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DIESEL SPILL CONTAINED AT HARBOR

[ centennial ]

SUNKEN HOUSEBOAT MAKES MESS From staff reports

Lars Howlett / Review

Jerome Valladao reflects on his life as a student at Half Moon Bay High School, from which he graduated in 1951. His mother attended the school, as did his wife and daughter. His grandson, Trevor Ormonde, graduates from Half Moon Bay High later this month.

HMB High School celebrates 100 years FAMILIES REMINISCE ON SCHOOL PRIDE By Mark Noack [ mark@hmbreview.com ]

Next week 225 seniors are set to graduate from Half Moon Bay High School, but they aren’t the only ones celebrating a major milestone. The ceremony also marks the 100th class to graduate from the Coastside’s largest campus. The high school has served as the educational bedrock for generations of Coastsiders — and the centennial anniversary has led many longtime families to reminisce. “I cried at my graduation because I knew it was the best four years of my life,” said City Councilwoman Naomi Patridge, class of 1958, who plans to watch her grandniece receive her diploma this year. “I had a lot of good friends, and it was like family … and now at graduation you

Photo courtesy Valladao family

Genevieve Deeney Valladao graduated with five other students in 1919.

always get that feeling of nostalgia.” Half Moon Bay High School started in 1909 as a two-story schoolhouse that even old school docu-

ments refer to as “modest.” During its first year, the school celebrated an original class of seven graduating students, according to the school’s first yearbook. Now recognizable as the “B” and “C” buildings at Cunha Intermediate School, the first permanent high school campus was built in 1939 with the help of government funding under President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal program. In 1964, school officials built the current high school campus at the end of Lewis Foster Drive to handle the growing population on the Coastside. For many local families, grandparents, parents and the younger generation each shared similar experiences at the high school. Sitting in the family room at his Miramar home, high school senior Trevor Ormande traded some stories of Cougar pride with his parSee HIGH SCHOOL a 8A

[ county ]

County makes way for poultry ORDINANCE ALLOWS CHICKENS IN UNINCORPORATED COUNTY By Lily Bixler [ lily@hmbreview.com ]

As it stands now, the wandering chicken can’t peck too far out of Half Moon Bay city limits because domestic poultry isn’t allowed in the surrounding unincorporated county. But that would change with a new ordinance the San Mateo County Planning Commission is proposing. It would permit backyard chickens and ducks in the unincorporated county. The proposal would allow six chickens in single-family residential properties 2,500- to 7,500-square-feet and 10 for plots 7,500-square-feet and larger, acSee CHICKENS a 8A

Review file photo

Some on the Coastside have taken to raising their own chickens, and the practice has gotten the attention of lawmakers in Redwood City.

The “Gypsy” has arisen from her watery grave and is no longer fouling the waters of Pillar Point Harbor. Now the beached houseboat is little more than an expensive curiosity — and much of that curiosity centers around just who will be stuck with the bill for cleaning up the diesel and righting a ship that went wrong weeks ago. Sid Walton, the boat’s owner, watched much of the day on Friday as the U.S. Coast Guard and its contracting salvage company worked to contain a smelly, oily sheen that harbor officials quickly determined was the result of the Gypsy springing a leak. The boat sank near the outer breakwater about six weeks ago. “I came down here and checked the boat on a Friday or Saturday, then it was sunk

“I came down here and checked the boat on a Friday or Saturday, then it was sunk when I came back here after the weekend.” Sid Walton, boat owner

when I came back here after the weekend,” said the vessel’s owner, Sid Walton, who has had a slip at the harbor since spring 2005. The report of an oily leak not far from federally protected waters brought quick response from a host of federal, state and local agencies. The San Mateo County Harbormaster responded and turned over the See SPILL a 8A

Lily Bixler / Review

Sid Walton, left, talks with an unidentified U.S. Coast Guard crew member Friday as they watch efforts to staunch a diesel spill from Walton’s boat. [ lcp ]

County considers LCP extension SUPERVISORS HOPE TO GET IT DONE THIS SUMMER By Lily Bixler [ lily@hmbreview.com ]

Like it or not, the Local Coastal Program is back in the news. The LCP is a longtime coastal document compiled by counties up and down the California coast; the Coastal Commission uses the LCP when making decisions about coastal policy. This encompasses city and county policy revolving around general plans, infrastructure, water access and growth rate. The LCP was born out of the Coastal Act, which California voters passed in 1976 to designate the coastal zone, which includes much of the San Mateo County Coastside. As part of the act, the California Coastal Commission was formed to work in partnership

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with coastal counties and cities to plan and regulate the use of land and water. In the early 1980s, several years after Californians passed the act, San Mateo County Coastside adopted its own, specific LCP. A lot has changed since then and the county — with input from the Coastal Commission — is in the process of revising the LCP to bring it up to speed. Why should Coastsiders care about the LCP? “(It) establishes the standard of review for any development proposed on the Coastside,” said County Planning Interim Deputy Director Steve Monowitz. “Whether or not you’re a property owner who wants to build something or if you’re a community member who is concerned with growth and development, then the LCP plays a key role in determining the type, location and intensity of development allowed.” A planning process throughout the early 2000s brought a preliminarily updated LCP See LCP a 8A

06.02.10  

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