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Hunting season

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

SIDNEY HERALD

Richland County Game Warden reminds hunters to know rules of sport SUBMITTED BY RANDY HUTZENBILER RICHLAND COUNTY GAME WARDEN

Well, the 2009 hunting season is right around the corner and by the sounds of it people are really excited to get out there and get to hunting. The biologists are saying that deer and bird numbers are looking real good in Richland County so it should make for an interesting and fun hunting season. I’d like to take this time to remind hunters of some of the common violations seen here in Richland County and encourage all hunters to review the regulations prior to hunting to prevent any unnecessary problems. The biggest problem I see is failing to properly validate tags. The tags

have to have three notches to be validated correctly. One Hutzenbiler notch for the month, one notch for the first digit of the day, and one notch for the second digit of the day. The notches have to be completely removed from the tag. The second most common problem I see is failing to get landowner permission to hunt. Hunters are reminded that prior to hunting on private property, whether posted or not, they are required to have landowner permission. This also includes

retrieving game animals on private property. Some other violations in Richland County include: • Using someone else’s tag or loaning your tag to someone else. This is considered party hunting and is illegal in Montana. • Hunting in the wrong district. Richland County is split almost in half between hunting district 651 and hunting district 703. Hunters should review the boundaries of these two districts prior to hunting. • Shooting from the roadway and/or shooting from a vehicle. Hunters are reminded that they need to be out of their vehicle and cannot shoot on, from or across any public highway or the shoulder, berm, barrow pit or right-

SHOW & TELL with the

of-way of any public highway. • Waste of game. Hunters or persons in possession of a game animal or game animal parts are prohibited from wasting

‘...review the regulations prior to hunting to prevent any unnecessary problems.’ Randy Hutzenbiler Richland County game warden

or rendering unfit for human consumption any part of a game animal

that is defined as “suitable for food.” For big game animals, excluding mountain lions, all of the four quarters above the hock including the loin and backstrap are considered “suitable for food.” • Baiting. It is illegal to hunt or attempt to hunt any game animal or game bird by baiting. Baiting shall mean the placing, exposing, depositing, distributing or scattering of corn, wheat or other grain or food source to lure or attract game animals or game birds. • Spotlighting. It is illegal to hunt or attempt to hunt game animals and game birds with the use of any spotlight or other artificial light. People wishing to report violations of fish, wildlife

and parks laws can do so by calling 1-800-TIPMONT. The TIP-MONT program is similar to the well-known Crimestoppers program and offers rewards for information resulting in apprehension of persons that abuse Montana’s natural, historic or cultural resources. A person wishing to report violotaions to TIP-MONT can do so anonymously. I would like to wish all the hunters best of luck in the 2009 seasons and anyone having any questions, comments or concerns can contact me either via e-mail or by calling 1-406853-7272. Please send all questions, comments or concerns via e-mail to sidneywarden72@hotmail.com.

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Hunting season

SIDNEY HERALD

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

3

Governor discusses hunting season opportunities HELENA – Gov. Brian Schweitzer and Fish, Wildlife & Parks Director Joe Maurier announced several new hunting opportunities and a new way to get involved in Montana’s annual hunting season-setting process. “When you start to feel fall in the air it means hunting season is just around the corner,” said Schweitzer, “It’s time to get your hunting equipment ready, sight-in your rifle, and make sure you are taking advantage of the new hunting opportunities. “Developing positive relationships with landowners is also important for our Montana hunting heritage and our economy with hunters alone spending close to $302 million annually.” Schweitzer has purchased his

tags for deer, elk and upland birds.

FUN FACTS Montana has the highest per capita hunting participation of Schweitzer any state at 19 percent. Montanans and visitors spend about $1.2 billion annually on outdoor recreation. Hunters spend more than 2.6 million days afield in Montana annually.

HELP SET HUNTING SEASONS EARLY, OPEN HOUSES For the first time hunters, landowners and outfitters got involved in helping set hunting seasons for the next two years. “In years past FWP would de-

velop tentative regulation proposals before receiving comment. It seemed like the cart before the horse, so this year we have invited the public to list or suggest things to change or consider for any upcoming big game or upland game bird hunting season before FWP develops tentative regulations for the next two seasons,” said Maurier. FWP hosted statewide open houses on Aug. 27. The open houses ran from 6-9 p.m. at FWP’s regional offices in Kalispell, Missoula, Bozeman, Great Falls, Billings and Miles City. The open house in Glasgow was held at the Valley County Courthouse. The quickest and most convenient way to comment is to visit FWP’s Web site at www.fwp.mt.gov – click “Sea-

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‘It’s time to get your hunting equipment ready, sight-in your rifle, and make sure you are taking advantage of the new hunting opportunities.’ Brian Schweitzer Montana governor

son Setting Suggestions.” Final proposals will be available for additional public comment in January.

have several new hunting opportunities this season including special “youth only” elk hunting areas that do not require a special permit and Youth Waterfowl and Pheasant Weekend Sept. 26 and 27 that allows Montana’s licensed youth hunters age 12 to 15 to get an early chance to hunt ducks, mergansers, geese, coots and ring-necked pheasants statewide.

HUNTING SEASON KEY DATES: Sept. 1 – Most game bird hunting opened Sept. 5 – Archery season opened Sept. 26-27 – Youth Waterfowl and Pheasant Weekend Oct. 10 – Pheasant season opens Oct. 25 – General season opens

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4

Hunting season

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

SIDNEY HERALD

Hunting season outlook looks good for Richland Co. BY SCOTT THOMPSON REGION 6 WILDLIFE BIOLOGIST – MONTANA FISH WILDLIFE & PARKS

Mother nature has treated our wildlife well in Richland County. The county largely escaped the brunt of winter seen just to the north and east last winter, and ample rainfall has produced a lot of cover and food. This combined with already healthy wildlife populations makes for a favorable outlook for the 2009 hunting season. Mule deer surveys indicate populations remain steady with mule deer occupying all of their typical habitat, as well as marginal habitats. Winter conditions affected overall numbers in the northern part of the county, and drought conditions in 2008 affected fawn numbers countywide. Still in most areas, mule deer numbers are very healthy, and landowners are expressing their concern of “too many deer.”

Whitetails have followed a similar pattern with some winterkill in the Missouri River bottom, while the Yellowstone continues to have strong Thompson deer numbers. River bottom habitats are very productive, and overall number of whitetailed deer are still very high. The abundant forage certainly improves body condition of deer, and antler growth can be good in such years. Similar to previous years, antlerless deer licenses are abundant, with hunters allowed to purchase a total of seven antlerless deer licenses and additional licenses available through management seasons. Hunters should consider harvesting does to help out private landowners and wildlife habitat conditions.

Antelope are above average in hunting district 650. Over winter survival has been good for several years while fawn production was again lower than average, mostly due to drought conditions in 2008. Similarly to mule deer, we are finding antelope throughout their typical habitat and in marginal habitats. Hunters are encouraged to seek out landowners wishing to have antelope harvested on their property. Upland game birds generally had a good year south of the Missouri River, while points north saw significant winterkill. Richland County traditionally escapes the deep snowfalls, while drought often has a larger effect. In 2009, things seemed to align with generally good numbers of bird “carry over” to spring, generally good nesting conditions and very good brood rearing conditions. Some hail storms likely decreased bird numbers in local-

ized areas, but countywide bird numbers look to be good. Average to above average game populations and additional license numbers should allow for plenty of hunting opportunity this fall. As always, preparing and scouting will increase your chances of having a successful hunt. Hunters are reminded to acquire permission before hunting on private land. Some good access resources to keep in mind are landownership maps available for most counties, and Montana Fish Wildlife & Park’s Block Management booklets and access guide to upland game bird projects available at regional offices. For more information, contact Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks in Glasgow (region 6) at 406-228-3700 or Miles City (region 7) at 406-234-0900 or the MFWP Web site (http://fwp.mt.gov).

SUBMITTED

Whitetail have strong numbers this year.

Welcome Hunters Before you go out, stop by and get everything you need! • Hunting & Fishing Licenses • Ammunition • Orange & Camouflage Sweat Shirts • Coolers • Pop • Beer

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Hunting season

SIDNEY HERALD

Some turkey, sandhill crane permits available in areas of Montana SUBMITTED BY MONTANA FISH, WILDLIFE & PARKS

Hunters can now buy surplus permits for turkey and a few sandhill crane hunting licenses. About 400 surplus turkey permits are available in western Montana hunting areas. Turkey permits are free, but hunters cannot possess any other fall turkey permits and must purchase a fall turkey license to use with one of these surplus permits. For sandhill crane, 13 hunting licenses remain for an area near Billings. Those who obtain a surplus crane license can also purchase an additional license. Surplus permits and licenses can be purchased online at fwp.mt.gov, or from any Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks liSandhill crane. cense provider.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

Be Sure To Check Out The 2009 Hunting Guide and lots more on

www.sidneyherald.com • News • Special Sections • Sports • Photo Gallery • Newspaper Ads • Obituaries • So much more! ting this Remember when you are out hun in to the m the g season, take pictures and brin ting guide or Sidney Herald for next year’s hun ! submit them for our photo gallery

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• Obedience and Retrieving • Introduction to Firearms • Introduction to Birds • Puppy Training • Conditioning • Pre-Season Refreshers

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6

Hunting season

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

SIDNEY HERALD

Additional antlerless deer “B” licenses available in FWP’s region 6 these license types were available for sale online and at all license providers starting Aug. 17 on a first-come, first-served basis. Only those hunters holding a 699-00 or a 640-00 prerequisite license will be eligible to participate in the management seasons. The management season licenses will cost $10 apiece for Montana residents. Nonresident hunters will need to buy a $75 prerequisite license to be eligible to purchase management season licenses for $20 each. For the general 2009 big game season, each hunter may possess up to seven “deer B” licenses in any combination via drawing, over-the-counter or surplus purchase. Because the special management seasons are administratively separate from the general season, hunters may purchase up to four more of the 699-01 or 640-01 licenses – or a combination of these two license types –

that are over objectives – typically took place after the general hunting season was over. But Gunderson said a continuing trend of high deer populations in these districts and a desire to get deer harvested during the general season to take advantage of existing hunters and lessen impacts on private landowners prompted the action earlier this year. In hunting district 640, surveys show that mule deer numbers have increased steadily over the past five years. While biologists say mule deer numbers dropped about 39 percent during the severe winter of 2008-09, they are still above 10-year averages. There is very limited winter cover or forage in the district, and agricultural damage has been increasing. Regarding whitetails, Gunderson said deer numbers in hunting districts 630, 640, 641, 650, 651 and 670 have been above long-

apiece. That means hunters who participate in the special management seasons in Region 6 are allowed to possess up to 11 “deer B” tags. In past years, deer management seasons – used to control populations of big game animals

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term averages since 2002. In hunting districts 630, 650 and 651, and 670 west of Highway 24, whitetail numbers have increased up to 54 percent above long-term averages. Rapidly increasing whitetail numbers brought a corresponding increase in depredation on private land. Gunderson noted that numerous hunters and landowners have expressed concern to FWP regarding very high whitetail numbers and associated agricultural damages, especially along the Milk River corridor. He said damages to standing crops are already occurring in many areas, and damage to stored silage and hay is expected to take place again this winter. “These measures are one way we can help reduce that damage,” Gunderson said. For more information about the special deer management seasons, call 406-228-3700.

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GLASGOW – Hunters in FWP’s Region 6 will have additional opportunities to harvest antlerless mule deer and whitetailed deer during the general 2009 big game season, officials said. That’s because two special deer management seasons in a limited number of hunting districts will take place the same time as the general season, said FWP Region 6 Supervisor Pat Gunderson. Nonresidents participating in the hunts can purchase the licenses at reduced prices. In hunting districts 630, 640, 641, 650, 651 and 670, Gunderson said a total of 2,000 additional 699-01 “B” licenses for antlerless white-tailed deer will be authorized. Also in hunting district 640, which encompasses the far northeastern corner of the state, a total of 200 additional 640-01 “B” licenses for antlerless mule deer will be authorized. Both of

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Hunting season

SIDNEY HERALD

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

7

Most common mistakes made by hunters, fire danger BY FISH, WILDLIFE & PARKS

Montana hunters have the opportunity to take part in some of the finest hunting opportunities found anywhere. But each fall, some individuals unwittingly or knowingly violate the state’s game laws. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks officials ask that hunters take the time to review Montana’s hunting rules and regulations to ensure they act within the law and are prepared to recognize when others violate the law. Any violation can be reported to TIP-MONT on 1-800-TIPMONT, 1-800-847-6668.

MOST COMMON GAME VIOLATIONS • Failure to properly validate a license/tag and securely fasten the tag in a visible manner to a game animal immediately after the kill and before it is moved or transported from the kill site.

• Failure to obtain permission from landowners before hunting on private property. • Using someone else’s tag on a game animal you killed or tagging a game animal that someone else killed. Party hunting is not allowed in Montana. • Shooting or attempting to shoot game animals or game birds from a vehicle. • Shooting game animals on or from any public highway or public right-of-way. • Using a vehicle (including all-terrain vehicles and aircraft) to concentrate, drive, rally, stirup or harass game animals. • Failure to stop at a check station going to or from hunting or fishing areas, even if you have no game or fish. • Failure to leave evidence of the sex of a game animal attached. • Failure to wear at least 400 square inches of hunter (fluorescent) orange clothing above the waist at all times while hunt-

ing big game during firearm hunting seasons. • Wasting any part of a game animal suitable for food. FWP encourages hunters to protect the future of their sport by hunting responsibly and calling the toll-free 1-800-TIP-Mont (1-800-847-6668) number to report witnessed or suspected property vandalism, trespass or wildlife violations.

FIRE DANGER DURING FALL HUNTING The 2009 fall bird hunting season is upon us and the early archery-hunting season began in mid-August. Landowners and land management agencies are concerned, as more folks will be out in the countryside. The fire danger is moderate to low but hunters should still take precautions against starting a prairie

HUNTING

SUBMITTED

SEE MISTAKES | PAGE 8

Properly notch your tag upon kill and fasten securely before moving game animal from kill site.

after the hunt, stop in at the.....

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8

Hunting season

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

SIDNEY HERALD

Mistakes: Common sense reduces fire danger FROM PAGE 7

fire. During the fall, the chance of starting a fire is a serious concern to landowners, land management agencies and recreationists. Using common sense and taking a few simple steps to minimize the danger of a fire start while we use the prairie can save everyone a lot of time, effort and expense. Human caused fires can and should be avoided. The landscape across Montana can be dry with a heavy fuel load of grass from spring and summer moisture. We all need to do our part in the prevention of wildland fires by using common sense and being prepared. Following some simple common sense guidelines will reduce the chance of a human caused fire start: • When you park your vehicle make sure no fuel (dry grass) is touching the catalytic converter or exhaust system. Find a bare spot along the roadside to park. Park your vehicle in an acceptable area. Don’t block the flow of traffic. • Carry fire suppression equipment in your vehicle. Water and a shovel are probably minimum requirements. Having a fire extinguisher is a plus.

• When requesting permission to hunt, it might be a good idea to discuss the fire threat with the landowner so he/she knows you are aware of the problem and will act accordingly. You may be required to park your vehicle and walk. • It’s important to find out the fire restrictions that apply to the location you intend to hunt or camp. That information is readily available by calling the local land management agencies, county commissioners or the local fire department. • Common sense tells us not to drive off-road when conditions are dry. • Any county that has instituted Stage 1 fire restrictions prohibits any open fire that cannot be turned on and off, such as in a propane fueled stove. Using common sense will help ensure a safe and enjoyable outdoor experience this fall for you and the landowners. Everyone appreciates a safe and fire-free fall hunting experience. For updates on restrictions in effect in Montana, visit the Northern Rockies Coordinating Group Interagency Restrictions Page: www.mt.blm.gov/fire/restrictions/index.html

ATTENTION HUNTERS OPEN October 25-November 29 Saturday and Sunday 4-7 p.m. • Wild game • Custom meat processing • Curing and smoking • Sausage and jerky • Vacuum sealed for maximum freshness

SUBMITTED

Showcase hunt The Filler boys, from left, Bradley, Aaron and Justin enjoy holding on to the family’s harvest during hunting season 2008.

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Hunting season

SIDNEY HERALD

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

9

FWP reminds hunters of off-highway vehicle laws, private land permission BY FISH, WILDLIFE & PARKS

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks reminds off-highway vehicles owners, including motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle (ATVs), quadricycle, dune buggy, amphibious vehicle and air cushion vehicle riders, that Montana has registration and use rules. Montana’s 2009 archery seasons began Sept. 5. Fall black bear hunting and the moose, sheep and goat seasons begin Sept. 15. Upland game bird hunting for most species began Sept. 1. On most public lands, OHVs are required to stay on designated routes established by the land management agency responsible for those lands. It is illegal to retrieve harvested wild game by going cross-country or going off designated routes. Private landowners may have additional restrictions or requirements of hunters with OHVs.

OHV registration requirements in Montana include: Off-highway vehicles operating on public land must be registered at the county treasurers office in the county where the owner resides and display a decal. This one-time registration is valid until the current owner sells the OHV. A license plate is necessary for any ATV or motorcycle to be used on a public road, which includes city streets, county roads and any road, including twotrack (4x4 roads) on national forest lands. To legally operate an OHV on public roads, the vehicle itself must be street legal and the operator must have a state driver’s license. For details on OHV in Montana, including rules on Nonresident use of OHVs, go to FWP’s Web page at fwp.mt.gov on the recreation page under licenses and permits.

PERMISSION REQUIRED FOR ALL HUNTING ON PRIVATE LAND Don’t wait until it is too late. Hunters who haven’t already asked permission from private landowners to hunt need to do so as soon as possible. Montana’s 2009 archery seasons began Sept. 5. Fall black bear hunting and the moose, sheep and goat seasons begin Sept. 15. Upland game bird hunting for most species began Sept. 1. Montana law requires hunters to obtain permission for all hunting on private land. Whether pursuing upland game birds, coyotes, gopher or any other wildlife, hunters must have permission from the landowner before hunting on private property. Landowners may grant permission in a face-to-face contact or over the phone, in writing or by posting signs that explain the type of hunting allowed and under what conditions.

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10

Hunting season

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

SIDNEY HERALD

Pheasants Forever conducts Youth Hunt/First Hunt SUBMITTED BY BOB CRANDALL PHEASANTS FOREVER

paid for by the chapter. Shells, guns and shooting instructions will also be providRichland County’s chapter of Pheased for the target sessions by the chapter, ants Forever will conduct a Youth the only requirement is young hunters Hunt/First Hunt for pheasant during the must have a valid and current hunter’s State’s Youth Pheasant Opener Sept. 26, safety card. and if the number of The trap shooting dates young hunters warare Sept. 13 and 20 at the rants it, Sept. 27. Sidney Trap Club The chapter has the grounds at 4 p.m. Randy support from a number Hutzenbiler, game warREGISTER for the Youth Hunt/First Hunt den with the Montana of area landowners by contacting Bob Crandall, 488who will allow young Fish, Wildlife and Parks, 3838, or George Biebl, 488-1443. hunters to hunt their will be present at the first DEADLINE to register is Thursday. land and has recruited shoot to meet the young a number of adult menhunters and discuss the tors to accompany the game laws for pheasant young hunters, as is rehunting. quired by the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Any young hunter between the ages of Parks Dept. 12 and 15 who would like to participate in The chapter, with the cooperation of the Youth Hunt/First Hunt and the trap the Rapid City Trap Club, will host two shooting should register with Bob Crantarget shooting sessions prior to the dall at 488-3838 or George Biebl at 488hunt. Costs for the clay targets will be 1443. Please register by Thursday.

Details

Open Early for Hunting Season! A GOOD HUNT STARTS HERE

Breakfast Served from 6:30 to 11 a.m.

SUBMITTED

Jack, 10-year-old Springer Spaniel of Larry and LaRiesa Zahn, Culbertson, helped bag these birds.

Great Steaks & Seafood Dinner is 5 - 10 p.m. Nightly Specials

Happy Hours 3-6:30 p.m. Beer & Well Drinks

Take your best shot at one of our hearty breakfasts.

175

$

EARLY BIRD SPECIALS DAILY Only 3 miles from Sidney

American and Mexican Cuisine

Open Monday thru Saturday

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER 6:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 5 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sun. (Breakfast only) Reopen Fri. & Sat. Night at Midnight

Bring in your motel key & receive a FREE drink.

102 E. Main, Downtown Sidney • 433-1839

South of Sidney

Restaurant 433-4709 • Bar 433-9936 • Open Monday thru Saturday


Hunting season

SIDNEY HERALD

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

11

Brief history of North American model of wildlife conservation EDITOR’S NOTE: Hal Herring, Augusta, is a contributing editor for Field & Stream and has written for publications including The Atlantic Monthly and The Economist. This essay originally appeared in Montana Outdoors. Article reprinted with permission. BY HAL HERRING

In 1842, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed the legal notion that America’s wildlife should be held in trust for the public and could not be owned, as wild game had been in Europe, by a ruler or any individual. This was in keeping with America’s fledgling experiment in democracy, and it would have enormous implications over the course of our history. As this radical notion evolved, it would become the basis for what modern wildlife managers and hunters call the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation.

At first, the concept of wildlife as a public resource belonging to everyone probably worked against any notion of conserving it. Herring Certainly the histories of the buffalo or the pronghorn during most of the 19th century offered little encouragement. They more accurately illustrated the so-called “tragedy of the commons,” where unregulated resources belonging to everyone are valued by no one. But by 1870, when it became clear that apparently inexhaustible numbers of wild animals were, in fact, extremely finite, the radical—and unique— notion of public wildlife became the salvation of those dwindling populations. Conservation leaders such as President Theodore Roosevelt saw the fate of America’s wildlife

as tied to the fate of the nation: Americans’ willingness to squander such a commonly held treasure did not bode well for democracy’s future. These leaders, almost all of them hunters and fishermen who had either lived or traveled on the western frontier, were the spokesmen for a citizenry anxious to save what was left of the nation’s wildlife heritage. As early as 1876, before the last great buffalo slaughter near Miles City, roughly 500 sportsmen’s groups had formed across the country to advocate for game laws and conservation. It took a while, but by the mid-20th century wildlife losses were slowly turning to gains. Under the North American model, everyone in the United States and Canada had the right to hunt and fish within the boundaries of laws – laws made in a democratic manner by the same people who owned the resources.

‘...laws were enacted to halt the market hunting that had devastated populations across North America.’ Hal Herring Contributing editor for Field & Stream

In its way, it was as revolutionary as the idea of democracy itself. Because wildlife belonged to everyone, it could not be bought and sold, and laws were enacted to halt the market hunting that had devastated populations across North America. Hunters and anglers agreed to buy licenses, and their license fees were used to purchase habitat and restore fish and game populations.

GUNS 'N' THINGS ...After the Hunt!

The Pittman-Robertson Act of the early 1930s, designed by hunter-conservationists, was a tax on firearms and ammunition that has raised over $5 billion for wildlife and habitat. The Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp Act of 1934 provided the money to purchase and maintain America’s federal system of wildlife refuges. The system now contains 5.2 million acres of waterfowl habitat that also provide refuge to at least one-third of all endangered and threatened species in the United States. The North American model worked, like no other system of conservation on the planet. And it remains unique to North America, the only continent that retains a modern culture of hunting and fishing along with the world’s healthiest populations of elk, deer, pronghorn, moose, grizzly bears, waterfowl, and hundreds of other wildlife species.

Relax....

LLC

Selling:

•Fire Arms •Accessories •Re-Loading Equipment •Ammunition •Stocks •Gun Safes

Plus: •Light Gun Smithing •Special Orders •Gift Certificates •Pawn Shop 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Mon. - Fri. • 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sat. Closed Sun. & Holidays 305 N. Merrill, Glendive, MT (406) 377-3969 or 939-GUNS

We process wild game! Call for your appointment. Custom made jerky and Sausage. For Sale: Federally inspected beef bundles, custom sausage & brats.

’s Meat l l a H

For all your Meat Processing and Butchering CALL US

Pro

cessing

8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.

488-2486 Meat Shop 12908 Co. Rd 353, Sidney, Mt. DOUG HALL: 488-4996 evenings or 489-3996 cell


12

Hunting season

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

SIDNEY HERALD

Season dates for big game, upland game bird Species Antelope 900 Antelope Archery Antelope General Bighorn Sheep Archery Bison Black Bear—Spring Black Bear—Fall Deer/Elk Archery Deer/Elk Backcountry Deer/Elk General Moose/Sheep/Goat Mountain Grouse Mountain Lion—Fall Mountain Lion—Winter Partridge Pheasant Sage Grouse Sharp-tailed Grouse Pheasant/Waterfowl—Youth Turkey—Spring Turkey—Fall

Start Date Aug. 15 Sept. 5 Oct. 11 Sept. 5 Nov. 15 April 15 Sept. 15 Sept. 5 Sept. 15 Oct. 25 Sept. 15 Sept. 1 Oct. 25 Dec. 1 Sept. 1 Oct. 10 Sept. 1 Sept. 1 Sept. 26-27 April 11 Sept. 1

End Date Nov. 8 Oct. 10 Nov. 8 Sept. 14 Feb. 15, 2010 May 31 Nov. 29 Oct. 18 Nov. 29 Nov. 29 Nov. 29 Dec. 15 Nov. 29 April 14, 2010 Jan. 1, 2010 Jan. 1, 2010 Nov. 1 Jan. 1, 2010 May 17 Jan. 1, 2010

SUBMITTED

Earl Siggaard caught this pike at Medicine Lake Aug. 6, 2009.

Wholesale Tobacco And Cigarettes

Welcome Hunters while you might not get that trophy buck, at least you can catch a great meal at the Depot.

Open Sunday Mornings too!

Cigarettes

Smokeless Tobacco

Skydancer (all natural) . . .$26.65 carton Marlboro . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$39.65 carton Winston . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$36.65 carton Maverick . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.75 carton Old Gold . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32.00 carton Pall Mall Filter . . . . . . . . .$31.25 carton USA Gold . . . . . . . . . . . . .$30.00 carton Camel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37.15 carton

Copenhagen & Skoal . . . .$18.25 5/roll Husky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11.00 5/roll Cougar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14.00 5/roll Red Seal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12.40 5/roll Kodiak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00 5/roll Kayak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.90 5/roll Grizzly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00 5/roll

Cigarette Tobacco Top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21.50 can Gambler . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00 8 oz. bag Premier . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00 8 oz. bag

WE ALSO CARRY: Paintings • Carvings • Candles Native American Crafts Handmade Traditional Dance Dolls

Off Sale Beer & Wine

Highway 16 South, Sidney

We Deliver For Delivery Call:

433-4650

ARCADE & CASINO AREA!

Open 7 Days Per Week: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. central time 701-572-5110 • Highway 1804 West, Trenton, ND


Hunting season

SIDNEY HERALD

13

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

Area hunters share photos of their award harvests

SUBMITTED

Nice rack with an 18-inch inside spread, taken by Doug Filler, Sidney.

ENJOY HUNTING SEASON BUT LOOK BEFORE YOU SHOOT

Shooting at power lines or insulators can be both dangerous and expensive. When taking aim at your target make sure that the power lines, poles or insulators are not in your sights.

Lower Yellowstone Rural Electric Assn., Inc. Highway 16 NW, Sidney • 488-1602 ®

Hunting for a place to stay

SUBMITTED

The Turek family, from left, including Christine, Luke, Sarah (holding on to antlers) and grandpa Clarence Turek make hunting a family affair back at the house.

We’ve got a room just for you. • Continental Breakfast • Touch-Tone Dial Phone • Cable TV - HBO - Disney • High Speed Internet • Remotes • Across from Central Park • Dog rest area across the steet at the park

Park Plaza Motel Low Rates and a Great Location

406-433-1520 FAX # 406-433-5245 601 S. Central, Sidney


14

Hunting season

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

Zone 4 Includes: Carter, Custer, Daniels, Dawson, Fallon, Garfield, McCone, Powder River, Prairie, Richland, Roosevelt, Rosebud, Sheridan, Treasure, Valley and Wibaux Counties. Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Rise Set Rise Set Rise Set Rise Set Rise Set Rise Set Day A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. 1 6:24 7:41 7:03 6:42 7:46 5:48 7:27 4:18 7:47 4:28 7:26 5:08 2 6:25 7:39 7:04 6:40 6:47 4:46 7:28 4:18 7:47 4:29 7:25 5:10 3 6:27 7:37 7:05 6:38 6:48 4:45 7:29 4:17 7:47 4:30 7:24 5:11 4 6:28 7:35 7:07 6:36 6:50 4:43 7:30 4:17 7:47 4:31 7:22 5:13 5 6:29 7:33 7:08 6:34 6:51 4:42 7:31 4:17 7:47 4:32 7:21 5:14 6 6:31 7:32 7:09 6:33 6:53 4:41 7:32 4:17 7:46 4:33 7:20 5:16 7 6:32 7:30 7:11 6:31 6:54 4:39 7:33 4:17 7:46 4:34 7:18 5:17 8 6:33 7:28 7:12 6:29 6:56 4:38 7:34 4:16 7:46 4:35 7:17 5:19 9 6:34 7:26 7:13 6:27 6:57 4:37 7:35 4:16 7:45 4:36 7:15 5:20 10 6:36 7:24 7:15 6:25 6:59 4:36 7:36 4:16 7:45 4:37 7:14 5:22 11 6:37 7:22 7:16 6:23 7:00 4:34 7:37 4:16 7:45 4:39 7:12 5:23 12 6:38 7:20 7:17 6:21 7:01 4:33 7:38 4:17 7:44 4:40 7:11 5:25 13 6:39 7:18 7:19 6:19 7:03 4:32 7:39 4:17 7:44 4:41 7:09 5:26 14 6:41 7:16 7:20 6:18 7:04 4:31 7:40 4:17 7:43 4:42 7:08 5:28 15 6:42 7:14 7:21 6:16 7:06 4:30 7:40 4:17 7:43 4:44 7:06 5:29 16 6:43 7:12 7:23 6:14 7:07 4:29 7:41 4:17 7:42 4:45 7:05 5:31 17 6:45 7:10 7:24 6:12 7:09 4:28 7:42 4:18 7:41 4:46 7:03 5:32 18 6:46 7:08 7:26 6:10 7:10 4:27 7:43 4:18 7:40 4:48 7:01 5:34 19 6:47 7:06 7:27 6:09 7:11 4:26 7:43 4:18 7:40 4:49 7:00 5:35 20 6:48 7:04 7:28 6:07 7:13 4:25 7:44 4:19 7:39 4:51 6:58 5:37 21 6:50 7:02 7:30 6:05 7:14 4:24 7:44 4:19 7:38 4:52 6:56 5:38 22 6:51 7:00 7:31 6:04 7:15 4:23 7:45 4:20 7:37 4:53 6:55 5:40 23 6:52 6:58 7:33 6:02 7:17 4:23 7:45 4:21 7:36 4:55 6:53 5:41 24 6:53 6:56 7:34 6:00 7:18 4:22 7:45 4:21 7:35 4:56 6:51 5:43 25 6:55 6:54 7:35 5:59 7:19 4:21 7:46 4:22 7:34 4:58 6:49 5:44 26 6:56 6:52 7:37 5:57 7:21 4:21 7:46 4:23 7:33 4:59 6:48 5:46 27 6:57 6:50 7:38 5:55 7:22 4:20 7:46 4:23 7:32 5:01 6:46 5:47 28 6:59 6:48 7:40 5:54 7:23 4:20 7:47 4:24 7:31 5:02 6:44 5:48 29 7:00 6:46 7:41 5:52 7:24 4:19 7:47 4:25 7:30 5:04 30 7:01 6:44 7:43 5:51 7:26 4:19 7:47 4:26 7:29 5:05 31 7:44 5:49 7:47 4:27 7:28 5:07

Welcome Hunters “Join us for some good home cooking” Breakfast Served All Day

A

SIDNEY HERALD

DEB SCHIEFFER | SIDNEY HERALD

Regulation times for hunting The sunrise/sunset table at left displays the times available to hunt. Regulations require that a hunter may not shoot until a certain time in the morning, and a hunter must lay down his weapon from hunting by a certain time at sunset. These are the legal shooting hours for our surrounding area. This table was taken from Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Web site.

THINK BEFORE YOU SHOOT

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Daily Specials

open at 5 a.m. every day

homemade rolls & pies are a specialty

Country Happy Hour 2-5 p.m. daily 433-1714 1721 South Central Ave., Sidney

Open 7 days a week: 5 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Sat. • 5 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday

A potshot at an insulator can often have a far-reaching effect. Linemen may risk their lives in order to restore service; a hospital operating room may go dark, resulting in serious injury or death; a farmer’s chicks may be lost when an incubator grows cold; families over a wide spread area may suffer all manner of inconvenience. Please remember, a lot of modern daily living depends on dependable electric service... so think before you shoot!


Hunting season

SIDNEY HERALD

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

15

1-800-TIP-MONT 1-800-847-6668

SUBMITTED

Like father, like son Father and son, Kevin, left, and Doug Filler filled tags in 2008 with two great mule deer, and they show racks to prove the great hunt.

1-800-TIP-MONT is the toll-free number you can call to report violations of fish, wildlife or parks regulations. It is similar to the well-known Crimestoppers program and offers rewards for information resulting in apprehension of persons that abuse Montana’s natural, historic or cultural resources. Montana is over 148,000 square miles of vast plains, badlands and river breaks, pure waters, snowy peaks, sprawling forests, rich resources, unique people and places, and a staggering array of wildlife. Although we have nearly 70 highly trained and dedicated game wardens to protect these resources, we ultimately depend on you – hiker, hunter, angler or state parks recreationists – to be our eyes and ears in the field and alert us to criminal activity that robs you of Montana’s treasures. Every year, hundreds of concerned citizens like you call TIP- MONT to report poachers, vandals, thieves and other criminals who have no regard for the natural heritage that makes Montana truly one of the “last, best places on earth.”

Rules of safe firearm handling: Always treat every gun as if it were loaded. Always point the muzzle of your gun in a safe direction. Always be sure of your target and beyond. Always keep your finger off the trigger until ready to fire.

LONE TREE INN BOAT DOCKS

The Original Zachmeier Dock Displays On Hand

Lake or River • Choice of Decking

Numerous Add-On Accessories

ENCLOSED HUNTING STANDS

H Conference Rooms H Fax H Continental Breakfast

H Queen Beds H FREE Cable H Non-smoking Rooms

H Winter Plug-ins H 24-Hour Desk H High Speed Wireless Internet

433-4520 • 900 South Central, Sidney, MT

• On the property • Food menu available • Room delivery available

• All Steel Structure • 12’ Hinges Trussed Legs • Jib Pull System Ideal for Bow & Gun Hunting, Wildlife viewing and photography

FISH HOUSES ZACH SHACK®

Hard shell • Portable • Enclosed Trailer • Patented Torsion Wheel • Assembly & Automatic Scisso Hitch

Ideal for Hunting, Bunk House & Storage

701-663-8194 3 miles N on Hwy 1806 Mandan, ND 58554 • www.zackshack.com U.S. Patent


16

Hunting season

SUNDAY, SEPT. 6, 2009

Stop at all game checking stations SUBMITTED BY FISH, WILDLIFE & PARKS

Officials at biological checking stations gather information needed to manage the state’s wildlife resources. When hunters stop at these biological check stations, they may be asked a variety of questions including how many deer, elk or antelope they saw and in which drainages or the general locations where their hunting took place. State law requires hunters to stop at all game checking stations while traveling to and

from hunting areas. Failure to stop at a checking station when personnel are on duty is a misdemeanor punish-

able by a fine. While in the field, hunters can also expect to encounter law enforcement check stations. For the most part, officers at law enforcement stations will check to make sure that any animals taken are properly tagged and that all other laws and regulations governing the taking of that animal were observed. Biological and law enforcement game check stations may be set up together in the same place or in separate locations. This fall, thousands of hunters will provide use-

‘When hunters stop at these biological

SIDNEY HERALD

Wear the color BLAZE ORANGE

check stations, they may be asked a variety of questions...’ Fish, Wildlife & Parks ful information during the annual game checks, helping FWP manage game animal populations and future hunting opportunities.

SUBMITTED

Joan Turek wears enough blaze orange to cover her torso, along with her hat to cover the head – for safety’s sake. The blaze orange color must be 400 square inches above the waist. RESPONSIBLE HUNTING INTERNATIONAL HUNTER EDUCATION ASSOCIATION

Wearing highly visible hunter or “blaze” orange clothing makes it much easier for other hunters to see you and increases your safety while hunting. That’s why the majority of states and provinces recommend or require hunter orange clothing for most kinds of hunting activities.

SEE AND BE SEEN

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • 406-433-1402 1 Store 2 Locations • 111 S. Central Ave • 114 W. Main • Sidney, MT • www.johnsonhardwareandfurniture.com

Don’t wear tan, brown or white clothing when hunting, even while wearing hunter orange, as these colors are associated with game species. Never do anything that could make someone mistake you for game, such as putting a deer over your shoulders to carry it out of the woods. Hunter orange requirements vary depending on your location and the kind of hunting you are doing. Always check and follow the regulations for the area you intend to hunt.

2009 Hunting Guide  

Richalnd County hunting guide.

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