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WOMEN

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2 WOI 2013 WOMEN OF INFLUENCE

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Congratulations

to all of this year’s amazing Women of Influence nominees.

Linda Wojtowicz

Sr. VP, Chief Operations Officer at TMC

TMC is proud to recognize our Woman of Influence, Linda Wojtowicz, for her continued commitment to excellent care in our community. Linda has made an outstanding impact on our organization, including over 2,000 professional women who serve as nurses, physicians and caregivers in our not-for-profit community hospital.

5301 E. Grant Road | Tucson, AZ 85712

| (520) 327-5461

Choose Well www.tmcaz.com


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WOI 3

102 INFLUENTIAL WOMEN

Past honorees of the Inside Tucson Business Women of Influence 2012 Carmen Bermudez Ginny Clements Carolyn Compton Valerie Diaz Colleen Edwards Jacquelyn Jackson Raena Janes Kathleen LaRose Barbara LaWall Lori Mackstaller Jeanette Mare Kelle Maslyn Jane McCollum Linda McNulty Karen Mlawsky Cindy Parseghian Jane Poynter Barbi Reuter Neelam Sethi Amber Smith 2011 Joni Condit Winnie Fritz Tannya Gaxiola Alison Hughes Michelle Livingston Shannan Marty Teresa Nowak Jan Offret Rae Orozco Lesli Pintor Amanda Sapir Patty Valera

2008 Judy Clinco Megan Davis Jayne Henninger Linda M. Johnson Nancy McClure Gina Murphy-Darling Mary Rowley Priscilla Storm Mindy Webb Jana Westerbeke 2007 Vicki Balentine Kerstin Block Vicki Chandler Alejandra Dreisbach Elizabeth Gonzalez-Gann Marian Lupu Lea Márquez-Peterson Dana Rambow Debbie Wagner Eileen Whalen 2006 Susan Boswell Marty Cortez Anne Doris Dorothy Finley Carlotta Flores Pat Klein Georgia Lacy Frances Merryman Laura Penny Leslie P. Tolbert

2010 Jodi Bain Lori Banzhaf Kim Bourn Katrina Heineking Katharine Kent Maricela Meza Keri Silvyn Laura Shaw Kimberly States Ellie Towne

2005 Kathy Alexander Sally Fernandez Mary Kamerzell Rosey Koberlein Melanie Larson Elsie MacMillan Terri Mitchell Kathy Oestreich June Webb-Vignery Laurie Wetterschneider

2009 Jessica Andrews Ruth Brinkley Katie Dusenberry Kim Fernández Cindy Godwin Charlotte Harris Susie Huhn Lisa Lovallo Diana Madaras Donna J. Zazworsky

2004 Bonnie Allin Jo Anne Arvizu Linda Arzoumanian Jannie Cox Mary Gruensfelder-Cox Jana Kooi Suzanne Lawder Jan Lesher Sarah R. “Sally” Simmons Tammy Stoltz, now Tammy Topp

l Center n Medica so c Tu l, a y hospit communit rough s Tucson’s nd well th a g n ro st en ping wom women ted to kee it m ducate the m e o c d n is a te e celebra provide e of life. W striving to y every stag tl n a st n o d are c join munity an leased to of our com TMC is p . re a c rt f-the-a ts of the ith state-o e recipien th g women w in iz n og ess in rec se women son Busin c Tu e d ards. The si w In A e c n e en of Influ nificant ual Wom had a sig e v a h d 10th Ann n dership a grity in lea te in fy li p exem ommunity. ving our c ro p im in influence

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impact!

Congratulations

to all of this year’s amazing Women of Influence nominees.

w w. tm We l l w e s o o h C

caz.com


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10 Years of Influential Women ARE RECOGNITIONS LIKE THIS STILL NECESSARY? YES, SAY PAST WOMEN OF INFLUENCE By Christy Krueger For Inside Tucson Business Inside Tucson Business since 2004 has recognized women who have a significant effect on the Tucson community - whether it be in business, the non-profit sector, public office or education. They are a special group of female leaders who are looked up to by thousands of women who work and live in Tucson and southern Arizona. The selection process for choosing the 2013 Women of Influence began in early summer when a call went out for nominations. Nominators were asked detailed questions about why their nominee is deserving of this honor. ITB staff members then reviewed all forms before whittling them down to a select group of 10 finalists who are being recognized in this issue and during a Nov. 19 awards breakfast. For the 10th anniversary of the WOI awards and after recognizing 102 women in nine years, and 10 more this year, ITB asked past winners if they think honors like this are still necessary? Women in America have made enormous strides in the past two generations, reaching the top levels of government, business and the arts. In Tucson, women run several of the area’s biggest corporations, serve on nearly every elected board and council and fill boards and executive directorship of the area’s nonprofit organizations. But nationally, the numbers are less rosy, especially when it comes to pay. In 1962, women comprised just 35 percent of the national work force and earned about 61 cents for every dollar men earned. In 2012, women comprised more than 57 percent of the work force but still earned only 77 cents for every dollar men earned. In the 1960s, few women owned businesses but in 2012, more than a third of U.S. businesses are owned by women and since 1997, the number of women-owned businesses has jumped by more than 59 percent. In Tucson, there are 260 women-owned businesses who have at least one employee. Women are enormously influential in metro Tucson. Yet past ITB WOI honorees say Tucson still has room for improvement. Five WOI honorees from previous years were given the opportunity to offer their views on what it means to be considered a woman of influence and how they think women are influencing the Tucson community. All stressed how honored they are to be in the presence of such outstanding women and to be able to make a difference in Tucson. “I’m overwhelmed by that honor and especially the company I’m in. Some of these women have done such incredible things,”

Jeanette Maré

Barbara LaWall

Kathleen LaRose noted Kathleen “Rocky”LaRose (2012 WOI, recently retired University of Arizona deputy director of athletics).

Larose has her fair share of accomplishments. Among them is becoming the UA’s first woman interim director of athletics and

overseeing men’s basketball and football programs. Jeannette Maré (2012 WOI, founder, Ben’s Bells) said she thought she was an unlikely choice. “I’m not the typical power businesswoman. It emphasizes how seriously the community takes what we do at Ben’s Bells. It’s remarkable to be featured in a business light with these amazing businesswomen,” she said. Each had a different viewpoint on how the rise of women in America has affected them, depending on their experiences and career choices. “My whole existence is in athletics and I witnessed the changes Title IX brought forth,” LaRose said. “It’s phenomenal – like a light switch turned on. It’s one of the biggest cultural changes in our history.” Barbara LaWall (2012 WOI, Pima County Attorney) is an example of how Title IX opened doors for women beyond the playing fields by ending discrimination in college admissions on the basis of gender. “Before Title IX,” she said, “fewer than a half-dozen women were admitted to the UA law school each year. After the law’s passage, the number of women admitted rose to 30 percent or more. I was one of those fortunate women.” During her early working days, Diana Madaras, (2009 WOI, owner, Madaras Gallery) said she experienced discrimination as a woman in business, but that she’s seen huge strides made since then. “I believe women are now on more of an equal footing in business. The struggles are less difficult then when I started working 30 years ago, and I hope for women coming up it’s easier,” she said. Although Maré is aware of challenges and unfairness women have faced in the past, this has not been the case with her personally. “In my lifetime I’ve never felt unempowered as a woman, which shines a light on the incredible progress that was made during my adolescence and young adulthood,” she said. When considering what the biggest disparity is today between women and men, the consensus was pay. “Women are still subject to prejudicial treatment on the basis of their gender, and this wage discrimination has a significant adverse economic impact on their families and children,” LaWall stressed. Laura Penny (2006 WOI, executive director of the Women’s Foundation of Southern Arizona) agreed with LaWall. “It’s a huge, hidden problem. People are often surprised to learn that women in the same job are paid less than men.”


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BY THE NUMBERS —Women have come a long way in 50 years but still lag behind men when it comes to pay. —Women as percentage of the total U.S. labor force: 57.6 —Percentage of median full-time pay of women to median full-time pay of men: 1962: 61 2012: 77 By profession 2012: Doctors: 63 Accountants: 71 CEOs: 74 Lawyers: 78 Professors: 80 Computer programmers: 90 —Out of 265 major occupation classes, number in which women outearn men: 1 – personal services —Percentage of women who are CEOs of Fortune 500 companies: 4.2 —Percentage of women who serve on boards of directors of the Fortune 500: 18.3 Source: Census.gov and Bloomberg Business Week

In her online Washington Post column on Aug. 13, Joann Weiner addressed the issue of income differences. She reported that in recent years women have surpassed the 50 percent mark among college graduates in earning undergraduate, master’s and doctorate degrees. Yet they still make 77 cents for each dollar earned by men. Weiner said she thinks there may be various reasons for this: 1) women choose career fields that pay less; 2) mothers are less likely to work fulltime than fathers; and 3) when women return to the workforce after an extended leave, they make an average of 16 percent less than they did before leaving. But, having children, Weiner concluded, has the largest negative impact on a woman’s wages. This is supported by findings that the pay gap between women with kids and those without offspring is greater than that between women and men. Penny said she believes it doesn’t have to be this way. She’s seeing changes in family dynamics that may help turn things around for women if the correct paths are followed. “I think we have systems for promotion and advancement that leave women feeling they have to choose between work and family. Wouldn’t we all be better off—men and women—if we honored work and family for everyone? Research shows that the younger generation of men want more time with their families, too. They’re not happy either with the systems we have.” A survey performed last year by Pew Research Center and reported in March showed that an almost equal number of working

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mothers (56 percent) and working fathers (50 percent) say they find it difficult to balance family life and work. And fathers were significantly more likely (46 percent) than mothers (23 percent) to say they’re not able to spend enough time with their children. Not surprisingly, the report also noted that fathers now spend more time on housework and with the kids than they did 50 years ago, suggesting the country is in the midst of a gender convergence when it comes to work and family roles. Within her group of friends, Madaras has noticed a positive shift in attitudes among fathers of daughters, which she said she believes is an encouraging sign for future generations of women. Although men generally outnumber women in the boardroom, Penny said she thinks women are well represented in the non-profit sector. That’s especially true on a local basis. Among the five largest Tucson area organizations included in the ITB Book of Lists under Foundations & Charitable Trusts and Business & Trade Associations, women make up 35 percent of board positions. Among ITB’s group of WOI alumnae, each spoke passionately about the positive differences women are making in all sectors of the Tucson community. LaWall pointed out that her generation is paving the road for today’s young women and girls. “A woman’s perspective is different than a man’s,” LaRose admitted. “If having balance in the community is important, we need women.” Penny is well versed on women’s contributions here and around Arizona, she’s worked in the private, nonprofit and government sectors. “Having women leaders in government makes a difference in the kind of policies we see at the local and state level in terms of pay equity, family and medical leave and domestic violence laws. All these policies came about since women were elected to public office or became leaders. It changed the conversation around the table.” Madaras agreed. “We have a tremendous positive effect on the community from the social services realm to the political realm and in education and business. We’ve made a tremendous contribution to Tucson.” “The skill set women are known for is being realized and we’re taken more seriously,” said Maré. “The more we show these kindness skills, we change the conversation.” She prefers to rejoice in women’s achievements rather than dwell on what has not yet been attained. “I think most women of influence feel the same way I do. We don’t feel like victims; instead we make things happen,” she said. Added LaRose, “We’ve come a long way and we need to celebrate. I believe in not letting your dreams limit you. When I started, I never would have dreamed we’d share the athletic department with the men. Anything is possible.”

WOMEN OF INFLUENCE 2013

PUBLISHER THOMAS P. LEE tlee@azbiz.com

ART DIRECTOR ANDREW ARTHUR aarthur@azbiz.com

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE DAVE WHITE dwhite@azbiz.com

EDITOR MARK B. EVANS dhatfield@azbiz.com

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JILL A’HEARN jahearn@azbiz.com

CIRCULATION/EVENTS LAURA HORVATH lhorvath@azbiz.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY SAMANTHA SAIS STORIES BY LISA HARRIS, CHRISTY KRUEGER, ASHLIE STEWART

2250 E. Broadway Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85719

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Jan Cervelli’s vision for downtown Tucson is of a vibrant hub filled create real solutions.” Her students are currently working with Tucson on options for with restaurants, galleries, offices, retail shops and grocery stores, inthe Ronstadt Transit Center. “They are creating designs that feature terlaced with green-space and market-rate housing. It’s a place where multi-use while still maintaining its transportation use—retail, office people live and who can hop on a streetcar, bike, or walk to work and space, living areas, possibly the University Art Museschool. As dean of the University of Arizona’s College um—a place where the community comes together, and of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecthe city earns income from rent.” ture, few know better than her how to help Tucson JANICE CERVELLI Dean of the University of Arizona College Another studio project is redesigning a downtown achieve this utopia. of Architecture, Planning and Landscape abandoned railroad corridor adjacent to Interstate 10. Cervelli enjoys working with task forces, powerArchitecture “We are designing a green-space with bike lanes, figuring through late-night meetings and bringing Pima ing out where the pathway goes, while acknowledging County’s and Tucson’s administrators together to Years in Tucson: 5 Other Leadership: Serves on boards of our cultural past and overcoming several environmenbuild trust and create a common foundation. Downtown Tucson Partnership, Imagtal issues.” “(Visions don’t) happen overnight,” she says, “But ine Greater Tucson, Arizona Forward The outcome of Cervelli’s studios is multifold. “We may take 20, 30 years, and step-by-step, we get to and Arizona Urban Land Institute develop practitioners who have experience on how where we are going.” decisions are made and where funding comes from, Since becoming dean five years ago, Cervelli has and as a result our graduates land jobs.” In addition, helped the community take huge steps with the deTucson benefits from her student’s creativity. sign of the Modern Streetcar Corridor and creation of the Main Gate Creativity is what keeps Cervelli at the University. Overlay District, Tucson’s first transit-oriented overlay zoning district. “I love to teach,” she says. “I love to be engaged in academia, to be An urban planner and landscape architect, Cervelli is a dean who part of a place that generates ideas, and to be active in the communiteaches. Her design studio engages students in real-world projects. ty.” A vibrant downtown Tucson is that much closer to reality thanks “It’s an interdisciplinary course for our students of architecture, to Cervelli’s imagination and leadership. landscape architecture, and planning. We work on a real project and

Jan

Cervelli


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CONGRATULATIONS TO ROXANNE VELIZ For being named to the 10th Annual Women of InямВuence list by Inside Tucson Business.

Straight talk. Sound counsel. Practical solutions. At Snell & Wilmer, some things never change.

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Crim’s proudest accomplishment is raising her 20-year-old son as a As former owner of a regional independent Internet service provider, single mother; and her favorite activity outside of work is traveling with Pamela Crim developed the ideal background to lead the sales and him. marketing efforts for Cox Business Arizona. While she worked to turn “I take him to see other countries. It’s important to see other cultures the struggling Dakotacom.net into a profitable enterprise, she formed and art and history – which are my loves.” numerous business and community partnerships that Although it is no longer operating, Crim founded the have carried over into her current work. Hershberger-Crim Educational Foundation. Her interest in civic service matches the philanPAMELA CRIM Southern Arizona Director of Sales & “It’s a scholarship foundation I put together in memthropic slant of Cox. Marketing, Cox Business Arizona ory of my mom and also for Freddie Hershberger, who “As a corporation, we’re extremely involved in the Years in Arizona: 19 was in the state Legislature. We helped educate several community. We help with poverty, provide Internet to Other Leadership: Board member La young women aspiring to leadership roles in college.” those who can’t afford it and drive technology to those Frontera Arizona, past board member Junior Achievement of Southern Lisa Lovallo, market vice president of Cox Commuwho need it,” particularly students in the classroom. Arizona nications, praised Crim for her advocacy work in the Crim actively supports La Frontera Arizona, Tucson community, as well as her support of downtown develHispanic Chamber of Commerce, Junior Achievement opment. of Arizona and Make-A-Wish Arizona. “She understands the need for re-investment in the downtown area She credits her parents for being early influences on her current sucand has successfully influenced Cox Business to spend several million cess. dollars in infrastructure improvements to expand the network there.” “My dad was an executive and wanted me to be independent and Crim’s passion for such growth is due to her optimism about the support myself. My mother was positive and taught me to look at the community. good in things,” she said. “I see a brighter future for Tucson. I see what’s happening downtown Attending Lincoln School for Women in Providence, R.I., also was influential on her life, she noted. The 20 minutes of silence during daily and I’m excited. There’s private student housing, outside investors, educhapel taught her to listen to herself. “It was a major impact on me,” she cation and commerce. I think the city will continue to grow as a center of commerce and belonging.” stated.

Pamela

Crim


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WOMEN OF INFLUENCE 2013

Transue also cited a few of the projects in which Davis has been a Mary Davis has been described as effective, energetic, intelligent, and compassionate. She was nominated as a Woman of Influence this key player. From her previous position as the senior director of business development and marketing at Tucson Airport Authority, to her year because she has demonstrated a high level of leadership in all work in community service, Davis always made an impact. walks of life. Davis describes her leadership style as open and Currently she is focusing on writing, working on honest. She prides herself on her ability to look past various community projects, and raising her kids. limitations and believes that anything is possible. “A true leader, a person of influence, leads from MARY DAVIS Public relations professional and “I believe I’m a connector, if you’re familiar with where they are at any point in time,” said nominator freelance writer ‘The Tipping Point.’ I bring people and projects toRuth Transue. “From her arrival in this community gether that make sense to achieve a common goal,” nine years ago, Mary has made a positive impact Years in Arizona: 9 Davis said. “I think people set too many limits on their wherever she is.” Other Leadership: Board member Southern Arizona Lodging capabilities and convince themselves of what they Davis has influenced countless people throughout and Resorts Association, past can’t do. I try to push them beyond those barriers and her time in Tucson. She loves working in the commupresident Public Relations Society show them they can be so much more.” nity and has been a part of the Tucson Rodeo Comof America Southern Arizona Chapter However, when asked about her greatest accommittee for six years. plishment, Davis didn’t site any of her notable contriProfessionally, she is currently working with severall butions to the business community or local charities. magazines and is busy writing, consulting and focusShe puts family first - “my children.” ing on journalism. “No matter what I ever do in this life, it will never be as great as “I am a devoted equestrian and have been working with the publishers of an online magazine launching in Australia, which I find very those two wonderful, compassionate and empathetic young adults heading out into the world,” Davis said. exciting,” Davis said.

Mary

Davis

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Downer, recognized by her peers as one of The Best Lawyers in Sherry Downer said she believes that contributing to the community is a way of showing gratitude for the blessings in her life. Downer America for Employment Law-Management, and a Southwest Super Lawyers Rising Star in Employment Litigation: Defense, strives for is particularly grateful for her husband Randy, daughter Ava, their excellence in everything she does. family and friends, and the Tucson community. Curiosity, a love of learning, and “a desire to make She contributes to organizations like the Primava positive difference in the lives of my family, friends, era Foundation, where she helps organize a series of clients and community motivates me,” Downer said. dinner events that raise money to support Primavera’ss SHERRY DOWNER Attorney, Fennemore Craig, P.C. Her enthusiasm for guiding clients and helping others mission of providing pathways out of poverty through h benefits the greater community in her role with the safe, affordable housing, workforce development and Tucson Metro Chamber, where she is Chairwoman of neighborhood revitalization. She also is a past CathoYears in Arizona: 18 Other Leadership: Adjunct professor, the Chamber’s Candidate Selection Committee, Vice lic Community Services Board and Human Resources University of Arizona; Chairwoman Chair of its Government Affairs Committee, and part Committee member. Tucson Chamber of Commerce Canof the Chamber’s Business Expansion and Retention Downer, raised in St. David, remembers how great didate Evaluation Committee; Legal Committee Chairwoman, Arizona team. it felt to help someone else. When she was young her Builders’ Alliance Downer uses her legal expertise to help organizafamily restored a bike as a Christmas present for a tions such as the Arizona Builders’ Alliance and the neighbor. Her family taught her that “you always have Cornerstone Building Foundation which benefit the something to give, if not money, your time or expercommunity as well as the construction industry. She is also teaches tise.” Downer hopes her daughter, now age three, will adopt the same employment law at the UA law school. attitude when she grows up. Downer summarizes her perspective with the quote, “to whom As an attorney with Fennemore Craig, P.C., Downer helps her climuch is given, much is expected.” Based upon the blessings she ents navigate complex business problems and employment issues. “I enjoy getting to know a client’s business and figuring out how to solve believes her family has received, the Tucson community will see a lot more of Downer’s contributions in the future. problems and help achieve their goals” she said.

Sherry

Downer


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Congratulations Shelly! From Dad, Troy, Lesley and your Quik Mart Family

We Love You!

Motivating people.

DRIVING RESULTS. Trailblazer. Innovator. Leader. That’s Pamela Crim. Working with nonprofit organizations such as La Frontera Arizona and Make-A-Wish Arizona, she is an influential leader in the community and telecom industry. As the Southern Arizona director of sales at Cox Business, Pam has paved her way to the top and earned the right to call herself a woman of influence. Please join us in congratulating Pamela Crim.

coxbusinessaz.com

WOI 11


12 WOI 2013 WOMEN OF INFLUENCE

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With a background in teaching, it was not Gibbons’ intention Shelly R. Gibbons never thought she’d stand on the same pedestal as other Women of Influence finalists. Whether at work or reach- to follow in the direction of crime prevention and helping victims, but, “Sometimes you get into certain niches. I’ve enjoyed it because ing out to local civic and charity organizations, she simply does it’s inspirational to me. I’m helping with crises and it’s rewarding. what comes naturally and she follows her sense of what’s right. That’s why I’ve done it for so many years. It’s exIn 1965 her parents founded Quik Mart Stores panded my views of the community.” with three locations in Tucson. Throughout the Other local organizations that have benefited from years, Gibbons observed her father’s strong work SHELLY R. GIBBONS Vice President, Quik Mart Stores Inc. her volunteerism include St. Luke’s Home, the Board ethic and the importance her parents placed on of Visitors, and she is currently board advisor for family. Today, as vice president and co-owner of Years in Arizona: 50 Tucson Association of Executives. the 26-store business with her two siblings, she Other Leadership: Board member and Advocating for buying local is another passion of tries to emulate the examples set by her parents past president of 88-CRIME; Past presihers. “The more you spend with local businesses,” during her youth. dent of Tucson Association of Executives; Board member Tucson Police Foundation she said, “the better it is for our community” beAfter working in education for 18 years, Gibcause they’re more invested in Tucson. “We have 170 bons moved into the business, primarily handling employees. We’re hoping to expand, and we can put operations and human resources. It was at this more people to work as we grow.” point when she discovered the importance of volunteering in the Just as her entrepreneurial aptitude has taken Gibbons far with community. Quik Mart, her sense of community is equally strong. But it’s not “The first board I was on was 88-CRIME. They said they needed more women on the board.” Not long after, she began volunteering because she’s looking for recognition. “I try to keep a low profile. with the Pima County Attorney’s Victim Services Division and then I saw previous women nominated for Women of Influence and I thought I would never be there.” with Tucson Police Foundation. County Attorney Barbara LaWall nominated Gibbons for the Governor’s Volunteer Service Award.

Shelly R.

Gibbons


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L AW T H AT L EADS ™

WOI 13

HONORS WO MEN O F IN FLU EN C E

Congratulations,

Sherry Janssen Downer *-),4*#+0 ,.#)0',+/

Claudia!

Fennemore Craig congratulates Sherry J. Downer on being recognized as one of Tucson’s Women of Inuence.

You deserve it! Wishing you many more years of success!

For more information about Sherry J. Downer and her colleagues at Fennemore Craig’s Tucson ofďŹ ce, please visit FennemoreCraig.com.

Ben Bauer Sherry J. Downer Barney M. Holtzman

WOMEN OF INFLUENCE 2013

John E. Kofron Erwin Kratz George Krauja

Nancy J. March Meredith K. Marder Scott D. McDonald

~Your team at Zanes Law

ATTORNEYS TUCSON

DENVER L AS V EGAS N OGALES PHOENIX R ENO

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Congratulations Catherine Your commitment to the community, professional exploration and mentoring are an inspiration for the entire TCI family. We are honored to be your colleagues. Tucson

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14 WOI 2013 WOMEN OF INFLUENCE

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believer that one person can make a big difference in the world Catherine Nichols said she believes one of life’s great rewards is because of the circle of influence one forms, as Stephen Covey de“paying forward” her own good fortune. She had the fortunate adscribes in his book, “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.” vantage of being mentored while a student and as a young profes“You affect one group and they affect another and it’s like a sional so now she guides others through career ups and downs and ripple effect in a pond,” Nichols said. delights in observing their successes. Using the corporate connections she made at TEP, “I had a sixth grade teacher who had an influNichols played a significant role raising money for ence on me. She encouraged me with math and CATHERINE NICHOLS Chief Operations Offi cer, TCI Wealth Advisors Inc. Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation. She gave me confidence to do it. Later, I had positive went on to do the same for University of Arizona experiences as a mentee,” she said. Years in Arizona: 24 School of Dance advisory board and Tucson Festival After graduating from Southern Methodist Other Leadership: Fundraiser and volunteer of Books, which she said she thought was a particuUniversity with a degree in law, Nichols moved to with The Ara Parseghian Medical Research larly good fit with her employer. Arizona and worked for Tucson Electric Power Co. o. Foundation; the UA School of Dance and Tucson Festival of Books. “Our firm supports financial education. Tucson for 17 years. She’s been in her current position as Festival of Books promotes literacy and education,” chief operations officer of TCI Wealth Advisors she said. since 2008 and loves guiding new employees. Those around her say Nichols has a special way with people that “When I was at TEP, I had a young attorney I mentored and make her stand out. watched her grow. She went on to become an accomplished attor“Her personal standards of professionalism, poise, empathy and ney. A couple gals here in my firm—I’ve helped them find their path honesty create a mentor for everyone she works with without tryand seen how it benefits them and helps the firm. It’s so rewarding ing,” noted Bob Swift, chief executive officer of TCI Wealth Advito see someone come into their own and surpass you,” Nichols sors. “She is like the best teachers who do not realize how much stressed. positive influence they are having on people just being who they She understands her Women of Influence recognition comes with a responsibility to continue helping others. And she’s a strong are.”

Catherine

Nichols


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Rich’s leadership, girl scouting has evolved to address some of the Debbie Rich grew up wanting to change the world. She was a Girl Scout, and willing to raise her hand to ask how. Now, she is the most prevalent systemic causes behind poverty, illiteracy, hunger, homelessness and violence. CEO of the Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona and she changes the “Our college-age leaders are role models for our Girl Scouts,” world one girl at a time. Rich says. “They are passionate about their interests, about becom“Once a Girl Scout, always a Girl Scout,” Rich says. ing teachers or scientists or business leaders, and The organization involves 15,000 girls per year share their passions with the girls. In turn, the Girl in leadership activities. “Our work teaches girls to Scouts can see themselves attending college and bebe confident, to be creative, to be problem-solvDEBBIE RICH CEO, Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona ing successful.” ers,” Rich says. “We empower girls so they may be Rich’s innovative leadership solution is unique to successful throughout their lives.” Years in Arizona: 21 the Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona. ‘We’re the only When Rich became CEO four years ago she Other Leadership: Assistant Director, Tu one within the Girl Scouts organization with this found that while many girls wanted to be a Girl Nidito; Community Relations Director Volunteer Center of Southern Arizona model.” Scout there were not enough troop leader volunHer framework has been so successful that the teers to accommodate Southern Arizona’s deGirl Scouts of Southern Arizona now needs more mand, particularly in underserved communities. space to fulfill its mission and Rich is leading a capital campaign. Rich did some problem solving and developed a model that The new building will include meeting rooms, science labs, a involved women students at the University of Arizona and Pima demonstration kitchen, a digital media lab and a gym. Rich aims to Community College as troop leaders. Her solution is a win-win — open the new facility in mid-2015. Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona offers its programs to more girls “I believe every girl has a unique voice and a place in our comwith college-age women leaders and the college-age women build munity,” Rich says. “I want to motivate them to be the best that resumes with leadership activities. they can be.” The activities include mastering traditional Girl Scout activities With her leadership model and a new building on the horizon —camp fire lighting, overnight trip planning—as well as science, she certainly will be able to empower more southern Arizona girls. robotics, public speaking, and multi-media communication. Under

Debbie

Rich

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$100 million or more.” She said she believes this type of non-adverWhile M. Roxanne Veliz may be too humble to toot her own sarial climate, where people work together toward a common goal, horn, others do—both by recognizing her with awards and by apfits her well. plauding the many accomplishments she’s achieved as a partner The firm’s commitment to serving in the community also fits her. with Snell & Wilmer. “It’s part of our culture and expectations. Seeing what people do She was named a Best Lawyer in America for Banking and Fiafter work – the staff, too, not only the lawyers - has nance Law and Real Estate Law, and in 2011, she enriched my life. Everyone here does something they was selected as one of Arizona’s Finest Lawyers. M. ROXANNE VELIZ care about and gravitate to.” Laura Penny, executive director of Women’s Attorney, Snell & Wilmer LLP For Veliz, that includes supporting several orgaFoundation of Southern Arizona (and a past ITB nizations. “The most exciting to me is the Women’s Woman of Influence), knows Veliz well as a memYears in Arizona: 44 Foundation. An amazing group of people serves on ber of the organization’s board of trustees who Other Leadership: Board member for Women’s Foundation of Southern Arizona; that board, mostly women. It’s invigorating.” volunteers on both the advocacy committee and University of Arizona Law College AssociaShe’s been a member of Chicanos Por La Causa the investment committee. tion; Chicanos Por La Causa since 1996 and is passionately dedicated to support“Ms. Veliz is a highly respected attorney with ing law students through the University of Arizona one of Tucson’s most prestigious law firms, where,, Law College Association. in 2002, she was one of the youngest attorneys to be named a part“The legal community here is always involved with the law ner at the age of 33,” Penny noted. “She is currently the only female school,” Veliz said. partner based full time in the Tucson office of Snell & Wilmer. In Her greatest source of gratification is being with her soccer-lovaddition, she is the only Hispanic partner.” ing 8 and 11-year-old sons. “In my free time I’m usually at the park Veliz loves her experience at Snell & Wilmer, both in the work or hanging out with family. On a personal level I’m proud of being environment and in the community. mom to two young boys – juggling and balancing that involvement “My practice centers on commercial finance. I represent lendwith also being a full-time lawyer in a large firm.” ers doing loan transactions to businesses, from under $1 million to

M. Roxanne

Veliz


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came naturally. Linda Wojtowicz thrives while working on burning platforms. “I liked the opportunity to affect change at a larger scale, parChief Operating Officer of Tucson Medical Center, Wojtowicz ticularly if the goal is to improve the health of the community,” she manages a $170 million operating budget and 200 employees. She said. gambled when she accepted her current position in 2008. She and her husband regularly vacationed in Tucson, and on one “I had a successful track record and TMC was financially chaltrip bought a house on a whim. She traveled back lenged. Joining their executive leadership team and forth between Chicago and Tucson for several was risky,” she said. Looking back, she realizes LINDA WOJTOWICZ years, before landing a job in Arizona, first as the that she never had a better job or more fun than Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, President and CEO of Sierra Vista Regional Health helping turn the hospital around. Tucson Medical Center Center then at TMC. “The leadership team worked well together and d Years in Arizona: 10 “I was TMC’s sixth Chief Nursing Officer in seven made decisions quickly. The platform was burnOther Leadership: Chief Nursing Officer, years,” she said. “There were no standards and moral ing and we needed to save it.” TMC, CEO of Sierra Vista Regional Health was poor.” Her efforts determined TMC’s nursing Working toward a common goal of improving Center practices, including developing standards of care the health of the community, Wojtowicz and othand shaping the identity of the hospital’s 1,000 memers on the leadership team created a financially ber nursing staff. stronger institution within 18 months. Being a nurse has helped her as a healthcare executive. In addition to guiding TMC to a sounder fiscal platform, Wojto“Nurses bring a different and valuable viewpoint to how we manwicz planned and oversaw the development of TMC’s Orthopedic age healthcare. We care about care,” she said. and Surgical Tower, a massive 200,000 square foot facility that While Wojtowicz no longer practices as a bedside nurse, the faincludes 25 operating suites and 40 inpatient beds. vorite part of her day is visiting patients. “I really see the difference Wojtowicz started her career as a nurse in the Chicago area. I can make,” she said. Making the transition from bedside care to hospital leadership

Linda

Wojtowicz

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for Women Movement, which is a national campaign run through Claudia Zanes has used her extensive knowledge in advertisthe American Heart Association to increase awareness of heart ing, sales and marketing to skyrocket Zanes Law to success. She disease in women. has served as the firm’s Chief Executive Officer since 2009, and has She also founded the Zanes Law Community Outplayed a large role in determining the direction reach Program, which supports multiple organizaand future plans of the company. She was nomiCLAUDIA ZANES tions in Tucson. The program has donated time and nated as a Woman of Influence because she has Attorney, CEO of Zanes Law money to the Tucson community. proven to be an extremely successful leader in the “You can often find me participating in our Teacher workplace and in the community. Years in Arizona: 21 School Supply Giveaway every August, events with Zanes has helped grow the law firm into the Other Leadership: Chairwoman, Go For Red Movement, American Heart AssociaTucson Young Professional, the Go Red Movement, multimillion-dollar statewide company. She detion; Board member Blair Charity Group; Child Spree with the Salvation Army, and much scribes herself as a visionary and a creator, and Founder, Zanes Law Community Outreach more,” Zanes said. she has high hopes for further development of the Out of all of her many accomplishments, Zanes firm. says her greatest achievement is successfully making a family busi“My ultimate goal is to open up a Zanes Law in as many markets ness work. in the United States as possible before I am 50,” Zanes said. “Not only do my husband and I work well together, but our Beyond her work in the office, Zanes has contributed a lot of daughter, who is 22, chose to work with us as well,” said Zanes. “In a time to the community. She has served in multiple leadership roles recent acceptance speech she said “I get to work with my beautiful throughout various organizations. parents every day,” and when you hear that, it makes it all worth it. She is currently serving as the 2013 Chairwoman for the Go Red

Claudia

Zanes


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Women of Influence 2013 Inside Tucson Business  

Women of Influence 2013 Inside Tucson Business