,300 44,575 MI ................................................................................................................... $11,950 2014 ALUMA 77.5X168 ALUMINUM UTILITY TRAILER 1-3000# AXLE TONGUE HANDLE BI-FOLD TAILGATE 7814S BT 60017 .......................................................................$3,400 2006 CADILLAC CTS 2.8L V-6, PWR LTHR SEATS, REMOTE START, SILVER, 77,043 MI . $11,700 2014 ALUMA 81X158 ALUMINUM TRAILER 1-3000# AXLE BI FOLD TAILGATE 8114SBT 2006 LEXUS SC430 CONV V-8, PWR HTD LTHR SEATS, NAV, PWR HARDTOP, BLACK, 25,752 ......................................................................................................................................$3,550 MI................................................................................................................................ $33,500 2013 ALUMA 82X216 ALUMINUM TRAILER 2-4800# AXLES PULLOUT RAMPS 8218H 2005 CADDILLAC DEVILLE PWR LTHR SEATS, REMOTE START, GOLD, 77,709 MI........ $10,500 .......................................................................................................................................$6,400 2002 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LTHR SEATS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, GOLD, 34,595 MI 2013 ALUMA 82X240 ALUMINUM TRAILER 2-4800# AXLES DOVETAIL PULLOUT RAMPS .......................................................................................................................................$9,500 8220HB ........................................................................................................................$6,900 2014 ALUMA 82X216 ALUMINUM TILT TRAILER 2-4800# AXLES 8218HTILT ............$6,900 FARM EQUIPMENT 2014 ALUMA 82X192 ALUMINUM TILT TRAILER 2-4800# AXLES 4’ STATIONARY FRONT BELARUSE 825 MFD TRACTOR 80 HP, W/CAB AIR HEATER, 3-PT 540 PTO FARMHAND 940 8216HTILT ....................................................................................................................$7,300 LOADER JOY STICK CNTRL SCOOP GRAPPLE 428 HRS ............................................ $15,500 2014 ALUMA AER820 ENCLOSED RACE CAR TRAILER 6-SWIVEL TIE DOWNS 9600GVWR RUST 17X29 PULL TYPE STACKMOVER VERY CLEAN EXCELLENT SHAPE............. $11,950 PEWTER .................................................................................................................... $12,800 BIG DIPPER FRONT WHEEL DRIVE LOADER 4-CYC FORD ENGINE 60’ HI-CAPICITY BUCKET 9.5-16 TRACTOR TIRES 3 SPEED TRANS 2/FOARD-REVERSE SCHUTTLE ..................$3,200 USED TRAILERS NEW WILSON TRAILERS RETAIL 1978 ALLPURPOSE 102X20 GOOSENECK MACHINERY TRAILER W/HYDRALIC WINCH TILT 2014 WILSON PSGN-5724 24’ RANCHHAND ALUMINUM STOCKTRAILER 2-CTR GATES BED 3-7K AXLES ..........................................................................................................$2,850 1-WITH INNER SWING REAR FULL SWING W/SLIDER 33” SIDE DOOR RUNNING BOARDS FULL 2009 ALUMA 78X14 SINGLE AXLE TRAILER W/FOLD UP RAMP .................................$2,500 LENGTH ..................................................................................................................... $18,100 2014 WILSON PSGN-5730 30’ FOREMAN ALUMINUM STOCKTRAILER 2-CTR GATES USED STOCKTRAILERS 1-WITH INNER SWING REAR FULL SWING W/SLIDER 33” SIDE DOOR RUNNING BOARDS 1987 KIEFER 7X20 GN STOCKTRAILER 1-CTR GATE GOOD WOOD FLOOR REAR FULLSWING FULL LENGTH ............................................................................................................ $23,875 W/SLIDER BRONZE .......................................................................................................$3,500 1993 WILSON SUPERSTAR 7X20 ALUMINUM STOCK TRAILER 1 CENTER GATE REAR FULL NEW PJ SUPERWIDE CARHAULER TRAILERS 2012 PJ 96X20 SUPERWIDE 2-7K AXLES 2’ DOVETAIL SLIDE IN RAMPS BLACK .............$5,100 SWING WITH ROLL-UP ..................................................................................................$9,500 2013 PJ 96X22 SUPERWIDE 2-7K AXLES 2’ DOVETAIL SLIDE IN RAMPS BLACK .............$5,250 2000 KIEFER 6’-8”X22, GN STOCKTRAILER 2-7K AXLES, WOOD FLOOR 1CTR GAT W/INNER SLIDE REAR GATE FULL SWING W/SLIDE BLUE ...........................................................$4,500 NEW PJ BUMPER HITCH CARHAULERS 2011 FEATHERLITE 7X24 STOCK/COMBO RUBBER FLOOR MAT COMBO FRONT TACKROOM 2011 PJ 18’X83” 5” CHANNEL CARHAULER, 2” COUPLER, 2-3.5K AXLES, BOTH ELE W/SADDLE RACK 1 CTR GATE REAR FULL SWING W/ SLIDER ALUMINUM .............. $16,700 BRAKE, STRAIGHT DECK W/SLIDE IN RAMPS, BLACK .................................................$3,000 2013 SOONER SR622 ALL ALUMINUM STOCK TRAILER 2-7K AXLES 1 MOVABLE CTR GATE 2014 PJ 83X20 6” CHANNEL CARHAULER, 2 5/16 COUPLER, 2-7K AXLES, PULL OUT W/SLIDER 4-PIN SETTINGS DRIVER SIDE ACESS DR 4’ CURB SIDE RAMP GATE LED LITES TIE RAMPS, 2’ DOVE BLACK ...............................................................................................$4,250 RAIL VENTS PLEXIGLASS INSERTS .......................................................................... $26,000 1970 HYDE 7X20 OPEN STOCK TRAILER WHITE .........................................................$1,500

HIGHMORE, SOUTH DAKOTA 57345 605-852-2122 • 1-855-852-2122 WWW.PIONEERGARAGE.COM Kristi Effling • Mike Konrad

*NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS

XNLV121485


Land & Livestock November 2013  
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